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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 239 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2015 12:00am EDT
we have why we don't want the bank as china to be worried they don't have enough capital. we want to make sure they are safe and protected his mistakes that he see for sees her than the requirement for the dividend they may not have. >> host: you mentioned in 2012 the market is already showing signs that it's going to get better again. i guess what do you -- we know the government said of the reason they did it. what do you think is the reason they didn't? >> guest: this is a subject of the lawsuits and there could be things that come out on both sides are interesting and i hope this goes to trial because it will be fascinating to the inner workings of the government. but it's hard to see the government didn't understand the two companies were about to become profitable. there was interesting stuff that came out saying they knew we were about to become really profitable. i guess i am in the camp of if the government has a good reason for doing this i would like to know what it was and that makes me very nervous because i don't like feeling that we are being lied to and that there
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2014 9:00pm EDT
an import from china it's hard to know exactly that about $10 million a year into those devices alone after the trade deficit with china because they are made in factories in southern china so they get made in a factory and put on a container ship on long beach and they get assigned a hotel which is $220 it is a $220 import or $250 import from china, but is it really? is anything that we now use really made in any one country? whether it is a t-shirt where cotton comes from one country and the pattern comes from another and thus watches come and then they are assembled, it is assembled in a factory. it isn't clear that $220 or $250 comes from the united states to china because if you break down that phone which a lot of economists have done. there are parts from taiwan and somewhere else and above all intellectual property from the u.s.. but in the world of trade numbers that assume the object has a final substance transformation in one country with no way of breaking any of that down. >> host: i think the retail value when they first came out it was $499. nobody ever paid that
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
competition with other workers, whether they're in china or mexico in terms of import's or in terms of immigration and certainly basic economics would lead toddes believe that more competition would have a downward pressure on wages, but there's been an awful lot of research and this is wart of what you calling length here -- both in trait grade immigration that makes a different argument that suggests that flights that, the effect wed would be led logically to believe are not in fact what is going on. why is this such an enormous fight within the immigration economic field? >> it has been over the last ten years or so that economists have begin to document the negative impact of trade on works the u.s.a. market. before the last ten years it was said to be very small and very sort of numerically relevant and now it's nobody -- showing that trade as an impact and some people, some americans have ends up behind by trade. this immigration is part of the trade. there's a couple of reasons wife it has so difficult and why it is -- why the debates still going on and -- for the next few years
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 9:00pm EST
are immigration put american workers in competition with other workers, whether they are in china or mexico or whether they are directly in the united states in terms of immigration. and certainly the economics would lead us to believe more competition would have a downward pressure on wages. but there's been an awful lot of research into this is what you challenge them to immigration to try to make a different argument that suggests that isn't true in the affect is that we would be led kind of logically to believe are not in fact what's going on. why is this such an enormous fight in the economic field? >> guest: i have to return to trade because you raised a point of trade. in the last ten years or so, economists have begun to document the negative impact of trade on the workers in the u.s. market. before it was thought to be very small and numerically relevant and now there is a new body of work schilling trade has an impact and some people have been left behind by trade. immigration is actually in part trade to measure the impact. there's a couple of reasons why it's so difficult
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 10:00pm EDT
what was the motive? where she on the payroll with china? is that what they are alleging? so i really don't think she should spend so much time being protected but they have a more full picture of who i am the good and the bad and the ugly. >> is an interesting case study with men and women in these positions to attract criticism said this is easy for corporate executives to be in a similar position. go back to the unusual roles to navigate of family and politics that they would push and prod to talk about even at a young age there is a wonderful anecdote to ask your the a in your career to come with you i am gathering that is not just a party. >> maybe he was seven or six or five i would say we're going to a party given in the car. so i told him to get ready. but then they don't realize how loud their whispering they said listen if she says if it is a party ask her if somebody will give a speech. if they give a speech it is not a party. [laughter] >> but if there was says of barrier but my guess is it enables you to keep integrating your family as so many women struggle with t
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2016 12:00am EDT
important to work in haiti or china? i know mandarin. so they said no it is most important that we staffed the embassy in baghdad. so there was a lot of discussion but yet the evidence in the cable suggests that officers willingly and wholeheartedly energetically each to accomplish some impressive things while they were there even without their knowledge of arabic or wrote without the knowledge of the region but the tools that they had been given and being creative and improvising. i think it is one of public diplomacy's success stories. it is hard to use the word success in the same sentence because things are in the air but the cable suggest a trajectory of officers who answered the call, were loyal and did with the initiation asked asked, search, and accomplished. >> host: you mention the assistant secretary of state for educational cultural affairs at the time. . . and it was very striking, his mark on that period. >> it became the largest in the world and we had other programs as well. my colleagues put on theatrical performances and had standing room only crowds coming and in
