Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171213
STATION
WUSA (CBS) 82
DATE
2011 27
2012 21
2010 18
2009 11
2013 5
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Jun 5, 2011 11:00am EDT
china's political economic and military influence in asia grows, how should u.s. policy change towards the region? we talked to one analyst who says washington needs a new approach. plus, the revolutions in tunisia, egypt and elsewhere across the arab world have been powered by the internet. so what can the united states do to ensure that the internet itself remains free? but first, pentagon acquisition chief ashton carter said federally funded research and development centers would play a getted greater role in the acquisition process to help the government make smarter decisions to save money. the centers were founded during cold war to help develop missiles and other complex systems. but sole sourcing working to these agencies worries the companies that provide technical and management consulting to the government. here to talk about the pitfalls of the new policy is stan, the president of the professional services council that advocates on behalf of contractors that provides services to the government. stan, thank you very much for joining us. >>> always a pleasure. >> so what do you v
CBS
Dec 8, 2013 8:00am EST
of afghanistan. bullet first, rising tensions in the east china sea, where china has extended its air defense identification zone to overlap territory long claimed by japan, south korea and taiwan. vice president joe biden has urged restraint and encouraged all parties to resolve their territorial claims peacefully. during a three-day swing through the region. and washington has said that the u.s. military will continue operating normally, refusing chinese calls for identification. but washington has also instructed civil airliners to follow beijing's new guidelines for the sake of safety. china has made the move to assert its claims over on the unpopulated islands, administered by japan, to force japan to back down, beijing has ratcheted up air and sea patrols and tokyo responded in kind of here to talk to us about china's aim and what is next are two leading asia analyst, bonnie glazer for the center for international studies and randy shriver the partner in armitage number who served in the state department as an asia hand during the bush administration. guy, welcome to the sho
CBS
Dec 25, 2011 11:00am EST
goes on. >>> coming up, >>> for decades china has diligently worked to build a high tech air force but hasn't always been successful despite reforms to its military aviation sector. but that's changing as beijing becomes richer and works smarter to steadily improve air comat capabilities. china is gaining ground so fast it won't be long until it will give western and russian industries a run for their money. our next guest is phil saunders, an expert on the chinese military at the national defense university and the coauthor of a new report, ," buy, build or steal, china's quest for military aviation technologies which details china's aircraft development and procurement strategies." phil, merry christmas and thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >> how have the chinese been going about trying to build their air force and how effective have they been? >> my coauthor and me talk about three main routes, buy, build or steal. if you buy you can purchase the most advanced aircraft you can get, but it leaves you dependent upon a foreign supplier. if you build it -- >> in the case with th
CBS
Jul 8, 2012 11:30am EDT
antagonizing an increasingly assertive china that claims the entire south china sea its own. our next guest has been instrumental in spear heeding efforts in the region. we met with kirk campbell assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs last week where we talked about the administration's rebalancing strategy. i asked him to explain the pivot and why it's so important. >> i would -- define our purposes in a larger context actually. i think by any measure, the lion's share of the 21st century is going to be written in asia in terms of the fastest growing economies, tremendous economic potential. a lot of security challenges. and opportunities that are virtually unprecedented for the united states. so i think our engagement is with the region as a whole. -- region as a whole. you know you really didn't divide the region in terms of like you know some countries that are anxious and others that are friendly. overall, every country in asia wants a better relationship with china and also want to have a good relationship with the united states. our determination is tha
CBS
Apr 10, 2011 11:00am EDT
fuels? we'll hear from an air force official involve inside that transformation. plus what china's new defense strategy tells us about beijing's regional ambitions. but, first, afghanistan depends on natey just more than troops for its security but also to purchase military and security equipment, overseas construction of its infrastructure and a trained leader that will assume the burden once western troops leave the country in 2014. we're honored to be joined by a man who handles these critical missions with a budget of $11.6, colonel john fer airy. sir, welcome to the program. >> thank you very much. >> let's start up, you're fresh in from afghanistan, you're going to be spending about two weeks in washington. what are some of the top priorities for afghan security forces? >> one is to get them the equipment they need so they can go out on patrol so our soldiers don't have to be the lead. one of the things we're giving them is a counter i.e. d. capability, mine rollers, up armored humvees and machine guns. that gives them the capability to go on the roads, do the patrols and all
CBS
May 22, 2011 11:00am EDT
general electric, here is ronald reagan. ♪ >>> for the first time in seven years the chief of china's general staff, general chungdu met with u.s. counterparts and toured u.s. base. it's the first high-level visit since china cut off ties with the united states since u.s. stopped selling arms last year. here to tell us is phil saunders, the director of the center that studies chinese military affairs at the national university in washington. phil, welcome back to the show. >> thank you, glad to be here. >> china has historically cut off military ties with washington whenever it's gotten upset, for example, arms sales to taiwan and all of a sudden turns on the charm offensive when it feels like, oh, my god, people see us as a threat. what does this visit actually accomplish? >> i think it does a couple things. there's been a lot of talk that the presidents have talked at summit visits about the importance of military-to-military relations and that the p.l.a. is not on board of that. >> the people's liberation army. >> yes. the chinese military. one of the things that general chun made
CBS
Oct 3, 2010 11:00am EDT
stance from china on territory questions. how does this pan out? >> i think we are headed for a long-term tense deterioration with our relationship with the chinese. part of it is the chinese are becoming more assertive. that is not the core issue. u.s. growth rate was 1.6%. 2/3 of our trade deficit is china. after 10 years, the entire political system of both parties are getting in line with the way china is doing trade. >> will chinabuildd up the defenses or is there cause for concern because china has a further reaching strategy? >> you spent a lot of time answering that question. >> this baffles china and this is the perception of the american decline. what do we do about this? >> we have a minute left. china takes the world supply. coming up with a report from the pentagon. what will it say? >> it will say the sky is not falling. we anticipate getting the materials for the next decade or so. it will contain an research and development strategy to help the manufacturing. >> this is a perfect example of the way china does trade. why is the united states no longer in the rail business?
