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CSPAN
Apr 14, 2013 1:50pm EDT
of his contemporary and did not affect him or his work. >> and now, logan beirne examines george washington thoughts on politics and government during wartime. this is a little over an hour. >> good evening. i am the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the booktalk series. i also want to thank the federalist society are cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne, the author of a new book entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." very much a yellow school boat. it began as a paper while logan was a law student at the under the supervision of eskridge. after graduation from law school in 2008, working at the law firm, he returned to yellow school in 2010 and begin turning the paper into the book we feature tonight. appropriately we have professor eskridge to comment on the boat. he's a highly distinguished member of the outlawed school faculty. the author of numerous casebook, monographs and articles covering a wide range of topics in several books have been featured by air they breathe. a
CSPAN
Feb 28, 2015 11:05am EST
, in richmond and in washington fought services for command, the new about his connections to george washington and common knowledge. both saw tremendous significance in them. they also knew that winfield scott who was the ranking general in the u.s. army fought lee was the best soldier he had ever seen in the field and robbery et looked like a fine soldier. he stood just under 6 feet tall had powerful broad shoulders, had barrel chest, had perfect posture, everyone who's saw him saw some version of the same thing that man looks every inch the soldier. in 1861 and emissary for abraham lincoln asked robert e. lee, right across from arlington to the city of washington. net emissary's name was frances blair and he has an extraordinary offer, he said will you lead and the union army to crush secession? remember the story, blair tried in every way to convince robert e. lee to say yes. he said the country looks to you, quote, as a representative of the washington family to save the union george washington forged and that is not an exaggeration because the son of george washington -- son in
CSPAN
May 28, 2011 12:00pm EDT
george patton had more of a voice that was kind of a blend of an elderly southern bell and the martian from bugs bunny. george c. scott has the voice patton wished he had. >> a good note to leave it on. thank you very much for tonight and safety for coming. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website, jonathanand wjordan.com. booktv in partnership with white house networks is seeking new viewers on the road to florida for a look at the literary scene of the tampa st. petersburg area. here is a video shot by our local content vehicle crew. .. >> people would grab at the bag, and whatever number they grabbed, that would be the leader number of the day. the dean of the underworld, charliewall. charlie had a number of lieutenants, chief among those was george. and george would collect all the gambling receipts every night from the el dorado. one night he's sitting here on the street in his car waiting for the gambling receipts when a black sedan pulls up alongside him. an unknown gunman blows through the driver's side window of george's car. surprisingly, george was not k
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 11:45pm EDT
latest book called mr. president george washington and the making of the nation's highest office. what did you discover new about george washington and this biography? >> the constitution had executive power in a president of the united states, but it failed to disclose what those powers were to visit and it didn't even tell the president how to use them. it told them simply that he was to execute the office of the president. what does that mean? it means nothing today. it meant nothing then and that is what the framers wanted. they had lived for years under an absolute monarchies in indolent and under the tyranny of that malarkey and they were not about to recreate the rtc they created a figurehead in the first president of taking the oath of office was to be just that and george washington and penn the commander-in-chief of the revolutionary army army that defeated the world's most powerful army on earth and one the nation's independence. they adored him and they elected him by the unanimous vote the only president to be elected unanimously. so he took his oath of office and sw
CSPAN
Apr 23, 2011 11:00am EDT
alexander hamilton won of the inaugural george washington book prize for early american history. ron chernow brings political perspective to the politics of today. listen to his words. president washington, like president obama, enters the office hoping for reasonable and sensible discourse, hoping to enjoy a period of non partisan politics. the two party system emerges rather rapidly from his own cabinet. hamilton and jefferson heading up different wind. like two years there has been a political honeymoon for washington do to his stature but once the attack start in the opposition they are ferocious and relentless. washington is actually accused of being a british double agent all along during the revolutionary war. sound familiar? ladies and gentlemen, let's hear more about george washington from his biographer. join me in welcoming ron chernow. [applause] >> thank you for that wonderful introduction. always a thrill to be here at the miami book fair. in 1789, two months before george washington was sworn in as the first president he received a fascinating letter from his frie
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2011 9:30am EST
chernow appeared at the 2010 book fair international to discuss his one volume biography of george washington. he took questions from the audience following his remarks. this is 45 minutes. >> washington was dignified, stoic, heroic and fiercely devoted but also a slave owner. and unyielding tax master, somewhat vein and a failure at business. unlike his peers, jefferson, madison little hamilton and adams who were college graduates, washington had only the equivalent of a seventh grade education. ron chernow was born in brooklyn and is a graduate of yale and cambridge. he is considered to be one of the most distinguished commentators on politics, business, finance in america today. the st. louis post-dispatch has hail him as one of the most preeminent biographers of his generation and the new york times calls him, ron chernow is an eloquent architect of monumental histories as we have seen in decades. in 2004 his biography of alexander hamilton won the inaugural george washington book prize for american history. ron chernow brings political perspective to the politics of today. lis
