Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171214
SHOW
( more )
STATION
DATE
2016 655
2014 634
2015 496
2013 55
2017 2
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,842 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2015 3:40pm EST
inauguration of george washington. when he took the oath of office two of the 13 states are outside of the union. north carolina and rhode island did not ratify the constitution because of their concern it was missing a bill of rights. this was common for the antifederalists read the common denominator, they opposed the constitution. many came at it from different angles. some believe that you could not have the union that covered all these diverse states. they believed independence, but they didn't think that any government could ever be suitable to this entire continent. james monroe resident to the majority of anti-federalist opinion. while washington took the oath of office 2 states were agitating for a new constitutional convention. in the words of james madison and george washington they were terrified of this prospect read the believed it would be in for traded by enemies and the -- prospect. they believed it would be infiltrated by enemies and the constitution would be scrapped and that are union would be fractured never come together again. the book goes into the french and indian
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 4:00pm EDT
, do you think we could find george washington, thomas jefferson, james madison, george mason, john marshall and patrick henry? we ain't going to find them. now, at some theoretical level they are there. that is, human beings with the capacity for leadership are there, but the situation doesn't permit that group to rise to the surface. and so the question is, why did that situation exist in 1776? now, there is another answer to this, which is that great leadership only emerges during times of great crisis. and this makes eminent sense, the pressure that the crisis creates. and yet we can all think of examples where there's a great crisis and there's no leadership. like now. [laughter] [applause] or the coming of your -- world war i in europe. so what was special, you can't say there was something special in the water back there then. you can't say god looked down upon the american college and bless them. supernatural explanations are not admitted. even if you're an evangelical you're not allowed to use those in a historical conversation. i don't know whether i have a good answer to
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2014 6:15am EDT
and helps resolve that crisis. and that i was able to establish registered with people like george schultz and others, and mcfarlane, that this was something that probably helped them think well, you do, maybe something like this could pen that. but even when they got to rafsanjani's nephew as it happens, and they felt they were reaching finally the centers of power really responsible officials in iran, the commander of the air defense forces in iran, they never met with him but he was definite part of it. he was named. they felt okay, we have is breakthrough and we're getting to the right people. well, it doesn't take long before the nephew tells them, good news, folks, this has reached the point where our side is going to form a commission to deal with this issue to do with the americans. over a longer term. americans a great. was on the commission? well half of them are the same people they dealt with before, the same assistance, the same revolutionary guards, deputy head of intelligence who still run by the way. he was considered such a negative force by the americans at the na
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2014 6:00pm EDT
george zimmerman unlawfully killed trayvon martin even though neither knew what really happened. he writes that martin was a drug user and street fighter who was confronted and shot by zimmerman. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. .. president obama will surely pass president richard nixon as the worst president ever on issues of national security and press freedom imagine what your enemies are saying. how is a man that launched for his but launched for his campaign presidency in springfield illinois comparing himself to abraham lincoln well end up the presidency hunkered down in the white house being compared. something went wrong in the process. we are here to explain that tonight. in other civil libertarian for a long time the village voice contributor said obama doesn't give a damn because he can get away with whatever he wants. unfortunately there is a lot of truth to what he says. i'm going to explore tonight how that came to be and it's a complex question. and it's one that i am not fully sure but to get the answer right he had a distinctive upbringing, much to do and he a
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2015 7:45pm EDT
books on the american revolution, an early american society. his books include biographies of george washington and john adams. his books also revolutionary war and in 2013 jefferson and hamelton: the rivality that forged a nation. several of his books have been selections of the history book club, and the book of the month club and almost a miracle of the american victory and the war of independence was an award-winning book as well. he had a 40-year teaching career at the university of west georgia in carrollton before retiring in 2004 to focus more on writing books which is why he's been very prolific over the past few years. you can learn more about him and his books by visiting johnferling.com can. please join me in welcoming john ferling to the atlanta history center. [applause] >> thank you kate, and thank you for coming out this evening on this gorgeous atlanta spring night. coming inside, actually, on this night to hear me talk. i want to talk tonight about my new book, "whirlwind," and let me tell you first ors how i happened to -- first, how i happened to come up with the
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 1:35pm EDT
the issues or trespass on these issues. we can think about bill clinton and his crime bill or george w bush and his education bill; no child left behind. they lead to significant but temporary shifts in the ownership of the parties. while no child left behind is being debated in congress republicans enjoy resurgeance in the public's estimation of how well they handle the public education issue and that goes back to two year earlier and the argument i made in the book is part of the reason that is the case is rank and file p republicans don't care about issu issues. democrats want a low crime rate but they would list the environment, poverty and health care well above fighting crime as the big policy. so because the partisan's priorities don't shift much ownership doesn't either. >> host: patrick egan, what happens if a politician is unorthdoxed in his or her party in position x. does that cause issues? >> guest: it can. voters of all strikes are making such big decisions based on the party' brand. it is difficult for a democrat to run away from obamacare. the same thing is true for r
