Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171213
STATION
DATE
2013 26
2014 25
2012 17
2015 17
2011 13
2010 4
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 4:00pm EST
a man like that. he says george bush instructed noriega to call fidel castro to warn of the invasion. that is not in my book because i could incorporate that. he testified before a grand jury mediationpated in a of the dispute between the drug cartel and noriega. cartel had rated a drug set up in 1984. against an agreement noriega had struck. they paid a great deal of money for protection of the laboratory. he said he media the dispute. that is a key point in the indictment. i have that story in some detail. the reason is i was able to cooperate it. this, theok like hardest i was not coming up with the information. it was coming up with the cooperation. hours were spent the readers not even notice trying to make sure i didn't overstep. when i write the man was bisexual, i have talked to people who were intimately involved with noriega in one way or another. i was able to confirm that to my satisfaction. that thed his habits way he lived? >> i think noriega was a man who liked control. he was not motivated by ideology. he was motivated to how our but control is the key. one s
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2013 6:00pm EST
amelia earhart. the book examines her life and times and her marriage to publisher george putnam who promoted his wife's adventures and feeds. ms. butler's book coincided with 100th anniversary of amelia earhart's birth in and the 60th anniversary of her disappearance. this is about an hour. c-span: susan butler, author of "east to dawn: the life of amelia earhart," where did you get the title "east to dawn"? >> guest: oh, the title "east to the dawn" was my h--actually my husband's contribution to the book. i had a very trendy title, "amelia earhart, an extraordinary woman," and we decided it had to be something really much more interesting, and he came up with "east to the dawn," which i thought was brilliant. c-span: what's it mean? >> guest: well, it means that her major flights were from west to east, and she was on her solo flight across the atlantic flying into the dawn. she was on her first flight, where she was just a passenger, from newfoundland to europe, flying into the dawn. and on her solo flight from hawaii to california, she was flying into the dawn. and then, of cour
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2015 6:00pm EST
black coffee. for tennessee williams, it was a glass of wine. for george simenon, he actually went to a doctor for a check-up before he started to write, and he had his blood pressure taken and his heart listened to. and then he went into total seclusion, like a monk, for 11 days. he didn't come out. he didn't do anything else but write. so rituals interest me. i think the most important aspect of this book is that it's not just photographs. i think that what makes it interesting to people is that each writer, each of the 56 writers, has text accompanying the photograph which talks about, in their words, the creative process; how and why and where and when they write. and some of them talk about the rituals. some of them say where they got the desk. with kurt, he talks about a prayer for writers. with everybody, it's different. and i think that it's this juxtaposition and this marriage of words to the text that makes it different than just a picture book. c-span: how long have you been married to kurt vonnegut? >> guest: we've been together since 1970. so that's. .. c-span: where'd yo
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 6:00pm EST
in massive numbers of american ground troops. george ball his undersecretary under secretary of state said to him mr. president, you put two or 300,000 ground troops into those jungles of vietnam and you will never hear from them again and kennedy said to him george you are as crazy as hell. i'm never going to do that. what would he have done about vietnam? we will never know. he didn't know. he didn't want to lose vietnam but he did to get deeply enmeshed in it. i love that and go to about he and arthur schlesinger. schlesinger help staring the 60 campaign. at the end of it bobby kennedy said to schlesinger arthur how would you like to be an ambassador and schlesinger said i would do anything i would like to come to the white house. a few days later schlesinger saw the president-elect and kennedy said to him so arthur i hear you're coming to the white house and schlesinger said i am? i don't know what i will be doing their you can bet we will both be there for eight hours a day. these men they run for office and they promise you the moon. they tell you they are going to do this and t
CSPAN
Jul 25, 2015 6:00pm EDT
world. c-span: when did king george iii become the monarch in great britain? >> guest: in 1760. his father had died, so he inherits the throne from his grandfather, george ii, so he's a relatively young man, i think about 20, rather immature, but full of all kinds of visions of what the empire could be and naive, i guess we'd have to say, as a monarch. he wanted to rule in his own right. his grandfather and great-grandfather had been german-born and really didn't know england. he's the first english -- hanoverian -- that is, coming from the house of hanover, who's englishly -- english-trained english-born and thoroughly anglicized, with lots of ambition to be a real king. c-span: what was his relationship to the house of commons? >> guest: well, he is -- unfortunately, the modern british party government with the crown being kind of figurehead and really dictated to by a majority leader of the house of commons, hadn't yet evolved. that would take another half century. at the same time, george didn't quite understand the convention that his ministers really had to get the agreement o
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2014 6:04pm EST
to be best for the country. this is a book about character, about 16 presidents, from george washington to george w. bush, who all, in a moment of national crisis, did what they in their hearts believed was the right thing for the country, who showed character -- not necessarily what turned out to be right -- i think there's some of the decisions they made that i don't know i agree with and you can certainly argue about them, but that they were not the popular thing. they were the brave thing. and that's what this is, "character: profiles in presidential courage." c-span: how long ago did you get the idea? >> guest: about a year-and-a-half ago. and it was a kind of collaborative effort. my -- a fellow, an agent, bill adler, came up -- called me up and said, have you ever thought of writing a book? and i said, yes, but i never have had an idea. and he kind of had some ideas, and we sort of put the idea together and then we went to -- got a publisher, rugged land, a small publishing house with a relationship with random house, and also, talked to richard neustadt, the great pre
