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CSPAN
Jan 10, 2015 3:40pm EST
inauguration of george washington. when he took the oath of office two of the 13 states are outside of the union. north carolina and rhode island did not ratify the constitution because of their concern it was missing a bill of rights. this was common for the antifederalists read the common denominator, they opposed the constitution. many came at it from different angles. some believe that you could not have the union that covered all these diverse states. they believed independence, but they didn't think that any government could ever be suitable to this entire continent. james monroe resident to the majority of anti-federalist opinion. while washington took the oath of office 2 states were agitating for a new constitutional convention. in the words of james madison and george washington they were terrified of this prospect read the believed it would be in for traded by enemies and the -- prospect. they believed it would be infiltrated by enemies and the constitution would be scrapped and that are union would be fractured never come together again. the book goes into the french and indian
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 4:00pm EDT
, do you think we could find george washington, thomas jefferson, james madison, george mason, john marshall and patrick henry? we ain't going to find them. now, at some theoretical level they are there. that is, human beings with the capacity for leadership are there, but the situation doesn't permit that group to rise to the surface. and so the question is, why did that situation exist in 1776? now, there is another answer to this, which is that great leadership only emerges during times of great crisis. and this makes eminent sense, the pressure that the crisis creates. and yet we can all think of examples where there's a great crisis and there's no leadership. like now. [laughter] [applause] or the coming of your -- world war i in europe. so what was special, you can't say there was something special in the water back there then. you can't say god looked down upon the american college and bless them. supernatural explanations are not admitted. even if you're an evangelical you're not allowed to use those in a historical conversation. i don't know whether i have a good answer to
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2014 6:15am EDT
and helps resolve that crisis. and that i was able to establish registered with people like george schultz and others, and mcfarlane, that this was something that probably helped them think well, you do, maybe something like this could pen that. but even when they got to rafsanjani's nephew as it happens, and they felt they were reaching finally the centers of power really responsible officials in iran, the commander of the air defense forces in iran, they never met with him but he was definite part of it. he was named. they felt okay, we have is breakthrough and we're getting to the right people. well, it doesn't take long before the nephew tells them, good news, folks, this has reached the point where our side is going to form a commission to deal with this issue to do with the americans. over a longer term. americans a great. was on the commission? well half of them are the same people they dealt with before, the same assistance, the same revolutionary guards, deputy head of intelligence who still run by the way. he was considered such a negative force by the americans at the na
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2014 6:00pm EDT
george zimmerman unlawfully killed trayvon martin even though neither knew what really happened. he writes that martin was a drug user and street fighter who was confronted and shot by zimmerman. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. .. president obama will surely pass president richard nixon as the worst president ever on issues of national security and press freedom imagine what your enemies are saying. how is a man that launched for his but launched for his campaign presidency in springfield illinois comparing himself to abraham lincoln well end up the presidency hunkered down in the white house being compared. something went wrong in the process. we are here to explain that tonight. in other civil libertarian for a long time the village voice contributor said obama doesn't give a damn because he can get away with whatever he wants. unfortunately there is a lot of truth to what he says. i'm going to explore tonight how that came to be and it's a complex question. and it's one that i am not fully sure but to get the answer right he had a distinctive upbringing, much to do and he a
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2014 1:35am EDT
or george w. bush and his education build no child left behind it shows it leads that is significant or a temporary shift between the two parties. while no child of to behind is debated and passed republicans have a resurgence in the destination how long they can but education issue that goes back two years later and make the argument that part of the reason that is the case is rank and file republicans just don't care about education as much as others like crime or lower taxes or the deficit. the same for the democrats. they once a low crime rate but if you ask which are more important they will save the environment and poverty and health care of of fighting crime. because of partisan priority don't shift very much ownership does not either. >> host: what happens if a politician is unorthodox does that create confusion? >> with today's polarized environment that is tough to be up against. voters of all stripes make judgments based upon the parties brandt it is difficult right now for as a democrat to run away from obamacare sova one in kentucky is trying to do that every
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2015 7:45pm EDT
books on the american revolution, an early american society. his books include biographies of george washington and john adams. his books also revolutionary war and in 2013 jefferson and hamelton: the rivality that forged a nation. several of his books have been selections of the history book club, and the book of the month club and almost a miracle of the american victory and the war of independence was an award-winning book as well. he had a 40-year teaching career at the university of west georgia in carrollton before retiring in 2004 to focus more on writing books which is why he's been very prolific over the past few years. you can learn more about him and his books by visiting johnferling.com can. please join me in welcoming john ferling to the atlanta history center. [applause] >> thank you kate, and thank you for coming out this evening on this gorgeous atlanta spring night. coming inside, actually, on this night to hear me talk. i want to talk tonight about my new book, "whirlwind," and let me tell you first ors how i happened to -- first, how i happened to come up with the