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2014 1:42am EDT
were all kinds of bachelor's back here when we came back to washington and george miller had a house on the hill and he finally said why don't we stayed together? so we moved into his house in the guy named to marty russo did chuck schumer and eyebrow on the bottom floor he slept on the couch but this truly was an old house. [laughter] and chuck was the kind of person where every once in awhile would come back and stayed with me if he would buy cereal because we didn't have it meet. he would buy cereal for himself and he shivered would eat the diem cereal before bet. [laughter] my son would always wake up and say what happened to my serial? i said i'm sorry. it is schumer. so that is an early lesson. >> host: so for so many of us with those aspects you go back to the beginning when you were running for congress but if you talk about tip o'neill as the speaker came out to campaign for you but did not go so well. >> guest: it was wonderful to have him the big guy richman from boston in he did a fund-raiser with democrats and he said i want you to do everything possible to work for leo
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2014 4:45pm EST
slavery which would've jeopardized the fortune of the murders who a founding fathers including george washington, thomas jefferson patcher cannery and james madison at all. i'm sure you know that after the formation of the united states of america a disproportionate percentage of the presidents were slave owners. the short pieces of this vote is june 1772, you had a case in london, england, which involved the effort inflated african man back to north america after he had escaped to freedom and the judge ruled, which is representative in the movie. [applause] lord mansfield the judge ruled the way the law works even though it did not speak specifically to the colony it didn't take an oracle to suspect that that case would then be applied to the north american colonies, thereby jeopardizing as i will suggest momentarily and explain at length in this book, there is good reason for the so-called rebels to believe the case would be used as the president of north america thereby jeopardizing the african way of trade. rather than wait for the other shoe to fall, they revolted against british
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 1:40pm EDT
. started this book before i got a job offer at george mason, but this is an expert as they have the time that i was on the admissions committee at ucla, the faculty oversight committee for admissions and sauce and illegal behavior. this is to be a very controversial book. cheating, and insiders report on the use of race in admissions at ucla. you imagine i am not going to make friends with that but. so i think i am pretty certain the would have taken the george mason job anyway, but that definitely help. >> host: and we have been talking with tim groseclose, future george mason university professor to a left turn is the name of his book, a liberal media bias towards the american mind. and you're watching book tv on c-span2. >> next professor lynn vavreck discusses her book "the gamble" in which she and her co-author evaluate the factors that impacted the top to toe presidential election. this interview, part of book tv pellets series is just over 20 minutes. >> host: the gamble is the name of the book. ucla professor lynn vavreck is a cut-author of this book. lynn vavreck, when you
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 8:30pm EDT
businesswise? governor george romney of michigan is ahead of lyndon johnson by eight points in the national polls. he is running far away from the republican nomination but if we are going to drop out for six months and do nothing? nixon said in its own manner, let them chew on him for a little while. [laughter] and i gather he meant the press corps. if you read my book, that is exactly what the press did. but you know in fairness i put a line in my book about mitt romney and how tough it must have been when he was 20 years old in paris seeing what happened to his father's launch for the presidency because i have never seen, it was not an outstanding performance. romney won out and he got caught up on the vietnam issue and the press went after him and there were one after another attacks from the press. it was one of the worst things i have ever seen. i told nixon one time i sent in this editorial come, i have never seen anything this vicious by this fellow. he said you should see what he writes about me, pat. .. so, then we really got into the later '6s so, 1967, and anybody can -
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2014 7:00am EDT
defeating the british. from george washington's interest and use of counterintelligence practices, an espionage network operate in your city. this is just under one hour. >> good afternoon and welcome to the international spy museum. my name is vince houghton, oms pod museum the story and curator of like to welcome all of you to another author debriefing. today subject will be the american revolution, and intelligence. we're joined by an exceptional often will introduce momentarily. before that i watched a couple words about the revolution itself and history about intelligence. this is one subject that is vastly underrepresented in historical literature, the impact of intelligence on the revolution. most of us when we went through school, even in college level don't delve into the importance of intelligence operations on the american revolution. that's quite problematic because if you look at the strategic imbalance of the revolution, the advantages the british had over the americans, ignoring intelligence aspects you don't get the story about how the united states wins the war. the b
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2013 7:15am EST
clifford, george shultz. one an argument the elder george bush who really had this quite distinguished appointed career and when he finally had to run on his own, he lost in 1993. he won in 88 by douche is a successor of reagan. >> politics is dirty. >> that really has a lot to do with it because there is among the hay crowd that opined, a certain distaste or least discomfort for what democracy has become, or is. as you know, henry adams famously said that if you want to see a contradiction of the theory of evolution, all you have to do is look at american presidents from george washington to ulysses grant. and there are people like that who either don't want to put themselves through which i could which is a through to get elected, or in some kind of vague way, usually unstated, they are rather dismissive, even scornful of the whole idea that void gets a vote. i'll just say that you don't have to look much beyond washington in the last two or three years to really wonder, i mean, i say this as a fan of democracy, it is this the last word in a way countries are run? >> i'll have a foll
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2015 9:00pm EDT