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2015 11:00am EST
elizabeth was a soldier's wife and had been on the plains with george for a number of years, she would have an idea of what was impending doom and what was not. the day george left to go, that was something inside her felt as though this wasn't going to go well. now, certainly george had been involved in other scrimmages and word had gotten back to her that he had been killed. he had expressed to elizabeth a number of times until you get a definitive word, don't believe it. the other men scouts come to let elizabeth know what happened, they would say to her, none wounded, none missing, all dead, so there can be no question that there isn't anybody alive. george is gone. i was fascinated with elizabeth custer's devotion to george. many history books make it seem that george had nothing likable about him, that he was too arrogant for anybody to be in love with him. elizabeth, her relationship with him fascinated me and i wanted to know more. he was in his latter teens and he was in early 20's. i say that because no one is ever really 100% sure when this event actually happened. i k
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 12:00pm EDT
tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >> well, george washington enjoyed a long 50-year relationship with al sand alexandria. we like to say this is george washington's hometown. >> this gives our visitors a great picture of what the interior of a civil war fort would have leaked like. >> did you know alexandria was part of the original district of columbia? >> welcome to alexandria, virginia, on booktv. with the help of our cable partners, for the next hour we'll take you to this town on the potomac river just a couple of miles south of washington d.c. join us as we explore its rich and varied history through the works of local authors beginning with a look at some of the city's hidden stories from the past. >> book is "hidden history of al alexandria d.c.," and the last part of that title is very important because it's not about alexandria, virginia, or it's about a period in history when the district of columbia included parts of what's now virginia. what i wanted to do was look at this 50-year time period and get a sense of why al sabd drink ya became part of the district of columbia,
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2009 4:15pm EDT
understand the ideals and unyielding integrity of george washington. despite all of our frailties, david mccullough dress many reasons why we should be proud to be an american. his lovely wife is in the audience. where are you? rosalie, thank you for being here. she has been his soul mate. they've been married over 50 years and together he bought his first typewriter in 1962 and still pipes his books on the typewriter. isn't that fun? these and gentlemen, david mccullough. [applause] >> thank you. how nice of you. thank you. what a warm welcome. thanks for all you said so generously and french and rosalie, who is my editor-in-chief and she is listen to the commission control for a large family. we have five children, five spouses of the five children, 17 grandchildren, and she runs this all in one way or another. she's also the secretary of the treasury. [laughter] somebody's laughing as though they really know what that means. [laughter] and the chair of the ethics committee. [laughter] i am pleased you mentioned my typewriter. i'm worried about my typewriter. it is a 1940 royal
CSPAN
May 16, 2010 12:00am EDT
memoir with cokie roberts. from george washington university. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good evening everyone. i am richard, the undersecretary for history, art and culture at the smithsonian institution. it is my pleasure to welcome all of you, and it really is all of you, a nice crowd here tonight, for this program this evening with the former first lady of the united united states, laura, on occasion of the publication of her memoirs, laura bush, "spoken from the heart." which the "new york times" called a deeply felt, keenly observed account, adding mrs. bush conjures her hometown with enormous detail, lyricism and feeling. tonight, mrs. bush will be interviewed by cokie roberts and we are all divided to welcome her back to the smithsonian associates event. copies of mrs. bush's book, which she has already signed, are available in the lobby. because of her schedule, there will not be any personalization of the books after the program. and before we begin, i would like to remind all of you to have your cell phones or electronic devices silenced and i had better do
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2011 2:15am EDT
distinguished senator, walter george, who was up for re-election. george was an old school southerner with formal, chifl rouse manners. he always refer today his wife as miss lucy, and she called him mr. george. he seemed to come right out of central casting. al seated on the platform was a young attorney named lawrence camp whom roosevelt was going to endorse. so there sat george on the platform not displaying any emotion. walter george, in fact, was not a diehard reactionary or an outspoken adversary of the president. in 1933 he'd supported virtually all of fdr's proposals including the national industrial recovery act, tva, agricultural adjustment act. later he voted for social security, the national labor relations act and other new deal measures. and during the 1936 presidential campaign george had backed roosevelt all the way. but during fdr's second term he cast votes against some key administration bills including housing bills, court reform, executive reorganization and the wages and hours bill. roosevelt began his talk by discussing the achievements of the rural electrify ca
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 12:00am EDT
