Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171214
STATION
DATE
2014 5
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 3:35pm EST
indian removal finally occur in the eastern united states. a lot of people like george washington had tried to formulate a policy of assimilation where indians could become americans, in their sense of the word, and stay where they were located. the american indians had populations in the tens of thousands. the american government was under pressure by settlers to take the land one way or another. so jackson was excited when he heard the news of fort mims and saw this as an opportunity to take land from the creek's and negotiated the treaty of fort jackson. at the end of the war, that took 21,000,000 acres from the creek nation. 20 years later when he became president, he was able to push through the removal act of 1830 that led to forced removal of indians from the east and the north, the ohio country. the attack itself launched the invasion of the creek nation and the confiscation of all this land, which after the war was opened up for settlement. alabama and southern georgia would not have been settled if not for this war. there was a thing called alabama fever, this land rush in t
CSPAN
May 17, 2014 5:36pm EDT
to see indian removal occur throughout the eastern united states. george washington, thomas jefferson had tried. they can become americans and their sense of the word and it stay where they were located, but on smaller parcels of land. the american indians of course the populations in the tens of thousands. and millions of acres of land. american government was under tremendous pressure by american settlers to take that land one way or another. saw this as a perfect pitch and the to take land from the creeks he initially negotiated the treaty. both from the creeks as well as those who fought against. and 20 years later when he became president he was able to then pushed through the removal act of 1830 that deadly to the wide scale removal. the attack itself, of course colloids to the invasion of the creek nation which immediately after the wall was opened, alabama and a good bit of central georgia would not have been settled as early as it had been if it were not for this war alabama fever, they land rush in the years following the war. the most immediate impact. the removal act, the
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)