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 9:00pm EST
pennsylvania. in 1754 each man listen to his own insurance heartbeat. the commander named george washington was to the edge of though low clef peering into the hollow with french soldiers in militiamen washington listened to the murmur to breathe the incidence of the fired the enemy had posted no santry. washington lacked formal military training. and surprises gave him a advantage so orders to enforce the sovereignty of his majesty king george ii washington relied on the and guidance and the yen in his 50s alerted him to do the danger who waited silently beside him. washington stood 8 inches taller than most men in his day. that they would see the strongest and most ungovernable passions in. and stewart speculated those make washington in the fiercest man of the savage tribes. but george didn't have the chance for a classical european education. on behalf of the fairfax family pretty vigorous constitution with the social connections to the back country and an eye for the lay of the land now the young officer directed his men with hand signals the indians circled to the downhill
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 1:35pm EDT
the issues or trespass on these issues. we can think about bill clinton and his crime bill or george w bush and his education bill; no child left behind. they lead to significant but temporary shifts in the ownership of the parties. while no child left behind is being debated in congress republicans enjoy resurgeance in the public's estimation of how well they handle the public education issue and that goes back to two year earlier and the argument i made in the book is part of the reason that is the case is rank and file p republicans don't care about issu issues. democrats want a low crime rate but they would list the environment, poverty and health care well above fighting crime as the big policy. so because the partisan's priorities don't shift much ownership doesn't either. >> host: patrick egan, what happens if a politician is unorthdoxed in his or her party in position x. does that cause issues? >> guest: it can. voters of all strikes are making such big decisions based on the party' brand. it is difficult for a democrat to run away from obamacare. the same thing is true for r
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2014 1:42am EDT
were all kinds of bachelor's back here when we came back to washington and george miller had a house on the hill and he finally said why don't we stayed together? so we moved into his house in the guy named to marty russo did chuck schumer and eyebrow on the bottom floor he slept on the couch but this truly was an old house. [laughter] and chuck was the kind of person where every once in awhile would come back and stayed with me if he would buy cereal because we didn't have it meet. he would buy cereal for himself and he shivered would eat the diem cereal before bet. [laughter] my son would always wake up and say what happened to my serial? i said i'm sorry. it is schumer. so that is an early lesson. >> host: so for so many of us with those aspects you go back to the beginning when you were running for congress but if you talk about tip o'neill as the speaker came out to campaign for you but did not go so well. >> guest: it was wonderful to have him the big guy richman from boston in he did a fund-raiser with democrats and he said i want you to do everything possible to work for leo
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2014 4:45pm EST
slavery which would've jeopardized the fortune of the murders who a founding fathers including george washington, thomas jefferson patcher cannery and james madison at all. i'm sure you know that after the formation of the united states of america a disproportionate percentage of the presidents were slave owners. the short pieces of this vote is june 1772, you had a case in london, england, which involved the effort inflated african man back to north america after he had escaped to freedom and the judge ruled, which is representative in the movie. [applause] lord mansfield the judge ruled the way the law works even though it did not speak specifically to the colony it didn't take an oracle to suspect that that case would then be applied to the north american colonies, thereby jeopardizing as i will suggest momentarily and explain at length in this book, there is good reason for the so-called rebels to believe the case would be used as the president of north america thereby jeopardizing the african way of trade. rather than wait for the other shoe to fall, they revolted against british
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 1:40pm EDT
. started this book before i got a job offer at george mason, but this is an expert as they have the time that i was on the admissions committee at ucla, the faculty oversight committee for admissions and sauce and illegal behavior. this is to be a very controversial book. cheating, and insiders report on the use of race in admissions at ucla. you imagine i am not going to make friends with that but. so i think i am pretty certain the would have taken the george mason job anyway, but that definitely help. >> host: and we have been talking with tim groseclose, future george mason university professor to a left turn is the name of his book, a liberal media bias towards the american mind. and you're watching book tv on c-span2. >> next professor lynn vavreck discusses her book "the gamble" in which she and her co-author evaluate the factors that impacted the top to toe presidential election. this interview, part of book tv pellets series is just over 20 minutes. >> host: the gamble is the name of the book. ucla professor lynn vavreck is a cut-author of this book. lynn vavreck, when you
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 8:00am EDT