come and john connolly said no and ronald reagan said no. and we asked george herbert walker bush to command he said yesterday came and spoke at a big fund-raiser at the civic center in birmingham. birmingham was the republican city at that time. we went to the civic center and i was sitting at the table and near me was this young man with blond hair and he said why don't you tell us what you think of george bush's speech? i said well okay i will do that. so i took notes as bush spoke and when the speech was done the young man turned to me and said what did you think of that and i said he's a very nice man and obviously very sensitive and very bright but he needs organization and he needs a sense of style. it's obvious that speech wasn't rehearsed pretty needs to rehearsed and the young man said my name is karl rove and i worked for him and how would you like to meet him right now? i could take you upstairs. went upstairs and i shook hands with mr. bush and he invited me to come to houston to meet him. with him and his wife in january of 1978. i flew to houston at january and came to
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2011 7:00am EST
/lcv. >> up next, patrick o o'donnell talks about the marines who made up george company, one of the most highly-decorated units in the korean war. he discusses his book at borders bookstore in westlake, ohio. it's a little over 50 minutes. >> good evening. i'm here to introduce you to the author of "give me tomorrow," pat o'donnell, tell you a little bit about him. for the past 20 years, pat o'donnell has been capturing the oral history of american combat veterans from world war i to afghanistan. he has personally conducted 4,000 oral histories and written seven books on modern war and espionage. he has co-produced or written 15 history channel documentaries and was a historical consultant for "band of brothers." he is award-winning and best selling author of seven books. most importantly, he was in combat, and he volunteered to go to iraq on his own. when he was in combat, he wasn't a serviceman. he went as a historian, and he just happened to be with the marines in the battle of fallujah. i don't know if you know where that is, but that was a big battle in iraq. he volunteered to
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2011 6:00pm EST
talks about the killing of san francisco mayor george moscone and supervisor dan white in november of 1978. this is about an hour. >> good evening and welcome to tonight's meeting of the commonwealth club of california. i'm steven seiber. i will be your mott raider for tonight's program. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everybody to visit us as commonwealth club.org. our speaker is journalist and author mike weiss. in 1978 and 1979, mike did extensive reporting on the assassinations of mayor george moscone and supervisor harvey milk while working for rolling stone and time magazine. tonight mike is here to discuss this book "double play:." "double play" is about a time in the city's history that is iconic, informative, and devastating. it provides an intimate look into the lives of three men who came to city hall from divergent paths. and mike details how city hall impacted them and the events leading up to the assassination. mike has great compassion for the shocking event of the day. mike weiss was an award-winning reporter for the san francisco chronicle and is a r
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2013 5:30am EDT
george c. marshall as chief of staff. the nomenclature, i think, is sometimes confusing. the chief of staff of the army is not a staff officer, he is the chief of the army, and that is what george marshall became under fdr. their first serious encounter in the white house did not go all that well. the president was describing a plan that he had for increasing the output of aircraft, and this was prior to our entering the war. ask he was very pleased with it -- and he was very pleased with it. he turned to general marshall, and he said don't you think so, george? and you could just read marshall's face. he was not at all pleased with this easy familiarity that fdr employed almost on first meeting anybody, and thereafter roosevelt picking up on this, they became throughout their association general marshall and mr. president. now, marshall, nevertheless, went on in this meeting which i've described to criticize the president's program. he thought it was an overexpansion beyond the capacity of the army air corps at that point. roosevelt, he could be surrounded by yemen who were a dime --
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 8:15am EDT
with washington" takes us on a tour of several alexandria, virginia locations important to george washington. >> by retired about 15 years ago and was looking for things to do. the alexandria archaeologists were looking for somebody to develop a walking tour of sites associated with george washington, so i agreed to undertake a project and a researched. i spent about two years researching the history and came up with 140 sites. i think she was looking for a per-share but i ended up writing a book called "walking with washington" which has two recent george washington. george washington enjoyed a 50 year relationship year by the time it was founded in 1749 when he was 17 until he died in 1799 at the age of 67. he participated in political life in the city. he was a trustee of alexandria and he represented a andrea in the house of the burgesses, the virginia legislature. even when he was president, he made sure when they choose area to be the new site of the nation's capital of alexandria was included in the original district of columbia. the george washington memorial powers of the
CSPAN
Jun 18, 2011 8:00am EDT
jonathan jordan presents a biography of general eisenhower, george patton and omar bradley. the author explores the personal and working relationships of the three men, all graduates of west point who were equally friends and opponents. it is a little under an hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. welcome to the national world war ii museum. of pleasure to see such a pact house tonight and i can tell you you are all in for a good show after having spent tonight with the speaker and redding most of the book, don't tell him have rattle of it yet but most of the book. we are pleased to have c-span who wanted to come down and fill mr. jordan's presentation. we have had a nice relationship with them over the years and is great that only not william our members viewed as on our web site but also c-span will be airing this hopefully soon. tonight's speaker, jonathan jordan, is the author of the award winning book loans star navy, texas, fight for the gulf of mexico and the shaping of the american west. some of you may have read one, many or all of his writings on the second world war.