CBS
Jun 10, 2012 11:30am EDT
china as the principal driver of the strategy, china remains america's leading trading partner and panetta hopes to visit china after recently hosting chinese defense minister at the pentagon. still, china remains the 10,000- pound tiger in every room where pacific security is discussed. its roaring economy has underwritten robust military growth that combined with sweeping territorial claims and belligerent actions have worried its neighbors. in cooperates, america has welcomed beijing's intimidation and continued regional stability. u.s. ships will operate from singapore, marines will deploy to australia as the philippines and vietnam warm to hosting u.s. forces and ships on a rotational basis. japan will remain a cornerstone ally. but washington must tread a fine line that reassures allies without becoming china's rational dll e for even more belligerence, especially as the economic growth that has been so critical to maintaining chinese internal stability cools. thanks for joining us for "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. you can watch this program online at defens
CBS
Dec 9, 2012 8:00am EST
situation. >> china has been driving hard to grow its naval capabilities backed up with a strong aerospace capability. you were the seven fleet commander. when you look at china and all the things in the chinese navy in particular, what do you see when you look at the chinese navy in terms of capabilities they're doing? >> i see a navy that's growing beyond a series of somewhat asymmetrical if you will approaches in its missions to something which frankly tends to be more conventional. what i mean by that, if you look at their shipbuilding plant, they're building a certain number of nuclear submarines similar to what the soviets did way back when as they look at what they need to protect and to be able to, if you will, operate forward in their own context. they're looking -- they build sort of dvgs like we did, missile destroyers with increased tonnage. they're building an aircraft carrier. that's a complex situation. you're into a new realm, you know. operating an air waing. every plane that takes -- air wing. every plane that takes off has to land. very complex. they're moving
CBS
Nov 20, 2011 11:00am EST
important. one thing people don't know about china is every p.l.a. district in china runs competitions every spring where they take all the people they've caught hacking and all the people that are interested in hacking and they compete and then they go with the -- the ones who win go to a 30-day, 16- hour a day workshop. it's great. >> that's an incentive to get nailed for a cyber crime in china. >> in china it's a capital offense. so they have yjw÷a lot of lever on whether you want to join the competition. >> we point out that there are defensive uses of offense, remembering that you might categorize offense as computer network attack and computer network exploitation. that same computer network exploitation capability that our nation has can be used to glean information about what that cyber environment is. on a more local level, many, many institutions, both public and private operate red teams that are, in fact, the perpetrators of offensive acts or purposes of including one's defense. >> more with >>> we're back with dale myroses of the harris corporation, phyllis s
CBS
Feb 19, 2012 11:00am EST
buy the joint strike fighter. but what america sees as reassuring, china sees as encirclement. china blames america for raising tensions, forgetting its claims of sovereignty over the south and east seas in 2010 is what drove its neighbors to seek greater american involvement in the first place. the increased u.s. presence, statements and actions have given china pause. now it's time for both sides to tone down the rhetoric. washington and beijing had link he'll in an economic co- dependency that would make any conflict mutually dever state sog neither should seek war with the other. still, china sees it severs as america as a fading power and is investing in capabilities designed to thwart u.s. military strength. washington must be especially careful not to give its leading economic partner and global competitor excuses for saber rattling or victimhood it. must let its actions speak louder than words. thank you for joining us for "this week in defense news." watch this program online or you can e-mail me at this address. i'll be back income week at the same time. until then, have a
CBS
Feb 13, 2011 11:00am EST
. that's not stopping india, china and rushing from charging ahead with plans to develop their own manned stealth jets. i recently sat down with doug barry, an air power analyst. i asked doug what trends will help shape military air power in the future. >> the usr, avs, you'll see a proliferation of these. i think initially these will supplement the supply, crude combat aircraft. i think you will see that the manned combat aircraft will be around for quite some time yet. >> that's one of the things analysts have been saying, you know, there's an imminent demise of this stuff, but you'll see china is developing a new stealth fighter. india and russia are participating in the $30 billion stealth aircraft program. is the outlook significantly more robust for manned aircraft going into the future? >> i think that depends on which continent you're actually on. china, yes, russia likely as long as their economy holds up and they continue the program with india. europe slightly more difficult, the aircraft combat there probably the mindset will be reduction within the next 10 years by the
CBS