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2014 6:00pm EDT
with e.j. dionne, when you talked about al gore and george bush and other candidates for the presidency. tell us about the conference world. >> guest: well, the conference world--you know, it's hard to imagine a hundred years ago that--like, andrew carnegie and john d. rockefeller sitting on a panel on the corporate responsibility of the corporation with mark twain as your celebrity moderator, but now i have a chapter on business life, how businessmen are all more like intellectuals, just as intellectuals are more like businessmen. and so now we all have to conference. we all sit on panel discussions, you know, where there's evenly bo--separated bottles of mineral water, and we're all sitting between them. we've got our five-minute prepared remarks. and the odd thing for academics especially--conferences are, like, sort of a status stock exchange. you can judge how many people showed up to sit in the audience for your panel discussion, how--are you on the same panel with the people with big names, big-named professors? are you the--the most famous person on the panel or the l
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2015 6:00pm EST
know, 52 people -- how are you winnowing this thing down? and i remember father -- father george from georgetown university was one of the leading candidates. and all of a sudden out of nowhere, kind of out of the catholic ranks, was this kind of undercutting thing that, well, we can`t have a lobbyist, and this guy is a lobbyist, so he won`t, you know, be a good -- couldn`t be a good chaplain. i thought, boy, there`s some deeds going on here someplace. somebody`s got some long knives out. and so the recommendations finally came down, and one of the recommendations was a fellow that was a swedish covenant minister, went to the north park college in illinois. and ted vandermead (ph), who`s one of -- my counsel, is on the board of north park. and you know, he was a good candidate, he thought. another was chuck wright, who worked with the pennsylvania legislature and was a presbyterian minister, did a lot of things here with the prayer breakfast and prayer groups on a bipartisan basis. as a matter of fact, tony... c-span: from ohio? >> guest: from ohio. tony hall... c-span: tony hall
CSPAN
Apr 4, 2015 6:00pm EDT
taken in the senate swamp when we won the senate. that's george mitchell, senator biden -- senator dowell, it looks like, senator biden, senator metzenbaum, and my husband. it was great celebration. c-span: in the book, though, you tell us about some people you don't like too much. you call senator phil gramm arrogant. why? >> guest: oh, i thought he was very arrogant. he almost had the attitude from the moment we walked in, oh, it's very understandable that you, sarah brady, would want to do something about guns, because, you poor thing, you've been through this horrible time but we -- those of us who know better know that this just an emotional response, and you're just misguided. c-span: what would the brady bill do? >> guest: the brady bill stopped people from purchasing guns from dealers if they were a fugitive it required background checks, a waiting period and background checks, to make sure you weren't a fugitive, a felon, adjudicated dealers if they were a fugitive it required background checks, a waiting period and background checks, to make sure you weren't a fugitive, a
CSPAN
Feb 8, 2014 6:00pm EST
man's name. you mentioned george eliot. who was she? >> guest: george eliot was surely the greatest novelist of victorian england; i think one of the great novelists of all times. i think she may be one of the most interesting victorians, one of the most eminent victorians, although that label has never been assigned to her. she was not only a novelist, she was an intellectual. she wrote great novels. her other writings aren't known, aren't as familiar to most people but they are very interesting. she was an interesting essayist. she learned german, for example, on her own and so mastered the language that she actually translated -- i think it was either strauss or feuerbach or perhaps both of them who were very, very difficult german theologians and philosophers of the 19th century. she had views about a very great many things, and she had a very interesting life. she was very much an english moralist, for example, but she happened to live a life that was rather unconventional from any victorian point of view. she lived with a man with whom she was not married, for example. she was
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2014 6:00pm EST
you do full-time? >> guest: what i do full-time is i teach at george mason university. i'm visiting associate professor there. and at the same time, i also lecture at the smithsonian institution at their campus on the mall. and i am--organized their western heritage program there, bringing on teachers and setting up courses and so on for--for the large audiences that we get--that we get over at the smithsonian's ripley center. c-span: how would you describe your own political views? >> guest: i guess i would describe my own political views as conservative of a--of a sort that is someone who grew up as a progressive, who in graduate school had been of the left, but then became disillusioned with it as a result of what had happened in vietnam and in cambodia after the american withdrawal there. and--and of really kind of reassessing your own deeply held beliefs and beginning to think that perhaps there's a different way to sort of see, a different perspective on all these other kinds of things. it's been a slow, long march for me to the kinds of views and issues that--that--that i've
CSPAN
Jun 28, 2014 6:00pm EDT
--what--what should we do to make it happen? >> guest: well, i think when--when george bush--george w. bush became president and announced that seeing what clin--seeing what clinton's activism--he was not going to be a activist with is--he was just going to let the situation go in israel. we all said, 'hooray,' because american interference, political interference and foreign policy interference has not been helpful. not a bit. and, look, the peacemaking that clinton was involved in resulted in israelis offering the palestinians everything, everything; more than they can possibly afford to do from--from the point of view of their security, and he turned it down that should have been message enough to leave it alone. but instead now bush is getting interested in israel, too. and that's very--that's very bad. c-span: do you think they think that that's part of what's going on in the world with the terrorists and all? >> guest: i think that colin powell, who believes in making this coalition, very important to have this coalition, which thwarted us in the gulf war and will thwart us ag
