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CSPAN
Oct 10, 2015 10:00am EDT
portrait of george washington is the image on the $1 bill. dianne: hello, i am dianne stephens from the national gallery of art. john trumbull is an artist who is well known for his history paintings in america, not as much portraiture. he aspired to be a history painter and then, he eventually went to england and spent a couple of years with benjamin west. benjamin west was an amazing figure who welcomed almost every painter that we are going to talk about today. they learned the art of history painting, came back to the colonies -- this is his portrait of alexander hamilton who was aide.gton' it is interesting that here alexander hamilton is hanging next to gilbert stuart's portrait of john jay. madison, john jay, and alexander hamilton wrote the federalist papers. also, in 1794, john jay invited alexander hamilton to be a part of the treaty commission in london. so there is quite a connection between these two men. who knew they would hang next to each other in the national gallery? looking at john jay reeves -- leads us to gilbert stuart, who is the preeminent american painter of th
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2016 9:45am EDT
george putnam, who was a publicist working for a woman named amy guest. she was a very wealthy american socialite who had the strong desire to be the first woman to fly across the atlantic, inspired by charles lind berg's flight a year earlier, she went out and bought an airplane and set upon this goal of being the first woman to cross the atlantic. it's important to recognize that flying was a very difficult and ar duous activity during this time period. it was also really risky one. guest's family ultimately convinced her this was probably not the right thing for her to do. she was a passenger and sat in the back seat and while she did some navigation, the two other gentlemen you see here, they were the pilots hired by mrs. guest. amelia acknowledged this fact. he had sa she said at one point i was a sack of potatoes in the back seat. by the time they land, and as you see in these photographs here and here it is amelia that is the center of attention for being the first woman to cross the atlantic. and here she is, again, the center of attention with her two co-pilots. she ne
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 10:00am EDT
reconstructed 1719 building where general george washington bid farewell to his officers following the revolutionary war. >> fraunces tavern is at 54 pearl street, which is the corner of pearl and broad street in lower manhattan. it was built in 1719 with the delancey family. it was never lived in, it was built at a home, but it was a very mercantile area, lots of sailors coming in and out, lots of ships. so the delanceys never wanted to raise their family here, so it was rented out by different tenants. one of the tenants was mr. holt and he rented a dance hall. in 1762, samuel fraunces purchased 54 pearl street and he opened up the queen's head tavern. and being down here in lower manhattan, you were at the center of commerce. so it was location, location, location. it was a very popular tavern. soon, the politics of the times started really kicking up and samuel fraunces was a patriot, so having a tavern named after your king and queen was not a good idea, so people referred to it as sam fraunces tavern, which is what it's known as today. the tavern was very popular. he had two kitc
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 3:50am EDT
suddenly aren't coming here to north america which makes george washington's life easier. we'll get money from france. we'll get supplies from france. we'll get french troops, plus that french navy. if you think of our victory at york town, probably the biggest of the war, we're probably not going to get that victory without the french navy. eventually the war slowly, and it is slowly, turns in our favor. 1783, back in paris, john adams and benjamin franklin sign a peace treaty. it's really back in 1783 that the continental congress can finally breathe that sigh of relief and know that we have achieved this american independence which would be nice if that's the end of our story, but there's more to do. go back 1776. each state writes its own constitution. each one is different. each one has its own sets of government and laws. i'll use pennsylvania. pennsylvania decides to write a constitution that's so radical for its day they get rid of the position of governor. they'll not have really a chief executive for pennsylvania anymore. they'll have a fairly democratically run one-house
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2015 2:37am EDT
maker in boston. hanging on the wall is george washington. i guess by now you're beginning to get the sense, i think, that the 18th century in america at the time of the revolution and after the revolution was a very small place. many of the same people congresswoman come up again and again. we've seen a few of those relationships upstairs. john jay and alexander hamilton and george washington. the most important thing, i think, is of this small place with all these people that are all interconnected george washington is the center. everybody knows george washington. everybody admires george washington. everybody wants a portrait. everybody wants to paint george washington if you're a painter. if it's a painting or an engraving from a painting or maybe it's a vase that you bought from france with george washington's image on it or a society of the cincinnati plate considering george washington to be the modern-day -- or maybe it's a clock with george washington on it imported from france. everyone wants something with george washington on it. this portrait we're looking at right here
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2015 11:05pm EDT