had written about it the e, i wanted to tell story. it cold opens at the inauguration of george washington. people don't know is that when he took the oath of office, two of the 13 states outside of the union. north carolina and rif ri did ot ratify the constitution because of the concern that it was missing a bill of rights. fundamental f liberties. this was common for the nti-federalists throughout the continent. the common denominator among the federalists of which james was one is that they oppose the constitution. many came at it from different angles. some genuinely believed you could not have a union to cover all of the different and diverse states. believed in independent states or confederacies but they idn't think any government could be suitable to this entire continent. ames monroe represented a majority of that opinion to his objection to the constitution the missing around the bill of rights. while washington took the oath office, two states, new york and virginia, were agitating for convention.tutional in the words of james madison and george washington, they were
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 8:30pm EDT
businesswise? governor george romney of michigan is ahead of lyndon johnson by eight points in the national polls. he is running far away from the republican nomination but if we are going to drop out for six months and do nothing? nixon said in its own manner, let them chew on him for a little while. [laughter] and i gather he meant the press corps. if you read my book, that is exactly what the press did. but you know in fairness i put a line in my book about mitt romney and how tough it must have been when he was 20 years old in paris seeing what happened to his father's launch for the presidency because i have never seen, it was not an outstanding performance. romney won out and he got caught up on the vietnam issue and the press went after him and there were one after another attacks from the press. it was one of the worst things i have ever seen. i told nixon one time i sent in this editorial come, i have never seen anything this vicious by this fellow. he said you should see what he writes about me, pat. .. so, then we really got into the later '6s so, 1967, and anybody can -
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2015 8:00am EST
authors, television for serious readers. >> next on booktv, president george w. bush discusses his biography of his father president george h.w. bush with andy card who served as white house chief of staff for bush 43 and secretary of transportation for bush 41. this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> today is a very special day in the life of the george bush presidential life foundation. it is special because we gather for the national book launch of "41: a portrait of my father." fittingly, on veterans day a. to wit, today we have both the author and subject, son and father, the 43rd and the 41st presidents of the united states here at the bush library center. this morning will consist of a moderated discussion about "41." our moderator served as depp canty chief of -- deputy chief of staff to the 41st president. he also served as chief of staff to the 43rd president of the united states and most recently as acting dean of the george bush school of government and public service here at texas a&m university. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the honorable andrew card. andy? [ap
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2015 8:00am EST
signing rivals cold opens at the inauguration of george washington. what many people don't know is that when he took the oath of office, two of the 13 states were outside of the union -- north carolina and rhode island did not lead a institution because of their concern because of the bill of rights, a guarantee of fundamental liberties. this is common about the anti-federal lists in the entire continent. many of them came at it from different angles. many of them believed you could not have a union that covered all of the different and diverse states. the independent states, regional confederacies but didn't think any government could be suitable. james monroe with the authority of anti-federalist opinions in that it would center around the missing bill of rights. while washington took the oath of office, two states, new york and virginia, were advocating for a new constitutional convention. in the words of james madison and george washington, they were terrified of this prospect. they believed it where do you lived be infiltrated by enemies of the new government and the constitut
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2014 10:00pm EDT
commanding officer george washington delong was already famous of the zero rescue mission in the bank rover of the new york herald james gordon bennett that also was the guy who send someone to africa to find livingstone and there is much more based on information that's hampton sides could piece together for a range of sources including official documentation journals and memoirs. it has founded will the opposite of frozen it is sizzling of story telling magic declared "the boston globe" funded venture narrative said "the new york times" please join me to welcome hampton sides. [applause] >> it is so great to be back here in washington d.c. one of the places i've learned to write spending time at washingtonian magazine and a lot of other places around town but i also wanted to do something different and ended up in new mexico where outside magazine is based in beverly cut my teeth on adventure stories and the narratives. so i will talk tonight about the environment that produced the voyage of the uss jeanette and the thinking and the theory about what was that the north pole with a g
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2014 7:00am EDT
defeating the british. from george washington's interest and use of counterintelligence practices, an espionage network operate in your city. this is just under one hour. >> good afternoon and welcome to the international spy museum. my name is vince houghton, oms pod museum the story and curator of like to welcome all of you to another author debriefing. today subject will be the american revolution, and intelligence. we're joined by an exceptional often will introduce momentarily. before that i watched a couple words about the revolution itself and history about intelligence. this is one subject that is vastly underrepresented in historical literature, the impact of intelligence on the revolution. most of us when we went through school, even in college level don't delve into the importance of intelligence operations on the american revolution. that's quite problematic because if you look at the strategic imbalance of the revolution, the advantages the british had over the americans, ignoring intelligence aspects you don't get the story about how the united states wins the war. the b
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2013 7:15am EST
