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BBC News
Apr 5, 2017 7:00pm BST
adaptation of george 0rwell‘s1984 in an anti—trump protest. i'm katty kay in washington, christian fraser's in london. we've seen more video today from the gas attack in syria, it's miserable viewing. rescue workers hosing down the lifeless bodies of children trying to wash away the chemicals. trump said he is the basher al—assad has changed. he said the attacks gci’oss has changed. he said the attacks across a lot of lines but he didn't say what he was going to do about it and he didn't condemn russia. we will show you what doctors say is evidence that sarin gas was used. his patients have those pupils which do not react to the flashlight and that would be a common symptom of a sarin gas attack. syria admits attacking a rabble target in the town of khan sheikhoun, but they say the bomb hit a rabble factory manufacturing gas. western sources said that is not likely. there is no information of such a factory existing and the casualties were over a wide area indicating the chemicals came from big brother. let me say a few words about recent events. yesterday, a chemical attack, a
BBC News
Apr 17, 2017 7:00pm BST
the west any easier. we will not listen to the words of george, hands or helga. we will listen to the words of allah almighty. a short time ago i spoke to our correspondent in istanbul, mark lowen. a pretty damning report on the vote in the campaign. is there any suggestion now in turkey that that yes result could be overturned? i think it would still be a very uphill struggle to try to overturn the results. but the opposition will feel emboldened and i think by this damning verdict by the observer mission in trying to appeal to the electoral court, the electoral board, they want a rerun of the entire referendum and a nullification of it if indeed the results are proven to be invalidated. it is very difficult in a country where the state machinery is so heavily controlled by the president and his inner circle, and where about 80% of the media is pro—government, so they are hammering home this message that this was a decisive victory. so it is difficult to overturn but what i think will happen and what i think the observer mission's verdict will do is to reinforce this cloud of illeg
BBC News
May 1, 2017 7:00pm BST
, president george w bush, president 0bama or went to the chinese to sake any help is leveraged north korea, helpless deal with this. so could donald trump do what those three could do?|j with this. so could donald trump do what those three could do? i don't think so. the chinese are frustrated with north korea, they don't want to see these threats, they also fear more a united korean peninsula, the dissolution of the north korean state at some point, a democratic government insult aligned with the united states, china does not want to see that outcome so i think president trump is overselling what china can produce it. i don't think they will use leveraged to the extent he wants them to. as the administration normalised american relations with the rest of the world ? at relations with the rest of the world? at their back on track with what the world would recognise? world? at their back on track with what the world would recognise ?|j what the world would recognise?” don't think so. the persistent denigration of nato, the persistent denigration of nato, the persistent denigration of nato
BBC News
Jul 13, 2017 7:00pm BST
throughout it all has been ron christie, who worked in the administration of george w bush. today he is holding down the fort in washington for us. i was so jealous of you being in london. i had to come to london. i was so jealous of you being in london. i had to come to londonm has been an hour going around this building, take me somewhere else he said. we are 175 days in, you are a republican, you worked for george w bush. i was going? republican, you worked for george w bush. iwas going? ithink it is going well now that the president has devoted a lot of his focus to foreign policy. he has a lot of problems here at home. his health ca re problems here at home. his health care bills and moving anywhere. the tax reform package has stalled. 0n foreign policy the president thinks he is finding his way, but he has gone to the 620, it didn't go as badly as many here in the united states thought it would and 175 days andl states thought it would and 175 days and i am surprised he is doing all right. i read your piece today on warsaw. you thought his words speech was his best yet. i think
BBC News
Jun 29, 2017 7:00pm BST
west london two weeks ago. one of the pope's closest advisors, cardinal george pell, has been charged with historical sexual offences against children. at a press conference this morning the cardinal insisted he was innocent and said he looked forward to having his day in court. theresa may has such a wafer thin majority in the house of commons, she can't afford to miss any of the important votes. today she was in berlin at a planning meeting for the g20, a trip she cut short. hours later she was back in the uk to ensure the government's legislative programme passed. within it are eight brexit related bills. tonight, with the support of the dup, the queen's speech was approved by a majority of 1a votes. through the day the conservatives did have to see off a series of challenges from the opposition. not that the labour leader jeremy corbyn has been getting it all his own way. one amendment tabled by his own backbencher, chuka umunna, exposed labour's own divisions, over mr corbyn's wish to leave the single market. labour's hillary bennjoins us from our westminster studio. he was chair
BBC News
Jul 6, 2017 7:00pm BST
work, it sanctions can work previous presidents, president 0bama, george w. bush, they would have imposed these sanctions, it's been under sanctions for 20 years so it's not making a difference. absolutely and i think that's the sticking point. when you talk to anyone at the security council, they all agree this is not changed the willingness to abandon the nuclear ambitions. the us believes if the sanctions are tight enough and that is where china comes in on implementing them, because that's always been the key issue, how those sanctions are implemented, then that could force north korea to get to the negotiating table and abandon weapons. china think it's the exact opposite, they have never understood american logic. they say the more that kim jong—un feels under threat the more they will cling to his nuclear programme. this is what we are seeing in the un security council, china going along with the united states and issuing resolutions but there is no of opinion. thank you. i was resolutions but there is no of opinion. thank you. iwasjust resolutions but there is no of opin
BBC News
Jul 10, 2017 7:00pm BST