this is george s washington who by this time is the central focus of life in america. he's seated with his family at mount vernon. it's george dressed in his revolutionary war uniform and martha washington, her lovely self as always, dressed in a gee beautiful gray satin with a laci shawl. george has his hand on the table at the center of the composition and his other arm is resting onn his young ward and stepchild, john washington park custis. george and martha called wash. martha is shown with nelly custis. these are martha's grandchildren. the children of her son jackie custis who died early of what might be called cabin fever or typhoid. these children came to live with martha and george. they lived when he was presidenn in philadelphia and new york and then they came to mount vernon. so they were very, very close, part of the family. george washington had high hopes for young wash. they didn't quite work out that way.idn't he wasn't ready to take on the t kind of activities that george washington had hoped with government and all, but he has his arm resting on him. you can see you
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2016 10:00pm EST
do not like the british very much. but for george washington, the first president, the notion of neutrality was preferable. we didn't really have any money. we did not have a navy at all and our army was not much to speak of, so we were not in a position to go fight a war. so he serves with the neutrality proclamation which divides us into this question of, ought we be doing more to help france? and then george washington will send john jay, our first chief justice of the supreme court, send him to britain to negotiate a new treaty, again with the idea of keeping us out of the war and settling questions of the border and these rights. he seemed like a good candidate for washington to send. of the treaty he brought back becomes very controversial and really one of the tipping points in creating these two parties leading to what we know today. the treaty basically becomes publicly attacked in the press, in what would become the democratic, republican party, men like thomas jefferson, james madison would start vilifying this treaty. what is interesting is nobody has actually read it
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2016 12:40pm EDT
american army, and then, to me, most importantly picking george washington to be the commander of that army. i think that is really one of the most important decisions made in this room. because if you think about the way this war will go for the young united states, it's 8 1/2 years. george washington will be the only commanding general we will have for all of those years, and at the end he will succeed. now of course, back in 1775, they're still figuring out exactly what they're fighting for. so that leads to one last letter to the king. we call this one the olive branch petition. and it again, like they had done before, starts off with the idea that "we are loyal british subjects fighting for our rights," again going, following the chain of command in britain to the king to ask that he assist us in redressing these grievances. the other thing they're going to write is a declaration called the declaration of the causes and necessity of taking up arms. now both of these things are going to be written in july. and again, it is just essentially putting out there to the world exactl
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 2:16pm EDT
george washington park custas. at one point he was actually living at the estate with his grandparents and lived at the estate once martha died in 1802. in 1802, we believe that he actually had relations with a slave, ari carter, another dower slave at mt. vernon and together they have a daughter mariah carter who ultimately married charles syphax here at the arlington estate in 1821. it's interesting that they both grew up here. charles, i think, as a young man had an affinity to watch mariah grow up who worked at the house when she became of age. interestingly enough, george washington park custis allowed the couple to marry here in the parlor which is unheard of. not too many times did that happen. they were married in 1821. shortly after that, they began to have children. the first child was born in 1823. a second one in 1825. and shortly after the second child was born, that was william syphax was born, george washington park custis decided to sell maria. the folk lower in our family is that he simply freed maria but in the last seven months we've actually found docum
CSPAN
May 3, 2015 9:32pm EDT
at george washington university and i feel every day so lucky to be able to be engaged in this great project of constitutional education. so signer's hall is the heart and soul of the national constitution center. this is this beautiful room, so simple, and so powerful that contains life-sized statues of the men who signed the constitution. there are 42 statues in this room. 39 people actually signed the constitution. and they are all here, and they are life-size. it was an extremely process of creation to make these statues. it is based on the 1940's painting about the constitutional convention. about 10 years ago when the constitution center opened, a studio in new york commissioned 50 actors to stand in the positions that you see here in costume to give you a sense of what it was like to be in independence hall of the time the constitution was drafted. this room has the same proportions as independence hall. so it is more or less the size of the room that the framers stood in. and there is something so viscerally powerful about just being able to see how big the framers were
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2016 6:00pm EDT