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2015 12:00am EDT
average high school democrat from immigrant from the place like china or india creates five jobs for the nativeborn americans. this is important. the guest worker program so they would stop being exploited coming to the united states and so on and so forth so we can make progress coming down the list going down the list and understanding that it takes a whole bunch. >> guest: this is a good way back from the personal journey and how that works in the book to the point where you talk about practical hope you and you referenced it just now. what is that does that for you, what does that mean? i had flashbacks to yes we can, keep hope alive, hope and change. we talked politicians and they talk a lot about hope that you gave a new emphasis for the gop. you talk about it in terms of being tactical hope. >> guest: hope as we come to understand as you mentioned from hope and change state from the 2008 obama campaign it was all about i hope the government will hopefully help me. you can hope all you want about events outside of your control. that's not the traditional understanding of hope i
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 3:00am EDT
threats now don't connie lee packaged it is rush-hour or china or germany. that increasingly facing the threats that have nothing to do with those formal decisions to have a loosely organized network. they don't look like what we think of as crime to cause death or destruction on non scale with the use of military force by states. but if you decide, one way is to say we have a world of the whole continuum for the state conflict on one end it does look more like individual crime. how do we categorize that? we have a big area in between traditional war but we have legal system that does not allow for in between either picked one with this set or it is not in to get this set that are diametrically the opposite so if we decide and i don't know how, but what is an armed conflict? what is a war? is that track a weapon? the airplane? the box cover? they killed a lot of people. what is a combat and? somebody who doesn't belong to any military with planning and supporting with any plot that will eventually hurt people? do have any special level? we have no idea so we have an arbitrary decisi
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2015 10:00pm EDT
current state of japan. it would also be true of china if it wasn't already whereby you have government of the special interests by the special interests for the special interests. i spent five chapters in the first part of the book justifying civil this obedience on grounds that a lot of these dynamics do not lend themselves to solutions. >> host: a couple of things. i still haven't given you a chance to say what you mean by civil disobedience. >> guest: let me give you the story that prompted this book without many details because i don't want to be identified but is a true story. my wife and i have a friend who is a small-business that employs latinos as certain kinds of businesses do. the difference between him and everybody else in this part of the country is he's documented. he spends 20 or 30 grand a year to do this but what happens is doing the right thing and documenting them he has made himself a visible target so he has been for lack of a harassed by a far different with her agency is not doesn't pay good wages are provided living conditions, he does but there are things that
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2014 12:00am EDT
, china's will be 46. it had a one-child policy for decades. now it is completely changed its age pyramid. germany's will be 51. japan's will be 53. so there are lot of the advanced economies in the world that are looking at uncharted waters in terms of relationship of older people to younger people. the challenge of society is older people developments have the energy, the ingenuity, imagine. they're wonderful, we respect them. we want them to live out their last years in dignity and above -- and all the rest but you don't want an economy, if you're looking at it from that point of view, driven by older people because you're much better off with the vitality that comes with youth. in. >> host: always sounds very dire but you book is not all doom and gloom. not mad max with geese-geezers. one of the upsites post great depression, it is fostered this renewed enter generational dependence simple. can you tell us about that? >> guest: one of the things the book tries to do, again, using data, is to play off the challenges in our public policy, for reengineering the social compact bet
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 10:54pm EDT
. it's e3 secbaclly timely to have this discussion today because of what's hg bpew ng in china, and of course impth the u.s. stock market. the problems that are causing the meltdown of china's stock market are not limited to china alone, many of the same economic faile mes that h urnt china afft the rest of the worlds. huge debts, corruption, lack of e span3 saren ge, lack ocare the rare ce of law and general lack of economic freedom. as you will lea on from teathas difanusn many mistakes china and others make are always also be in debt by the s led miw stration. we should not be surprised that that our economy is in trouble to and we have lost the particular ability to lead the world out of trouble. which culm se me all of oe m rcrticipants, particularly grat will be talking about. to get us startei hapant impll deliver sdiie rema, he wears many hats and has a wide range of experience in e spade and econdiiic policy and the law. 2001 to 2005, roughly the same thousand fivsome rou3 huly the same time i was at the state department, grant was secretary ocare comiliaerce of national t. a
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2015 9:00pm EST