, who tweeted: joining us now is former national security advisor to george w bush, stephen hadley. i will assume when you were national security adviser to president george bush who and like this in the white house? we are an unprecedented space in so many respects. this is a president who ran as a political and surgeon president who ran as a political and surgeon to shake up washington and thatis surgeon to shake up washington and that is what he is doing. how damaging is this to national security in america? we are an early daysin security in america? we are an early days in this administration and they have clearly put down some markers about trades, about climate, the bush administration in its opening day is pulled out of the kyoto protocol which had been reached by the clinton administration and we received a lot of criticism for that. i think we are early days and the question is on issues of trade and climate, what is the trump administration going to do in place of that. you were at the g20 meetings in warsaw and on this latest indication there were meetings between donal
BBC News
Apr 4, 2017 7:00pm BST
george w bush, and republican political strategist, ron christie. talk to me about the political strategy of this because neil gorsuch is going to be a supreme courtjudge. we are the democrats deciding to fight this as much as they are when it could be causing them problems in one election campaign? it's simple. the democrats feel that they have to the base. they have to play to play to those that but that hillary clinton will be the next president. they are really disappointed by the fact that the justice that president obama had pointed out to get a hearing. this is payback time. it is about to miss jetting to the base that they are fighting and that they will stop donald trump anywhere possible. this is really all about politics and not about how good of a judge neil gorsuch might be? yes, some people say he's qualified. he might be qualified but they might not like his positions. some of these democrats might disapprove of what you would do with america. this is about ideology. of course it is very conservative. he is an original list, wants to hold to the original wording of
BBC News
Mar 8, 2017 7:00pm GMT
it wrong. some people said as soon as we leave george osborne said we would need an emergency budget within weeks. but there is a longer term prediction about what happens when we beat the single market and customs union and for that we have to wait until believe. i know you have been around europe talking to others about brexit, how will other countries view what is happening, do they look at it with some concern? no, i do not think it is the case that other european states want us to suffer but in terms of whether it looks as if we are benefiting from leaving, i think they will be calm because we had not left yet. they will wait and see when we leave the single market 01’ see when we leave the single market or customs union. at what point do you think we will whether those forecasts put forward of lower growth and high unemployment, when will be get a sense of that?” growth and high unemployment, when will be get a sense of that? i think the real impact if there is one will be felt once we can no longer trade within the single market or customs union. some economists are now pr
BBC News
Mar 27, 2017 7:00pm BST
president george deby bush terry ——with me now is the former advisor to president george w. bush, and republican political strategist, ron christie. donald strategist, ron christie. trump said he would chan the donald trump said he would change the way people do business, but republicans have been fighting with each other. it is a very important reset, that donald trump is now going to have to recognise that he's going to have to recognise that he's going to have to recognise that he's going to have to get some democrats to come with him is he's going to have some legislative victories. isn't the implications of that is that he will lose the freedom caucus? i think those 42 members are essential for getting a lot of things through what nancy pelosi can deliver a lot of head democrats, i would look for a pair, something that could have bipartisan report and allow the president to get the victory. he needs a victory and needs to be up to say to the american people that this is why they elected him and this is what he's doing. ijust they elected him and this is what he's doing. i ju
BBC News
May 22, 2017 7:00pm BST
palestinians. one man who knows the process and players well is george mitchell, who served as president 0bama's middle east envoy. he joined me just a short time ago. the president speaking in israel today talked of array opportunity for harmony, prosperity and peace in the middle east between israelis and palestinians. do you agree there is this opportunity and can he take advantage of it? i hope and pray he will. it is very difficult now stop there is a high level of mistrust, polarisation on both sides. the two state solution, which is the only feasible solution, is the losing ground in both israel and among palestinians. so it is a huge challenge but the effort must be made because the history of the region is that when there is no visible effort to bring about a resolution of conflict, violence tends to flare. the danger of violence now is much greater than in the past because of the tremendous up the past because of the tremendous up evil in the entire region.|j the past because of the tremendous up evil in the entire region. i was talking to senior white house officials
BBC News
Feb 23, 2017 7:00pm GMT
national intelligence under george w bush. he has also served as a us ambassador in a host of countries, including mexico under bill clinton. when you hear donald trump talking about the need for a military operation to get rid of what he called bad dudes and send them back south of the border, how much does that reflect the reality of the immigration situation as it is today? well, anything first of all, mrtrump today? well, anything first of all, mr trump sometimes is trying to speak to multiple and in speak to multiple audiences and in this case, i think speed a bit to his base and reiterating some of the things he said during his campaign. in actualfact, there things he said during his campaign. in actual fact, there are more mexicans leaving the united states than here at the mexicans leaving the united states than - here at the moment, as than arriving here at the moment, as far as the flow of migration is concerned, the largest flow of migrants to our country, undocumented migrants, has been from central america. and mexico has played a role in trying to restrain that f
BBC News
Jul 11, 2017 7:00pm BST
