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20090604
20171022
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CSPAN 3452
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2015 1739
2016 1451
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,738 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2014 2:00am EST
. margaret thatcher wrote me that it was the greatest speech she had ever heard. george heard it in the white house. was that high because of controversy. isn't that too bad? i became a great speaker that day. who knows? somewhere out in this audience there may be even -- there may even be somebody who will one footsteps andmy take over as the president's spouse, and i wish him well. [applause] >> you brought down the house with your closing line about the political >> same thing i'd give the first wife which is be yourself. if you can watch your mouth. trouble with that. i would say just be yourself. and take advantage of the opportunity. i had lunches for heart, children, arthritis, cancer, nobody paid hometown except in the where the doctor came from or he sick child came from or -- and then you got great publicity out in the country. that's counts. ho cares -- sorry -- broadcasters say. was care about is that the being know they're helped. >> barbara bush, what should in the firstng and about know?and her role we don't >> i don't know. what you don't know. seems to me i everythi
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2012 1:00am EDT
norquist, and george said that we will never be able, if republicans keep citing his pledge, we will never get to a balanced budget. he says not only can you increase revenues, asking the wealthiest taxpayers to pay more, you cannot stop the outsourcing of jobs by taking away the tax break that corporations get when they move jobs. you can talk about this but you have to have a balanced approach. >> but you have not passed the budget -- you can do this on a partisan vote. the house passed a partisan -- a partisan budget. why didn't harry reid do this? >> the budget control and cut $2 trillion from spending. we cannot get closer to a balanced budget because of the lobbyist pledge. this said no tax increase for upper-income people, -- >> did not want to pass this with only democratic votes? >> this is not the issue. you have to have the balanced approach with revenues and tax loopholes. this was $2 trillion in cuts. this is not a game without the budget control act. >> the next question is to you, and we will continue the conversation. >> you have portrayed herself as an outsider and s
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2014 4:01am EDT
happens there. george was. it -- >> george never tell what -- this had nothing to do with those of all ever. they were very high up in the wholesale business. he did know where -- other than some of the guys you would hire to protective he never noon. he was at ten very. he was care in this class of black kids to teach. they were not trying to except any of his teaching to get a ged people decide that he would teach them how to smuggle if they would get their gigi. it was air conditioned and there. jurors is not want to return of the school. but on this level that has nothing to do with the wire. >> i don't think my father was the guy in that tall grass. he would be there to receive it. if the load was eight times he would call eight guys. a ton of peace. where it went from there he had no idea. the money, no one pays up front. so the money washes back. when it washed back in small bills my father would get excited. he had some conception of the end user but the he was doing marijuana. that end user is writing music ended late submitted. >> your. >> so in 86 the gang decided to do one
CSPAN
May 26, 2015 3:00am EDT
lot of people have giving consideration to. in the book, we do talk about that. george w. bush came in sort of wanting to do things differently from the way bill clinton had done them. bill clinton had been very cautious about boots on the ground. he had not wanted to do that. air war was ok, but not ground troops. he did ir1 kosovo, but not putting ground troops and in. then of course, september 11 happened. i think the combination of wanting to do things differently, and the fact that the u.s. had been attacked, and the attack had come from a base in afghanistan, that played a big role. if you think about iraq, you could see possibly that he was trying to continue something that his father had started with the gop gopher with iraq. -- with the gulf war with iraq. i think ghost were haunting the -- ghosts were haunting the bush presidency, but maybe in a different way. bush headed to respond in a more muscular way to get in there and show the world what america was all about. maybe i will let you answer the first question. guest: i think world war ii was going in such a way that the u
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2015 10:42pm EDT
tv. >> now, a look back and communications with of the george w. bush white house. we will hear from presidential candidate howard dean, julie mason. this is an hour and a half. >> good morning. i am the dean of the lord's herbert school which medication here, and it is my pleasure to welcome to you to this morning's panel on white house communication in the george w. bush residency. each of our panelists will open with a short statement of their own perspective on the topic we will then have discussion among y invite audience participation. i have a minute bad news i have to give at the beginning, which is you will notice that scott mcclellan is here. he is ill, and not is able to make the trip. we are sorry he is not here for we will try to soldier on as best we can. i just want to note the presence of mr. calico in the audience and thank him for his longtime support. [applause] i will introduce the panelists and sit down and allow them to go in order. i want to underline the question. many people will be arriving as we get underway. to give everyone a to ask questions, please ask
CSPAN
Jun 26, 2015 1:00am EDT