CSPAN
May 10, 2014 6:00pm EDT
, planning, it also started with a society late 19th century with george bernard shaw. and so on. but the war itself you have to have government control. but after the war you needed a rational plan and, organized society that was the atmosphere. those of us who did not agree with 19th century liberalism works for quite a number of us. but for the rest of the world they were very isolated and his idea to bring them together to enable them to get encouragement from one another without having to look around who was trying to stab them in the back which was a set -- situation with their home country. >>c-span: i saw at the peace on "the new york times" your introduction. why did they do that? what got their attention? >> guest: i cannot answer that. ask the people at "the new york times." as a whole they have not been very favorable. quite the contrary but they have been changing. two or three years ago they turned down many an op-ed piece from me. but a couple of years ago they did publish a piece about the situation of the fall of the berlin wall. my thesis was simple. everybody agrees
CSPAN
Jul 12, 2014 6:15pm EDT
columnists are conservative or neo-conservative: george will, charles krauthammer and others. ideas are coming from the left. the left is an--the left is an idea-generating organism, but they are very peculiar ideas, very seditious, which is obviously what the left always wants, but half the time not quite comprehensible. the left has become so academic in our days, so irrelevant in one sense, except in the educational system, where it is very relevant, but it no longer is populist as it once was. the right has become populist; that is, conservatism has become populist aiming to speak to ordinary people. and i think the most interesting ideas today--and i don't know anyone who really disagrees with this--come from the various conservative think tanks, plus some individual conservative scholars in the universities. c-span: you say in the book that your wife, gertrude himmelfarb, is a anglophile and you're a francophile. >> guest: i've become something of a anglophile since then. c-span: what is--what do either one of those mean? >> guest: well, an anglophile is someone who thinks bri
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2014 6:00pm EST
predicted, without hesitation, that george bush was going to be re-elected in 1992. >> guest: and that if he ran with colin powell, it would be the largest landslide in american history. yes, i have that column on my bulletin board to remind me about the sin of hubris. c-span: is that why you put it in the book? >> guest: it's not why i put it in the book. i put it in the book because it was a column that had many other things in it, but it's also useful to know when people have said things that they shouldn't have said because they thought they were taking the long view, only the long view in america only lasts about 60 to 90 days. c-span: you write a lot about abortion. >> guest: yes. c-span: what's the liberal position on abortion? >> guest: i think it is that that's a matter of individual choice and personal liberty. c-span: do you still practice your catholicism? >> guest: yes, i do. c-span: how do get along with your view on abortion and the church now? >> guest: well, i don't really think of myself as having a relationship with the institutional church; that is, the hierarchy. but
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 6:05pm EST
from ground zero. but as i started plowing through the papers of george marshall, the papers of bill donovan and fdr's papers, i realized there were a lot of unst--untold stories and i was very encouraged to proceed. c-span: let's pick one of those names, bill donovan. who was he? >> guest: bill donovan was an authentic hero of world war i, a congressional medal of honor winner, subsequently a vastly successful wall street lawyer. now he becomes, in effect, the first head of a central intelligence agency in the united states. franklin roosevelt appoints him in the summer of 1941 as--what eventually becomes the office of strategic services. kind of a strange choice because donovan was a staunch republican, had run for governor of new york on an anti-roosevelt, anti-new deal platform. but he was also a man of irrepressible spirit, boundless optimism, full of ideas and, in a sense, he--he reflected the qualities of franklin roosevelt so he was named the head of our first spy service. c-span: as you know, they called him wild bill donovan. tell us a wild story. >> guest: well, one--one o
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2015 6:00pm EST
, and his brother dr. allan george thurmond just passed away a few weeks ago at the age of 85 and only the older brother passed away, also a doctor, william thurmond and he was in his 80s. so this is a family of very strong stock. c-span: where did you find the twin sisters? >> guest: i found them in south carolina. mary thurmond tompkins lives in edgefield, not far from where senator thurmond and his family all grew up, although that house does not exist. his other sister, martha thurmond bishop, lives in the town of greenwood, kind of up in the northwestern part of the state. c-span: senator thurmond has quite an accent. >> guest: yes, he does. c-span: do the sisters talk the same way? >> guest: sort of, but a little softer. the one thing i think of -- senator thurmond's first name as strom. they refer to him as strum as though it were spelled s-t-r-u-m. but they were very charming. i had no trouble understanding them at all. they are both retired school teachers in what was as sweet as anything. they were both prepared for my visit and had written notes about things they wanted
CSPAN
Apr 5, 2014 6:00pm EDT
mcclellan. c-span: gen. george mcclellan from the civil war? >> guest: yes. because they had seen this civil war series where mcclellan sits outside the gates of richmond with a vastly superior force and still won't attack lee, so schwarzkopf was referred to as mcclellan because they had seen it on television. c-span: who is "they?" >> guest: i don't know, and honestly i mean it. everybody comes after me and says, "name names." do you know why i don't know the names? because colin powell had the very good sense not to give them to me. c-span: but they're the civilians around the president? >> guest: yes. some civilians within the white house around the president, people in the national security council. i don't know if they're back-bench aides that he was referring to. colin was relaying to me what was going on in washington as well. we were trading information freely back and forth. but when this mcclellan thing got up, i got particularly burned because, first of all, this guy that watches the pbs series and now all of a sudden he is schooled in the operational arts and is going to ex