for her book. she also won several literary awards including george washington book prize and the ambassador book award for the great improvisation and the birth of america. as well as the number one national bestseller. she's currently working on a new book re: 1692 salem and we are looking forward to having her return next winter. succumb if that one person come if you are here sign up for our brochure and you will get all of that wonderful news. so before we begin i just want to ask that you please turn off your cell phone or any other electronic devices and note that photography is permitted except for the house photographer. and with that now please join me in welcoming the wonderful guest tonight. thank you. [applause] >> let's see how this goes. this is a very radical book that you've written. you've reminded us here that the continental army waged a war for independence not for union. the idea of nationhood comes later. only in 1787 to be become one nation indivisible. >> we get a government that is a national government before a nation. >> so that we backtrack a little bi
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2014 11:00pm EDT
firm position but the problem was once he was nominated george took the lead he was raising much more money so in 2008 he never goes back on his word he says he still supported the idea of public financing but unfortunately the system was broken and those that are masters of gaming the system not then is taken straight out obamacare does not give a because the king get away with whatever he wants. the first person to call him on that was a skier south carolina congressman joe wilson on the night of september 9, 2009, is still highly popular and spoke spirit of the to a joint session of contract -- congress in the air was what he would call the powerball. but among the lions was this one nothing in his plan will require you or your employer to change the coverage or the doctor you have. let me repeat this nothing in your plan requires you to change what you have. at the time of the said this he may have thought it was true. but yet i went to check the record and within two days of that announcement, there were serious dissent in major publication sank that is impossible. you cannot get
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 7:47am EDT
claims of emancipation. maybe one more. >> george, right here. et al. distinguished gentlemen in the second row. >> i wanted to thank you for a really interesting talk. fantastic. if there's one central message or lesson you hope someone takes my book, what would that be? >> i could have planted you there for that one, couldn't i? [laughter] he's also the godfather of my children so it actually could have happened. [laughter] i would say the fragility and loneliness of leadership, and how we can do think about the decisions, about great men as having arrived at them with little consternation, very little uncertainty in making their standing history. when, in fact, there are a lot of things competing for those choices, and history turns on their making the right decision at the moment when it could have gone either way. and that if we understand that first and foremost great men, great women are men and women that their humanity is really the essential element of their being, and that we share that with them. it gives a much deeper appreciation of history. take away all the halos and
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 4:51pm EDT
and today's administration can borrow from the arsenal of george h.w. bush. one thing that worked really very well back in 1991, that's the u.s. policy to take onboard western europe and all major west european players at that time; germany, france, canada. bush was on telephone all the time during the coup in moscow in august and then leading to the ukrainian referendum and then immediately after that building this alliance. so when bush spoke at that time, that meant for all major players in the region that that was a unified position of the west. so that's why in this -- [inaudible] in belarus when they a agreed to dissolve the soviet union, yeltsin and the leaders of belarus and ukraine, the first call goes not to gorbachev, the first call goes to the united states, and it was very clear that bush was speaking on behalf of the west in general. it was very different from the way how the disintegration of yugoslavia was handled when germany was playing its own policy, and the united states was playing its own policy. so this unity of western countries, of course, it's much easie
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2014 12:59pm EDT
painting said the daily leader, killed by special courier, a writer. the news was telegraphed to george henderson who happen to be in the capital, cheyenne, the paper reported. henderson was at the 71 ranch on sweetwater and a friend of james averell and botwell. henderson was sympathetic with the minister's and thought years later that henderson was partly involved. durbin arrived in rollins the sunday afternoon after the lynching and took the train to cheyenne. this would have put him in shy and in time to work with henderson to make sure the papers printed a version the cattle men liked. the results writes daniel metz the, the scholar who has looked at these questions, was a publicity campaign for the management of the story from that point upon was nothing less. the campaign was immediately successful thanks to the news wires. the sy and paper's version went national with a story in the new york world the same day. three weeks later the national police gazette which you are looking at here, the national enquirer of its time went much farther. a blaspheming bought bristly boosted bla
CSPAN
Jun 14, 2015 6:04pm EDT
. department of labor and served as chief of staff to the consul of economic advisers for president george h.w. bush. she's a senior fellow at the manhattan institute and drax institutes washington-based economics 21 project. she is the author of five previous books including the most recent one ready living to disaster. jared meyer is a fellow of institute a graduate of st. johns university right here in new york where he received a bachelor's degree in science, in finance. to discuss the new book "disinherited" please welcome diana furchtgott-roth and then jared meyer. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen thank you so much for coming to hear us today. there's so much going on in new york. you could have been going to the theater, you could have been going to dinner but instead you are here to hear us and we are very great owl. we wrote "disinherited" because it seems as though our governments policies are systematically biased against young people and in favor of old people in just a broad variety of ways. and there has been a lot of discussion about how the young are going to have to pay
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2014 1:45am EDT