clifford, george shultz. one an argument the elder george bush who really had this quite distinguished appointed career and when he finally had to run on his own, he lost in 1993. he won in 88 by douche is a successor of reagan. >> politics is dirty. >> that really has a lot to do with it because there is among the hay crowd that opined, a certain distaste or least discomfort for what democracy has become, or is. as you know, henry adams famously said that if you want to see a contradiction of the theory of evolution, all you have to do is look at american presidents from george washington to ulysses grant. and there are people like that who either don't want to put themselves through which i could which is a through to get elected, or in some kind of vague way, usually unstated, they are rather dismissive, even scornful of the whole idea that void gets a vote. i'll just say that you don't have to look much beyond washington in the last two or three years to really wonder, i mean, i say this as a fan of democracy, it is this the last word in a way countries are run? >> i'll have a foll
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2015 9:00pm EDT
for her book. she also won several literary awards including george washington book prize and the ambassador book award for the great improvisation and the birth of america. as well as the number one national bestseller. she's currently working on a new book re: 1692 salem and we are looking forward to having her return next winter. succumb if that one person come if you are here sign up for our brochure and you will get all of that wonderful news. so before we begin i just want to ask that you please turn off your cell phone or any other electronic devices and note that photography is permitted except for the house photographer. and with that now please join me in welcoming the wonderful guest tonight. thank you. [applause] >> let's see how this goes. this is a very radical book that you've written. you've reminded us here that the continental army waged a war for independence not for union. the idea of nationhood comes later. only in 1787 to be become one nation indivisible. >> we get a government that is a national government before a nation. >> so that we backtrack a little bi
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2014 11:00pm EDT
firm position but the problem was once he was nominated george took the lead he was raising much more money so in 2008 he never goes back on his word he says he still supported the idea of public financing but unfortunately the system was broken and those that are masters of gaming the system not then is taken straight out obamacare does not give a because the king get away with whatever he wants. the first person to call him on that was a skier south carolina congressman joe wilson on the night of september 9, 2009, is still highly popular and spoke spirit of the to a joint session of contract -- congress in the air was what he would call the powerball. but among the lions was this one nothing in his plan will require you or your employer to change the coverage or the doctor you have. let me repeat this nothing in your plan requires you to change what you have. at the time of the said this he may have thought it was true. but yet i went to check the record and within two days of that announcement, there were serious dissent in major publication sank that is impossible. you cannot get
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2014 1:20am EDT
different university. >> i will be up patriot at george mason. >> host: on the fairfax virginia? >> i used to have the job fair 20 years ago. it is a little uncomfortable at times been one of the only conservatives on campus i had as suspicion one time when i was up for a raise but george mason in the economics department i think the rest of the school is pretty close to the university's but. >> host: working on another book? and then this is the expos day i was on the faculty oversight committee. london insider report on the use of race. within that definitely help. >> "left turn" is the name of his book professor tim groseclose you are watching booktv on c-span2. >> the name of the book is "the gamble" professor lynn vavreck when you hear the term game change in politics what does that mean to you? >> guest: that is the great question.ñ >> that fundamental shift and if you are behind the net looks like you will start losing. >> host: are there game changers in the elections? >> guest: there can be. recently? not so much but there could be one in the future.
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 7:47am EDT
claims of emancipation. maybe one more. >> george, right here. et al. distinguished gentlemen in the second row. >> i wanted to thank you for a really interesting talk. fantastic. if there's one central message or lesson you hope someone takes my book, what would that be? >> i could have planted you there for that one, couldn't i? [laughter] he's also the godfather of my children so it actually could have happened. [laughter] i would say the fragility and loneliness of leadership, and how we can do think about the decisions, about great men as having arrived at them with little consternation, very little uncertainty in making their standing history. when, in fact, there are a lot of things competing for those choices, and history turns on their making the right decision at the moment when it could have gone either way. and that if we understand that first and foremost great men, great women are men and women that their humanity is really the essential element of their being, and that we share that with them. it gives a much deeper appreciation of history. take away all the halos and
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 4:51pm EDT
and today's administration can borrow from the arsenal of george h.w. bush. one thing that worked really very well back in 1991, that's the u.s. policy to take onboard western europe and all major west european players at that time; germany, france, canada. bush was on telephone all the time during the coup in moscow in august and then leading to the ukrainian referendum and then immediately after that building this alliance. so when bush spoke at that time, that meant for all major players in the region that that was a unified position of the west. so that's why in this -- [inaudible] in belarus when they a agreed to dissolve the soviet union, yeltsin and the leaders of belarus and ukraine, the first call goes not to gorbachev, the first call goes to the united states, and it was very clear that bush was speaking on behalf of the west in general. it was very different from the way how the disintegration of yugoslavia was handled when germany was playing its own policy, and the united states was playing its own policy. so this unity of western countries, of course, it's much easie