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2015 6:00pm EDT
general by the name of george kirk. he was the commander at fort omaha in late march of 1879 he watched his 29 parker come into the lower parade ground. he was shocked at what he saw. he saw horribly sick and weak women who had clumps of flesh like charred bacon hanging off of their wrists and elbows. skin that was so severely dead's that it was just hanging". and he was shocked at how bedraggled and deftly and sickly this group of 29 were and george kirk has to make a key decision. he telegraphs his superiors in chicago philip sheridan had famously said the only good indian is a dead indian they had arrived in his command. his immediate order was to turn their faces south. and brigadier general george kirk, the highest-ranking military men who looked at this group and new that order was tantamount to a death sentence. you think how many times in history military commanders have been given orders by superiors that initiate this fierce battle between the military conscience and their civilian customs. and you can envision george kirk pacing in his home trying to decide how do i h
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2014 6:03pm EST
husband george brokaw. but it was too much of a melodrama. if she had really dealt with it as the semitragedy that it was, i think she would have had a powerful play, but she wasn't quite expert enough yet and not quite ready to, i think, expose her own life in--in literature and fiction. c-span: how was the marriage between the two viewed in this country? >> guest: well, his magazine editors didn't care for it because they were very possessive of him, and he'd always been very hard-working and very collegial with them--rolling up his sleeves with them to put the magazines to bed--and suddenly he's married to this enchanting woman, brilliant woman, with whom he was totally besotted. and so he would want to take the 5:00 train home to connecticut every night so he could be with her and take long vacations with her. and at one point two of his editors took them both out to dinner and said, 'harry, you know, you used to be here till 10:00 at night on the magazines. now you want to be home on the 5:00 train. there's no way you can run your magazines this way.' and she very--who had ho
CSPAN
Jul 11, 2015 6:00pm EDT
inaugural he told his friend, george bancroft who was to be his secretary of navy, great historian, he said bancroft, there are four things i want to do that will be my great measures -- one we will lower the tariff. controversial issue. two, we will create an independent treasury. we'll take all the government's money out of these corrupt private banks which pay us no interest, and we'll put those funds in private vaults to pay the bills meet the payroll. three, we will take california and we'll take oregon. that will make us from sea to shining sea. he said he would do it and did it. >> what right did we have to take either texas or california or oregon? >> well, the oregon territory which was washington and oregon belonged to us jointly with great britain and he considered it part of the natural right of the american nation to take that contiguous territory. he threatened to go to war with the british over it. he bluffed them and said he was prepared to go to war over it. and at the last moment the british capitulated. california he had hoped that he would be able to purchase. both henry
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2014 6:00pm EDT
. >> guest: walter williams is a professor at george mason university and a syndicated columnist, very articulate spokesman for libertarian ideas and has, again, been involved with reason for many, many years. c-span: now thomas beach and william dunn and neal goldman steinahans--is that... >> guest: steinahans. c-span: got that one wrong. manuel--or manuel... >> guest: oh, he actually goes by manny klausner, yeah. c-span: ...klausner, david koch or koch? >> guest: koch. c-span: david koch. >> guest: david koch. c-span: missed that one, too. james lintott, robert poole, al st. clair, joel stern. any of those folks that you can explain to us and how they get there? i mean, wh--what--what's the central reason why somebody comes to the reason foundation? >> guest: well, i think they are excited about the ideas that we believe in and they are -- sometimes they've been involved with us on some particular policy issue. o--often, they--many of the people whose names you read are people who are essentially magazine readers and are enthusiastic about the magazine, and then came to know about th
CSPAN
May 23, 2015 6:00pm EDT
synonyms. >> guest: i have to composite characters george and tommy and i changed one name. c-span: island boy repair was about what? >> guest: they came to the island and decided to stay. i call them the quintessential island suckers. they are the handy man who seemed to screw things up more than they fix. c-span: c-span: rad still on the island? >> guest: there are people like that on every island i've learned there are people like that just where i live and they seem very familiar. c-span: tammany lived there have read your book? >> guest: most everyone has read it at this point. before it was available in bookstores i was nervous how the islanders would receive my book and what they see it as an invasion of privacy. so far the reports are very positive which i couldn't feel better about. i was very nervous about it for a while and toy started getting good reports and feedback. c-span: if you get in the car at the the mainboard or how many hours does it take you to drive and then you have to take the boat over? >> guest: from the mainboard or it would be about a four-hour drive
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2014 6:00pm EST
had to go down and take those 21 shots in your stomach, but out of it, george became a rabid republican and i became a rabid democrat. it had its effect. c-span: i wanted to ask you about that. your brother tom was the one that died and then left you with the three children. was he a republican? >> guest: no, he was a democrat, and, you know, we're in charge of give-away programs, accused of it. but he was a very interesting character and a soul mate in my life, and there was a beautiful eulogy to him at his funeral. when people read about it in the newspaper, i'd get these calls saying, "i wish i had known tommy. i didn't know him." and i'd say, "would you like one of his children?" it was kidding, of course, but nobody took them. so i have them and i have grown with it, and i love them and i miss them when they're gone from home. it's worth considering if you're older. certainly it's more worthy than taking a dog, and maybe a lot less trouble. c-span: in a family like yours how would one of your brothers be a republican and you be a democrat? what happened in the family? >>
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 6:00pm EST