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2011 1:20am EDT
new york. >>> and now an interview from george mason university. >> george mason professor who rosemarie zagarri in your book the politics of size you begin the book by saying that the deepest and most antagonistic conflict that the federal constitution convention was the controversy over her presentation in the national legislature. why is that? home is a lot of people think slavery is an issue that and i was a major issue in the was contentious but the fact is that it was only the deep eight over how people would be represented in the lower and upper house of the new congress that was the major issue that nearly stopped the convention and nearly cent of the delegates home who are that nearly resulted in the whole debate being ended, and what i think it is very little understood debate but it's what got us when this sort of a sesto em ho we have today in congress where all of the states have two representatives in the senate in other words and equal vote in the senate and representation some the basis of the population in other words what more representatives for more people i
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2011 11:00pm EDT
francisco major george positive coney and supervisor harry milk by dan white in november of 1973. this is about -- 1978. this is about an hour. .. >> make it details the rise to power house city hall impacted them and the events leading up and his perceptions are poignant with compassion for the shocking events of the day. mark weiss was an award winning reporter for the services go, go and receive the mystery writers of america award for his narrative account of the assassinations. please welcome mark weiss. [applause] >> thank you. thank you to the members of the club for inviting us to be here. i want to assure you i will let everybody get out of here before dark which is not much of the promise of the longest day of the year but what i will do tonight is simply recreate the assassination and trial that followed in the events leading through the suicide. and try to answer some of the questions that i know still troubled people when dan white went down two city hall to assassinate george mosconi and harvey milk he had a plan. very methodical in the preparation and execution and he waile
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2011 1:00pm EDT
here on c-span2. >> recently book tv visited george washington university to interview several professors who had written recent books. over the next few sundays he will be airing these interviews starting at 1:00 p.m. eastern. this weekend we talked with the former spokesman for the 9/11 commission and author of the leaders we deserved and the few we didn't. and assistant professor of media and public affairs at gw and author of the myth of digital democracy. for a complete schedule and a list of other george russ bin university interviews cut to booktv.org. >> this is book tv on c-span2. we have been doing a college series on book tv where we visit colleges so that we can talk to professors who have also written books and expose you to a few more ideas. now joining us is a professor at george washington university. we are on site. here is his book, the leaders we deserved and a few we didn't about the american presidents. how do we typically rage president's? >> not well. every president stay or july 4th or in the news we are told by the newspapers that yet another pow was se
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2011 10:00am EST
their representative in the discussions that were about to take place this man, francois george pequot. now, the two men went into the french foreign office and pulled out maps and crayons. they assumed that their countries would defeat the ottoman empire, and they proceeded to redraw the map of the middle east in their own interests or in the interests of great britain and france as they understood those interests to be. very broadly, the french would get control over what today we call syria, and they colored crayons. and the british would gain control of mesopotamia, and they colored that red on the map. now, i should possibly explain in area a and area b, that was where the envisioned independent arab kingdom would be. but in area a, the independent arabs would have french advisers whose advice they must accept -- [laughter] and in area b the same was true for the british. now, by the way, they also -- you'll see there's another color on the map, and that's because they recognized that palestine was different. palestine was different because jerusalem is located there, jerus
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2011 9:00am EDT
charlotte, north carolina on c-span2 and free. >> up next and interview from george washington university. >> host: we are doing a college series where we visit colleges and talk to professors who have written books and expose you to a few more ideas. now joining us is alvin felzenberg from george washington university. here is his book, "the leaders we deserved (and a few we didn't)". about the american presidents. how do we typically rate presidents? >> guest: not well. every president's they work july 4th we are told by newspapers another poll has been done were 50 or 100 historians and here are the great presidents. great, near great, average and below average. then it tells what criteria. all the familiar faces come up. the ones we see on the currency. the ones we build monuments to in this city and others. let me tell you what distinguishedes the great from the ordinary. hi enjoyed seeing somebody putting a bill in congress giving george washington back his birthday. somebody decided in the 70s that every holiday would change so veterans day changed. they're all not the s
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 9:15am EST
examples we saw that was last year in the george zimmerman case. the george zimmerman case was the greatest case of media malpractice i think in american history. the only one that would even come close is walter durant trying to cover of genocide in ukraine. the attempt by the media, very clear attempt to frame george zimmerman, really frame him, was obvious and politically motivated. was obvious what they were trying to do. what actually happened in the george zimmerman case in a hispanic man trailing a black man he thought was engage in possible criminal suspicious behavior, called 911 and got out of this kind when he turned around and then back to the car, was confirmed by the black man who proceeded to pound the man's far into the ground until he shot him. that is what actually happened. every police investigation has shown that is what happened. nothing to contradict george zimmerman's accountant invest and not a shred of moments to counter the george zimmerman's of count of invent which was why he was least in the first place. the media turned this into what jesse jackson term debt a
CSPAN
May 28, 2011 11:00am EDT