Aug 14, 2011 11:00am EDT
important than ever and china is using smart power to advance its global interests. and yet the chairwoman of the house foreign affairs committee has been pretty vocal opponent of foreign aid spending, except for israel. how do you convince her and her colleagues that this is actually a strategic investment in the long-term, that it may be tens of billions of dollars but you can actually get more benefit at the end of the day from it? >> well i think secretary clinton has been particularly eloquent in making the case that our foreign policy is important to keep americans safe, to help americans prosper, and is a national security budget, not just a foreign aid budget. that foreign aid helps our national security. we've had a number of crisis around the world and our embassies are helping keep americans safe. when americans are caught up in tumult and unrest. and her reporting back to washington what they are seeing and hearing and they are form the backbone of the information that we in washington use to make decisions. they also represent american businesses, american educational institut
CBS
Feb 20, 2011 11:00am EST
driven by costs, why not go to china for ships or india for electronics, for example? >> first of all, i don't have anything new on tankers, i don't want to comment on tanker at all. there are occasions when in the interests of competition and best value, if a particular component or piece or system can be obtained somewhere else, we do that in the interests of the war fighter and the taxpayer. that can't take the places of the essentials that we need in this country in order to be a successful country going forward. i'm a physicist. i'm particularly concerned about science, technology, engineering and mathematics, capabilities, education and so forth. i think the government has a very important role in making sure and we in the defense department and our technology base efforts also to make sure that the foundations, quality people, god technology base here in this country, last for defense and for the nation as a whole. >> any chance for a split buy on tanker? >> we said a million times that that's not something that you -- economical to do. you can't have two people making very sma
CBS
Aug 21, 2011 11:00am EDT
whole new generation coming in that expects this. >> let's talk about what china is doing and whether or not we have to compete with them. the united states has been very good at going out and building roads and having projects to engage people. we've been sort of a leader in smart power for decades. but china has stepped up its game in terms of building roads and rail links, power plants, hospitals, schools all around the world. at really a break-neck pace. is that something that we've got to look at and say, look, we have to step up our game in part because the nation that has its eye on the super power seat is doing the same thing? >> i think in part it's about thinking through what is it that we're trying to convey outwards? recently i was at an event that folks were tack being africa and chinese investment in africa. in some ways, as the conversation it went on, it was a bit of the public relations discussion. and so a big splashy infrastructure project gets a lot of attention and gets a lot of recognition. what the u.s. is trying to do, which is about institutional capacity buil
CBS
Jan 1, 2012 11:00am EST
in the era of global competition. china is not our enemy, it is our competitor. brazil is not our enemy, these are competitors. >> right. >> we have to increase our competitive nature. general jones thought that one of the biggest dangers general jones the former national security. >>> and former chairman of the counsel. >> former marine commander of europe, thought one of the greatest challenges facing the transatlantic unit in the united states was our noncompetitiveness. this is a national security threat every built as important as weapons of mass destruction. >> let's go to the question whether or not europe is in a terminal decline. some say the growth rates aren't there there is going to be a long catastrophe for europe. what is your state going to be for the decade? >> we have a double crisis of the west. meaning both the united states and europe at the same time are in a certain degree of crisis and are in an economic and political crisis. the united states can fix this with an election. the 5xeunited states can fix th we've done it before. i'm more worried about europe.
CBS
Nov 1, 2009 11:00am EST
china and peer competitors and so on, but actually when you get down to it, those are the two big unresolved questions. >> this qdr is a good example if you don't make a decision, you make a decision. if they think they're going to go up 3% and know things like health care costs were going up 150% over the last eight years, then by failing to tackle health care or failing to tackle personnel costs you guarantee the outcome is that those things gradually squeeze investment spending, weapons out of the budget. >> one of the problems they have too, they killed most of the easy-kills, the troubled programs, the things that have been around forever, talking about getting rid of forever, those are gone. the ones left are going to be big fights. it is tougher to kill weapons systems this next time around, than the last time around, when we hailed robert gates as the great hero. >> and even on the vector we're on, we're heading for more labor-intensive posture. >> i think there is a 3% increase coming. i think there may not be. the administration is trying to find money for job creation.