about. you've got george ball... >> guest: yes. c-span: the late george ball saying... >> guest: yes. c-span: 'the thing that fascinated me about adlai was that he accepted so easily the idea that he was a great historical figure.' >> guest: yes. yes. c-span: 'i think he had abraham lincoln on his mind a great deal.' >> guest: yes. yes. well, i think--there's also a quote in there from the alsops about how they worried about american politicians who put themselves in--next to abraham lincoln. but you had to worry about american politics. there are illinoians, though, and they have a strong identity with abraham lincoln. now as to the issue of adlai stevenson thinking of himself as a great man, i see him somewhat differently. this is a guy who's very self-deprecatory and who may suffer from a lack of what we call in modern america self-esteem. this is a guy who's had a lot of barbs and arrows along the way and who i don't think, except perhaps at the end of his life, that he ever was pompous and prideful and full of hubris. i see him as a man who was very much in touch with the reality o
CSPAN
Jun 21, 2014 6:00pm EDT
much about it. but he was--he joined st. george's church in new york, which is a low church--episcopal parish, and was hugely committed to it, i mean, he was a very religious man. he went to church a lot. he read the prayer book and the bible on his own. he contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars, $500,000 in 1892 alone, to the church. he would attend the triennial conventions of the episcopal church, which is, you know, the debates of the clergyman about church policy. and most laymen would have found that incredibly boring. morgan, in the middle of his busy schedule, would take off three weeks every three years and go sit in and listen on into these debates. he helped subsidize a new addition of "the book of common prayer." he could quote you anything you wanted from the bible. many people who disapprove of his career think it was hypocritical of him to be so religious and to be what they call a robber baron. i don't actually think he was a robber baron, and i don't think that his religion was about trying to pass through the eye of the needle. i think it was a very deep-seated,
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2015 6:00pm EST
detail will remind some of you of a famous detail from george orwell's essay, "a hanging," where orwell watches in burma a man being led to the gallows inexplicably swerve around a puddle at the last second on the way to, on the way to being hanged. and although it actually happened, he -- as it was -- sees with a novelist's eye this occurrence which isn't explicable, it seems to me, except as some kind of life force extending itself beyond death, right? we can all see that it makes no sense. the man's life will be over in a half a minute. and yet some other life surplus goes on instinctively as if he were going to live another day. and so he doesn't want to get his shoes dirty. he walks round the puddle. i think it's important -- i deliberately pushed together there montaigne, orwell, an essay nonfiction and tolstoy, fiction -- made up -- to make the point that in all these cases what the punctum, the thing that comes out and grabs us, is this moment of accidental lifeness. and to most of us, i think, it is irrelevant that tolstoy is the sole fiction writer this that trio, that tolstoy
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2014 8:00am EST
get from a man like that. for instance he said to george bush instructed noriega to call fidel castro to warn him in advance of the grenada invasion. that fact isn't in my book because he couldn't corroborate it. he testified before a grand jury that he participated in the mediation of a dispute between the drug cartel and noriega. noriega had raided a drug laboratory that the cartel set up in panama in 1984. against an agreement they struck with the cartel they paid a great deal of money for protection of that laboratory. landon said he mediated the dispute. i have that story in some length and some detail in the book because i was able to corroborate it. so a book like this i think the hardest job isn't the mediation, it's the corroboration. hours were spent trying to make sure i didn't overstep the bounds. when i write the man was bisexual, believe me i talked to people intimately involved with noriega in one way or the other and i was able to confirm that to my satisfaction. >> how did his personal habits affect the way he lived? >> he liked control. that's what motivated h
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 6:00pm EDT
? >> guest: george washington. c-span: why? >> guest: no question. well, not only what he did but, as important, what he didn't do what he did was to win the war of independence and to guide the country during its deliberations over its constitution and then to embody those ideals as the first president. that's what he did do. what he didn't do was to become a man on horseback -- to become a dictator, to identify the state with himself. after he served two terms, he stepped down. it's an interesting thing. george washington's favorite play was a roman costume drama by the english playwright john addison. it was called cato. and the two most famous lines in cato are: "'tis not in mortals to command success, but we'll do more, sempronius; we'll deserve it." washington must have been familiar with those lines, since it was his favorite play, and i think that's a key to a lot of washington's behavior and very waspy kinds of sentiments, i think. c-span: second american president on your list. >> guest: lincoln. this is not a startling list. i'm not going to pull out millard fillmore or che
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2015 6:00pm EDT
. shultz and shevardnadze in their own right were extremely important. george shultz is a steady, methodical, sort of bulldog figure who knew how to get things done, and as an economist, which is sort of rare in the political side of government, he's a man who believed in the long gain and in steady inputs -- in putting things on the table and keeping at it. shevardnadze, i think, is just a truly remarkable person -- a remarkable figure. he is a man who had absolutely no experience in diplomacy, none in democracy, and he became one of the important diplomats of our time and, in my opinion, a small-d democrat. how he got that way is an incredible puzzle, and i think he was more important than we knew to lots of things that took place in the soviet union. c-span: you spent a lot of time with george shultz and eduard shevardnadze in preparation for this book? >> guest: i spent a lot of time with george shultz. i had 13 taped interviews with him in california at his place in stanford. i didn't spent nearly as much time with shevardnadze. i had one interview in moscow in the foreign m
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2013 6:00pm EDT