security advisor under president george w bush. ambassadorjeffrey, what ambassador jeffrey, what happens ambassadorjeffrey, what happens to islamic state fighters, both from iraq and syria, who haven't been ca ptu red iraq and syria, who haven't been captured or killed? there will be some. there will be some. a few will try to generate a gorilla campaign against whatever the authorities are in iraq and particularly syria. we saw visinia rack in 2010, 2011. there weren't saw visinia rack in 2010, 2011. there we ren't many saw visinia rack in 2010, 2011. there weren't many but they can strike from time to time. there will be very stringent controls on letting these people back to their homes. there already are in places like tunisia. what would your advice be to the trump administration and the coalition forces in the region, to try to make sure that isis 2.0 doesn't re—emerge? to try to make sure that isis 2.0 doesn't re-emerge? that is a really great question and it is what people are focused on. this is a huge victory we are seeing unfold in mosul and in the days and weeks ahe
BBC News
Mar 7, 2017 7:00pm GMT
territory. a post—mortem into the death of the singer george michael has found that he died of heart disease and a fatty liver. the singer—songwriter, who sold tens of millions of records around the world, was found dead at his home in england on christmas day. and an incredible picture to share with you. this comes from australia where a sydney ferry worker captured the moment a giant wave hit his vessel as it battled through a storm. amateur photographer haig gilchrist posted the picture to instagram, and it's been a social media hit ever since. idid not i did not think it was real. back injanuary munira ahmed became the face of resistance to the trump administration. the image of her wearing a hijab made from the stars and stripes of the american flag was seen in marches across the us and around the world. that's despite the picture being taken more than a decade ago. we've been speaking to munira about how it feels to be a global image of protest. to me, the picture represents empowerment. it represents inclusion, it represents america. the original photo was shot in 2007. the
BBC News
Feb 7, 2017 7:00pm GMT
history, right? this is the slowest confirmation hearing process for any cabinet since george washington. i'm not sure he's going to love that bit of history but that's what the democrats have decided to do. senator kunz said they needed to mobilise the grassroots. i'm just wondering if this is something to coalesce around. is this going to prove a point to the democratic grassroots? i think what the democrats are deciding is that they have no interest in trying to combo mice with republicans —— compromise with republicans, they won't get anything from the white house seems to be the calculation. for eight years republicans basically said no to resident 0bama and the republican party is in great shape. the calculation of the democrats, being the party of obstruction did not hurt the republicans. my question is do they have the stomach for being the party of opposition, they haven't always liked being in that position. it's going to be interesting watching their strategy. ididn't interesting watching their strategy. i didn't think chris coons sounded very confident of their chances of
BBC News
Jun 8, 2017 7:00pm BST
political consultant who was a senior staff member for president george w bush. mr blakeman, paul ryan today said that the reason that the president had put pressure on donald trump to drop the investigation into mike flynn was because "he's new at this". frankly, if that is the best defence that republicans can come up with, it suggests the bar is pretty low, doesn't it? no, it does not. the president did not order the fbi director or anybody else to stop an investigation. what he said to the... he asked him... he said at the... he asked him... he said at the time, it was an expression of frustration, if anything, that it's respect that he had for flynn, a decorated general, he thought he'd been through enough and it would hope —— he'd hope there would not be a criminal liability. that's in the a criminal liability. that's in the a direction to do anything and comey didn't do anything based on that conversation. it was not a direction, you are quite right, but it was an ask or a request and they got into that. i wa nt to request and they got into that. i want to get into the quest
BBC News
Mar 16, 2017 7:00pm GMT
communications with us to discuss is legal professorjonathan turley, from the george washington university. is this religious discrimination, the travel ban? frankly, i don't think. case the travel ban? frankly, i don't think - case law the travel ban? frankly, i don't think. case law supports the think the case law supports the opinion. the ninth circuit made the! on due process. this is based ruling on due process. this is based on different courts. so in some ways this is opening up a new legal front. but the case law doesn't really favour the court that much on something like this. and the court was light on - analysis. it was was light on case analysis. it was long on the rhetoric and discussion of the president's campaign state m e nts of the president's campaign s - of the president's campaign statementsegéeé statements made by statements and statements made by his aides. that is usually not something that courts place so much ézfl/eii " something that courts place so much ,,fcp,: on. i something that courts place so much eipfg; on. you have said in something that courts place so
BBC News
Feb 6, 2017 7:00pm GMT
cold war that has not started the administration by saying, let's do a reset. george bush famously said, i looked into his eyes. so it is another president who has clearly said, let's try to re—establish the relationship with russia and move forward. but to put a moral equivalence between president putin and the united states, a re president putin and the united states, are you comfortable with that? not really, do not think anyone wants to point a finger at the country. factually, there are some situations where donald trump may have a point, but i think emotionally, no country wants to have their fingers pointed emotionally, no country wants to have theirfingers pointed in emotionally, no country wants to have their fingers pointed in their eyes. how can you account for the president's reluctance to criticise vladimir putin? i cannot. but at the same time! vladimir putin? i cannot. but at the same time i think he would have a relu cta nce same time i think he would have a reluctance to criticise the chinese premier. a number of world leaders that he would be... he has been more
BBC News
Jun 27, 2017 7:00pm BST
general mark kimmitt who served as deputy assistant secretary of defense for george w bush. general kimmitt, what is the white house strategy here? why have they issued this warning to the syrians? i think they have made it clear they will not accept another attack like there was on april four. this is a clear declaration from the united states that they are prepared to respond the way they did before. after the attack in april and the 59 tomahawks said, the criticism of the white house is that there was not a follow—up strategy. do you think there has been a more conference of strategy designed beyond just taking action against one air force base? frankly i don't think there has been an overall strategy for syria... from either the united states or its coalition partners such as the united kingdom. that has to be part of any solution. the solution cannot simply be military. it has to be diplomatic and i'm glad to see that the french have started pushing very ha rd to the french have started pushing very hard to try to put this back on the table. general kimmitt, president trump o