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2014 12:59pm EDT
painting said the daily leader, killed by special courier, a writer. the news was telegraphed to george henderson who happen to be in the capital, cheyenne, the paper reported. henderson was at the 71 ranch on sweetwater and a friend of james averell and botwell. henderson was sympathetic with the minister's and thought years later that henderson was partly involved. durbin arrived in rollins the sunday afternoon after the lynching and took the train to cheyenne. this would have put him in shy and in time to work with henderson to make sure the papers printed a version the cattle men liked. the results writes daniel metz the, the scholar who has looked at these questions, was a publicity campaign for the management of the story from that point upon was nothing less. the campaign was immediately successful thanks to the news wires. the sy and paper's version went national with a story in the new york world the same day. three weeks later the national police gazette which you are looking at here, the national enquirer of its time went much farther. a blaspheming bought bristly boosted bla
CSPAN
Jun 14, 2015 6:04pm EDT
. department of labor and served as chief of staff to the consul of economic advisers for president george h.w. bush. she's a senior fellow at the manhattan institute and drax institutes washington-based economics 21 project. she is the author of five previous books including the most recent one ready living to disaster. jared meyer is a fellow of institute a graduate of st. johns university right here in new york where he received a bachelor's degree in science, in finance. to discuss the new book "disinherited" please welcome diana furchtgott-roth and then jared meyer. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen thank you so much for coming to hear us today. there's so much going on in new york. you could have been going to the theater, you could have been going to dinner but instead you are here to hear us and we are very great owl. we wrote "disinherited" because it seems as though our governments policies are systematically biased against young people and in favor of old people in just a broad variety of ways. and there has been a lot of discussion about how the young are going to have to pay
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2015 8:00am EDT
what families go through during deployment. cornell west and robert george discuss bipartisanship plus the financial cost of damage and we visit st. augustine, fla. to speak with local lawyers. check booktv.org for complete schedule. booktv, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend on booktv. >> booktv continues now. michael bohn looks at 17 international emergencies faced by presidents going back to harry truman and assesses how they were handled. michael bohn served as director of the white house situation room under president reagan. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you for taking your seats, we will get started in just a moment. welcome. i am the acting dean of the school of government and international affairs at george mason university we are delighted to have robert guttman one here to a presentation based on his latest book, and we talked about it, some excellent work. and his experiences as well in the situation room in the white house. on will introduce the director of the center for politics and foreign relations and there's a formal
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2014 1:45am EDT
. >> host: how many presidents have you worked for? >> guest: well, three, if you count george h.w. bush, and of course i do. but the -- i really came to help ronald reagan in his second term. i joined the justice department in 1985, stayed through 1989, which allowed me to serve that first year of the senior bush administration. and then in 2008, after an easter sunday epiphany, i endorsed barack obama, which he wasn't anticipating, and i wasn't anti pating either at the beginning of that campaign because i began as a legal adviser to mitt romney, and left that campaign only after he did, after his defeat in the primary, but i was very distressed, i have to tell you, about the manner which the candidates were treating each other and particularly the way in which mr. romney's religion had been handled, and that caused me to think more broadly, and one person that i discovered in my examination was kind of the ecumenical commune spirit of barack obama which resurrected probably where i began life, i began life as a democrat because my father was a coordinator for one john f. kennedy. you
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 4:15pm EDT
george washington gave his farewell address to the troops and ultraleft terrorists bombed it. in 1975 the fbi counted 89 terrorist bombings on american soil for terrorism is no new thing. "the cleveland plain dealer." as "the new yorker" arrives it seems sometimes as modern government is helpless. patty hearst kidnapped in joining the ultraleft gang. we have squeaky from trying and failing to assassinate the president trying to springer hero and mentor charles manson. this is the boston busing crisis. you can see louise day hicks in the middle saying whites have rights boston fighting running battles with the police over busing and air pollution. the journalist elizabeth drew in her column in "the new yorker" wrote as new yorker wrote as a nation's birthday. we don't seem to know how to celebrate it. there's a vague feeling that merchandisers ride off in cajun and the orders will bore us to death. there's an uneasiness about celebrating our history began so grandly and it doesn't seem so grand anymore. there's the famous evacuation of the american embassy, america leaving south v
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2014 1:00pm EDT
george w. bush and the son of richard bush senior of course. he just had a curious and really astonishing career in the oil industry, which certainly hasn't been based on his success because he's failed repeatedly time and time again. you'd see a track record unblemished by his success. and yet people over the years have continuously partnered with him and it's really hard to understand why it is because his family name. he hasn't done as well in the obama years. i would think that a star would rise. truly it was because i thought it was a funny story and an interesting story and reflection in the way not just go businessworks aired it is the way the world works. the way the business world works. >> host: chelsea clinton had a number of astonishing career opportunities. >> guest: getting paid an astonishing amount of money. i thought it was a funny story. the truth is my editor and i discussed it and it didn't really fit anywhere else and we didn't want to lose. so that is true that how it ended up being in the last chapter. >> host: i was going to ask this in you provided one