exhibition about the revolution could be had without some discussion of washington. george washington was a universally liked individual. very unique in american history. hissure that he had detractors. his exploits.ut these objects relate to him specifically. of the very interesting items that we have is a light mask of washington. by don, theed original being at mount vernon. thethis mask was created in 1830's who was advertising at he time in philadelphia that had the mold and was making plaster busts and this is one of those made from washington's life mask. made for the artist emmanuel lutes, who made it the same as washington crossing the delaware. it has a really interesting art connection to the revolution, as well as, you are at what washington actually looked like. because the life mask was taken from his face. finish this section with the inauguration of washington. in 1789.cted president one of the interesting items that i find is these inaugural buttons. he's souvenirs. we have several inaugural buttons in our collection. arranged on the items that they may have been worn
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2014 10:06am EST
footage of president george bush, and bob dole. with speeches from presidents john kennedy, and ronald reagan. at noon, fashion experts on first ladies' fashion choices, and how they represented the styles of the times in which they lived. and then at 10:00, former nbc news anchor tom brokaw on his more than 50 years of reporting on world events. that's this christmas day on the c-span networks. for a complete schedule go to c-span.org. >> about 50 years ago on august 10th, 1964, president lyndon johnson signed the gulf of tonkin resolution, which in lieu of a declaration of war, gave him broad powers to wage war in southeast asia. that resolution was passed by congress in response to an august 2nd attack, and an alleged august 4th incident in the golf of tonkin involving u.s. destroyers and vietnamese torpedo boats. american history visited the national security archive at george washington university to learn about numerous declassified documents that have shed more life on the gulf of tonkin incidents. >> i'm tom blanton, the director of the national security archive. we are on the
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2015 10:01pm EDT
conference. american military strategists including army chief of staff george marshall and brigadier general dwight eisenhower argued vigorously for an immediate invasion of france. mr. huxen: when the united states entered world war ii after the attack of pearl harbor, we were faced with a strategic choice of who to fight first, japan or nazi germany. roosevelt believed that hitler and nazi germany were our chief enemy. the problem was we were not ready to fight the nazis on the continent of europe. we did look into plans to perhaps invade across the english channel into normandy in 1942 or 1943 but realized it would not have the material resources or the army built that would be necessary for victory. in the meantime, the soviet union was taking a terrible pounding on the eastern front. and so franklin roosevelt and , winston churchill realized they had to do something to meet pleading for a second front, but it would not be in france. we decided we would land in north africa. so we tell the story in this north african farmhouse we are standing in of that decision and its consequences. is
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2015 6:00pm EDT
is george washington who by this time is the central focus of life in america. he is seated with his family at mount vernon, george dressed in his revolutionary war uniform and martha washington dressed in beautiful gray satin with a lace shawl. table has his hand on the in the center of the composition and his other arm is resting on his young ward and step who george and martha called wash. these are marked as grandchildren, the children of her son jackie custis who died very early at age 26 of what might've been cabin fever, maybe typhoid. these children came to live with martha and george when he was and innt in philadelphia new york and then they came to mount vernon. they were very close, part of the family. george washington had high hopes for young wash but they did not quite work out. he was not ready to take on the kind of activities that george washington had hoped with government and all, but he has his arm resting on him and you can see on wash his hand on the globe which is vivian and asian of those hopes or him. martha and nelly are holding a map and martha is pointing
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2016 2:19pm EST
, american history tv visits chatham manor. the only known house in the u.s. visited by both george washington and abraham lincoln, built in 1771 by virginia continental congress delegate it was a union headquarters during the civil war and a field hospital during the battle of fredricksbu fredricksburg. chatham was given to the national park service in 1975 and part of the national military park. >> did you all want a guided tour of the house? at least the downstairs anyhow. i would like to welcome you to chatham. i'm the staff historian here. you have never been here before? >> no. >> no. >> i've been to a chatham, new jersey. >> these a town though. but they are named after the same person. both named after william pitt who was the earl of chatham who was a popular figure about the time of the american revolution. he was a member of the parliament and supported america's right to representation and very popular man here in the colonies and william fitshu liked him because he would name his house after him. that's him right there. he's the man who built chatham. the house was cons
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 6:40am EDT