BBC News
May 2, 2017 7:00pm BST
pretty daunting for most of us. but britain's former chancellor of the exchequer george osborne tweeted that he was ‘excited' to be starting his new role as editor of the london newspaper the evening standard today. mr osborne announced in march he'd be swapping the world of politics forjournalism — an announcement that drew criticism from opposition politicians who called on him to quit as an mp. mr osborne has since announced he is stepping down from that role. amol rajan reports. george osborne's new working hours mean he will probably wake up at 5am each day, but this morning, he looked eager to get his feet under the table. it is very exciting to be starting in the newjob and it is a really important time in our country where people are going to want the straight facts, the informed analysis, so they can make the really big decisions about this country's future. the evening standard is going to provide that and it's going to entertain along the way. now i've got to get in there. we've got a paper to get off stone. keen to show familiarity with newspaper jargon, osborne will hav
BBC News
Feb 28, 2017 7:00pm GMT
constitution. since george washington delivered the first annual message to congress in 1790, what has come to be known as the state of the union has evolved from a simple statement on the health of the nation, into a political call to arms, a presidential rallying cry. from 1801 for a century after, the political they will simply delivered in brightening from the white house to the capital. it was woodrow wilson who in 1930 unit took to the fore, transforming it into a blueprint for the president's legislative agenda. his successors have used the opportunity to showcase leadership, frame a new direction orjust lift the spirit of the nation during difficult times. may i assert my firm belief the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. that the watershed moments. in 1823, president james monro itself. that the watershed moments. in 1823, presidentjames monro used the address to articulate a new foreign policy doctrine, war and european powers not to meddle in the western hemisphere. during his state of the union in western hemisphere. during his state of the union “119611, lyndon wester
BBC News
Feb 27, 2017 7:00pm GMT
. the 43rd president criticises the 45th. george w bush says we all need answers about the trump team and russia and defends the press. power can be very addictive, and it can be corrosive, and it's important for the media to call to account people who abuse their power. for best picture... la la land! the wrong result at the oscars. mistakes do happen though — we'll look at some presidential errors. also, unreal and overoptimistic. for the nhs and welfare state if britain leaves the eu without a trade deal. that's the opinion of the former prime minister sirjohn major. and the greek economic crisis — it goes from bad to worse, we'll speak to the former greek finance minister yanis va roufakis. i'm katty kay in washington — christian fraser's in london. big increases in defence spending offset by cuts to domestic agencies and the state department — that's what president trump wants from his first budget. he's promised one of the "greatest military build ups in american history", and briefings by the white house suggest the increase could be more than 9%. also today, the d
BBC News
Jan 30, 2017 7:00pm GMT
because of what george bush was doing. a lot of this has been about steve bannon, one of the senior advisers to donald trump will stop he was once in charge of breibart. some people are saying he is now suppla nting breibart. some people are saying he is now supplanting the military top brass. some are saying the military top brass are not excluded although that did seem the position of the executive order which is now signed. george bush specifically said he did not want karl rove, who was a political appointees come in on those intelligence meetings because he wanted it pure intelligence, not litter sized intelligence. we can now speak to retired army general wesley clark. he served that nato and was a former presidential candidate on the democrat side. he is in little rock, arkansas. i want to ask you about this travel ban on immigrants from seven countries. as a security matter, it is a mistake. it does not help your security. first, you cannot win the war at the border, second we might be doing what is called extreme vetting of people in the country anyway. third, it does alien
BBC News
May 18, 2017 7:00pm BST
. joining us from washington is ron christie, a former adviser to george w bush. why not? it is important to recognise what is going on in the united states government, it was engaged in a counterintelligence operation to ascertain whether or not the russians had on properly influence the election, the appointment of a special counsel takes it out of the realm of counterintelligence, when there is not a prosecutor involved. —— unproperly. now we have some blue with prosecuting powers. question a lot of republicans ask in washington, what is the underlying crime, i don't understand and i have not, from looking at the statement from robert mueller, i cannot see what underlying crime he may be looking at which donald trump, the president, or his associates are allegedly having considered violated. one possible case with the attraction of justice, violated. one possible case with the attraction ofjustice, if it was proven that donald trump asked jim crow me to drop the investigation into michael flynn. -- james comey. in the statutory, obstruction of justice, not only are you in
BBC News
Jun 13, 2017 6:55pm BST
ester of the evening standard is these days, george osborne, one of the pro eu mps within the conservative party, the creationists are the hard brexiteers. to be very serious about this, it is the existential issue for the conservative party, for britain at large, and fast from this debate being settled, it has burst out into the open again. thank you very much. it is not without an element of risk, this meeting between emmanuel macron and theresa may, because in the short time that he has been president, he has not avoided some controversy when he has come up against the big readers. you might member that was that of grandstanding with donald trump. he ignored him at the nato summit, and he also had some words of that you put in about press freedom and gay rights of that sort of thing. she will be slightly worried that there might be some sort of comment in this press conference which might embarrass at home. it is a headline writer's dream. ca rtoonists embarrass at home. it is a headline writer's dream. cartoonists have been having fun with this. here is emmanuel macron dri