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 3:00pm EDT
. >> i have to make this observation. george bush, george w. bush, second inaugural address proclaimed that it will be the policy of the united states to spread freedom and end tyranny everywhere in the world and i actually thought of you when i heard that because i thought you were watching at home you were throwing something at the television because it is so exemplifies what you think is a dangerous misapprehensions of how the world works. >> guest: the united states has to have three levels of understanding. one, objectives or definitions of security that are so vital to us that we try to achieve them if necessary. the second is the objectives and security concerns which are important to us but which we will try to achieve only with allies. and objectives and particular concerns which we should not do because they are beyond the capabilities or values. this is the sort of discussion we need to have. >> host: if you have a question of will get the mike to you and i am sure you will remember we have to come to a common understanding of what a question is. very important and i will be
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2014 8:45pm EDT
separately. george miller had a house up on the hill and george miller eventually, we were all friends and we go to dinner and he finally said one away all kind of stay together. we all moved in to george miller's house and it was for congressman, myself george miller or landlord chuck schumer and a guy named marty russo from illinois. chuck schumer and i were on the bottom floor and he slept on the couch and i had it bad that i had moved into one corner in the room downstairs. this was truly animal house. this was really animal house. chuck was the kind of person, i mean chuck would munch on anything. my son every once in a while would come back and stay with me and he would buy a serial because we didn't have any cereal. we didn't have any food. most of the time we ate out. he would buy cereal for himself and schumer before he would go to bed would eat the dan cereal. [laughter] my son would always wake up and say what the hell happened to my serial? i said i'm sorry, schumer took care of that. >> it was an early washington lesson. mr. secretary you with the most amazing life for tho
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2014 8:15am EDT
said sir, is this wise? governor george romney of mexican is ahead of linda johnson by eight points in the national polls. he is running far away for the republican nomination and we are going to drop out for six months in do-nothing? makes him sad in his own manner, pat amo let them chew on him for a little while. and i gather he met the press corps. if you read my book, that is exactly what the press did. but you know in fairness i put a line in my book about that from me, how tough it must've been when he was 20 years old in paris sees what happened to his father's launch for the presidency. it was not an outstanding performance. romney win out and he got caught up in the vietnam issue and the press went after him one after another attacks on the press. it is one of the first things i've ever seen. i said i've never seen anything vicious. he said you should see what tully writes about me. it was just terrible. a great writer, new york post. i was an admirer fan. it was american voters. a huge success he brought out the early national rambler. that's one of the things that halted
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 7:45am EST
presidential administration of ronald reagan, george h. kelly bush, and george w. bush. his book "when things went right" is drawn from his diary of the first years of the reagan administration. so please help me give an answer to our to authors, and we will get started. [applause] jonathan, since your book chronologically comes before chases i will ask you a twofold question. number one is, how did you find covering the campaign of 1964 in historical time after you have covered in real time the campaign of 2004 and 2008. that is part one. part two is, how do you perceive that politics changed in that 40 year time frame? >> thank you. i am happy to be here. the weather is not quite this nice in most places that have been talking about the book this fall, and i have not had need of the charlie crist fan, which i wish we had today under the table. [laughter] that aside, i am happy to be here. it is a great question. i would say that stepping back from present-day political reporting to look at the 1964 campaign has on the boast -- has on the most basic level made me see politicians a lot more c
CSPAN
Apr 22, 2014 8:45pm EDT
smile, yes. since that was john a. john george nikolai was only slightly less insufferable. around the same time he informed his fiancee that in my position i necessarily hear something new almost every day that would certainly be of infinite interest to someone and sometimes to another. but it's my duty to say nothing, so i won't. if you have to impress your fiancee with your job at the white house then i think you're probably still a little green. to one supplicant who saw just a few minutes of lincoln's time, nikolai replied, the president's task here is not child's play. it's not hard to understand why many people view them as being a little too big for the bridges, but as the war progressed the secretary has lost something of their youth and grew to become trusted and close aides to the president. midway through the war he was commissioned with an official detailed. at the same time nicolai effectively became lincoln's defacto political director and chief of staff. he used them in different ways at different times. the usually, i would say for the most part, about a third of t
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 8:00am EST
spectacular institution for alexander hamilton also us receiver of the george washington alexander hamilton and james madison. his most recent book which was released last week as "founder's son" a life of abraham lincoln" and already getting wonderful reviews. i'd like to ask before i invite him to the stage anything that makes noise like a cell phone is switched off now pleased when meet to welcome richard brookhiser to the stage. [applause] >> thanks. i n being adjusted. they did not need this in the 19th century. it is always a pleasure and an honor to be here at the historical society. just my publicist, basic books has done a terrific job they are publishing and well and i could not be happier. roger has done so much for history and particularly was very generous to support the publicity of this book. and lou gave me crucial early a vice when i was trying to find my way ever 15,000 books published now 15,001. and also my friend and agent over 20 years this is our tenth book together restarted with washington and andrew johnson next. we will try to do better than that. abraham lincoln