sacrifice to that and. if your second goal is to use an opening to china to put pressure on the soviets, then you may have to make compromises with the pakistani government. if you have no other concerns you might not make that. i think any judgment you make about foreign policy has to be done not on a case-by-case basis but in a strategic framework. it is the nature of statesmanship that you have to make choices in your free to make these choices. but there really that's the problem and the challenge of the statesman that there are sometimes no good options. there are just evils that you have to choose between. >> all that is persuasive but i wouldn't put that in the real policy camp. are you seeking stability for the sake of peace. were having to look the other way in pakistan or his joint decision for the bombing of cambodia. you do some of this in the book, his role in chile these sound like realpolitik to me and they are the reason he is so controversial himself. in january 1969, the question is does he remain an idealist? does he adhere to the principles that he set out as an inte
CSPAN
Apr 12, 2015 9:00pm EDT
-- >> guest: there was an effort and pledge that became a great wall of china beyond which they could move which was from the presidency from 94 until 2009 there was no tax increase, the longest period with no tax increase its only when it's only when they were all democrats in 1993 and again in the 2009 when they passed the tax increase. that period as soon as they got control of the house increased again. the reason you say no tax increases is to force the discussion about spending reform and government reform and prioritizing. if the tax increases aren't an option, the government never reforms, just all the things we've been doing some smart, some stupid. it just keeps accumulating the articles and there's never an effort to decide whether some of this stuff doesn't work anymore. the pledge is what forced to the sequester and do u. live under for the next ten years. because of that the people that care about the national defense talk about the legislation to reduce the number of civilian and pleased at the pentagon at about 100000 say $85 million in five years, 170 billion in ten y
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2015 10:29pm EDT
guest about the affect china's economy has on the u.s. stock market and global economy. after that, senior science writer john markoff discusses the use of robotics in the u.s. manufacturing industry. his new book is machines of loving grace, the quest for common ground between humans and robots. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span and you can join the conversation on facebook and twitter. >> a signature feature of the tv is our all-day coverage of the fearsome book festivals and coverage. beginning this weekend we have the 15th annual national book festival from the nation's capital. near the end of september we are in new york or the brooklyn but festival celebrating its 10th year. in october we have the southern festival of books in nashville and the weekend after that we are live from austin for the texas book festival and near the end of the month we will be covering tube book festivals on the same weekend from our nation's heartland as the wisconsin book festival in madison. and then the boston book festival. at the start of november we will be in port
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2014 12:00am EST
more information on both tvs visit from china to tennessee and the many other cities visited by her content vehicles, go to c-span.org/local content. up next on booktv, "after words" with the former senior researcher of columbia university. nicholas johnson in his book "negroes and the gun: the black tradition of arms." in it, the law school professor discusses the tradition of african americans using firearms to defend their families and communities. a tradition that dates back to reconstruction. he argues that the nonviolence of the civil rights help to bury this fact of black history. this program is about one hour. >> so this strikes me as an important intervention in three ways. one of the black freedom movement and over the years has been increasingly revising the way that we understand the role of violence related to nonviolence. the other intervention is cultural in terms of who we see or who we think of when we think of gun owners, and also how we think about black individuals. finally there is a public policy implication for the presentation of the black tradition of arms.
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2015 12:00pm EDT
will be soon the true of china if it isn't already whereby sclerosis sets in and you have government of the special interests by the special-interest. i spent five chapters in the first part of the book justifying civil disobedience on grounds that a lot of these dynamics do not lend themselves to solutions. host: a couple of things, i still haven't given you a chance to say what you mean by civil disobedience, and you should because our audience needs what i do that right now. spee2 let me get to a story that prompted this book. without many details because i don't want my friend to be identified, it's a true story. >> my wife and i have a friend who has a small business that employs latinos as are kinds of businesses do, the difference between him and everybody else in his part of the country as he documents it. he spends 2030 grand 30 grand a year to do this. what happened is by doing the right thing and documenting them he sorta made himself an easy target and he has been relentlessly harassed by regulatory agencies not because because he doesn't pay good wages or living conditions,
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2014 4:00pm EDT
about china earlier. where is china in all of this? i will describe america's banker and it's interesting in this section you talk about some of the rhetoric from republican politicians, in 2012 talking about naming and shaming china as a currency from day one of his presidency which never happened and nationalism. let's. >> guest: economic national and has eyes been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan talked about this and they were on the fringes of the debate in many ways but if you look at the 19th century america was the great protectionist country. that's a historical fact. we can argue about whether was the right thing or the wrong thing but the fact is as someone described to me the american industrial base was built, that's just what happened. so the argument on the right is very much, has been about or shaded into as you say economic nationalism and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's about having a level playing field so if i'm exporting to china i probably have a 15% tariff to get into china whereas if i make chinese exporter to get a 1
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2016 10:18pm EST