BBC News
May 30, 2017 7:00pm BST
where george bush, the first, did not know how much a pint of milk costs. this slide in the polls, how serious is it for theresa may? i think it is immensely serious. at the start of this election she made the campaign about herself and leadership. the campaign which has been less than stellar, her ratings have gone down by half and perhaps more. i'm sorry i must interrupt to give way to sean spicer. he is at the white house. jared kushner has volunteered to share with congress what he knows about these meetings. i'm not going to get into what the president did oi’ to get into what the president did or not discuss. your question assumes a lot of facts that are not substantiated by anything but anonymous sources being leaked out. you're asking if he approves of action but that is not a confirmed action. i think secretary kelly and general mcmaster have both discussed in general terms back channels that are an appropriate part of diplomacy. your question presupposes fa ct diplomacy. your question presupposes fact that have not been confirmed. did the president, he tweeted an artic
BBC News
Jan 24, 2017 7:00pm GMT
. mr gates, who served in the george w bush and barack obama administrations, says china, iran or russia, will step into any vacuum that is left by the us. more now on mr trump's senior appointments. a senate committee has approved ben carson as the new housing secretary, allowing the nomination to go to the full senate. but there are delays on the confirmation ofjeff sessions, who donald trump wants as his attorney general. the top democrat on the senate judiciary committee has forced a one week delay. senator diane feinstein said the women's march at the weekend brought his position into focus. the role of the attorney general she said is to defend equal rights. one thing we want to do in this programme is connect the dots between the new political trends on both sides of the atlantic. that, of course, includes brexit. britain made its decision last year, but supporters of leaving the european union may well think their populist revolution is moving a lot slower than america's. who gets to pull the trigger on divorce? today, the supreme court decided the prime minister, theresa
BBC News
Apr 13, 2017 7:00pm BST
correcting himself. why is he not doing better than he is? having been in the white house with george w bush for his first 100 days, you coming and... are the promises and what you want to do, then you realise it is harder to manipulate the government then you realise. it is harder to make change than you thought. some promises you make, pragmatism tells you can't. take for example the president saying he would have a constitutional amendment in the first 100 days, with congressional... he has recognised that working with people in congress to get regulatory reforms through, the package through, it is harder than he realised. his recognition that government can be part of a solution rather than the problem, i think, will have his ratings rise rather than the level we have right i'iow. it isa i'iow. it is a stunning turnaround, shifting positions, carrying his supporters with him, you have to think that only donald trump can do it, perhaps. thank you, to you. voters in turkey are set to cast their ballots in a referendum on a new draft constitution this weekend. a "yes" vote would signif
BBC News
May 10, 2017 7:00pm BST
strategist to president george w bush — ron christie. what is the mood in the white house? pretty frantic. last night when the initial announcement was made in a frantic e—mail that said to all of those going on television today please check with the white house immediately. i thought that is interesting and then today there has been a flurry of information as to why this was legal and proper, it clearly seemed to be much on the defensive, the way it was unveiled. you said it is the white house did not anticipate the blowback on this but in some respects this present throughout his career has embraced controversy. he thinks it is an asset for him. so perhaps he likes all of this. in some secret way i think he loves the attention, loves the fact that we're sitting in washington and folks around the world a re washington and folks around the world are watching us and talking about him. what he needs to recognise, yes, was properfor him to fired the fbi director, certainly. you serve at the pleasure of the president of the united states. your service could end much more quickly than you wa
BBC News
Apr 10, 2017 7:00pm BST
today. the parallel with george w bush might emerge but it hasn't emerged yet. thanks forjoining us. pleasure. syria isn't the only foreign policy problem for president trump. in fact some would say the north korea's rush to develop a nuclear missile programme is a far more dangerous development. at the weekend the us announced it had sent a naval strike group to the korean peninsular, a clear sign of the escalating tensions. it comes on the heels of mr trump's meeting with the chinese president on friday. north korea was front and centre in those talks. joining us now is bruce klingner, former cia deputy division chief for korea who is now at the heritage foundation. how much do you read into this strike group heading to the region? continuing the theme from the previous guests, there is uncertainty we don't know. it could be as benign as the expected missile tests during upcoming important anniversaries for north korea, and the united states would like to make sure it has sufficient deterrence abilities, especially when the missile defences down for repairs, so it's only prudent t
BBC News
Apr 27, 2017 7:00pm BST
republican figures in the foreign policy will have experience working save for george w. bush and virtually all of them are being denied the opportunity to work here because they oppose the candidate donald trump. i am hoping that at some point, this president and those around him get over that. we are at day 98, i think it is, is president trump putting america first? i'm not quite sure what it means to the extent it means we will calculate the very narrow way, what is good for us, than! the very narrow way, what is good for us, than i fear to some extent he is. one of the messages of the foreign policy is notjust that it is unpredictable to our adversary 's, is unpredictable to our adversary 's, which can be a times useful, but to be unpredictable to your friends, most recently it has been canada and mexico, it was australia, it's been in germany, south korea and japan. that is very dangerous because friendly relationships depend upon predictability. reliability. these countries are placing their security in our hands. if they sense our hands are not predictable and save, they w
BBC News
Jul 4, 2017 7:00pm BST