. >> host: how many presidents have you worked for? >> guest: well, three, if you count george h.w. bush, and of course i do. but the -- i really came to help ronald reagan in his second term. i joined the justice department in 1985, stayed through 1989, which allowed me to serve that first year of the senior bush administration. and then in 2008, after an easter sunday epiphany, i endorsed barack obama, which he wasn't anticipating, and i wasn't anti pating either at the beginning of that campaign because i began as a legal adviser to mitt romney, and left that campaign only after he did, after his defeat in the primary, but i was very distressed, i have to tell you, about the manner which the candidates were treating each other and particularly the way in which mr. romney's religion had been handled, and that caused me to think more broadly, and one person that i discovered in my examination was kind of the ecumenical commune spirit of barack obama which resurrected probably where i began life, i began life as a democrat because my father was a coordinator for one john f. kennedy. you
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 4:15pm EDT
george washington gave his farewell address to the troops and ultraleft terrorists bombed it. in 1975 the fbi counted 89 terrorist bombings on american soil for terrorism is no new thing. "the cleveland plain dealer." as "the new yorker" arrives it seems sometimes as modern government is helpless. patty hearst kidnapped in joining the ultraleft gang. we have squeaky from trying and failing to assassinate the president trying to springer hero and mentor charles manson. this is the boston busing crisis. you can see louise day hicks in the middle saying whites have rights boston fighting running battles with the police over busing and air pollution. the journalist elizabeth drew in her column in "the new yorker" wrote as new yorker wrote as a nation's birthday. we don't seem to know how to celebrate it. there's a vague feeling that merchandisers ride off in cajun and the orders will bore us to death. there's an uneasiness about celebrating our history began so grandly and it doesn't seem so grand anymore. there's the famous evacuation of the american embassy, america leaving south v
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2014 1:00pm EDT
george w. bush and the son of richard bush senior of course. he just had a curious and really astonishing career in the oil industry, which certainly hasn't been based on his success because he's failed repeatedly time and time again. you'd see a track record unblemished by his success. and yet people over the years have continuously partnered with him and it's really hard to understand why it is because his family name. he hasn't done as well in the obama years. i would think that a star would rise. truly it was because i thought it was a funny story and an interesting story and reflection in the way not just go businessworks aired it is the way the world works. the way the business world works. >> host: chelsea clinton had a number of astonishing career opportunities. >> guest: getting paid an astonishing amount of money. i thought it was a funny story. the truth is my editor and i discussed it and it didn't really fit anywhere else and we didn't want to lose. so that is true that how it ended up being in the last chapter. >> host: i was going to ask this in you provided one
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 3:00pm EDT
. >> i have to make this observation. george bush, george w. bush, second inaugural address proclaimed that it will be the policy of the united states to spread freedom and end tyranny everywhere in the world and i actually thought of you when i heard that because i thought you were watching at home you were throwing something at the television because it is so exemplifies what you think is a dangerous misapprehensions of how the world works. >> guest: the united states has to have three levels of understanding. one, objectives or definitions of security that are so vital to us that we try to achieve them if necessary. the second is the objectives and security concerns which are important to us but which we will try to achieve only with allies. and objectives and particular concerns which we should not do because they are beyond the capabilities or values. this is the sort of discussion we need to have. >> host: if you have a question of will get the mike to you and i am sure you will remember we have to come to a common understanding of what a question is. very important and i will be
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2014 8:45pm EDT
separately. george miller had a house up on the hill and george miller eventually, we were all friends and we go to dinner and he finally said one away all kind of stay together. we all moved in to george miller's house and it was for congressman, myself george miller or landlord chuck schumer and a guy named marty russo from illinois. chuck schumer and i were on the bottom floor and he slept on the couch and i had it bad that i had moved into one corner in the room downstairs. this was truly animal house. this was really animal house. chuck was the kind of person, i mean chuck would munch on anything. my son every once in a while would come back and stay with me and he would buy a serial because we didn't have any cereal. we didn't have any food. most of the time we ate out. he would buy cereal for himself and schumer before he would go to bed would eat the dan cereal. [laughter] my son would always wake up and say what the hell happened to my serial? i said i'm sorry, schumer took care of that. >> it was an early washington lesson. mr. secretary you with the most amazing life for tho
CSPAN
Apr 22, 2014 8:45pm EDT
smile, yes. since that was john a. john george nikolai was only slightly less insufferable. around the same time he informed his fiancee that in my position i necessarily hear something new almost every day that would certainly be of infinite interest to someone and sometimes to another. but it's my duty to say nothing, so i won't. if you have to impress your fiancee with your job at the white house then i think you're probably still a little green. to one supplicant who saw just a few minutes of lincoln's time, nikolai replied, the president's task here is not child's play. it's not hard to understand why many people view them as being a little too big for the bridges, but as the war progressed the secretary has lost something of their youth and grew to become trusted and close aides to the president. midway through the war he was commissioned with an official detailed. at the same time nicolai effectively became lincoln's defacto political director and chief of staff. he used them in different ways at different times. the usually, i would say for the most part, about a third of t
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2014 9:02am EDT