really working between the states. maybe we need the strength of that army. george washington, of course, is very much a believer in this idea of civilian control. that's one of the great principles we've embraced in american history from our beginning points and george washington is a big part of that. one of what a lot of people would look at as one of his greatest moments, at end of the war up in newburg, new york, he's going to call a meeting together of all his officers as this word of, you know, maybe the army trying to change government a little bit. and he's against it. he calls a meeting, puts some of the guys he feels are behind a lot of this talk in charge of the meeting. he's not going to be there. he wants them to talk amongst themselves. then he shows up. washington is not a public speaker. this is not a man who wants to stand up and make speeches. if he can avoid it he's going to do it. but he comes and he starts making a speech. and he wants to read this letter. he pulls out a pair of glasses and puts them on and said i've not only grown gray but half blind as well
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 6:00pm EDT
much turned into a british lake. the royal navy squadron, under the command of her admiral george cockburn had established domain over the water. george coburn was a very effective officer, who served under nelson in the wars with france. he had been sent over here to pep things up. he was a very capable officer, ruthless without being vicious. he pretty quickly determines that the americans are not capable of providing much in the way of a real defense. from the start, he sees washington as being vulnerable. very quickly, as he spreads his terror up and down the bay, he becomes not only the most feared man in america, but also the most hated. he is compared to attila the hun, and satan among others. he takes anyone who shows resistance, can be expected to taken in chains to halifax. the chesapeake provided access to the richest and most important land in america at this time. certainly, in addition to being the home of the capital of washington dc, some of the most important cities like baltimore in norfolk were on the water, and within easy access of the british. by establishing
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2016 8:00pm EDT
our war. we still don't line the british very much. for george washington, the first president, the notion of neutrality is preferable. we don't really have any money. we didn't really have a navy at all. and our army was not much to speak of. so we certainly weren't in a position to go and fight a war. certainly not in europe and probably not even fighting our neighbors in british canada in those days. so he is going to present with his cabinet approval a neutrality proclamation which starts dividing us into this question of ought we be doing more to help france. in the same notion of keeping us out of war, george washington will send john jay, who was at that time our first chief justice of the supreme court, send him to britain to negotiate a new treaty with the british. with the idea of keeping us out of this european war and settling some of those questions of border and ocean rights and such that we were arguing with the british. john jay had been on the team that negotiated the peace treaty that ended the revolutionary war. he seemed like a good candidate for washington to se
CSPAN
Jun 21, 2015 6:00pm EDT
most importantly picking george washington to be the commander of that army. that is one of the most important decisions made in this room. if you think of the way this war will go for the young united states, it is eight and a half years. george washington will be the only commanding general we will have for all of those years. and at the end, he will succeed. of course back in 1775, they are still figuring out what they are fighting for. so that leads to one last letter to the king. we call this one the all of france petition. -- the olive branch petition. it starts off with the idea that we are loyal british subjects fighting for our rights. again, following the chain of command in britain to the king to ask he assist us in redressing these grievances. the other thing they are going to write is the declaration called the declaration of the causes and necessity of taking up arms. most of the things are going to be written into life. again it is putting out to the world exactly what we are looking to do, to basically correct the situation we feel has gone against us, our rights are
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 6:00pm EDT
of the portrait of george herbert walker bush, who was director of central intelligence at a particularly difficult time in history, follow the pike and church committee hearings back in 1975. underency was investigation by congress and morale was pretty low here at time. he is the first member of congress to serve as director, over by the president to help repair those relationships between c.i.a. and congress. the oversight committees come out of this investigation as well. the senate select committee on intelligence and the house permanent select committee on intelligence. he was with us just 10 days shy year. heed like to have stayed on. a couple things to note on his watch. he established a practice that we still use today which is analysis,petitive where the agency would generate analysis on a given subject and up another team to attack that theory. we think osama bin laden is at abadabad.und not, what explains it. another thing that took urgency was c.i.a.h briefings to the presidential candidates. it was truman who started it. didn't want his successor, president eise
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2015 6:00pm EST
basically was a convoy of supply trucks. got a moving army, george patton think about him racing across france. you need to be able to keep up with them food and gasoline. john mack lost his dog tags on the beaches of normandy when he came ashore as part of the red ball express. over 70 years later, just a couple of years ago, his dog tags were rediscovered by a farmer in france who then sent them to the secretary of state's office here in louisiana. he presented us with the dog tag. so in a sense john mack and his dog tags came home 70 years later here in the case as well. you can see the red ball express is badge is what they wore on their uniforms. we are now moving into a bunker. a bunker that supposed to be a german bunker. basically, after the failure of market garden, september of 1944 where we famously came up one bridge too far too short from being able to invade in northern germany, people still hope that the war might be over if not by christmas. maybe a little later. some of these people included omar bradley and dwight eisenhower. unfortunately, this was a terrible misjudgm