eisenhower, george patton and omar bradley during world war ii. the worse it -- personal and working relationships of the three men who were friends and opponents. it is a little under an hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. welcome to the national world war ii museum. of pleasure to see such a pact house and i can tell you you are in for a good show having spent the day with tonight's speaker and having read most of the book. we are pleased to have c-span that wanted to fill mr. jordan's presentation. we had a nice relationship with them over the years. is great that not only will our members across the world view this on our web site but also c-span is going to be airing this hopefully soon. tonight's speaker, jonathan jordan is author of loans star navy, texas league original the fight for the gulf of mexico and shaping of the american west. some of you may have read many or all of his writings on the second world war personalities, battles and weapons such as world war ii magazine, are injured general, military history, and so on. he is a contributing author to the armcha
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2011 1:20pm EDT
us. >> guest: thank you so much. >> and now an interview from george mason university. >> george mason professor. in your book you begin by saying you have the deepest and most antagonistic conflict at the federal constitutional convention was the controversy over representation in the national legislature. why is that? >> well, i think that a lot of people think about the constitutional convention and they think that slavery was the major issue in toward the delegates apart. and, of course, slavery was a major issue and it was very contentious, but the fact was that it was only the debate over how people would be represented in the upper and lower house of this new congress that was the major issue that nearly stopped the convention and send all the delegates on that nearly resulted in the the whole debate being ended. end i think it is of very little understood debate, but it is what the us the sort of odd system that we have today in congress where all the states have two representatives in the senate, in other words, an equal vote in the senate, and then representation on the
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 8:00am EST
political scene. lyndon johnson readily beat barry goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a pitted battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country, with the winner walking off with a modest majority. there is customary wisdom, a campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it is easy to point to the national security or economic consequencess or consequent impact on the rati
CSPAN
May 16, 2010 1:00am EDT
happened? >> george was running for congress at that time and george's mother gave me some advice. she said don't criticize george's speeches. she said she had criticized her george's speech and he had come home from weeks later with letters saying it was the heat-- best speech he had ever given. [laughter] so i really take it too hard and i did not ever criticize them. one time we were driving home from laveck and we were just driving into our driveway. george said, tell me the truth, how was my speech? i said well, it wasn't very good. he drove into the garage wall. [laughter] .. >> my dad never talked about it. we had these photographs and every wants in awhile we would look at it that we would not talk about. my mother did tell me one story that he was impressed he remembered one of our readers standing with a shovel and handing it to one of the germans that was still there when they were liberated and said it dig he said no. i am an officer. she took a shovel and hit him across the bottom and said it dig. and he did. [laughter] of course, there were digging graves. percolator many
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2016 11:49pm EDT
. >> george dickson is the publishing director of blue scary. what is blue saberi? >> blues berry in the u.s. is a division of the will of lounsbury worldwide publisher so the u.s. division founded in 1998. bloomsbury company was founded in 1986 and the first harry potter novel layup opened in the united states and the publisher the adult division here. >> host: a kind of books to publish? >> guest: we publish about 110 books a year largely nonfiction. we do 20% fiction put a lot of history and politics and current events, food related books, popular science, those are the four areas and publishing memoirs as well. >> host: who want to catch up with you at the publishing convention to talk about some of the books coming out this fall and you've got one coming up. guess who was called a faustian bargain by woman named joan mellon and as the story of the trial and lbj accomplished to an enormous amount of the dark side. the stories told of the lens of a man completely unknown to system history named matt wallace who only attracted with lyndon johnson on a couple of occasions but his life and h
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2009 1:45pm EDT
undergone a massive arms buildup. >> in your view, did george w. bush contribute to the decline of the american conservative movement? >> will, there is a strong sediment that he did within conservatives. i do think that the war in iraq, while george bush thought it was a principled action, really caused a great consternation among suffering of the right. and i also think the republicans having gained control of congress in 2004, and being spendthrifts really helped cause a reaction as well. it's easy to forget that bush won a pretty decisive victory in 2004, so the down slide in the fortunes of the republican party were pretty severe, as you look at 2006 at the midterm elections in 2006 and the last election in 2008, presidential election. >> we are speaking with you here at the organization of american historians annual gathering. as a conservative, are you in the minority as a historian? >> i think i am very decided minority. i think minority exaggerates the number of conservatives here at this meeting. i should tell you that i started off on the left. and i got my union card, p
CSPAN
May 14, 2011 4:00pm EDT
year she was introduced to a young george puppy bush. that was his nickname. she said that when he was in the room he was so tall and attractive that you could hardly breathe. later on i found this wonderful" she said, when i tell my kids that george bush was the first man i ever kissed they just about to throw up. this is really, by the way, very typical. she is the master of self-deprecating humor. she has never minded pointing at herself and making herself but of rancho. she was smitten with an ambush. he was her and they were married in 1946. he had been a fighter pilot. mrs. bush always thought that she was going to be settling down with an investment banker in new york. much to her surprise george bush said to her, no, i think i would like to have a career in the gas and oil business. we are going to texas. interestingly they went to texas. it was 19,408th. 1949. and mrs. bush's mother was so appalled that they were going there. she was so convinced that texas in 1949 was just a frontier town that she used to send barbara packages which contained ivory soap and tissues becaus