CBS
Jan 2, 2011 11:00am EST
border context, fighting on a larger scale as an example, growing threat from china that i referred to, iran situation or north korean, it takes a different kind of fighting. that means the integrated, the synergy that you get from the army, navy, air force, marine corps when we do it together in a joint environment. the current stress on the army and marine corps has not allowed them to continue with that type of training. >> i'll be back with general >>> we are back with general hugh shelton the 14th general of the chairman of staff. we were talking about personnel levels. you oversaw an increase in benefits for men and women in uniform to redress some of the salary cuts that happened in the mid'80s. there are some critics that say it has gone too far, the personnel costs are increasing at a level unsustainable. what are some recommendations that you would have in order to try to control that given that cutting forces isn't really the right answer either. >> well, vago, cutting forces is not the right answer. i would say that we can never pay our men and women in uniform the -- for t
CBS
Jul 25, 2010 11:00am EDT
countries, china. we consider russia to be an emerging defense equipment supplier and we are looking closely at what it is they offer. we believe that they still trade very much on the basis of price. our policy has been to trade on the basis of quality and proven capability in operations. and we think that gives us a very strong edge in the competition to come. >>> how soon do you think before the chinese in particular end up in a position where they are a dominant threat? >> i think they are already a competitor. i think they have reach, ambition and needs. needs economically and they are a very, very powerful force in the development of energy security needs throughout the world. we see them already as having emerged. we still believe but the united kingdom as a supplier of tested equipment has a strong edge over the emerging suppliers. >>> let me take you to the question. you -- your charter is to increase exports. is your prime position to support an industry that employs 300,000 britains going to put you in a position to dodge cuts? >> that is not for us to decide. that is for
CBS
Jan 3, 2010 11:00am EST
nuclear program looms large. will it compel israel to use military force? in asia, china's rise to military prominence vexes the region as japan redefines its relationship with washington. and will the world's largest defense program the joint strike fighter stay on track for become the major effort to fall into a self-defeating effort of rising costs and slipping schedules. thanks for joining us in this week in defense news. i'm vago muradian. can you watch this on defense news tv.com. or e-mail me at defense news tv.com. have a great week.
CBS
Aug 2, 2009 11:00am EDT
financial conference last week the administration assured china washington will be fiscally responsible. relying on beijing to finance more american debt. what does it mean? cuts to f-22, and presidential hell koltd and ddg destroys can seem minor in comparison to what is to come. you can e-mail me. we're send ago very happy 219th birthday to the united states coast guard. we'll be back next sunday morning at 11:00. have a great week.
CBS
Jan 30, 2011 11:00am EST
same time, most of our competitors, certainly china, india and europe, they have an industrial policy. they comply with trade laws but they also try to protect and grow their own industries. we need to do the same. it has to be wto complaint but even with nwto there is room to protect and help local industries good for your economy and also good for our fashional security. the more u.s. firms that are leaders on critical technology that contribute to the national security, the better off we are. so yes we need industrial policy. we can do it with wto complaint and grow our industries. >> what are some of the critical technologies. through the 40s, 50s, 60s, it was commercial gain. do you think we have to go back to the model where the government increases investment in defense technology that has commercial spinoffs. >> we've done that. i don't think we've drifted away from it. we've had a massive increase in defense spending over the course of the last seven or eight years and that's contributed to the development of a lot of technologies and we can't envision where those are
CBS
Apr 4, 2010 11:00am EDT
china, to a russia to iran, but you also have non-state actor use in this. robotics are different than other technologies. they are not like using an aircraft carrier where you need a big industrial structure to build it but also to use it. we have this flattening effect coming into conflict. and i think that is -- you asked about nightmare scenarios, the other set of users for this lethal technology. >> and you think this could be used against the american home land not just for deployed troops. >> during world war ii, hitler's air force could not reach the continental united states. couple years ago a 77-year-old blind man built his own home made -- from canada -- built his own home-made drone that he flew across the atlantic. we have seen non-state actor use in these technologies. the war between israel and hezbollah. we had border troops in arizona use this. it is a counter-terrorism for us but with this flattening effect other actors may get it as well. >> thank you, peter. illuminating be as always. >>> past, present and future of military radios. stay tuned. >>> communicati
CBS
Oct 21, 2012 8:00am EDT
won't wish to attack us like our allies or china or russia where there's a lot more at stake. i think the concern is that the nations or groups that have the motivation can be developing the capability to cause serious harm. and i think he sees a trendline moving in that direction and i think he's using the incidents rather than just saying these specific examples we need to do something. but what they represent moving forward. >> it is said that until the strategy was adopted, that cyber command for example was a bit handcuffed in its ability to respond. is that true? >> i don't think cyber command has been handcuffed in a strategic sense. so at the end of the day, the national command authority, the president, has -- makes a decision about what the united states will do in cyber and so they could have gotten that authority at any time to move forward and take action. at the operational level though, in terms of the military functioning day-to- day, and wanting to respond more quickly to events that are maybe not at the highest strategic levels. to do that they need rules of engageme