influences. if this is a new case where china and china slow down precipitates a greater slowdown in the east asian industry and that translates to the united states that would be effective. >> host: has the legislation of 2008 important for stabilization of the economy? >> guest: so i think there are many aspects of the legislative response. the first one, the first big wan was the araa, the american recovery and reinvestment act implemented in 2009. that was a big counter cycle move. i would say that is one thing that pushed the economy in the right direction. that was early on and most affects of that have petered out. but i think that mitigated a lot of the pain and suffering that could have occurred. the other legislation that was passed, i think, have more long-lasting implications and that includes the dodd-frank legislation regarding the bank of legislation. so that is important over the longer term in so far as it really -- it reduces the incentives for banks to over over-leverage. that is borrow up lots amounts and only putting in shareholders money and borrowing up with the sh
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2015 9:00pm EDT
-backed securities in china thinking they would start learning about this. >> host: it's one of the downsides of this global connected system that we have a further central bank of china to be worried about fannie and freddie don't have enough capital. we want to make sure that the securities are protected. so this makes the security seemed safer than having the requirement to pay the dividend with money they may not have. >> host: you mentioned they were showing signs that they were starting to get better again. we know the government said the reason they did it. what do you think was the reason? >> guest: you know, this is the subject of the lawsuit, and there could be things that come out on both sides that are interesting and i almost hope it goes to trial as i think it will be a fascinating insight into the workings of the government. as well as fannie and freddie. but it is hard to see that the government didn't understand the two companies were about to become profitable. they had investors and they were tallying them and and there have been interesting stuff that had come ou
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2016 10:00pm EDT
. >> why not buick making cars in china now, buick, why not h1v workers. these are taken white-collar jobs, they're taking your kid's jobs. why not time on that? >> trump continues the conversation and responds to every question posed to him and turns the conversation back to himself. if you're a hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign on what you believe or who you're taking money from, you want to run a campaign that's referendum on donald trump's character and so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> what do you mean? >> why wouldn't you turn the issue -- exactly right. or about what he believes, if i'm elected, this is what this is way it will be. >> that's exactly right. you know what percentage of clothe that is we buy in america are made in america? 3%. >> i believe it. he wants to change it so that your ties will be made here. >> you follow the stuff as close as anybody and you're clearly, you have emotional skin in the game and if you watch trump go off meanl, do you call him, do you call people on his campaign. >> no,
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 12:00pm EST
come. i find amazing talking to friends in china, members of the chinese intelligentsia, the appetite i find this mainly low, just cannot believe how little importance they seem to attach to it. young people in china who you would have thought would be in the vanguard of wanting this thing, i i find there is a cultural difference. i think it is inevitable, and it we will come, like all revolution, circumstances of economic distress. as as soon as the bourgeoisie feel the pinch they will want greater political relief, but it is not happening yet. >> no comments. [applauding] >> thank you. [applauding] [inaudible conversations] >> every weekend book tv offers programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. keep watching from over here on teewun. watch any any of our past programs online. next on book tv afterwards. this week cheryl atkinson and her book stonewalled, my fight for truth against the forces of obstruction, intimidation, and harassment in obama's washington. and if the former cbs news investigative reporter presents her account of the opposition she says she encountered
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 12:00pm EDT
and, oh, it's russia or, oh, it's china, or, oh, its germany and you can tell they're coming because there are whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks are rolling towards us that increasingly we're facing threat that cross borders, that may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or their militariesful we thieves loosely organized networks. we have cyber threats and so forth. and and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the u.s. of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem is --ec one way to put it would be to say we have a world in which there are threats along this whole continuum, from traditional masker state-on-state armed conflict at one end of the continuum, on the eend we have individual crime. a guy drives a truck through a crowded nice how much do we categorize that? so we have threats alonging this continuum, with a big area
CSPAN
Sep 25, 2016 3:00pm EDT
being made in china is such a point. he wants to change it so your ties will be made here. >> host: you follow this up as closely as anybody and clearly you have a lot of emotional skin in this game. when you watch trump on television and you think he goes off message, do you call him? you call people on his campaign? >> guest: no? >> guest: now, a tweet. >> host: do you think he listens? >> guest: i'm not saying necessarily to me. i think he totally listens to criticism. we have seen it over and over again where he will make a mistake and sometimes the full-fledged clarification. he absolutely listens to people and he is a quick study. he's obviously very smart. he's going in the direction we want to go when. one of the things they make fun of the media for because i think it is a time filler. they kept attacking them for no policy specifics. one thing i've learned from my fondest editor was the way he used to edit me was to unexampled me. i'm a lawyer so i like to make a statement and had 20 examples. he would say ann, give one example and move on. i got to this chapter and i tho