CSPAN
May 29, 2011 11:00pm EDT
dwight eisenhower, george patton, and omar bradley during world war ii. the others was the personal and working relationships of the three men, all graduates of west point, who were equally friends and opponents. it is a little under an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. welcome to the national world war two museum. it is a pleasure to see such a packed house tonight. i can tell that you are all in for a good show after having spent the day with tonight's speaker and having read most of the book. don't tell him i have not read all of it yet, but most of the book. we are pleased here to have c-span that wanted to come down and fell in mr. jordan's presentation. we have had a nice relationship with them over the years and it's great that not only will our members across the world be able to view this on our website, but also c-span will be airing this, hopefully, sen. tonight's speaker, jonathan jordan toy is the author of the award winning book, lone star navy, tex. the fight for the gulf of mexico and the shipping of the american west. some of you
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2012 1:00am EDT
future. >> host: george gilder when you see the fight to in congress over the debt ceiling or the tax rates what would you like to see congress do? >> it is a theater of the absurd. we need to flat senate tax rates and deregulate. i tell this story to a number of countries that face a crisis far exceeding our own. is the land is my favorite. the third richest in the world in 1930's. by the 1980's was the third world countries. it could not even feed itself. it is essentially was a socialist country. fifth latin to government spending and eliminate did add cracker troll subsidies it started not only feeding itself but became a great source of food around the world and competed with dairy products and wisconsin so aggressively they accuse them of unfair trading practices. it is the great vanity of bureaucrats somehow their jobs are important but we have eliminated 150,000 bureaucrats and the keynesian economist declared it would cause a new great depression, the worst dislocation that anybody faced and instead we enter the 1950 use that was a period of boom. this was after a reduction o
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 6:00pm EST
[inaudible] >> george wolf did a lot of very detailed interviews about that match race, and i had a wonderful luxury in writing about this match race in that everybody did he tell the interviews. everybody talked at great length about things coming and george was a very observant man. and he would tell you very tiny things about what horses were doing that could tell you a lot. which way a horse's year was pointing in which we he was looking and that's where i got that from. >> [inaudible] >> i was wondering if it was still a race track. >> it's the most beautiful race track in the world of very much like it was then. it's the same color and in a very high class race through much of the year the mountains are still behind it and it is just lovely. >> right back here. >> "seabiscuit" is the best book i've ever read. [applause] >> it's engaging, it's an engaging book. it puts you back in time. i felt like i was living with those people. it's just a phenomenal book. having said that, i would like to know why do you think that seabiscuit didn't run the triple crown of freezing? >> that'
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
rise of the balkans about george bush's foreign policy team. lots of people think now understandably, but not quite accurately that the book was about neoconservatives or hawks like chaney and rumsfeld. it's not exactly true. it was up about all of the people in the george w. bush administration. cheney, rumsfeld and colin powell and richard r. medish who had risen with them in sight of the republican party. despite all the differences among the members of the previous administration, they shared some common traits and beliefs. all of them had backgrounds in the military or in the pentagon and this was true of the secretary of state who had been the chairman of that joint chiefs of staff. richard r. medish as it was of cheney and rumsfeld. it's rare to have an administration with the former secretary of defense. and they also shared some common beliefs. america was unquestionably a force for good in the world. a military power was of supreme importance and in fact the disagreements among them were halgand win force should be used for the united states should be saved for the big war
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 1:00am EST
, dan balz, george packer of the new yorker and jeremy scahill dirty wars. this is live coverage here on booktv. international. those of you joining us to chapman center in the lou harrison and absurd as a volunteer for many, many .. years. it's happy anniversary to the 30 years here in our community. [applause] we are very grateful to art software in particular, american airlines and always shall. i'd also like to recognize the friends of the fair, many who are here in our first couple of rows. thank you so much for your generosity in support. we look forward to your continuing to be a friend for many, many years. miami book fair international and miami dade college work hand-in-hand to bring this book fair to us every year. it's a wonderful, this wonderful cultural affair that thousands and thousands of fairgoers are enriched by each and every year so thank you all. come on and have a seat, please. and as you know, our sessions are being streamed live by c-span. please help us to keep the fair going for another 30 years and we usually ask you to turn off your cell phones that we are
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 8:00am EST
, george wallace took office of governor alabama in a speech and inaugust rail address famously denounced defending segregation today, tomorrow, and segregation forever. he was speaking for a cast system that was pervasive, not only in the laws and in the state constitutions of all the southern states, but in many institutions and cultural institutions across the whole country of separation. this was separation strictly by race is what the segregation was about. young black people couldn't go into libraries under law, and then he went to jail trying to got to the library. in birmingham, you couldn't play checkers with perp of a different race in public. in the freedom rides, of course, people went to prison in mississippi for riding on a bus seated next to somebody of a different race. segregation was pervasive beyond what we think, but when you stop and think about it, it was pervasive in things far beyond race. there were no women at yale. there were no women at the university of north carolina except nursing students by state law. when i was there, student body was 95% male.