failed union generals was long and included george mcclellan, john pope, burnside and joe hooker. lincoln and all his hopes on the western general, grant, megan general in chief of all the union armies in march 1864, sweeping authority never before bestowed on a union general. grant was an impassive man who won battles. while chain-smoking cigars. he had a reputation as a strategist who never gave up. grant's 1863 victories at the vicksburg and chattanooga had made him famous. when grant into washington in march 1864, to meet lincoln and four secretary edward stanton was the first time, he was the object of intense curiosity. grant did not look the part of a great general. he was of medium height, or medium weight. he wore a privates nondescript blue uniform with his general stars sewn on the shoulders. one man said he was an ordinary scruffy looking man with a slightly seedy look. someone else thought something different. the look of a man determined to drive his head through a brick wall. dislike -- dislike in washington and its shoe business, grant chose to direct all the armi
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2014 8:15am EST
photography, some of the greatest names in war correspondents, staff, malcolm browne, peter arnett george edgar, a adams to name a few. the photo coverage from the vietnam war constitutes 25,000 images. now almost 50th anniversary of the war, we could get a first associated images of the conflict in vietnam. the book vietnam the real war, photographic history by the associated press is a collection of 300 images, we are thrilled to have some of the ip correspondents joining us as well as current ap photographers who covered modern day was to talk about these images from vietnam. gillick surprise winning correspondent peter arnett who covered the vietnam war. ap for 13 years, julie jacobson who has worked as a photographer for the associated press since 2001 and has covered pretty much everything from the olympics to wars and been embedded multiple times in iraq and afghanistan, santiago lyon. [applause] >> director of photography for the associated press responsible for the global total reporting and hundreds of photographers and photo editors worldwide who produced it. if you take pictur
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 9:00pm EDT
meaning. in his memoir he includes a particularly wonderful george bernard shaw quote. this is the true joy in life being used for a purpose recognized by yourself and the mighty one. being a force of nature instead of a feverish selfish clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not dispose itself with making you happy. after reading this experience we can all agree. we are in the presence of a force of nature tonight. joining norman tonight in the conversation as the incomparable jackie lyda. jackie's wit and wisdom is progress for over 30 years as a contributor and host of ncr. mike norman jackie regards as a first and foremost as a storyteller and like him she is endlessly curious and pushing new formats in order to connect with people and ideas. her newest project is a fashion series on npr. the themes is breaking new ground at the intersection between fashion culture and intelligent conversation. these two forces of nature will be in conversation tonight for about 40 minutes. afterwards they won't bite you to join in with questions. ladies and gentlemen please
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2014 4:00pm EST
served him right for fighting for the rebels, when all the rest of his family fought for king george." this is the war of 1812, not the revolution, but for this man as for so many, they regard this as a continuation of the revolution, but the revolution is not over for these people. dunlap concluded said "such is a rancore of political rank that it overcomes nature." we think we have just one civil war from the 1860s which is a much bigger and bloodier affair than the war of 1812. but we need, i think, if we can recall the war of 1812 as a civil war, if we recall just how unstable the american union and republic was in the generation after the revolution. there was a feeling of many people, the united states including many leaders, that they were embarked on a very risky experiment in the geographic scale, and they were conscious of the powerful regional differences, not just between north and south, but also between east and west, and there was a great deal of anxiety that some people were conspiring somewhere to kind of lead their section off separately, but i'm wondering if you ba
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2014 4:41am EDT
einstein, somebody like winston churchill, george george washington, all their memories sensations have been recorded. there you are talking to a hologram having a great afternoon tea with abraham lincoln. this is possible. and the question of mind without body, science fiction writers love this concept and believe it or not, if you have two disks, one with your genome, and one with your kinectome, live on after you die, in some sense the mind is living beyond the body. this is the dream of ancients and science fiction writers. this is conceivable. talk about the brain. blood flow can be analyzed by mri scans. on your left is your blood flow in your brain when you tell the truth. not much happens. on the right, when you tell a lie, ah, yes, when you tell a lie. when you tell a lie, first you have to know the truth. then you have to create the lie. then you have to create the cover-up and consistency with the lie with all the previous lies you've been telling all these years. that is a lot of brain power. your brain lights up like a christmas tree. there is your brain on the right tellin
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 11:00pm EST
organisms. so, our story begins with c. george washington who bred wheat. he would use a magnifying glass and shake one to another and he did with some success. he was an agriculturalist with the resources. so that makes perfect sense because it seems like it could have been in the nature of the wind conditions were right. but then as you may know, people are able to -- we had a problem in the u.s. with a european corn border. so these people found a way to take the genes from a virus or this bacterium that lives in the soil below the corn plants and put it in the corn and then it crystallizes and ties. so that seemed like a great thing. is that good or bad? everybody here has eaten it. i've been eating it for years and i'm fine. i think. so then as you know they got the genetic modifiers and they are able to make corn and soybeans that are in this pesticide roundup that is a big brand and it kills everything that's not the corn and soybean plants that have been modified. so also if you don't know the story, if you are a monarch butterfly, poland is the best. it's the best. and so i
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2014 10:00pm EST
now. i remember interviewing nancy pelosi. she was saying -- george w. bush was on a reform social security cake. cake. it was going to be his big initiative his second term. to deny barack obama's second term. i am sure democrats are saying similar things. a pretty big structural problem and impediment. on the republican side people are far more worried about being primary. primary down the right it is muddled uncomplicated. i would not make a blanket statement that these people don't care. >> your buddy is he going to talk? and so that's got me thinking. are there any specific instances where you've you dealt with either a hostile or unwilling participant and then sort of circled around until you broke it? >> that happened. there is always a bit of a down. i read -- i i have not been up here all day. talk me into cooperating. wanting to cooperate. it was weird. but what often happens, it is best to do two things. call every one around them never underestimate the power of showing up. people usually do public events. they are out in public if they see you around they no that you w