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2014 9:02am EDT
failed union generals was long and included george mcclellan, john pope, burnside and joe hooker. lincoln and all his hopes on the western general, grant, megan general in chief of all the union armies in march 1864, sweeping authority never before bestowed on a union general. grant was an impassive man who won battles. while chain-smoking cigars. he had a reputation as a strategist who never gave up. grant's 1863 victories at the vicksburg and chattanooga had made him famous. when grant into washington in march 1864, to meet lincoln and four secretary edward stanton was the first time, he was the object of intense curiosity. grant did not look the part of a great general. he was of medium height, or medium weight. he wore a privates nondescript blue uniform with his general stars sewn on the shoulders. one man said he was an ordinary scruffy looking man with a slightly seedy look. someone else thought something different. the look of a man determined to drive his head through a brick wall. dislike -- dislike in washington and its shoe business, grant chose to direct all the armi
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 11:00pm EST
organisms. so, our story begins with c. george washington who bred wheat. he would use a magnifying glass and shake one to another and he did with some success. he was an agriculturalist with the resources. so that makes perfect sense because it seems like it could have been in the nature of the wind conditions were right. but then as you may know, people are able to -- we had a problem in the u.s. with a european corn border. so these people found a way to take the genes from a virus or this bacterium that lives in the soil below the corn plants and put it in the corn and then it crystallizes and ties. so that seemed like a great thing. is that good or bad? everybody here has eaten it. i've been eating it for years and i'm fine. i think. so then as you know they got the genetic modifiers and they are able to make corn and soybeans that are in this pesticide roundup that is a big brand and it kills everything that's not the corn and soybean plants that have been modified. so also if you don't know the story, if you are a monarch butterfly, poland is the best. it's the best. and so i
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2014 8:15am EST
photography, some of the greatest names in war correspondents, staff, malcolm browne, peter arnett george edgar, a adams to name a few. the photo coverage from the vietnam war constitutes 25,000 images. now almost 50th anniversary of the war, we could get a first associated images of the conflict in vietnam. the book vietnam the real war, photographic history by the associated press is a collection of 300 images, we are thrilled to have some of the ip correspondents joining us as well as current ap photographers who covered modern day was to talk about these images from vietnam. gillick surprise winning correspondent peter arnett who covered the vietnam war. ap for 13 years, julie jacobson who has worked as a photographer for the associated press since 2001 and has covered pretty much everything from the olympics to wars and been embedded multiple times in iraq and afghanistan, santiago lyon. [applause] >> director of photography for the associated press responsible for the global total reporting and hundreds of photographers and photo editors worldwide who produced it. if you take pictur
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 9:00pm EDT
meaning. in his memoir he includes a particularly wonderful george bernard shaw quote. this is the true joy in life being used for a purpose recognized by yourself and the mighty one. being a force of nature instead of a feverish selfish clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not dispose itself with making you happy. after reading this experience we can all agree. we are in the presence of a force of nature tonight. joining norman tonight in the conversation as the incomparable jackie lyda. jackie's wit and wisdom is progress for over 30 years as a contributor and host of ncr. mike norman jackie regards as a first and foremost as a storyteller and like him she is endlessly curious and pushing new formats in order to connect with people and ideas. her newest project is a fashion series on npr. the themes is breaking new ground at the intersection between fashion culture and intelligent conversation. these two forces of nature will be in conversation tonight for about 40 minutes. afterwards they won't bite you to join in with questions. ladies and gentlemen please
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2014 4:00pm EST
served him right for fighting for the rebels, when all the rest of his family fought for king george." this is the war of 1812, not the revolution, but for this man as for so many, they regard this as a continuation of the revolution, but the revolution is not over for these people. dunlap concluded said "such is a rancore of political rank that it overcomes nature." we think we have just one civil war from the 1860s which is a much bigger and bloodier affair than the war of 1812. but we need, i think, if we can recall the war of 1812 as a civil war, if we recall just how unstable the american union and republic was in the generation after the revolution. there was a feeling of many people, the united states including many leaders, that they were embarked on a very risky experiment in the geographic scale, and they were conscious of the powerful regional differences, not just between north and south, but also between east and west, and there was a great deal of anxiety that some people were conspiring somewhere to kind of lead their section off separately, but i'm wondering if you ba
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2014 4:41am EDT