was as robust as it should have been. c-span: you mean george herbert walker bush. >> guest: that's right. c-span: why are they weak-willed? >> guest: they failed to respond in a manner that the terrorists would recognize as -- as a real defense of this country. so there was one attack after another. and the weakness of the response only convinced the terrorists that they could win, that in fact we were a paper tiger, and it -- it caused them to increase the level and intensity of their attacks. it enabled them to get recruits, because it looked as though they were the winning side. it helped them establish themselves in afghanistan and elsewhere. and i think september 11 was part of the price we paid for that decade of failing to respond. c-span: you name names in here about people you don't agree with, like james baker and brent scowcroft and colin powell. they are all friends of this president, and you're supposedly a close friend of this president. explain that. >> guest: well, i'm not a close friend of the president, although i admire him greatly. i was part of the little group
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2015 6:00pm EDT
and private life of general george custer. in her book professor barnett depicts a man had never adjusted to life after his success at leading volunteers in the civil war. it examines how the battle of the little bighorn depicted him as a mythic hero and a villain. here's a look at encore booknotes. c-span: louise barnett, author of "touched by fire," what's that title mean? >> guest: it comes from a speech that oliver wendell holmes made about the civil war, and it seemed to me very appropriate. he said, "to our great good fortune and our youth, our hearts were touched by fire. and we learned at an early age that life was a passionate and serious thing." i haven't exactly quoted that, but the point is that people who were young during the civil war were inspired and matured in a way that perhaps hasn't happened to every generation. c-span: but the subtitle on your book is "the life, death and mythic afterlife of george armstrong custer." who was general custer? >> guest: well, custer was part of that generation that was touched by the fire of the civil war. he had a splendid, he
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2014 6:00pm EST
they were talking about george washington--some of the tourists. >> guest: they were. they were. george washington, of course, is a prominent revolutionary for most americans. they assumed he had to be there they were looking for george washington. but george washington wasn't at congress in july 1776. he was in new york heading the continental army. c-span: do... >> guest: the people were sure they saw him there. c-span: what else did you hear people say that surprised you about what they thought they were seeing in that room? >> guest: well, i'm--was interested in their responses. they thought the--i was struck by the mother saying--i took it to be the mother saying to her children, 'doesn't this make all of your history come alive?' and i wondered if it did make it come alive or if it somehow locked it in some sacrosanct quasi-religious past that was not reachable for most people. c-span: you write in your introduction the following: 'perhaps i should also explain that i bear no animus toward jefferson. true, i once nominated him as the most overrated person in american histo
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2015 6:00pm EST
and me; simply a first cause. c-span: for instance, you say in the book that george washington was thought to be a deist by some. >> guest: it has been said that he was a deist. c-span: yeah. >> guest: some people said that george mason was a deist, and i say we don't know. tocqueville said some years later, 1835, that no one can search the human heart who knows how sincere these professions were. but if you go by their public statements, go by their institutions, then these people were believing christians on their statements and on the institutions that they established. and just to come back to what sweet's calculations showed, he showed -- most of them, i think, were members of the church of england, some presbyterians, congregationalists, methodists two roman catholics... c-span: two quakers. >> guest: two quakers, john dickinson being the one that everyone knows about. and many other researchers have shown the same thing. but the formal church affiliations don't tell you a lot. i have a note, also, there from daniel bushton, i think, who points out that, of the more than 100
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2013 6:00pm EST
. some of the others you will hear from kate helprin and george packer who won the national book award jeremy scahill bill ayers represented debbie wasserman schultz and chris athey -- chris matthews are some of the authors and you can find the entire schedule a booktv.org so we look forward to seeing you tomorrow. everything you have seen today will re-air beginning at midnight eastern time. thanks for being with us. now booktv continues. so the first of all increasingly women's identities are tied to their work in a way which me might not like and we may find disturbing and unnatural but it is in fact true. when i look at some one like mercer mayor who was recently chosen to be the ceo of yahoo! when she was visibly pregnant and then was asked you now how much maternity leave do you want to take and she said basically none. the fact that such women exist, it's not the way i would do it. i took plenty of maternity leave i feel like that is a growing -- that is the kind of woman that there can be space for in the fact that there are some stay at home dad's who are set happy stay-
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2014 6:00pm EDT
-- whose contribution to all history is so great -- president george washington drew upon some of her works. and she became a symbol of achievement, a symbol of education. and she has -- her name has been used on many institutions in the black community, as -- for the inspiration that she brings. c-span: did you ever meet her? was she alive when... >> guest: oh, no. that was way ahead of my time. c-span: way ahead of your time? but you did meet, as you say, mrs. roosevelt. when was the first time you met her and why? >> guest: well, i first met her when i was on the staff at the harlem ywca. i had been there about a month. i was the assistant executive. and the -- i had the assignment to escort mrs. roosevelt into a meeting that mrs. bethune was holding at the ywca building in harlem. c-span: got a picture here of you and mrs. bethune. >> guest: yes, that -- that picture is from the time when i -- when mrs. bethune, since i was working for the ywca in washington, made me -- or coopted me, almost, as the executive director for the national council of negro women but in 1937, when i was