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 6:00pm EST
choose wraps to keep all of their body warm. george is eating an apple as he waits for them. that is a wise no thank you, joan. never share another's food. george has forgotten something. it is lucky for george joan has an extra tissue to lend him. some children learn to go around puddles, but george waits right es rightuble -- wad into trouble because he forgot his galoshes. rick: we could do a whole program trying to understand that. during the world war ii, the american family fragmented. men worked late or they were sent overseas. women worked outside the home, often at night. kids were largely unsupervised. they got a little wild. rates of juvenile delinquency went up. teenagers were sexually active. a groundswell of anxiety -- well, there always is. they talked about the end of literacy. we have our moral panics now. the moral panic then, margaret mead was afraid marriage was obsolete and would kids would no longer feel the need to have permanent partners. kind of like what we have now with the same-sex marriage debate, the fact that we would lose monogamy. as part of this clus
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 11:30pm EDT
plattsburgh gone, they can sweep down the lake, they can go on to lake george, and they can go on to the hudson and split the united states in half. in the meantime, the treaty of gent talks are on. and this is a bargaining chip. if you can take plattsburgh, and you can redraw the northern border of the united states, wherever the british troop lines are at the time, well, these negotiations are going on, that's going to be the new northern border. what they had in mind, they didn't plan to take the united states again. this is not a revolution. what they planned was they wanted a new northern border for the united states. not the 45th parallel, but the 43rd. they wanted the northern border of massachusetts to be the border of the northern united states. if you take that line, and you run it across the country, take that parallel, you end up in buffalo. that means that the united states would have lost maine, vermont, new hampshire, and all of northern new york. that way the british would have had control of the southern shore of the great lakes and that's what they were after. but platt
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2016 10:00am EST
george h w bush. presidency, a history professor talks about her book and argues the 20th century was shaped by four elections that occurred during economic and cultural change, starting with the election of 1912. for the clique american history tv we can schedule, go to www.c-span.org. announcer: each week, american artifacts explores the story of the united states by visiting historic places and investigating important objects. next, a look at george washington's personal copy of 1789cts of congress, a printed record with the president's handwritten notes in the margin. the book was auctioned at christie's in new york city. >> we have come to a proud moment. we are selling george washington's personal copy of the acts of congress, signed by the estate of h. richard dietrich, jr. it is shown in the front of the room for those of you who have not had a chance to peek at it. you may do so. we will start the bidding at $1,300,000. $1,400,000, $1,700,000 $1,800,000 -- $2 million. now at $2 million. >> my name is carol and i serve as the senior curator and vice president of collection
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2016 10:01pm EDT
. usually wore a red rope servicemen could always find him on the battlefield. george patton war that distinctive look in world war ii that was made famous. there are many other generals that cut distinctive figures so that their men knew here is the boss. there is one officer in the american army in france that dresses like this. it is douglas macarthur. if you see someone like this, it is general macarthur. you notice he is not wearing a gas mask. he was gassed twice in the war. he also issued orders that if anybody followed his example and did not wear their gas mask, they would be court-martialed. this is important not only for the distinctive look but look at where he is. in an era where most generals were in the rear, comfortably, macarthur is up front also notice, he is not wearing a weapon. he would often lead attacks carrying nothing but a riding crop. the men looked at this and realized if the colonel and later the brigadier can take it, i can take it also. that is called command presence. not just bravado. macarthur believed, as he wrote later that leadership is often cryst
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2014 4:01pm EST
people wanted. and this is something that george washington explained personally to the seneca nation delegates by saying this means you will never be defrauded of your land again. now, would that have been true, it was true at the time he meant it, at the time president george washington, in making the treaties of 1790 with the muskogee nations of the southeast and the treaty of canandaigua which was the with shownee, the confederacy, and that was new york at the time, so what george washington wanted as president of the united states was some territory for the united states to govern over and wanted a definition of the state boundaries and a clarity of the muskogee nation and the huedensaunee lands. what the president was trying to do was stop any possible encroachment by european nations. stop any overreach and harm to native people with the states. and to enter into secured peace and friendship forever arrangements. with the muskogee and the huedensaunee peoples. they was trying to secure the western and southern borders of the united states. these were buffalo, savannah. w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2014 9:02pm EST