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2015 2:30pm EST
the british translators of doctor zhivago, george capped off who told the console in munich in the message a message that was forwarded it to moscow about pasternak had recently noted in a private conversation with one of his french translators that he didn't want the book published in russian by u.s. funded groups were in the united states. he said that this had no anti-american implication it was just a matter of personal safety for pasternak. the ideal option he said to the consul, was that the book be published in a small european country. it turned out the one chosen was the netherlands. other options of of course included switzerland or one of the other but they finally settled on the netherlands. i won't go into the details leading up to doctor zhivago's publication in russian and the netherlands because i hope some of you actually read the book. and of me just say that the first publisher at the agency was a trusting cold warrior who was utterly unreliable when it came to keeping secrets and to the consternation of some at the cia headquarters the operation threatens to bec
CSPAN
Apr 12, 2015 9:45am EDT
. welcome. i am mark rosella the international affairs here at george mason university and we are delighted to have mark bone here to do a presentation based on his latest book which i had the pleasure to read in draft form and we talked about it at length. it is excellent work. i am thrilled that he is here to make a presentation based on the research he has done in his six years as does well in the situation room at the white house. i am first going to introduce my colleague, the director of our center for politics and foreign relations than he is going to make the formal introduction or speaker. >> i teach a class on the presidency from jfk to obama, so i'm going to use this for my next few classes. what i like about this book presidency in crisis from truman to obama is that at the end of each crisis or decision-making problem in the white house from truman through obama, he does an assessment which gives it an interesting background. you see what jfk did their in decision-making during the cuban missile crisis and he looks at how cautious he was and what happened. it's excell
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 6:15pm EST
buchanan gave his story. we are in a cultural and a religious war speech which provide the george h. w. bush supporters that could see the vote flying out the window as he spoke but this was the era of the culture and i find some people are uncomfortable with diversity and there are others that are a markedly comfortable and i think this is the way the country is moving but they need some dialogue and this is why we have a level of diversity and i found one column after another dealing with this issue. the biggest divide there's this nation for a lack of better labels and coming from middletown ohio i know that home of the late congressman for anybody that remembers him they were good republicans because i'm so old iron member when there were black republicans. the party of lincoln and eisenhower. they are trying to get into central high school and they are keeping them out. the next day we turn it on and they are gone. i want to give proper credit. they were escorting the students into the high school. and i turned to my parents and i said what happened. my dad said president eisen
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2014 10:45am EDT
. we watched them lose support in the midterm elections in general, george mcclellan, and discovering that his replacement as more competent than he was at war. he begins to step towards a more brutal less forgiving kind of war that attacks civil society as well as the army, assured by his legal advisers at the freeing of the slaves can be seen as part of that very method of battle. then in the summer of 1862, at the annual address at the state of the union today, he reverses his approach yet again, never mentioning the proclamation instead offering constitutional amendment turrentine compensation to those states that agree to gradual emancipation plans extending to the year 1900 and states taking advantage of such an offer should take the money and then readopt slavery, all they have to do is repay the money they received. so who is this man? to be fair, there are obstacles, from one there were constitutional issues and could the slaves be freed without a constitutional amendment two and if so? under what power of congress? they were, after all, property in a legal sense, even if lin
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2014 8:00am EST
was reading george saintsbury's criticism. what can i tell you? he's a 19th century omnivorous book reader. he's written every single thing everyone has written in french or english or greek or latin, and he has this wonderful, flowing style that helps me think so when i want to say things fluently, it helps me. not so much as it should, but -- [laughter] >> well, for reasons that are probably too dark and personal and weird to go into -- [laughter] i've been on a huge thomas burn hart kick, so i was reading "the woodcutters" on the way down. i realized when i woke up early in the morning to catch an early flight, i was reading on a kindle, that i had a little tiny bar, so i was afraid it was going to run out. instead of doing the obvious thing, i'd read a few pages and then do the soduku puzzle -- [laughter] so going back and fort. in a way, i thought he would have loved it. if he loved anything. [laughter] >> yeah. it's hard for me to remember the title, "the war hound and the world's pain" written in 1981. i started reading this author when i was 16 on an american institute for f
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2014 11:00pm EDT
nomination of 1964? george wallace of alabama. it's very well in several primaries. he did quite well. the white backlash has begun and johnson understands this sort of backlash as a phenomenon in 1964. in 1964 he is looking towards what should be a pretty easy election for him because he has so perfectly come to him that anybody after the kennedy assassination and he has made his whole campaign about that. it's a remarkable piece. at the same time as he's escalating the vietnam war he is running a campaign of peace and prosperity. and -- spin and goldwater called him out on that. >> he did. what johnson is trying to do companies looking towards an easy reelection but he thinks about the backlash but it's not as appealing for johnson who really needs a source of fear to come in human form as some of those lurking potential threats he sees among people he knows chiefly the kennedys. so the lead up to the convention in 1964 he is quite focused and he spends a lot of time thinking about that. if he spent at same time thinking about the question of what's happening in this country, who ar