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2016 9:00pm EST
i think that the workers say they've moved to california and outsourced to china meanwhile the engineers are designing products and intellectual workers and i'm waiting for them to put me back to work but so are the adults and adult children that a lot of people are looking for innovation and supervision and entrepreneurialism. i think those things can increase wages but they might slow the growth relative to the rest of the economy. >> host: with the slow wage growth it seems like a natural thing to do to redistribute more and give more to the people at the bottom of the economic ladder that's not what you want to do. >> guest: i recognize that as a possibility because i think if you are a 50-year-ol were a 50-r that spent your life working and you've are trained in your endeavor to get a job at the same level you were at we need to be thoughtful about that. but one of my chief concerns is the upside of inequality is the combination of the pool of highly trained, highly motivated talent taking the risks that grow the economy and the talent is working inside of institutions lik
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2014 11:00am EDT
sides, both the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: tell us about china. where is china in all this? described as america's banker and you talked about some of the rhetoric from republican politicians and talking about naming and shaming china on day one of his presidency. and you talked with some of the economic nationalism. >> guest: economic nationalism has eyes been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan talk about this and are on the fringes of the debate in many ways. america was the great protectionist country. that's a historical fact and we can argue whether was the right thing or the wrong thing but the fact is that someone described to me the american industrial base was built behind the wall. that's just what happened. the argument on the right very much has been about shaded into as you say economic nationalism. and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's about having a level playing field. if i'm exporting cars into china i'm probably going to have a 15% tariff to get my goods into china for as if i am a chinese exporter you get a 15% subsidy. the
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 9:54pm EST
, mei fong joins us on afterward to talk about her book, "one child: the story of china's most radical experiment" about the one child policy in china and its impact on the country. this is about one hour. >> mei fong, welcome to "after words". you just published your first book. it's a remarkable book. i enjoyed it immensely. it's the subject of a lot of discussion. the book is called "one child: the story of china's most radical experiment". in a minute we will talk about why you chose this subject and how you went about answering the questions on your mind. first i think it would be helpful to define for people what it is we are actually talking about. what is china's one child policy? >> evan, the the one child policy is really a bit of in misnomer. it's a name we used to describe a set of rules that china has used to regulate the population. theoretically, you could lightly call at 1.5 child five child for a long time. now they have moved it to a two child policy, but it's laws and regulations. >> it's not one law, but a basket of policies. >> that's right. >> when did it happen?
CSPAN
May 26, 2014 6:00pm EDT
age of terror for some and the rise of china and the nuclear progr program. much with the wherewithal clinton cut the defense budget and when you cut spending and maintain a certain level of revenue are going to get a balanced budget surplus and that's what's happening in the states. i have a whole chapter on what's happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana doing fantastic jobs in balancing budgets. i wish we could have that in the federal level. the federal government of course the word goes out at the end of the fiscal year if we haven't spent it all spend it all the budget might be cut at last to be covered in indiana they send a check with the remarkable thing. you wrote in the federalist papers and all the rest, but then you have to somehow explain to me well then how is it that you can say that the social security and medicare into these things that are around that that is a good thing and clearly you are a big fan of the defense spending and now guess what if the founding fathers were not about the international use of the military overseas. >> thomas jeff
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2014 11:53pm EDT
important his decisions on anything from it the epa to china than nixon was. they drove the decisions. you can see the man suffers making decisions. >> host: what he is doing is trying to tease out from people what they know. >> guest: well there is some of that but he's also trying to clarify. >> host: this is an going to be -- history is not going to judge him as a management consulting team would judge him. history is going to judge him about whether he was good, whether he accomplished some things, whether he cared about the people he represented. >> guest: they will judge him in the context of other presidents is what they will do. as you know i am a hearty biographer. the president has gotten a really bad rap in no one has ever understood it because they have never dug into the facts. i think as long as the facts about nixon's presidency on things like watergate, he's not going to be well respected as a president. he's not going to be an admired figure. he can't be. >> host: will not only that but i mean what these new tapes in the old tape show is he almost had this view of the pres
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2015 9:00pm EDT
immigration. the average high skilled immigrants from china or india creates five jobs for the nativeborn americans. the second thing is the guestworker programs available stop being exploited coming to the united states and so on and so forth and we can make real progress going down the list understanding that it takes a lot of years. >> host: this is a good feedback from your personal journey and how that works in the book to the point that you talk about practical help. you referenced hope just now. now for you what does that mean? i had flashbacks to guess we can , hope and change. we talked politicians and the political system that talks about the hope. but you gave it a new emphasis for the gop. you talk about it in terms of being a practical help. what do you mean by that? >> guest: it is what we have come to understand hope and change for 2008 in and the obama campaign, it was all about i hope the government will help me and that's to say i hope you hit the lottery. i hope i don't get hit by a car today. you can hope all you want about events that are more or less outsi