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2013 6:00pm EDT
know you--you bring up pete wilson in here, and you also bring up george pataki, the governor of the state of new york, who are both republicans who you say talk out of both sides of their mouth. >> guest: well, exactly. pete wilson had often inveighs against judicial activism, and yet who does he appoint as chief justice of the california supreme court? a man named ron george, who has just recently overturned a law in california that required parental consent in order for a minor to get abortion. now, oddly enough, the most liberal member of the court, stanley mosk, who was appointed by governor pat brown back in the '60s, actually voted to uphold the law. so in other words, what you had was the spectacle of this wilson appointee voting to overturn a law that a pat brown appointee was voting to uphold; very odd when it's pete wilson who often complains about activist judges. c-span: on your list of federal judges, us district court judge robert aguilar, appointed to a vacancy in san jose, california, by president carter, was convicted in 1990 of leaking a wiretap to a mobster and ly
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2015 6:00pm EDT
in a boat and retrace arnold's steps when he made that hair-raising escape from george washington to the british ship in haverstraw bay. i was able to do that with the same kind of a tide, with a stopwatch and figure out how fast they rode and that kind of thing, which was a lot of fun. and, of course, west point itself is very interesting. c-span: when did you start the book? >> guest: it took me six years to research and write so a long time ago. i've been living and breathing with this man for a very long time. c-span: when was he born? >> guest: 1741, in norwich connecticut, the son of a prosperous merchant and trader very high standing in the community. norwich was then one of the biggest towns in connecticut and like every other town in new england, it was full of traders -- international traders who were trading to quebec and to europe and down to the caribbean -- and arnold's father was one of them. he had various siblings. when he was 10 his other brother died, and he was then the only son. he was sent away to a classical boarding academy in a town just a few miles uprive
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 6:00pm EDT
george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i just happened to meet shultz one day and asked him if i could interview him for my research. and he'd just left the reagan administration, and he was allowing students to interview him. and so he allowed me to interview him, and it led to me working for him to do the research for his memoir. c-span: now how did condi rice become your--what?--outside of what s... >> guest: my reader. c-span: harvard? >> guest: yeah, the--an outside reader on the dissertation, but from another university. c-span: but from ucla. >> guest: no, at harvard. c-span: at harvard. ok. >> guest: yeah
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2014 6:00pm EDT
to fight so hard to get recognized even though yeah after the civil war and george carlin did a great bit talking about there was shellshocked in world war i and it was battle fatigue and world war ii and they talked about how it in the beginning you could picture what i caused. shell shock, like a shell goes off and it shocks you and it gets more and more clinical and tele sounds like something may have happened to a vehicle and it's a really terrific fit. learning more about it in historical terms helping both understand my own family's experience better understand history a little better and the challenges for people who were not allowed to talk about this. my dad wrote to my great uncle when i came home and was having trouble in my great uncle wrote back and said oh my god i had no idea but i have ptsd. reading about what your daughter is going good now i know what's wrong with me. he never talked about as i think it's helpful for everyone to be able to ground this in a circle in a global context and see there are different ways to conceive of how to come back for more in ti
CSPAN
Mar 29, 2014 6:00pm EDT
. i actually was at a lecture at george washington university in st. louis, and someone in the audience said to me, 'do you have a car?' and it was kind of--the duck came down. 'oh, i'm only going to get asked this question again and again.' so i sold the car and it was a very positive experience, but i was prepared, if it hadn't been, to have gotten the car back again and written a different book. c-span: where'd you get the title "asphalt nation?" >> guest: it came to me, i think--i used the word 'karma'; there's lots of bad puns in writing a book about automobiles, but kar--my karma was--we had a working title, "car-bound," that nobody, including me, liked. and my editor asked me for a list of cars, kind of a brainstorming thing. i sent it to him. he called back and he said, 'we're going to call it "asphalt nation."' and i said, 'oh, that's good. where'd--where did that come from?' and he said, 'it was on your paper.' so somehow in this list of playing with metaphors, that one surfaced and that was the title of the book. c-span: what's the point of your book? >> guest: the s
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2014 6:00pm EST
this discussion. c-span: george stallings and another catholic priest. my question for you is did it irritate you that you were asked to come to the show and then because of this disagreement that broke up a rescheduled you? >> guest: no, it's normal. one may understand particularly that may happen. i don't think it was a personal thing that happened. c-span: what has been the overall reaction from what you have seen by the media to you and this book lacks. >> guest: i felt very good here and i don't have any complaints. i am glad to be here. i hope that the book will help people understand the struggles for israel and the people there. from every aspect. i tried to make it interesting. sometimes i found it easier to do the things been bent to write about those things. but it was interesting. c-span: i have a cover story in insight magazine which is published by "the washington times" in the cover story looks like this. we will show the the audience a couple of people that you probably know pretty well. just incidentally we talked about the fact you were born in israel 61 years ag
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2015 6:00pm EDT
here on book tv i want to talk to you about one of your most recent books. doctor george, how do you define liberal secularism. >> guest: it is a view about human nature human destiny command human dignity that competes with other views, some secular but not liberal, some religious. very common in places like the one where we are right now
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 6:00pm EDT