CSPAN
Apr 4, 2015 11:00pm EDT
. >> what tools do you have been your tool kit? >> the aircraft carrier george jones can solve everything. therein is the phrase that is overused it is boots on the ground. but that is the question there is a sea change about how a decision making has changed about the abolition. we used to think twice. everybody petraeus back to the good old days with reagan. he was cautious as well and was forced to be. >> did he have the best decision making? >> i realize the crisis by an expert but kennedy did the best of the most serious situation and was cautious. the quarantine allow khrushchev to back away and eyeball to eyeball never happened. that was part of the movie and part of the myth. in and we one which was full of nuclear weapons. . . >> you know, you had asked me a question that i had not really thought of before. but he was practical and he had a lot of ideology. that is the best answer that i can give you right now. the next time that we get together, i will try to think of another one. >> i think that we have come to the end. so i would like to express my gratitude. buy the book, "pr
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 9:47am EST
. and diplomatic missions in washington d.c.. and a professorial instructor, at george washington university. and i leave this to have mr. myron bellkind and you can tell by his journalistic background and ask pertinent questions about the book. and we will talk later. [applause] >> senator mccain, i am truly honored to welcome you on this veterans day. and the president of the national press club. my classmate pat buchanan made a similar report. i welcome you as a member of the nash -- the press club. and i want to acknowledge and what can be acknowledged for a moment. [applause] >> senator mccain, your book, published today, appropriately on veterans day, profiles 13 soldiers from 13 wars from the revolutionary war to iraq. among all the millions who served in the military how did you select those 13 to be easy subject representing each work? what criteria did you use? how did you do it? >> thank you. could i say thank you to the press club for hosting this event and after i lost running for president slept like a baby. sleep two hours, wake up and cry, sleep two hours -- very h
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2015 10:13pm EST
media campaigns. george tiller the nation's leading abortionist was gunned down while attending church. 1/3 to 1/5 of professional women cannot obtain the abortions they desire. they have succeeded in providing a broad array of restrictive statutes to make it more costly and less accessible. more than half states have trap laws which seek to force clinic closures by imposing expensive requirements such as demanding women receive counseling and establishing a timeframe between which they obtain the procedure, sometimes as long as 72 hours. these increased the expense and difficulty for women who do not live close to a provider. many states have informed consent procedures that specify information which must be given. one government survey found almost 90 percent of centers gave out false information concerning the link between abortion, breast cancer, infertility. funding creates another obstacle. women cannot obtain abortions because of lack of resources. although women certainly differ on the morality most can unite around the goal of making it safe and unnecessary. nearly one third w
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2015 7:00pm EST
jealous of its exact to say it is okay. but george macdonald fraser is terribly objectionable british empire sort of chap and to it is combined with the sharp novels. and actually felt some of that feeling going from book to book to read the flash me as serious. >> are there other writers you feel you have to read every single thing they write? >> ask somebody else. i have to think. [laughter] >> how did you become a reader? >> by parents or provide have no memory of my parents actually reading it to us but they would say go away we are reading. [laughter] >> that is the way to do is. >> i think it is to show your child that you are in an important relationship with the book. my parents were divorced and i was very young we only saw our father one week per year. but i remember i was very young going to visit my father and he was reading the first godfather if he could not even looked up he was really happy we were there but he was so stuck with it i will remember he cut the head off the horse and he put the head in the bed. my father was a cop in losses angeles. and somehow i think th
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2014 6:00am EDT
. the east three different women us who they had voted for desma brooks voted for word george bush and debbie never votes begin she thinks politicians are no good. deployed together. once they're in afghanistan the differences between them don't seem as important any more in what is important is the question of their personalities and how do they get along and to how will they use their time and how will they interact with each other? and debbie takes michelle under her wing she is very maternal but she is especially trying to affirm the show. they work for an ex-marine and he is super frustrated with michelle who will stop talking about how the war is about idea and to use yet the one point to make a bet if they can turn this woman into a good soldier and michelle is bound and determined that will never happen and debbie tries to show her this is not the easiest way to go. [laughter] there they are. in afghanistan. the armament team michelle and debbie are both on the armor mitt team as weapons mechanics. it runs out of american weapons to fix. they are in a support battalion doing ma
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2014 8:00pm EDT
, somebody like winston churchill, george washington because all of their memories have been recorded. there you are talking to a hologram having a great afternoon tea with abraham lincoln. this is possible. and the question of mind without body, science fiction writers love the concept and believe it or not if you have to discs one with your genome and one with your connect dome and they live on after you die some say the mind is living beyond the body. this is the dream of the ancient, the trade of science fiction writers and this is now believable. let's talk about the brain. first of all blood flows on mri scans. on the left is your brain. not much happens but on the bright is when you tell a lie. when you tell a lie first you have to create the lie and then you have to create the cover-up in the consistency with the lynn with all the previous lies you have been telling all these years. that's a lot of brain power. your brain would light up like a christmas tree. this is your brain on the right telling a lie. what have we learned from these brain scans quickly have learned the most ancie