CBS
Dec 20, 2009 11:00am EST
on china or iran. it is not. it is more general in its composition. >> this is borne from air-land battle. as a young air force officer when i served with the army as a liaison officer, that document guided us to fighting on the planes in europe. but it was very narrow to that. we have entered into this in a much broader sense. across all five phases of the conflict, from warfare to high-end kinetics, and so we're forcing these young men to think much broader. how do we integrate in peace, i kinetic war and in the after-war which we find ourself in more and more these days. >> speaking of the war we're currently in. what is the air force and what are some of the ways you guys are surging in order to support that surge in afghanistan. >> this will be a problem we have not faced in the past. we're asking to move troops at a much faster rate than ever before, and so we're having to think our way through that. planning factor in the past i'm sure you've heard, is about 40 days for a brigade combat team. that will not meet the president's timeline. we'll have to be better, smarter, fas
CBS
Nov 27, 2011 11:00am EST
, and a bunch of other minor moves throughout the region. as one person said, the more angry china gets are the better off we know we're doing. is that something that you can economically do? >> absolutely. the real thing you should be looking anthony in asia is not more troops, but what you do with the ones that are there and not only how many you keep but where you move this. too and how you have them placed. it's really comp complex chessboard and there's a lot of opportunities. >> and the keywords are minor moves because you could get a lot of oomph from small things. >> well, and most allies in the region want to be reassured at the end of the day that we care enough about them and that we're going to abide by our security commit. >> and we aren't leaving. >> and we're not leaving, exactly, which was the sense that everybody had that we would -- >> a lot like reinforcing the philippines in the 1930s. >> yes, but i this it matters. in the time when the chinese are unloading construction materials on a contested reef off the phillipines, it helps. >> against the 1930s. >> let me go t
CBS
Dec 18, 2011 11:00am EST
involved there. china, for example. and it would sort of -- it would sort of be foolish for us to cut off aid. >> coming up >>> we're back with our roundtable discussion. i want to start with rick mays, the super committee fail today reach a deficit reduction deal. see questerration is now the law of the land. it's supposed to take another $600 out of the pentagon spending. there are people in the pentagon that don't believe that's going to happen. what's going to happen? are they going to end up losing more money than they think? >> they're going to lose more money than they think. will we see see questerration happen? probably not. there will not be a $1.2 trillion cut across the board. it doesn't mean defense is off the hook. whatever they need to replace that is still going to be $1.2 trillion or larger in cuts because that's the price of getting out of this. that could fall on the defense department. >> i think you're right. there is more of an appetite with defense spending cuts with tea party people, democrats. i think we're likely to see more cuts. the see questerration, that
CBS
Aug 26, 2012 11:30am EDT
to china's quickly modernizing navy? plus, a top industry executive on the most promising international defense market. but first, the u.s. military's promotion system has long been criticized for being too rigid, automatically advancing too many while at the same time limiting opportunities for innovative leaders. our next guest argues that it's time to change a system that he says breeds mediocrity by taking some cues from multinational civilian organizations while at the same time more actively weeding out bad ones. in an article published by the armed forces journal brigadier general mark arnold from the 100th training command at fort knox, kentucky argues for a series of commands including scrapping a structure that forces everyone to move up or leave in uniform. general arnold joins us from houston where in his civilian life he is the president and ceo of gse environmental, a multinational manufacturing company. sir, welcome tothe show. >> hello, vag go. pleased to be here today. >> so in 2010, army research institute study found that the main reason that talented fo
CBS
Apr 15, 2012 11:30am EDT
underestimated the speed of china's weapons program. that's the conclusion in a new report how did washington get it wrong and what capabilities is china investing in? here to answer those questions is is the commission's chairman, dennis shay, a government policy attorney who served in the bush administration and was an adviser to former senator bob dole. sir, welcome to the program. >> thanks, vago. good to be here. >> how did we miss something so important and who's responsibility was it for us to be really updated as to what was going on in china? >> the the ultimate responsibility is the intelligence community. let me talk a little bit about the report. the report relies exclusively on open sources, it does not rely on classified channels, so the report is very clear about that. it also doesn't take a look at what the intelligence community was saying exclusively, it takes a look at what the broader china-watching community, the media, in public affairs, in the government, not just the intelligence community. so even secretary gates acknowledged we got it wrong or were a bit surprised wh
CBS
Nov 4, 2012 8:00am EST
of an increasingly assertive china and america's renewed focus on the region? we talk to defense news' own bureau chief for some answers. but first the national guard plays a critical role in america's national security. at home, supporting disaster relief operations as in the wake of superstorm sandy that devastated parking lots of the northeast -- parts of the northeaster operations worldwide including afghanistan. while the guard is part of the air force, units -- units in each state are under the command of governors and so the guards relationship with the active duty force can sometimes be strained. that's been the case since february when the air force said that of 9,900 proposed personnel cuts, 5100 would come from the guard. a move that sparked a fire storm of protests on capitol hill. lawmakers governors and guard leaders accused the air force of failing to coordinate cuts they say fell disproportionately on citizen airmen and in protest the congress prohibited the air force from executing $9 billion in cuts freezing the services ability to shed personnel to meet targets