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 8:45am EDT
was actually from kenya, and i answered it, and it was actually george obama, the president's half brother. he's the youngest son of barack obama, senior. he said, i'm calling because my 2-year-old son is in the hospital with a serious chest condition, and i wondered if you could help me. i said, are you at the hospital, george? yes. hand the phone to the nurse. he did. the nurse confirmed that george's son is sick with a chest infection. i sold george i would send him a thousand dollars by western union. i said, george, suspect there anybody else to ask? why are you calling me? [laughter] he said, no. he said, this was the line that kill me, he said, you're like a brother to me. now, i thought to myself, here 1 ssh -- is a young man, half brother of the united states. barack is not only a multimillionaire, but the most powerful man in the world. yet his half brother can't call him in a time of need, and this same half brother is living in a six by ten hut slum dog millionaire style in the slum of the nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. this is a gu
CSPAN
Jul 13, 2013 8:00am EDT
lost america. and of course among the list of characters had to be george iii, the last king of america who shared the belief of many of his countrymen that written would cease to be a great power if it lost america. he was not responsible for the policies that led to the american revolution, that he became the leading war hawk and he refused to negotiate with opposition leaders who were committed to withdraw from america. writing at the time of the second world war butterfield described him as being almost churchillian vowing that he would never surrender whilst any 10 men in the kingdom will stand by me. he called for sacrifice. we must stretch every bit to defend ourselves and must run some risks for if we are to play it cautious game ruin will inevitably ensue. this i think responds to one of the great myths about the american revolution that the british simply didn't care. they cared deeply. this is one of the third longest wars in american history and one of the longest in british history. they made a very determined effort to recover this country. lord north and this is a
CSPAN
May 18, 2013 7:00pm EDT
last name i was close friends with somebody named george bush who i voted for for president not president but of might richard a. [laughter] i will -- my a fraternity. i will come back but not one person my wife says a redundancy is two words that is redundant so there were a lot of men who had egos and the women will say that is a redundancy. with all of these egos i did not know one person who had a bad thing to say about george bush. and the like ability, the character and good hardness of this man i did not vote for him for president on either occasion. i will say a majority of his policy positions but as to a good heart and character and strength, there is a man i would rely on in a crisis. richard nixon and devoted his life to public service and as we say in the world of politics, you can do the nixon to china moment that is a proper noun. it is more about richard nixon but what john kennedy wrote with "profiles in courage" and standing up to your base to make them larger than your narrowness. that a liberal democrat could not have gotten away with because it would have be
CSPAN
May 5, 2013 9:00am EDT
situation today for a super comes along. we can pick up karl rove or george soros, whichever side of the aisle you want to skewer. the average member in order to counter that these $3 million, which is $10,000 a day. they take their staffer, go across the street of federal time and get on telephone to the dccc or the under cc and they do that. that doesn't mean we've got that members. i promise you many members of congress would like this to change, too. many members do not find it delightful to raise this money. .. intervention and the public needed intervention. beautiful place can make it even better. so i address a lot of issues in the book and i hope it's not just look that at one issue or attacking one person. i'm not a better person. i spend time with my granddaughter. i get to go to india, as i told you. i get to do radio. a lot of great people like tom harkin and people to the right or left or the middle they get their voice out there and they tell people a story of what's going on in their government. the journalistic side of this is critical. so i'm happy. i'm not a per
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2009 9:00pm EDT
welfare as we know it. george will objective at the time and so did patrick moynihan but there you have it. it could be a problem. to answer the question abou what should be don h will tell you one place where i differ with most observers in all of this and this may have-- i am actually not one of those who think the republican party went wrong when it ceased to be conservative. i actuay think it got in trouble when the conservative ideologues took over. i think we would be better off with at least one republican legislator from the northeast and a representative in congress. back in the days of the late '50s and early '60s there was talk of there not been to parties in america but for. there were presidential party zen legislative parties and that is partly by the way white eisenhower and fdr also wanted to form a new party because they saw everything deadlock in stymied in congress often by conservatives with their own party so they wanted to drake realignmts. we now not only don't have the four party system any more, we have an imbalance with the republicans are very disciplined and