it from mr. george that these documents were not destroyed willfully. i'm glad you said that. you said a number of things already. i think there many irs employees that are working very very hard short of staff giving the everything they got so they can do their jobs so that we can have the resources as a government to exist. i want to take a moment to thank all of those employees who are working so, so very hard. this oversight committee is now holding our 22nd irs hearing. 22. some people tuning in today may not realize this investigation is still going on. they also may not realize that the american taxpayers have spent more than 20 million dollars on this investigation. $20 million. total does not include the millions of additional dollars spent by the inspector general was here to testify before us yet again. i want to thank you, mr. george for his hard work. this investigation has squandered tens of millions of taxpayer dollars and a failed xaf xaf xaf efrpger hunt against lois learner, the irs and the white house. 250 irs employees have spent 160,000 hours producing more th
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 7:30am EDT
? he is working on a very big book on dick cheney, george bush and barack obama. and covert intelligence policies. he was very close to writing the book when someone dropped a trove of documents, it has gone from not just the george bush administration worse than we ever thought, the book has gone from just being about george bush to being about obama and i suspect very soon we will see headlines and we will see sy hersh going across the country with his latest expos day about the george bush/obama foreign policy. what does hersh think about the revelations of leaking of material by ed snowden? he has been the recipient of leaks like this for many years. if anyone knows what it is like to be friends with and have secret sources in formation of sy hersh, you read sy hersh story and don't know who's talking, just a lot of unnamed people, turned out to be right. but he said about ed snowden, he broke the law he has to be prosecuted but i have to tell you he has changed the nature of the discussion and that makes me think of sy hersh. she has changed the nature of discussion in
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2014 8:30pm EST
because the hemlocks from the day to remember, but i did talk to george once i got their chests. the girls, and then of course my mother was the one i really one of the call. know what a mother to say everything is going to be all right. of course i called her and said everything is going to be all right. it's certainly is. >> how did she respond? how did she redefine our role after that day? >> i have to say, i was with her that it because i was covering her as first lady to the "washington post". so there was some confusion initially as to whether anyone was going to appear or speak. and then senator kennedy made a brief statement to the press who were there. i can remember looking in her. it is always remarkably composing. she drives offenders underside when she is struggling with something that was clearly very dramatic. i remember thinking, she is wise enough, her mother-in-law lives in this white house. she's said in that moment what really she came to say over and over again which is, you know, i think we just have to us make sure we tell our children that we love them and that amer
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2015 4:00am EDT
. >> patrick adams. >> shannon adams. >> stephen george adams. ignatius udo adanga. >> sophia addo. >> lee adler. >> alok agarwal. >> david agnes. >> brian ahearn. >> joanne ahladiotis. >> andrew alameno. >> peter allegretoo. >> and to my loving brother in law, paul james the past at an early age as many have come and just as reminder, his mother, his father and his brothers and sisters, is nieces and nephews have never forgotten him. his memories live on every day. we never forgot come easter, his living laugh come his love for life. we love you dearly and we miss you all. and peace to all of you who stand here today. >> david alger. >> joseph ryan allen. >> richard dennis allen. >> richard l. allen. >> janet alonso. >> antonio alvarez. >> telmo alvear. >> christopher amoroso. >> kazuhiro anai. >> calixto anaya, jr. >> kermit anderson. >> michael andrews. >> siew-nya ang. >> joseph angelini. >> doreen angrisani. >> and my brother-in-law, peter milano. we miss you every single day. we love you. you are always in ourhearts. >> and my brother, police officer ronald joseph -- >> peter
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2016 1:36am EDT
things up but, we have a great pro bono attorney, george lehner, who is -- i mean, without him, we would be in trouble. he is so good, he gives us good advice. washington, everybody has an attorney, write? >> when you are a nonprofit, >> it makes sense to do that. >>having attended the dinner -- it is really crowded in there. is that part of the appeal of -- >> no, that is probably not very appealing for people that everybody says, is in or credit this year? in we say -- same number of people in the room every year. on not worked very hard letting people wander the halls. they cannot go to those two battles without a dinner ticket. in invitation to a party down there in their hand. so one of those party people have to have a solution's desk because if one of their guests doesn't have something, they are directed by security that the table if they are on the list then they will be given an invite to get down the escalade -- if not, they do not go down -- >> [inaudible] d.c.shington, >> always lived in the area? >> yes or >> any irony in effect at your office is in the watergate? >>
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2014 8:30am EDT