wall with c-span footage of president george bush and bob dole with speeches from presidents john kennedy and ronald reagan. at 12:00 p.m., fashion experts on first lady's fashion choices and how they represented the styles of the times in which they lived. and at 10:00 a.m., tom brokaw on his more than 50 years of reporting on world events. that's this christmas day on the c-span networks. for a complete schedule go to c-span.org. >>> each week, american risry tv's american artifacts visits museums and historic places. 1814, british and american naval forces clashed for 2 1/2 hours in cumberland bay. the battle was the culmination of six days of army and navy conflict. up next, we travel to platsburg where david, author of the final invasion platsburg, the year of 1812's most decisive battle, takes us on a tour of kilo indications to tell the story. >> pilot, joseph baron, ship "saratoga" september 11th, 1814, battle of plattsburgh in cumberland bay. this battle is lost to american history. at the first 100th anniversary, it was known by everyone. this was a human celebration. pe
CSPAN
May 28, 2015 5:48am EDT
offer advice and encouragement to the class of 2015. speakers include former president george w. bush and melody hob son, and former staff members reflect on the presidency of george h.w. bush. sunday at noon more commencement speeches from across the country, with former secretary of state condoleezza rice, and madeleine albright, and mayor michael nutter. events from the book expo america beginning at 10:00 live call in segments with publishers and authors through the day. sunday, on after words looking at the case of hollingsworth v perry which considers the constitutionality of proposition 8, the law allowing same sex couples to marry. and a conversation on first ladies with the most impact on the executive mansion. sunday, the life and death of james garfield who served almost two decades as a congressman from ohio and was assassinated 200 days into his term as president. get the complete schedule at cspan.org. >>> each week american history tv visits museums and historic places. this is peterson house in washington, d.c. where president abraham lincoln passed away at 7:2 7:22 a.
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 1:50pm EDT
washington and george washington, it gives me an opportunity to say because i'm trying to make the case that one of the most important abolitionists in the united states at the time was george washington himself who had become an abolitionist before he became president of the united stat states. so think about that. okay. anything else? thank you very much. [ applause ] >> today, we explore in exhibit at congress marking the 100th anniversary of the panama canal opening. three to show how photographs, newspaper reports, and sheet music document construction between 1904 a.m. to 1914. that is on american artifacts, that takes viewers into archives, museums, and historic sites around the country. >> each week, american history tv's american artifacts visits museums and historic places. next, we visit the national archives in college park, maryland, to learn about the kennedy assassination records collection. the warren report was released to the public 50 years ago on september 27, 1964. we will see video recorded by the national archives of many of the well-known artifacts of the investigatio
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2016 8:35pm EDT
, outgoing president george washington. this is a big deal. changing presidents for us today is a fairly normal thing. we have parades and parties. it's a big thing. but this was a really important day. because this is where we are proving that the system where we the voters elect our leaders and we change them when we vote, we're proving that that system works. because the john adams election is a lot of firsts. it's the first time we will not have george washington as our president. george washington is the only man to be unanimously elected president, which he was twice. he did not particularly run for office. at the end of the first term, he didn't want a second term. he was talked into it. essentially kind of almost guys on both sides talk him into another four years. he doesn't really run. he is unanimously re-elected. at the end of the second term, people try to talk him into a third. he is not having it. he wants to retire at this point in time. it's somebody else's turn. he will step aside for john adams. now, we don't know if this works. we have never done this before. we have
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2015 2:10am EDT
family, but this is george washington who by this time is the central focus of life in america. he's seated with his family at mount vernon. it's george dressed in his revolutionary war uniform and martha washington, her lovely self, as always dressed in beautiful gray satin with a lace shawl. george has his hand on the table at the center of the composition and his other arm is resting on his young ward and stepchild, john washington park gus tus. martha is shown with nelly custus. these are martha's grandchildren. these children came to live with martha and george. they lived when he was president in philadelphia and new york and then they came to mount vernon. george washington had high hopes for young wash. they didn't quite work out that way. he wasn't ready to take on the kind of activities that george washington had hoped with government and all, but he has his armresting inresz -- resti. martha and nelly are holding a map. martha is pointing to something on the map. we think it might be penn penn aven pennsylvania avenue or the white avenue. the setting is mount vernon, washi