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2015 12:02pm EDT
china? is that what these people are latching? china is getting our e-mails without help from anybody. i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of personal. i think she's got to open herself a. i did that in the senate race and to think missourians got more full picture of william, the good, the bad, and the ugly. >> host: i think that is sort of an interesting lesson our case study that applies outside of the route of politics because there so few women in these positions, because they attract so much criticism, that bunker mentality i think is probably easy for corporate executives to be in a similar position. it's easy for any woman facing back. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you've given to navigating the family and politics in a way that i certainly have never in any of the sort of male senator's memoirs. your daughter maddie was going to push you to endorse barack obama. you talk a lot about in the book didn't even at a young age is a wonderful anecdote what you're asking early in your career, your public career and
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2015 12:00am EDT
, all this e-mail stuff. exactly what was her motive? is she on the payroll for china is? that what people are alleging? china is getting our e-mail without any help from anybody. i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of herself. she has to open herself up. i did that in the senate race and i think missourians got a fuller picture of who i am, the good, the squad the ugly. >> host: that it is an interesting lesson or okayed study that a -- case study that replies outside of the realm of politics because there are so few women in these positions, attract so much criticism, the bunker mentality is probably easy for a corporate executive to be in a similar position. it's easy for any woman facing that. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you have given to navigating the family and politics in a way that i certainly never read in any of the sort of male senators' memoirs. your daughter, mady, was the one who pushed and prodded you in 2008 to endorse barack obama. you talk about in the book them even at a young age -- there's
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2014 9:02pm EDT
some detail is true of the vietnam, of the china. >> host: these meetings about watergate with his top aides, haldeman, or liquid, you to a certain extent. they are rambling. they are unfocused. >> guest: and i have tightened them. >> host: and there's no kind of let's march through this and let's make a decision. and he will just say something, almost at random. and then haldeman will say something. at one point -- >> guest: and 30 minutes later at the same conversation if not with the same person. >> host: nccic on traversing things. use of the metaphor can you say as a participant you and his counsel at the time, not in the inner circle but you say this was the devils merry-go-round. what did you mean by that? >> guest: that was actually a metaphor i picked up as i was writing but i thought about this but i thought about the circular nature of the watergate conversations. and how the same tune in the same circle repeated, sometimes slight difference but basically over and over but the man with the lever a city in their right in the middle is richard nixon, and he never pulls it.
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 10:00pm EDT
we hear about china. they are poor and their collectivist and they don't have our standard of living. of course now tokyo have stronger -- and yet we still want to say the wave of the future is windmills and solar energy and green energy. the market is just not moving that way so what we need is the white house and the congress and the commerce department and the department of energy and these geniuses to push s. right direction. what we get a cylinder as a talk to me a little bit about windmills and unicorn flatulance i say this as someone who is a great admirer. their simple arrow oil refinery that runs on wind power because it's like kitty hawk, no people, lots of win. if you go to western pennsylvania the gas wells that are pumping natural gas out of the fracks wells out there run on solar power. there are good applications for these things but maybe not this way of thinking. maybe talk about that in the case of elon musk who is the genius when it comes to rent seeking. >> guest: the last segment of our book is modern subsidies, what we call political entrepreneurs seeking
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2015 12:02am EDT
japan and it will be true of if china isn't already whereby sclerosis sits in and you have the government by the special interests and for the special-interest. i've done chapters in the book to justify the civil disobedience on the grounds that a lot of these dynamics do not lend themselves to the solutions to the process. >> host: i still haven't given you a chance to say what you mean by civil disobedience and you should. >> guest: that they but think of the story that prompted this book without many details because i don't want my friend to be identified. we have a friend who has a small business that employs latinos. but the difference is he documents them. he spends 20 to 30 grand a year to do this but what happened is doing the right thing and documenting them he made himself an easily visible target so she's been have asked by regulatory agencies not because he doesn't pay good wages were perfect good living conditions, he does but there are things that you can't have enough nativeborn americans working for you to comply with certain regulations because it's hard to get
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2014 9:00pm EST
tennessee williams. as an awesome though some age of ambition is about china and his experiences there. .. >> >> finally the literary awar
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2016 12:00pm EST