CBS
Jan 17, 2010 11:00am EST
, why improving china's nations with taiwan is good for the united states. and a look at a small company viking to get innovative technologies into military service. >> good morning, welcome to this week in defense news. how do small companies get innovative technologies into military service? we'll talk to one of the companies. >>> plus, a look at the u.s. navy's newest high-tech ship. first, china's been making headlines this week. internet titan google is considering pulling the plug on its operations in the country, accusing chinese hackers of infiltrating the network. other companies include north rum grumman and beijing stepped up the campaign to stop washington from selling arms to taiwan. china and taiwan split after a 1949 civil war and china considering taiwan its territory and all relations with taiwan as an internal chinese matter and tested an antimissile defense system. joining us is bonnie glacier, a senior fellow and china expert at the center of strew tonalic international studies. thank you for joining us. >> good to be here. >> we have the cyberattack issue. light talk
CBS
Jan 16, 2011 11:00am EST
lockhead hartin and bowing and edwards air force base, china lake and the marine logistics bake in barstow. in the first interview since becoming chairman, i asked him if defense cuts should be on the table? >> i think that the leadership has said everything has to be on the table. i think probably what we need to talk about is what does that mean, being on the table? the secretary has said for a year now, he's been selling the service chief, we want to come up with $100 billion in savings, but when you find the savings through different efficiencies we'll let you keep the savings. we had a briefing last week that departed quite a bit from what we had been hearing. and i was quite concerned. i was shocked really to hear some of the numbers that he was talking about. we haven't seen the details of that yet. but basically what he was saying is the $100 billion that he had been asking the service chiefs for, they have found those efficiencies. and they are going to be able to keep $70 billion of it, but they're going to have to use $28 billion of it to pay for must-pay things. so basi
CBS
Aug 8, 2010 11:00am EDT
would agree the united states has a strategic interest in asia. you have a rapidly rising china. deploy it forward, how are we going to get the money if we don't have more money to field larger forces and origination? >> well there's only one way, we'll have to take the money out of other vision areas in order to focus more strongly on the western pacific. i don't know whether we will. china can grow at 10% a year for decades now. we produced no net new jobs in the united states over the last decade. >> we're a retreating power. it's just natural that china is going to grow influence in the western pacific. >> how many carriers isn't specific to that question-- >> kirk campbell used to say it was more about simply the cop on the beat, regularly see a freighter or destroyer in the region. china has had a rather dramatic military missile fluxing this week. indisputably its territory and all negotiations, territorial disputes should be negotiated bilaterally. we're going to stick to the multiliable framework. doesn't china, don't china's actions in the south china seat and the future that
CBS
Jan 8, 2012 11:00am EST
side of the ocean. our main issue is chai china is not a military buildup. >> it is -- if this administration cannot close the gap between chinese and american economic growth rates over the long run it won't matter, china will dominate the western pa glisk but still american allies want a strong american presence because beijing is being -- and it has grown to such that there are big territorial claims being made as well. >> no doubt about it. but let's go to the programs, i mean the strategy doesn't talk about programs, it talks about broad area, speck ops, spiker capabilities, air and naval, ground forces would draw down infestment in technology. the one program that was mentioned was a new bomber which i thought was very, very interesting. why did that deserve mention and what are some of the other programs that will fair well and others that will fair poorly. >> there's no reasons why the bomber is interesting symbol here. one is that there's a tendency on the part of the administration to look at defense industry and defense jobs in two different categories. there's the k
CBS
Jul 10, 2011 11:00am EDT
♪[ instrumental music ] >>> welcome to this week in defense news. on the eve of his trip to china, i sat down with aderal mike mullen when he visited our offices in virginia. mullein started his <÷& extraordinary military career at the naval academy in 1964. he was commissioned in 1968 and became chief of nave operations in 2007, chairman of the joint - chief of staff. during his tonier that well end in october, he has in the wars in afghanistan and iraq, managing the thorny pakistan relationship and preparing the united states for a leaner future. we started with afghanistan. with bin laden dead and relations with pakistan fraying. americans, including those who served in afghani, are saying that the mission is unduable the best course is to withdrawal as soon as possible. i asked the chief if the mission is still achievable. >> a critical part of the world. as we focus on this, it has been a focus on both afghanistan and pakistan and the region. as you said, bin laden is dead and had a huge impact on al- qaeda, but it did not eliminate al-qaeda. their leadership still lives the
CBS
Sep 29, 2013 8:00am EDT