einstein, somebody like winston churchill, george george washington, all their memories sensations have been recorded. there you are talking to a hologram having a great afternoon tea with abraham lincoln. this is possible. and the question of mind without body, science fiction writers love this concept and believe it or not, if you have two disks, one with your genome, and one with your kinectome, live on after you die, in some sense the mind is living beyond the body. this is the dream of ancients and science fiction writers. this is conceivable. talk about the brain. blood flow can be analyzed by mri scans. on your left is your blood flow in your brain when you tell the truth. not much happens. on the right, when you tell a lie, ah, yes, when you tell a lie. when you tell a lie, first you have to know the truth. then you have to create the lie. then you have to create the cover-up and consistency with the lie with all the previous lies you've been telling all these years. that is a lot of brain power. your brain lights up like a christmas tree. there is your brain on the right tellin
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2014 10:00pm EST
now. i remember interviewing nancy pelosi. she was saying -- george w. bush was on a reform social security cake. cake. it was going to be his big initiative his second term. to deny barack obama's second term. i am sure democrats are saying similar things. a pretty big structural problem and impediment. on the republican side people are far more worried about being primary. primary down the right it is muddled uncomplicated. i would not make a blanket statement that these people don't care. >> your buddy is he going to talk? and so that's got me thinking. are there any specific instances where you've you dealt with either a hostile or unwilling participant and then sort of circled around until you broke it? >> that happened. there is always a bit of a down. i read -- i i have not been up here all day. talk me into cooperating. wanting to cooperate. it was weird. but what often happens, it is best to do two things. call every one around them never underestimate the power of showing up. people usually do public events. they are out in public if they see you around they no that you w
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2015 2:30pm EST
the british translators of doctor zhivago, george capped off who told the console in munich in the message a message that was forwarded it to moscow about pasternak had recently noted in a private conversation with one of his french translators that he didn't want the book published in russian by u.s. funded groups were in the united states. he said that this had no anti-american implication it was just a matter of personal safety for pasternak. the ideal option he said to the consul, was that the book be published in a small european country. it turned out the one chosen was the netherlands. other options of of course included switzerland or one of the other but they finally settled on the netherlands. i won't go into the details leading up to doctor zhivago's publication in russian and the netherlands because i hope some of you actually read the book. and of me just say that the first publisher at the agency was a trusting cold warrior who was utterly unreliable when it came to keeping secrets and to the consternation of some at the cia headquarters the operation threatens to bec
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 1:30pm EST
ago into slavery in the bluegrass country of kentucky. his father was a white man named george higgins and his mother, who we know only by the name of elizabeth, was a lifelong slave likely of mixed racial ancestry. brown would never have seen his father left the state shortly after his birth. by contrast his relations with his mother, the longest the last of her close and sustaining. once he struck out west in 1817, brown spent most of his boyhood on the missouri frontier chasing the daniel boone's. after he relocated in 1825 st. louis, he was rented out to a succession of employers including a half-dozen same steamboat captains and during the worst of those years he served one of the most victorious slave traders on the mississippi, william walker, who had been found lifelong influence on him. and he attempted to unsuccessful escapes during his teenagers and then finally at age 19 in 1834 successfully escaped on his third and final once the steam boat landed and he lifted himself out of a litter sienna numeracy. over the next 50 years he reinvented himself repeatedly as a wor
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2014 5:21am EDT
up next, david theodore george presents his book, "untangling the mind," why we behave the way we do. >> now, i would like to introduce dr. david theodore george, the author of, "untangling the mind." in "untangling the mind," dr. george presented us with a virtual owners manuel of the brain, how it works, how it is put together and what outcomes you may expect from the inputs we all make to it every day. s. i think three major parts of the book explain themselves very well. part one, why emotions spin out of control. part two, losing it, extreme behavior. and part three, thankfully, seeking healthy emotions. as dr. george goes through his presentation he will probably explain to you as how these all knit together. why you see such aberrant behavior as road rage, addiction and other extreme and unexpected reactions so stimuli. on behalf of the library of congress i present dr. theodore george. [applause] >> thank you very much. it is quite a privilege to be here. you have to keep in mind that i'm a psychiatrist and i'm used to dealing with one-on-one. so, this is a little bit over
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2014 10:30am EDT
else involved. there are virtually no heroes in this story. even somebody like george shultz , one of the few who repeatedly spoke out against this in reagan's presence, and i have a couple of documents that i will refund. even he fell prey to the old washington scandal haven't of retreating into a shell and figuring out a way to minimize exposure in a way it did not do him justice. i will throw out the thought that this is another thing that l.a. at the feet of ronald reagan. in his unwillingness or inability, and is probably both, to consider the collateral damage of the decisions that he made, one of those bids of damage was the effect that this had on all of the advisers and everyone who worked for him he did, to their credit, repeatedly said this is a dumb idea and the legal. you have got to stop it. this notion that he had no advice. ne'er-do-wells mike macfarlane and so on the record is in the handwriting of people like weinberger. but what happened to them, at some point, the national reaction of tightening offenses and circling the wagons, there was a sense that they not only
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