. take a look. there he is in his beach chair on the george washington bridge. and so on and so forth. this is a man whose approval rating has plummeted. he was a presidential candidate and he opened the republican convention backin opened the republican convention back in 2012. it is amazing, isn't it, how quickly the arc of chris christie ‘s political career as cratered, frankly. he is a person who, not unlike donald trump, was very forceful and aggressive and very forceful and aggressive and very abrasive and he tried to present himself as something of a moderate to the american people and it never really caught on. after you look at the presidential election and the loss and the way that president trump humiliated the governor and brought him into run his transition team but then immediately fired him shortly thereafter, it makes you wonder if he has a future in politics in the united states. at thisjuncture i just do not see it. his approval rating of 15%. he was asked about in the press conference just after that but he said he did not care about his poll ratings. john m
BBC News
Apr 3, 2017 7:00pm BST
since george washington started with his own supporters back in the 1700s. so i think the idea that the american supreme court, which is clearly divided and has been for a long time, five to four republican democrat, is not political, is slightly fanciful. you are probably too young to remember this, but back in 2000, the supreme court decided in the election race on al gore against bush. it was a totally political decision. it could mean you get summary more extreme nominated next amara nth you get summary more extreme nominated next amaranth and stop lots of supreme courtjustices have only been confirmed with 5253 votes. not a lot of bipartisanship on that court. but you are right, america is becoming more stream, i suspect. court. but you are right, america is becoming more stream, i suspectm was the chads. i remember that. —— more stream. you would think that all of these issues like north korea, and what else have we got on our plate, she's in pain visiting, al sisi is here and the supreme court justice, that might al sisi is here and the supreme courtjustice, that might be wha
BBC News
Apr 18, 2017 7:00pm BST
, pateland michael fallon. you have just confirms you are going to run again. what about george osborne, i think you will. even though he has taken up you will. even though he has taken up thejob you will. even though he has taken up the job at the evening standard? absolutely. i think george is a great asset to public light. i hope he stays in parliament and i think you will. he will be able to campaign as well as run a newspaper you can keep up to date with the latest news and weather throughout the day via our twitter feed i think you will be able to be an mp and run a newspaper as. as for what happens during the campaign, i don't know but i should say that in the last election he was both chancellor of the exchequer and a campaigner both in his constituency and campaigns elsewhere. he is talented and i think george is more than capable of running a highly effective campaign represented middle of tartan and also making sure that he contributed not always as well. thank you for coming to talk to us. —— for the people of his constituency. we have heard a lot of english mps
BBC News
Feb 8, 2017 7:00pm GMT
and former advisor to george w bush, ron christie. i think this might have backfired for elizabeth warren. she said the 46% of people in massachusetts want someone 46% of people in massachusetts want someone is to represent them in the senate other than her so i think she did this as a ploy to get attention, to get money and try to get her campaign in the senate back contract but ultimately, trying to impugn that a senator is a racist was a bad move for her. let's take the case of jeff sessions. he has this contentious history, he was not 30 yea rs contentious history, he was not 30 years ago deemed fit to be appointed asa years ago deemed fit to be appointed as a federaljudge because of that history and allegations of racism. yes, but these were only allegations. there was never concrete proof that he was defeated by the committee never made it to the vote. jeff sessions supporters will say this is all about politics, what is the worst things you can say toa what is the worst things you can say to a southern white politician? they are racist. at that time, it is why he was defeate
BBC News
Feb 15, 2017 7:00pm GMT
, actually, since george dubya bush. it was the notion of a palestinian state. —— george w bush. as one of the authors of the clinton parameters, we were offering up not as american policy but as a bridging proposal to overcome differences between two sides. it was clear that benjamin netanyahu feels he has a new—found friend in president trump. he also praised his son—in—law. on the critical issue of iran, do you think the israelis might be disappointed? the trump administration has made clear since the election that they are not going to rip up the nuclear deal with iran? i don't believe that there will be disappointment on that. prime minister netanyahu has never liked the agreement, the comprehensive plan of action. he also realises it bides time. what he is concerned about is, at the end of 15 years, under the terms of the jcpoa, iran is allowed a large nuclear infrastructure with no limitations on size or quality. he worries that is another way of legitimising what will be iran having a nuclear weapon down the road. i think what he is probably saying to the president in
BBC News
Jun 7, 2017 7:00pm BST
. so what can we tell you about christopher wray? well the yale lawyer was president george w bush's assistant attorney general from 2003 to 2005 — while there he worked under james comey at the justice department. he ran the criminal division of the justice department, dealing with fraud scandals that plagued the corporate world. after his service he worked for a big private law firm, specialising in white collar investigations. wray was also a lawyer for chris christie, the newjersey governor — and trump ally — during the "bridgegate" scandal. we will get to know him better. one thing that will bring up a lot on the programme is the popularity of president trump. and it means that he can govern. but are his approval ratings on the wane? if we take an average from the polling, his popularity rating at the moment is 39%. not great numbers but here's some context that might surprise you — on day 138 of his presidency — his figures are in fact better than the approval ratings bill clinton had at this same stage. 138 days into clinton's adminstration just 37.8 percent of ameri
BBC News
Mar 2, 2017 7:00pm GMT