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2013 6:20am EST
? >> thank you. [inaudible question] [inaudible question] >> the question is about george hickey. there has been a television program on a book written claiming that george hickey who is manning the rifle, that he accidentally shot the president and that was what killed the president and a lot of people are believing this. >> we met years ago he was still alive, and the story came out in a book. he sued the entrance to the publisher. the publisher did not want to go to court because they found out that we have photographic proof that hickey could not have done it. so they settled with them out of court. now that he is dead, there is nobody left to assume. and so they sold this thing to production company and some detective down in australia put in his 2 cents and they resurrected that theory. it didn't happen. the gun he was holding was examined after the motorcade and it had never been fired. he was standing between two particular individuals, dave powers, president kennedy's personal public close associate and kenny o'donnell, his chief of staff. and he had done what they had a
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 2:48pm EDT
was used during impeachment of bill clinton to contest the 2000 election of george w. bush in the affordable care act in the constitution today. in my underground american dream. they write about her experience in america as an undocumented immigrant. they look at the establishment of freedom of the press in the american colonies fight club. they discussed the modern day sexism in the workplace through personal stories, research and statistics. edward conard is not the blame for economic stagnation. in the redistribution programs hurt the middle class look for these titles this coming week and watch for many of the authors on book tv on c-span two. the war in court have as the equality and growing the meaning of equality in the constitution that was not the burden worn burger himself was a judge on the dc circuit who was running for the supreme court. they have given a series of quite sober and semi- academic -- academic critique in the criminal procedure area but behind the scenes he wasn't wasn't quite so sober and so discreet and in the correspondence that he head with his old
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
vice president b. chief of staff to president george w. bush and his attendant countries involvement with the superpac, and american crossroads. [applause] be mac thank you. there's a little less than two months before the election and in many ways this is the time the book was designed for because this are into these last two months, this is the election really get going. and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove and he's in behind the scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. read new york here are not going to see much spent in the battleground states. and he's become king of the sub two. he has cover when you put this together money with money romney has raised the republican national committee is a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in this, in no way, mccain had 375 million to spend, so this is a fact or a five. you'll start seeing it come out now. the other thing i want to discuss about him, is susie really? what does he do? is a pol
CSPAN
Jun 25, 2011 12:30pm EDT
the american resolution and the father and son relationship between george washington and the yang marquis de lafayette. dr. russell, i also point out, has been an enthusiastic patrons of the book festival since its beginning and was an author / speaker in 2008. ladies and gentlemen, the true renaissance man, preston russell. [applause] at bank. >> thank you. thank you very much. i see my reputation has exceeded me. give me your tired of low poor, amasses yearning to breathe free, richard refuse of your teeming shores, send these to me this could easily applied in our country of immigrants to the founding of savannah in 1733. it applies to the statue of liberty from france to our first centennial in 1876. indeed, savannah was founded and is 50 years older than before america even was recognized as a country in 1783. so, story of immigrants. i guess we're pretty proud of these parts of being there rather old and traditional. trough study insist up the road are also a little bit older and they did a little bit up the about how much older there are. and it has been described that trus
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2015 12:06am EDT
continental forces under the command ultimately of george washington and washington would appoint general nathaniel green is the commander of the southern forces after 1778. after the american revolution of course the indian trade was over as farmers with dan and filled the backcountry and increasing numbers of land sessions from the creeks and the cherokees with which the indians all the way out of georgia. the initial farmers that lived in this area were producing tobacco. many of them had come from virginia and the carolinas where that was the cash crop and tobacco grew in this area as well so in the 1780s, 90s, we see augustine's and people in the countryside producing large numbers of tobacco that was put into what were called hogsheads and moved into town and basically big barrels that were then turned on their side. and axl put through the center hooked up to a team of horses and then world to town. that was how people made their money. the roads on which they were rolled and came to be called tobacco road because they followed bridges to keep the tobacco from going through
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