ended at the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china. the book is called tran 11 -- "one child." first i think it would be helpful to find for people what we are talking about. so what is china's one child policy? >> one child policy is really a misnomer. it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and illustrations that china has placed to regulate the population. theoretically you could more likely call it 1.5 child for a long time and of course the two child policy. in reality with regulations. >> not one not particularly, but a basket of these. when did it happen? when did it begin? >> 1979, 1980 when the communist party supposedly took members saying we are raising everybody to move to one child family. it was really telling. >> people sometimes imagine the policy that would've gone into effect under chairman mao, but it went to affect under xiaoping. what was going on at the time it was so important people imagine they needed the safety of a policy level? >> now had passed away. china had come off the cultural revolution. people are poor and als
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2014 9:06pm EDT
they balance the budget and that is what is in the case on china government and it is agreed by both sides the liberals as it was and the conservatives. >> host: you talk about china earlier. where is china and i was interested in the section you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come and if romney in 2012, talking about naming and shaming china as a currency manipulator on the number one. and you talk about the economic nationalism. >> guest: the economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the country that is a fact we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing the fact is as someone described it to me the american industrial basis was built on the high tariff war. that is just what happens. and so they put the argument on the right that very much has been about the economic nationalism. and it's not just about economic nationalism but it is about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting the cars into china
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 12:00pm EST
think the workers look and they say, entrepreneurs have moved to california and outsourced to china and engineers that remain behind are designing products more mexican and off-shore workers and i'm waiting for entrepreneurs to put me back to work and so 40 million born adults, that's a lot of people looking for innovation and super vision and entrepreneurialism to put them back to work and without that, if you dilute resources, slow growth relative to the west of the economy. >> we are facing high inequality, slow wage growth, it seems like it's a natural thick to do is use the tax code to redistribute. that's not what you want to do. >> well, i certainly recognize that as a possibility and maybe useful in some places. if you're a 50-year-old worker who spent your whole life working in one endeavor and trained in that endeavor and you lose your job it'll be awfully hard to get a job so there's cost and we need to be thoughtful about that. and that talent is working inside of institutions like google, like silicon valley which greatly amplify their productivity. those institutions were
CSPAN
May 4, 2014 9:00pm EDT
we cannot be expected to compete with the japanese. we hear this about china. they are poor and selectiveness and don't have our standard of living. now tokyo has much higher standards of detroit did or has. and we want to say the wave of the future is wind mills and green energy but the market isn't moving that way so we need whitehouse, congress, and department of energy to push capital in the right direction. talk to me about wind mills and whatever the new trends in green energy are. and i say this as someone who admires green energy. there is an oil refinery in texas that runs on wind. no people lots of wind. western pennsylvania, the gas wells pumping the gas from the fracked wells run on solar. talk about ilan musk as well. >> guest: the last section is written about the people seeking the subsidies. with world war one and two we learned the wrong lesson. the budget declined by 50%. in world war down from 73% to 25% cut. so it wasn't a state directed recovery. it was a private directed recovery. we come out with the wrong lessons. and in the '70s, we had an energy crisis.
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2014 11:00am EDT
him by the former armed robber brandon that he does business with china comes through for him anyway that his former employer doesn't. >> host: what does he do? >> guest: he's behind the eight ball when he buys his bank of america paper and it's all senior citizens. he feels he can't come he's not going to be able to turn a profit because he is invested all this money into. so he goes back to brandon and brandon special is finding what he calls crap, and crap in his definition of it is old debt that is when things is worthless because it's been around the block a few times, it's been bought and sold a bunch, 10 to 15 years old but it still pays because maybe he was sitting in a call-center in brazil for five years and no one was working it, or maybe it comes from a debt buyer it's about to go under and needs to sell it off cheaply. brandon would find these deals on this paper. so after aaron buys this stuff from bank of america that puts them into a ball, he turns to brandon and says you've got to come through for me and help me find these deals on this crap and other stuff that you
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2015 12:00am EST
china to put pressure on the soviets, and for the sake of that you may have to make compromises with say the pakistani government, if you have no other concerns you might not make. i think any judgment you make about form policy has to be done, not on a case-by-case basis but in a strategic framework. in his his early writing and i do talk about in the book he says it is in the nature of statesmanship that you have to make choices and you are free to make these choices. their choices between evil and the challenges to decide what the lesser of two evils is. kissinger says this is their right from the very earliest writing. that is the problem, that is the choice that there is sometimes no good options. there there are just evils that you have to choose between. >> all that is persuasive but i would put that in a real policy camp in the sense of seeking stability for the sake of peace, or not annihilation. having to look the other way on the repression on pakistan or his decision and joint decision on the bombing of cambodia. or something you do engage some of this in the book, his ro
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2015 9:00pm EDT