white house adviser to george w bush. president trump, we are getting report from reuter‘s agency, has said he does not think thatjeff sessions should recuse himself from russian investigations. do you think the attorney general has compromised himself, either because of the meetings, or because of what he told the senate he can be trusted toover see an investigation into links with russia, between russia and the trump administration? these are two distinct questions. a political and legal question. from a legal question, has the attorney general done anything that would trigger the independent counsel statute? the independent counsel statute? the independent council came in to look at white water, it there evidence that would indicate that he has broken the law or that there is evidence that will be forth coming that will show elicit conduct? at this point, no. from a little standpoint, however, the trump administration is in hot water. there are calls, we heard them today, we heard it from the senate minority leader thatjeff sessions should resign he has compromised himself on t
BBC News
Jun 15, 2017 7:00pm BST
me is ron christie, a former adviser to george double u—boats. he worked as a congressional staffer, you live near this neighbourhood. we live in a country where we don't expect members of congress to have to worry about their lives. perhaps we have to start doing so? i am stunned and shocked. this is less than a mile from my house. i went to practice for this very baseball game. it brings it home how vulnerable you are, how vulnerable you can be in an open setting. we heard a tribute from those that were hurt in the attack last night. he spoke from the white house. we may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation's capital is here because, above all, they love our country. the president talking about the kind of unity that americans have all been talking about since that attack. but here he was a few hours later, coming out on twitter and talking about the investigation into his administration. i want to pick up with you, it is striking that the president got the tone right, he talked about unity, he talked about d
BBC News
Feb 22, 2017 7:00pm GMT
blakeman — a republican strategist and former senior white house advisor to george w bush. what did you make of our previous guest, the idea that if the americans start to send back millions of immigrants, some of whom are not even mexican, into mexico, the mexicans could retaliate and imagine what might continue in particular is the idea of retardation with drug cartels and intelligence surrounding them. retardation with drug cartels and intelligence surrounding themm retardation with drug cartels and intelligence surrounding them. it is amazing the brazen way a former mexican official basically threatens the us that they do not even want to ta ke the us that they do not even want to take back their own citizens or as he told you, those who have come through his country to enter the united states. what kind of neighbour is that bill allows not only their own people to flee so they're not a burden on their country but facilitates others, in committing crimes here in the united states. that is not a good neighbour. you may not like it but it could end up as he suggested being a probl
BBC News
Mar 9, 2017 7:00pm GMT
and former adviser to president george w bush. you have to feel for paul ryan, he is selling something with all his heart and doing a greatjob at that powerpoint presentation. but so many conservatives don't like it. they are saying, this is 0bamacare like. why are you still having a tax but on people for their health care quiz night why are you still allowing medicaid to be expanded, why republicans doing this? we are at the greatest juncture republicans doing this? we are at the greatestjuncture since 1929 of being in power, and we are essentially not feeling and not replacing the presidentsignatu re accomplishment. in the end, don't you think the white house will get this through? they are doing a massive charm offensive. we have still got the picture of ted cruz, the arch enemy during the campaign, lyin' ted goes to the white house, guns are down, no more duels. family dinner instead. 0ne guns are down, no more duels. family dinner instead. one of his daughters even brought her classroom giraffe along with her. that is the kind of charm offensive that donald trump is putt
BBC News
Feb 1, 2017 7:00pm GMT
with democrats against right now over the appointment of george gorsuch. that would be an absolute shame if a man of this quality was caught up in the web. congress gets a warning — the international order is under unprecedented threat. we speak to a former us defense secretary about how to face it. it didn't seem real to me, it didn't seem real. and the moment a us veteran gave away his purple heart award to an iraqi stranger at an airport. we'll find out why. today we are keeping an eye on the supreme court in washington and parliament in london. here, mr trump's made his pick for for a new supreme courtjustice. for a new supreme courtjustice. here he is. neil gorsuch. you'll get to know him because he could be on the bench for life. and he's only 49. we'll look at how he could change american life in a moment. here in britain, katty, we are turning our attention to the house of commons, the lower house in parliament. it's a historic vote because it's the first one a brexit bill. we expect this moment, this amendment to be defeated, it was put forward by the snp. the formal pow
BBC News
Jun 20, 2017 7:00pm BST
— the former advisor to president george w bush. thank you for coming in. at this stage is it more important for democrats to win this to show that they are galvanised against donald trump or is it more important for republicans to win it to show they can hold on seats. i think it is more import of the democrats, they have spent a lot of money. i am so glad you agree with me. they spent a lot of money here and i find it fascinating thatjon lot of money here and i find it fascinating that jon ossof lot of money here and i find it fascinating thatjon ossof only has 700 donors in georgia. it has come from california, massachusetts and new york. the democrats are angry and looking for a way to find some way to send a message to donald trump andi way to send a message to donald trump and i think that is what this race is all about, 26 million dollars. they have had to near losses recently, in cancers and montana and they really need to win georgia. i am intrigued about how flippant you are about the cost. all the parties that the uk party spent was around £40 million. was never a debat
BBC News
Sep 13, 2017 7:00pm BST
not unusual. even says it is so unusual, george bush did it. eight years of gridlock with president obama he didn't have members of democratic party to the white house. he is like bring everyone in. he has started doing what at the oval office and he is bringing it to a new level. reagan did it in the 80s. everybody is surprised, but knowing donald trump, this long, i don't think it is surprising. i think he wants to say to the republicans, hey, if you don't work with me, i can work with the democrats. i think the american people want that type of president. he is obviously desperate for a win, he wants a legislative win, how consumed or derailed has he been thus far do you think by these russia investigations and by o' ba machair. barack obama care hurt. donald trump deferred to congress and didn't realise they didn't even get the buy in of their own members. the thing was a disaster. i think trump's learned now that you cannot ta ke trump's learned now that you cannot take the lead from congress. he has to start the game here, carry the football, he has to show leadership, i think