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 5:30pm EST
this was something that george washington explained personally to the seneca nation delegates by saying, this means you will never be defrauded of your land again. now, would that have been true. it was true at the time. he meant it at the time. president george washington in making the treaties of 1790 with the muskogee nations of the southeast and the treaty of canandaigua, the six nations iroquois confederacy, and that was new york at the time. so, what george washington wanted as president of the united states was some territory for the united states to govern over. and wanted a definition of the state boundaries and a clarity of the muskogee nation and their lands. what the president was trying to do was to stop any -- to enter into secured peace and friendship forever arrangements with the muskogee. he was trying to secure the northern and southern, western borders of the united states. and these were buffalo. savannah. we are talking about really eastern-western borders at that time. and that was the united states. so, the muskogee nations had similar goals. they wanted pe
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2016 10:00pm EST
ratified bill of rights. it was auctioned at christie's in new york city. >> we are selling george washington's copy of the acts of congress. and it is showing in the front of the room for those of you who have not had a chance to peek. atwill start the bidding $1.3 million. [bidding occurs] >> my name is carol and i served as the curator here at mount delightnd it has been a to work with the team to think about the acquisition of this. george washington is exacting with his books and takes great care of them. he has them in beautiful shells in his library and we learned that he takes great care with each individual volume and often puts a flourish in the right-hand corner of the title has the important fromthat he ordered england and he gets them as early as 1771 before the revolution and they had the coat of arms with his name and his motto on them and he puts them on the inside cover of the volume and this was probably pretty special to him. he had his signature on the title page. what is more unusual is the notes in the margin and we marginalia. see any there are scribbles in s
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 8:03am EDT
december den sents of george washington's family put up for sale the tent that housed him in every campaign of the revolution. it was acquired by the minister from the valley forge era and that launched a century of collecting and launched the idea of a museum to tell the entire story of the revolution. the collections of the museum are incomparable. they have no peer. we have objects related to washington which truly are unique. one of a kind. and they bring to life his leadership, his incredible role in keeping the continental army together and never waivvering fm his goal of success. at the same time, we have objects that represent the common foot soldier, the cavalry man we have objects that reflect the role of not just american soldiers but british and french and native americans. so our collection will enable to us to present the entire story of the american revolution all to come to philadelphia. scott stevenson is the director of collections and interpretation for the museum and he's the ideal person to oversee the creation of these exhibits. he is ph.d. historian in the am
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2016 10:00am EDT
discussion of washington. george washington was a universally liked individual. very unique, i think, in american history. i'm sure that he had his detractors. but we do not hear a lot about that. we do hear about his exploits. he is a hero, father of the country. and we have objects that relate to him specifically. one of the very interesting is a life we have mask of washington. it was created by don, the original being at mount vernon. but this mask was created in the 1830's by who we believe was au gust glency, who was advertising lenci,time -- 00 auguste who was advertising at the time he had the mold from houdon and was making plaster busts and this is one of those made from washington's life mask. this one was made for the artist lutes, who painted the famous washington crossing the delaware painting in the 19th century. it has a really interesting art connection to the revolution, as well as you are looking at what washington actually looked like. because the life mask was taken from his face. we finish this section with the inauguration of washington. washington is elected p
CSPAN
Jul 11, 2015 10:00am EDT
monarch the first british foreign in the 18th century, george iii. he is young, very vibrant. he considers himself to be a real patriot king. americans of the future revolutionary generation are extremely patriotic. they have just disappeared in one of the most dramatic victories in modern history and are now part of really the richest, most extensive empire since the classical age. the first object i wanted to show was actually an engraved soldiers powder horn. this is a cow horn. one of a pair, that was carved in 1763 to reflect that great victory. you can see a crown and g.r. george rex, or king george iii. it is engraved with the theme of the city of havana in cuba images of some of the fortifications around havana. british ships in the harbor. the british and colonial american forces had taken havana from the spanish in 1762. and this horn was carved to commemorate the embarkation of those troops. the city was illuminated july 7, 1763. this is marking a moment in which britain and colonial americans were reveling in this magnificent empire. they had defeated the spanish. the
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