renewing its focus as north korea continues the threatening antics and china becomes aggressive in asserting its territorial claims. we met with the general at the air force association's exposition outside washington, d.c. i asked him how it's affecting his command and what he is telling alleys in the region. >> it's been a big factor for us. and we are called the operations and maintenance. we don't procure things. our whole budget is basically our operations and maintenance. out in the pacific, the biggest problem has been the engagement that we do the exercise in the pacific, more than just training, their presence in different area, building the partnership capacity up, being places, it's flying hours. and in the pacific, flying anywhere takes longer than anywhere else in the world. so it's a lot of flying hours. and it's just that cut is magnified. when we cut a percentage, it's magnified in the pacific. so the biggest thing, we had to cancel exercises. one example of a challenge would be a lot of the west pack units, places like that have to do the drops back in the united s
CBS
Dec 4, 2011 11:00am EST
joining us, >>> for years asian nations worry about china's increasing assertiveness and growing military capabilities has looked to washington for reassurance and not always gotten the attention they wanted. now top american leaders are making it clear they are listening. late last month secretary of state, hillary clinton from the decks of the u.s. destroyer in manilla bay reaffirmed their equipments to the philippines as they pressure them on territorial claims. at the same time, president obama announced 2,500 marines would be posted to a new base in darbin, australia, stressing the tight budget cuts that america would remain specific power. all this irritates china, which accuses washington of trying to box it in. beijing wants to use its growing economic and military power to compel its neighbors to accept its sweeping territorial claims around the south china sea. as a tired america steps aside. obama is right to renew their focus on this region critical to america's long-term security and economic prosperity. but as america reassures allies about china's rise, it is not u
CBS
Dec 30, 2012 8:00am EST
really won't, can't for many years. they see china as a potential threat in the future but recognize we have common interests in china which would ease that threat. and they see the great instability in the middle east as posing specific threats to us such as the chemical weapons in syria which could fall in the hands of terrorists, but see these threats as threats to be managed, not to be resolved once and for all. meaning we can protect the chemical weapons. we don't have to go in and turn syria into a democracy. >> you want the united states to build one of the points that the report makes early on, to build on comparative strengths and address comparative weaknesses. from your standpoint what are those strengths that need to be built on, and then what are the weaknesses that need to be addressed? >> well, our military forces have unprecedented capabilities. we've spent a lot over the last 10 years, as you know, and it shows in our naval power, our air power, our space capabilities, our intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance capabilities. our forces are flexible to move quickly a
CBS
Jun 12, 2011 11:00am EDT
because it produces the best scientists and engineers. countries like china, india and brazil continuing at break neck pace. 50% of all u.s. engineers will retire in a few years with 30% of all engineers to follow by 2020. the trouble is fewer and fewer young people are attracted to careers in science, technology, engineering and math. a few million college freshman annually, less than a million studying in the technical field and less than half of those earn technical degrees. worse, american graduates ranked 27th of 29 developed nations in science and technology and math degrees. the navy's effort to attract young people to the sciences. sir, welcome back to the show. >> good to be here. >> you guys are launching a mult million dollar program. what is it aimed to do and how is it aimed to do it? >> united states is the world's technology leader and of course our military relies heavily on technology as you know. as we look to the future we are going to need a talent pool from which we can draw sailors an marines to operate that high tech equipment but also civilian engineers an scienti
CBS
Oct 15, 2011 12:00pm EDT
pacific is theater and fundamentally you said in your speech that china is rising mill terrell, at the same time there are a lot of armies in asia. what is the army's role in asia and even in a china scenario where folks say, look, demographically there is just no role? >> what we're trying to do is first maintain relationships, develop capabilities with our partners in the asia region. and what that -- and in asia we have seven of the 10 largest land armies in the world in asia. so we have not been able to pay the attention i think that's necessary there because of what we've been doing in iraq and afghanistan. so as we look to the future, part of the things that we have to do is build our relationships, build partnerships with our allies and friends in the asia pacific region. i think that's a great role the army can play, working with armies because in many of these countries, the army is the dominant military force of the country and i think we've been ignoring that for a long time. >> for outside purposes as well as domestic. >> that's right. >> any particular sorts of exercises o
CBS
Aug 7, 2011 11:00am EDT
. we have a riot in china, for example, that folks are worried about and a number of other things. is anybody considering the industrial-base implications of this? for example, the navy is already considering slipping carriers from one every five years to one every seven years in part because of the cost and there are guys in the industrial base who are already saying, you know, wow, you guys don't make these that quickly anyway, stretching us to a seven-year cycle, could actually break some of the smaller companies. >> if you're going to start to buy things, you'll have to be spending more for them solving that issue in part. >> depending on who's so busy to build the '13 budget and the strategy to chase it down, they don't have time to examine the impact on the industrial base. i really see this as a fundamental problem, particularly for the navy who's taken great care in this regard. we see troop reductions in the army set to close this year, you know, all their vehicle lines could be at risk as well. i see it across the board, all of the services, major industrial-based impacted.