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2013 6:00pm EST
president of the united states was. she said oh, yes, george washington. and they said it's fine, you go register for it and they looked at my father, a big and imposing man, six 2'", and they said my father, how many beads are in that jar. and there were hundreds of beads mentor. and so my father said you failed the test and he was very unhappy, he ran back and was talking to frank hunter was an old man in his church and he said, oh, reverend thomas we had to get registered. there's a clerk down there, she's a republican issue trying to build the republican party. and she will register anyone who will say that they are a republican. and now you didn't register by party, but i suspect that this woman was telling her to go register republican. so he registered republican was republican the rest of his life. a very proud one. but he came through it because that was waged for him to get his vote. >> my grandmother talked about it as well when goldwater ran for president. and one of the most moving parts of the book that really came through loud and clear what she felt the fear that it wasn'
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 5:00pm EDT
channel invasion of france in 1942, which would have been in an educated disaster. george marshall was the primary proponent for that. this election began the eclipse of isolationism in america. america had always an isolationist nation come of it ever since then, we've always been engaged for better or worse than often for the worse in the rest of the world. when the lease on the destroyer deal really planted the seeds for the national security state that we have become today. and it changed the way we think about the presidency. before 1940, we seldom if ever thought, is this someone a presidential candidate who is capable of conducting foreign policy and protect the american people, which is the premier responsibility of any president. so as i said, i think 1940 was one of the most consequential elections in 1964 with lincoln ran for reelection during the civil war. altogether, it was an extraordinary example of presidential leadership. roosevelt set his sights on saving britain in giving the united states the time it needed to prepare for war, which he knew was coming. he concluded
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 8:00pm EDT
, government, and international affairs, at george mason university. she founded and directed terrorism, transnational crime and corruption center, t.r.a.c., which is a characteristic way in which she approaches her research. she is very empirically ore yep -- oriented. the problem with criminal networks is those who don't know talk, and those who don't know talk. and that's not the case we louise shelley and her team's work. they have a propensity for empirical research, for going out in the field, and in this subject, going out on the field very often is quite dangerous. she has won and earned many awards. she is the recipient of a national endowment of the humanities, cannon institute, full bright -- fellowships and grants to study the subject. the author of ten books of this latest one. she will give us a brief introduction to the main messages and the main conclusions of "dirty entanglements" and then we are lucky of the may associate who specializes in india. but takes a broad view of these trends and has some very interesting insights about how some of the global trends
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 9:00am EST
oversswung the pendulum. the first six years of the george bush administration and overreliance on military force, first six use of the obama administration and under reliance on military force. the bush administration corrected in the final two years and the best individual signal was the hiring of bob gates, the best secretary of defense we ever had, i am extremely hopeful, as we spent lots of time talking about iraq, we do what is required to defeat isis in iraq and we learn from this and make different choices in afghanistan so we don't have to fight a third afghan war in my life. >> let me invite your questions on that cheerful note. what i call on you if you would stand and say your name is so we can get to know each other. icy hand there. i don't see the body attached to it but you got the microphone. go ahead. >> you asked about the battle for ideas. i wondering in terms of cultural understanding of the american political establishment and specifically as an example of the need to get a status of forces agreement in iraq where publicly the protest asian was we don't want on
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 12:15am EDT
ellsworth is the fbi cancer described the sightseeing visit to george washington's home in mt. vernon that he took with sebold during a break in the trial and a letter that ellsworth wrote to his parents. he said here was bills outstanding item of the trip to ellsworth wrote. he admired the simple mansion, the outhouse organization the building for the kitchen one for the tools one for the smokehouse the greenhouse the laundry etc. each with its living quarters with the slaves doing the work there. he spent much time there and bill said that was the kind of like he wanted. a little kingdom not dependent on any one for its existence. i think a walnut creek he had that briefly until then. so thank you so much for your time and i'm happy to take any questions. [applause] >> thank you peter. would you be willing to sign books for people afterwards? great. good for them if anyone has any questions. wait for the microphone. >> thank you. what happened to sebold cosack mother in germany. >> siebold's mother, this was a great great. he went to the fbi and told them you have got to promise you are
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2014 10:16am EST
instructor at george washington university. as far as the rest of it, i am going to leave this up to mr. myron belkind. you can tell by his journalistic background that he is going to do a great job with senator mccain and ask some pertinent questions about the book. we will talk to you later for the q&a. it is all yours. [applause] >> senator mccain, i am honored to welcome you on this veterans day. in my capacity as the club at 107th president of the fresco -- >> at least you were president of something. [applause] >> my classmate at buchanan made a similar remark. i am also honored to welcome you as a member of the national press club american legion post 20. your book, published today, i want to acknowledge, your co-author, and in the back. [applause] >> senator mccain, your book published today appropriately on veterans day profiles 13 soldiers from 13 wars from the revolutionary war to iraq. among all the millions who served in the military, how did you select those 13 to be the subjects representing each war. and could i just say thank you to the press club for hosting this ev
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,842 (some duplicates have been removed)