professor at george washington university school of media and public affairs, harvard international bureau chief with the associated press and the 107th president of the national press club. the national press club is the world's leading professional organization for journalists committed to our profession's future through our programming with events such as this while fostering a free press worldwide. for more information about the national press club, please visit our web site at press.org can. on behalf of our members worldwide, i'd like to welcome our speakers and those of you attending today's event. our head table includes guests of our speakers as well as working journalists who are club members. if you hear applause in our audience, i note that members of the to general public are attempting, so it's not necessarily of a lack of journalistic object it. [laughter] i'd also like to welcome our c-span and public radio audiences. you can follow the action on twitter using the hashtag npclunch. after our guests' speeches conclude, we'll have a question-and-answer period, and i wi
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2015 7:00am EDT
presidents have been interviewed? >> guest: only george bush. i can to go behind the scenes, get the real story. presidents are not going to save very much. i love to get the real story. it is a thankless job asking questions of the press secretary. woodward and bernstein would never have had this develop. the fact is at the washington post, thought the whole thing was baloney, try to undercut on the metropolitan staff. they bring in police headquarters covering local stories, this was a big thrill for them. that is a major region the post was able to reveal stories because woodward and bernstein on the national staff were courageous. >> host: what do you think the health of investigative reporting is today? >> the washington post has been doing a good job as i mentioned they have been doing very good stories on the secret service scandals. on the other hand you have this impetus to put this on the internet without checking or investigation. it is the mixed bag. >> host: martha, you are on with ronald kessler. >> caller: hello. this past september fbi director james toney put forth a
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2012 8:00pm EDT
, 2012. that 7:00 that night, george zimmerman called 911 to report a suspicious person, trayvon martin. he stated that he was following martin after the teenager's started to run from them. he told the dispatcher that he was person and martin despite the dispatchers that advice to the contrary. at about 7:10, martin was on the phone with his girlfriend when he sells a moment -- when he saw george zimmerman. the girl friend recalled george zimmerman asking trayvon martin what he was doing. there was an altercation, during which martin's phone went dead. george zimmerman told police that martin approached him, they exchanged words, and when he reached for his cellphone, martin punched him in the nose and began slamming his head and the sidewalk. the precise nature of the altercation is still not clear, i 7:25, martin was shot and killed. he was carrying a small amount of cash, a bag of skittles, a can of ice-t. 15 minutes after the shooting, george zimmerman clancy shot martin in self-defense. the chief of police for the police decrement stated that george zimmerman had not been charged
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2015 10:00am EST
told george stephanopoulos that isis was contained. all these things, every one of them, have turned out to be wrong. this is the problem. newness and inexperience allows you to see the world as you want to see it, as a fantasy. not the way the world really is. we cannot afford to have another person behind the desk in the oval office who sees america as he sees it. we cannot afford to elect another president without the requisite experience and values that our fathers enshrined in the declaration and constitution. less than one term in the united states senate has proven to be woeful training for the oval office. especially when most of that time was spent running towards the presidency and away from the issues. you cannot abandon protecting the american borders because the political heat is too great. you cannot cast the vote because it is fashionable to do so at a time of seeming safety. that is not the time of leadership american needs in a dark and dangerous world. i stood up last spring against the restrictions that were proposed for the nsa for one very simple reason. i know t
CSPAN
May 29, 2015 6:30pm EDT
president clinton who delivered it, it was george h.w. bush. he delivered it because the congress of the united states demanded it. we cut the armed forces 25%. that was a huge cut, biggest cut since world war ii, really especially if you look at how we did it. bases and everything. bill clinton came with his secretary of defense and cut another 3%. what relevance does this have to this? powell was former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. and even though dick cheney told him that, he felt it was his responsibility saying we can't do two wars at the same time. we destroyed that with the 28% cut. so we better finish afghanistan. no one's arguing with you about afghanistan. you better finish that before you do iraq otherwise you're going to negligent afghanistan which is what we proceeded to do. so we shattered the global solidarity and we went to iraq with too few forces in the first place because donald rumsfeld decided that that would be the amount we would send. some of that amount was based on the give and take with the military commander tommy franks who powell had told on two di
CSPAN
Apr 16, 2016 10:00pm EDT
eight minutes. we ended this program with george w. bush. he goes about 20 minutes. clearly, the speeches are getting longer. reagan,onald particularly in his last dinner, was getting up there. he was ready to go home. 20 minutes is about the average now. to be fair, all the presidents, they insist on getting out of there and going home. so when we are working on the schedules for the white house always reminds us, whether it is barack obama or ronald reagan, they want that done by 10:45 or 11:00. >> do you find the presidents take a different approach, billy get more comfortable, enjoy themselves as the years go by? steve: absolutely, they get more relaxed. you can see it. the humor changes. particularly the last couple of presidents, barack obama at the beginning often told jokes the kind of stone a little bit. he was using those jokes to go after his rivals or enemies. as each of them go on to become more relaxed, more egalitarian, make more fun of themselves. and everyone laughs little more. >> what about first ladies? how long have they been attending the events, they take a