united states of america. what was her motive that she was on the payroll of china i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of herself. i think she should open herself up. i did that in the senate race and i think they think they got a more full picture of who i was, the good the bad and the ugly. >> i think that think that is an interesting lesson or case study that occurs outside the realm of politics as well. because they attract so much criticism that bunker mentality is probably easy for corporate executive to be in a similar position let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you've given to navigating family in politics in a way that i certainly never read in any of the male senator memoirs. your daughter maddie was the one who pushed and prodded you and there's this wonderful anecdote where your early in your public career and you're asking your son to get ready to come with you to what you called was a party but i'm gathering was certainly not just a party. >> i was going to a political event when they were very young. h
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2015 12:00pm EDT
system has developed, it means that in china can finance home in kansas. it's turned american home ownership what's more domestic than home into a global financial issue. >> host: right. this is something that's unique to the united states or at least the united states or one or two other countries. so what does having the system in place give americans, somebody in the united kingdom getting home? >> guest: that's part of a debate. private capital would fulfill the role that fannie and freddie play. i want to pause on that for a second. the fact that fan incomer ie are government sponsored. it's lead to the perception in the years before conserve -- conservatorship, the u.s. government would step in and pay. that's obviously what happened since they were put into -- into conservatorship. that system has given americans access to a 30-year fixed mortgage which is something that people around the gloap don't have, 30-year fixed rate repayable, i think i saw some data from the institute that on 80% of buyers who are buying are choosing 30-year. >> host: in other countries mortgage fo
CSPAN
Mar 22, 2014 10:00pm EDT
median age of 41 by mid-century. by then china will be 46 with their one-child policy for decades now and it's completely changed its age pyramid. germany's will be 51. japan's will be 53 so there are a lot of advanced economies in the world that are looking at uncharted waters in terms of the relationship of older people to younger people. the challenge with an older society is older people don't have the energy and they don't have the imagination. they are wonderful and respect them and we want them to live out their last years in dignity and all the rest that you don't want an economy if you are looking at it from that point of view driven by older people because you are much better off with the vitality of youth. >> host: this sounds all dire but your book is not all gloom and doom and the mad max for. one of the upsides of the things that have been going on post the recession as you point out from the numbers it has fostered this renewed intergenerational dependency. can you tell us a little bit about that? >> guest: one of the things the book tries to do using data is to play of
CSPAN
Apr 13, 2014 9:02pm EDT
of terrorism and now the rise of china and the nuclear program even thevent the president saide wants to cut the military and others are getting this message ithat the united states doesn't have the well much less the wherewithal to stand against the tyrants of the world so he cut the defense budget and when you cut spending and maintain a level of revenue you're going to get a balanced budget and surplus and that is what is happening in the state. i have a whole chapter on what's happening. we had indiana, louisiana, georgia doing fantastic jobs many of them balancing budgets. the state constitutions require them. i wish we could have that in the federal level but also because of the policies that he had in indiana they send people checks when he has enough money. this is an amazing thing to me. they say we don't need all this money. the federal government of course it goes out at the end of the fiscal year if you haven't spent it all spend it all because your budget might be cut next year but in indiana they send you a check and what they were marble thing. >> host: you addres
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 10:02pm EST
for nothing or not just for a thousand dollars a year. my slogan now i believe china had a slogan they are going to build a 100 harvard equivalent. i think we need to build 100 berkeley's. we need to have two or three dozen every state so we don't have every high school kid in america competing to get into one of 12 schools in some of those can go for free. >> host: if you get and, true so you want great access but you also want standards for the schools so they will still be competitive. >> guest: let's be clear about this. for the kid who can get into princeton or harvard it's amazing. three or 4% of their student body our kids from the bottom quarter. we are not talking about a lot of kids. >> host: we are trying to increase first-generation students and we have a program for an additional scholarship at not only a scholarship at a mentor -- mentorship. they are mentored by all kinds of alumni in its negotiating an environment that is very different than the one in which they came so they are comfortable. they are bright enough to get through it and do well but there are cultur
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2016 11:00am EDT
: good question. >> guest: why not buick making cars in china? buick. why not h1b workers question mark these are taking white-collar jobs, these are taking kids jobs. it's not just taking your nanny job anymore. how about a little time on that? >> host: one of the reasons perhaps because trump continues the conversation and respond to every question posed to him. eventually he turns the conversation back to himself and your hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign based on what you believe or what you might do, you want to run a campaign that's a referendum on doldrums character so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> guest: what you mean? >> host: why would you help hillary clinton by talking about yourself? >> guest: why isn't he talking about her correction? >> host: if i'm elected, this is what america will look like. that's not the point. the point is if elected, everyone else says this is what we hear. >> guest: not exactly right. the close that we buy in america are made of america, it's like three percent on i belie
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