FOX News
Jan 23, 2017 11:00pm PST
under george w. bush and barack obama. i did not see either time, under administration when i was there, intelligence being politicized politicized. we have seen what happens, we see how bad it is for the country. it will be interesting to see what mike pompeo is my like uso cia director. will it be the mike pompeo that was on the intel community com? or what we see the mike pompeo who was on the benghazi committee? who was very outspoken about the iran deal, for example, which the intelligence community had quite a bit of information on. will he stick out for the cia officers when it isn't political convenient? it remains to be seen. >> martha: we will leave it there. pete hoekstra, great to see you. marie harf, welcome. great to have you heard of. also, president trump has a front runner and mind to replace antonin scalia on the supreme court. judge ♪ >> martha: president trump has an ambitions plan for the first 100 days. one of the biggest and most impactful announcements will be his choice to fill the supreme court vacancy. now, "cbs news" reporting that denver federal appe
BBC News
Oct 19, 2017 7:00pm BST
went to the top of maltese politics. many more questions to be answered. and today, george w bush was stinging in how serious his thinks the russian involvement was in the meddling of the campaign. the russian government has made a project of turning americans against each other. it is broad and it is conducted across a range of social media platforms. ultimately it will not succeed. the foreign aggression, cyber attacks, disinformation, arched financial influence, should never be downplayed or tolerated. george w bush. so how did the russians do it? so—called troll farms used social media and fake websites to exacerbate americans and its divisions. 0ne troll farm was the internet research agency based in superb. it said that the activities, many of them, including infaking up a said that the activities, many of them, including in faking up a fake twitter account, claim took the voice of tennessee republicans. and hundreds of facebook sites, including one called secure borders that paid for anti—immigrant adverts like these that appeared. it is thought to be behind controversi
BBC News
Oct 24, 2017 7:00pm BST
christie who served as an advisor to president george w bush. i don't know where to start, it is another tuesday in the trump administration. you say you have a talk to people in the white house, what do you make of this dispute? this is the last thing they want to be doing now. coupled with the fact the president has been arguing with a gold star mother, a mother who has lost a soldier son. he needs to pass this tax bill. so listening to the folks in the white house this morning and i came from capitol hill moments ago, there is a sense of anxiety and tension on both sides that they need to find a way to get a ceasefire otherwise it will spiral out of control. there were a whole list of things bob corker accused donald trump of, there was that one about debasing america and he was asked, would you trust donald trump with the nuclear codes? he refused to a nswer with the nuclear codes? he refused to answer the question. we use words unprecedented but the one who should be an adviser to the president on foreign policy matters, the one who should be consulting with the president and the mi
BBC News
Sep 19, 2017 7:00pm BST
, eisenhower, or george hw bush giving this speech, they would have been steely, determined, talked about the alliance, talked about the entire world being at risk. they would not have talked in such narrow, parochial terms and such bombastic terms. the language that he used does not really work in international politics and will not be received well internationally, particularly in south korea, by the way, and i worry that president trump may give, unwittingly, propaganda advantage to kim jong—un. we have heard from foreign diplomats that there were gasps in the room when the president was speaking. if you were looking for a foreign policy doctrine for the trump administration, it seems to be that america is being taken advantage of by multinational treaties and administrations and that. under president trump, is that a foreign policy doctrine that will work?m will fail, that is what america first is, it is quite insular, a rejection of international trade, the way it has been practised so successfully, it is a rejection of oui’ successfully, it is a rejection of our alliances and pa
BBC News
Nov 29, 2017 7:00pm GMT
is our political analyst ron christie who served as an advisor to president george w bush. you were listening with me to nadhim zahawi you were listening with me to nadhim za hawi speaking, you were listening with me to nadhim zahawi speaking, do you think any of that goes through donald trump's mind when he decides to press retweet a nd mind when he decides to press retweet and videos like this? no. what really worries me is where is the president getting this information? is he looking at youtube and far right—wing groups in the uk and saying, i really like this? or is it someone like steve bannon feeding it to him? this is very destructive. it is destructive to the way america is perceived around the world and frankly destructive to the way the president conducts himself in office. i'm stunned and angered by these retweets. this is so far beneath the dignity of the office that he holds. the thing that worries me is he and his supporters love this. everybody knows the president now acts to play to his base, he's done it again. explain to us the processes that we re explain to us
FOX News
Apr 10, 2017 11:00pm PDT
george washington, but we know that assad is using chemical weapons against its own people, he's done it on almost more than a dozen occasions over the last year and a half, and the system is one that can't stand i'm have to make the russians say that bashar al-assad is a problem to them as well. >> sandra: what did the next steps look like? you just heard sean spicer speaking at the white house earlier today. they're leaving the door open for more military action. do we see continued action? what do the next few days look like? >> i would say the trump administration position and strategy is evolving, and i think that is a good thing. what we have to see is i think we can build an international coalition against the russians and against the iranians. the fact that the russians and iranians and hezbollah are willing to do a joint statement together makes them complicit with the syrian president using chemical weapons. that is a violation of a number of treaties, and we can even possibly see the u.n. act and enforce the russians to veto the security council measure that is about them. tha
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