CBS
Jun 16, 2013 8:00am EDT
threat where we have a tendency of looking at things that are more understandable like china or something elsewhere this sort of mushy area is something we tend not to pay attention to? >> in the real world see more convergence, see more overlaps. we see this in iraq, we had terrorism, criminality and we had insurgency all going on so that is a trend of the fast and it will continue in the future. >> you are one of those avid readers. you say you read a book overnight that might take my days. this will constitute roughly our first summer reading list and hopefully we have more. what are your top picks? >> as people getting ready for father's day they might think of three major titles out right now, the first one is battle of bunker hill. it is a revisionist history of an insurgency that we ran as opposed to a counter insurgency up in new england and i learned a lot about that battle which was a particularly bloody fight, 400 americans died and 1000 british soldiers died in one day and a very bloody fight. >> which back then were huge casualties. >> yeah, it's the largest casualt
CBS
Aug 15, 2010 11:00am EDT
with a rapidly rising china uh, military that's unsteadying our allies. where do you find the additional money? this budget has secretary gates trying to save 100 million. >> we think we do have to save money. we applaud what secretary gates is doing in dropping programs we don't need and those programs we do need, making them more efficient. we applaud what he's done, acquisition reform, we go much further in terms of acquisition reform. by adapting the military personnel system to the needs of the current day, and there are a lot of ways to do that, we'll actually, in the end, save money, without short-changing our men and women in uniform. our point is you oughta do all those things, you oughta save all that money and use it to ensure we have forestructure and modernization, all successful volunteer force, but if the savings are not enough to achieve those three objectives, then the congress of the united states has to be willing to add to the top line. we think they may have to do that. we felt they needed to put it on the table. >> obviously some of these things will requ
CBS
Oct 17, 2010 11:00am EDT
aggressive cyber states like china and russia to rein in their hackers that operate with government support and direction, making both better world citizens. but because they are members of the u.n. security council with veto power, crafting a power won't be easy until they and others who think they can conclude that war in that domain is likely to hurt them more than it will help them. thanks for joining us for this week in defense news. i'm vago muradian. you can watch this program online or e-mail me.
CBS
Nov 15, 2009 11:00am EST
. china proposes a representative case. myriad technical, architectural and cultural challenges lie ahead. they will build the most crucial element of all. trust. you can watch this program online at defense news tv.com or e-mail me. i will be back next sunday morning at 11. have a great week m
CBS
Sep 5, 2010 8:30am EDT
to china in the 1990s, they made it so hard that they lost sales in satellite sales. two years ago the white house and congress agreed to interpret existing regulations to no longer require military licenses for military components. it will help save money and boost u.s. exports and help u.s. allies get the technology that they need. thanks for joining us in this week's defense news. till next time, have a great week. my "me time" is when i thought i parked on level 2. or maybe 8? my "me time" is when there's a 10% chance of rain! [ cellphone rings ] my "me time" is when he doesn't get the hint. ♪ my "me time"... [ bang ] is when everybody's takin' shots at me. [ male announcer ] discover you time anytime. mccafé your day with a mcdonald's frappé. smooth and icy caramel or mocha blended just for you and topped with a decadent drizzle. "me time"! [ male announcer ] the simple joy of a frappé. ♪ captioning made possible by johnson
CBS
Aug 23, 2009 11:00am EDT
from russia or china or elsewhere. >> right. but in my experience of the last several decades of working in networks, where the attack appeared to have come from never has been where it actually came from. in cyberspace you usually try and hide who you are when you're trying to doing something surreptitious or nefarious. >> what are some of the tactics and strategies used by cyberattackers? there's an analogy, when you said that everybody is an attacker or user all simultaneously. what are some tactics and strategies that they are using? >> for instance, an attacker, whether it be a criminal, extremist or nation state, attempts to use either lily pads or robots, that's where you get the term "bot" from of computer for doing things. so they will be pastors and aliases and all kinds of things that they will use as tactics which may be surround and attack an intended target from different angles. but the curious thing about that is, is that no attacker knows perfectly how the network is set up or how peoples computers are configured. while they may get their intended target they als
CBS
Jan 9, 2011 11:00am EST
ask you this question. the critics are saying, china is spending more money, russia is spending more money and this isn't the rate time to be cutting back on defense spending. what's the counter point to that? >> the counter point was delivered at the pentagon presser by chairman mullens who said, yes, they're increasing spending. there's a list of possible adversaries that are, but our defense spending has doubled in the last decade, post-9/11, so it's not like we've been cutting every year. we've been spending more and more and more, now there are these fiscal problems that the nation has, and we're going to have to deal with those and defense is going to have to be part of the solution. >> due think there's going to be a lot more -- what's the shape of the congressional push- back? is this going to be something more along raw partisan terms, here is the liberal, democratic president, and he's taking risks with us, or is this debate over time going to be something that's going to have a little bit more nuance to the? >> i don't think we know yet. i see various factions on both
CBS
May 30, 2010 11:00am EDT
. russia and china. those are your partners. >> is it fair to characterize it as saying it is soft or that it doesn't preserve the united states' ability to act? is there something to allow the united states to act? >> sure. there is the element of u.s. exceptionalism in the document. it says we have to take into account other factors and realize in the 21st century the national security goes beyond hard power and military force. >> in terms of trying to strike balances, how is the united states, do you think, going to be able to do this expansion of eight powers and expand to 20. does that lead to a dilution of the american affairs in the global voice? >> nothing has changed about the united states being a power house. what is changing is the way we operate to get effective use of the american power globally. >> that essentially is using your voice to harness others are moving in your direction? >> yes. the trans national threats. thee nuclear proliferations, yes. we have to do more than just protect the home lands and the terrorists we are trying to defend. >> also, the homeland sec
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)