bill. that's the canonical image of george washington. c-span: what do you think of americans putting this painting on the dollar bill? >> guest: i think it's a good idea. it's not a reproduction of the painting, but it is a version of. there it is, yes, that's washington. and as you can see, it's reversed by the engraving, you know, in that one he's facing to his >> guest: you tie the president up indefinitely with painting ops. and so there was a real demand for effigies of washington. also served by people like the -- [inaudible] i mean, i think it was rafael -- no, it wasn't rafael. oh, my god, i'm getting confused. charles wilson peel was the father who founded this dynasty of artists, and one of his sons specialized in portraits of washington just like his dad had. and there are hundreds of them all over the united states. and, but, of course, this is an age before mechanical reproduction, and here we have copley, certainly the greatest american portraitist of the 18th century, and this is, again, it's an iconical image of paul revere, you know, the intelligent, skeptical, deter
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2015 6:00pm EDT
being appointed by george h.w. bush was a fairly conservative judge and so there's a lot of controversy and concern that he would not be represented the same sorts of things that thurogood marshall stood for and then he went through his initial hearing without too much surprised and along comes anita hill with her allegations and added a whole second batch of hearings and that's where things become much less focused on his record as a judge and the personal relationships that he had. >> i think that this today is a travesty. i think that it is disgusting. i think that this hearing should never occur in america and from my standpoint as a american as far as i'm concerned it is a high-tech lynching for uppity blacks who in any way deign to think for themselves and do for themselves to have different ideas and it is a message that unless you kowtow to an old order this is what will happen to you. >> one of the interesting findings we discovered with the advent of television was nominee senators are now basing their votes on different things and they were prior to tv. prior to t
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2013 6:00pm EDT
you in your life that you're the great granddaughter of david lloyd george? >> guest: well, it's been nice in a way, i guess, to know that i have a famous ancestor. i never met him. on the other hand, it actually sort of inhibited me from doing this book because i thought i don't want to write a book that people will say oh, she's just doing it because of her great grandfather and it's sort of an act of filial piety. so, i've had some mixed ambivalent feelings about it really. c-span: what role has it played in your life? >> guest: not much in canada and north america but more in england where people still know about him. i mean i used to go to england when i was young and my grandmother was his daughter. my great aunt, who i was very fond of, was another daughter and so i did hear a lot about him and occasionally people would say to me, you know things about my great grandfather, sometimes rude. he was a controversial figure, but in north america it's meant very little. most people don't remember him today. c-span: which one is he on the cover of this book? >> guest: he's the one on
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 6:00pm EST
, george h. w. bush, robert dole, gary hart, richard gephardt, joseph biden and michael dukakis. mr. cramer died this past monday at the age of 62. this is about an hour. c-span: richard ben cramer, in your book "what it takes: the way to the white house." is there any one thing that was a thread through the six candidates that you followed that would tell you what it takes? >> guest: i think there was, although i didn't set out to write a paradigm of a presidential candidate. there were some similarities, and, alas, similarities in the stories of their campaigns. i found out that the title what it takes is kind of a double-edged sword because all of them start out thinking they have what it takes, but in the end they find out what it takes from them, and what it takes is that whole life that brought them to the point they could be candidates in the first place. c-span: when did you start this book? >> guest: the middle of 1986 is when i wrote the proposal. i was out there working by the end of '86. c-span: who are the six candidates? >> guest: i had two republicans, george bush and
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2011 6:00pm EST
alexandria, which was actually there before washington, d.c., george washington hometown, tell a lot of anecdotes, the revolutionary war through the civil war, then go right into the present day situation and the problems we are having in iraq today. >> 18,000 items. >> i have written, i figure, i have been writing the column now going on 13 years, about 18,000 anecdotes, and thousands of columns. in fact, when i compiled everything, just for research purposes, of what i have written only with regard to the inside the beltway column, i had so many books sitting on my floor that could have been written. it was very difficult to choose the best material to put in narrative form in this book. >> someone who has never been here, what does inside the beltway mean? >> inside the beltway is obviously the beltway, 66-mile ring of heavy traffic that encircles washington, d.c. none of us local folks, i am sure yourself, like to even get on the beltway. it's a treachetreacherous drive, usually standstill, i might add, but also expression in washington, and i have written an entire chapter about wh
CSPAN
Jul 21, 2012 6:30pm EDT
. >> george will calls you on the back of a book a public philosopher seasoned by public service. what do you think he meant by that? >> well, perhaps he's referring to the fact that i did spend some time in the justice department. i have two degrees in the philosophy so i guess george will is referring to the fact that i have thought some about the public interest which is true. i think this book is an expression basically of my understanding of the presidency, and also of government. >> he writes on the back about two points. he says, he is utterly convincing that ethical behavior is central not to peripheral to a strong presidency. what he is talking about ethical behavior? >> i think what he is talking about and writing about in the fact is that we have to understand our president in terms of someone who basically has an office that he has been entrusted with. a certain degree of power has been given to the president and he's responsible for its use to the american people. it is an ethical undertaking. and i think that that basically is what i'm re -- referring to, but there'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)