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 9:00pm EDT
on george osborne ahead of big day. sagging growth predictions on one hand, demands to raise unpopular taxes on the other. be underr was said to orders not to provide products for parties euro skeptics. making this budget even more of a political and financial balancing act than ever before. >> this in our country would not repeat the mistakes of the past. today, we maintain that commitment to long-term stability in challenging times. decisive action to achieve a 10 billion surplus that we do not pay later. but the next generation first. >> and eye-catching proposal to put a tax on soft drinks. and a tax cut for business. invest inple to business and how great jobs. to encourage that is to let them keep more of their -- and that investment is successful. capital gains taxes the highest in the developed world, and we monitor taxes to be among the lowest. headline rates of capital gains currently stands at 20%. today, i'm cutting it to 20%. tax, 18% to just 10%. >> an increase in income tax virtual. increase in the amount people could earn before paying higher income tax. >> an
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2016 10:00am EDT
transitions at the george w. bush library in dallas in mid july. participants include officials who helped plan the last you federal agency and presidential transitions including former white house chiefs of staff. this is one hour and 20 minutes. one of the most striking features of presidential transitions today is the bipartisanship that prevails among government officials. the president and the white house staff who set the direction of planning and department and agencies that carry out the policies. it was not always the case. -- in 1952,h of president truman want to bring in both the republican and democratic presidential nominees to meet with his cabinet and white house staff members, he met with the part of them divide. he had wanted them to come in because he found when he came into office, he was unprepared. of 1945,n in january roosevelt died in april. truman knew nothing of the atomic bomb. he feared by that experience he wanted to bring people in so that they would understand what was ahead of them. excepted thison but general eisenhower turned down his invitation. in large p
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2014 11:04pm EDT
pretty easy. you can take the 9:15. president bush? >> george w. bush was a man of conviction. very grounded.ent he was also very deliberate and disciplined. he is also very courageous he's because he has the courage to make a decision. and i would say his flaws were that h allowed there to be a myth that he couldn't read. and i would say his flaws is that he allowed there to or didn't read, when he was very well read and took time to read while he wasve president and it was usually relevant to the bily responsibilities that he had. but he also kind of preferred to be from west texas when he of really was well-educated at be yale. so he allowed there to be a perception that he wasn't as as engaged as in fact he was. real but i think having the great decision, notde a allow politics to drive a decision but to allow conscie e conscience, and to make the decisions that he had to make >> and they were impossibleably difficultl, decisions.v"ém >> well, as well with leon, i had the opportunity to serve with him. he is the embodiment of public e service, so theca perfect guy i run an inst
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2016 2:00am EST
for a long time. i did not know -- let me start at the beginning. george washington is my hero. george washington is a man who makes me want to be the better man, he's a man who makes me believe you can be a better man. he is a man who puts things for me into perspective, that your whole life really is about service, it is not about you. it is not about your name in life. it is not about fame or fortune. it is about service to others in a greater cause. george washington, his life of service started when he was 13-years-old. at 13-years-old, he knew what he wanted to do and think goodness he did not do it. he wanted to serve as a sailor in the royal navy. and he actually joined the navy. in those days, you could go down to the ships and go on and be like, "i am in the navy." and he joined the navy and took his trunk and he brought it up and set it there on the deck of the english ships and then he listened to his mother, who was down by the gang plank and she was making a scene and she was like "oh george, please, no, don't leave your mother, no." and all the guys on the ship,
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2014 7:00am EDT
george washington who lives across the river be built, because it is at this strategic point:mz that th confluence of the piscataway creek and the potomac river, but the fort that is built here in the early 1800s is not that impressive. in fact, one newspaper account describes it as little more than a pigpen, so it is basically earthworks and gun platforms up there on the high ground, but because of the channel coming to close to the shoreline here, those guns from that height would have enormous effect on any ship trying to sail by. it could have been a much stronger position if the u.s. government had done more to f t fortify it. recommendation had been made the prooef youts year that the fo fort -- the previous year that the fort be rebuilt into a stronger and more effective position, and ita1)ñ had not be done. but even so, it is an obstacle that the british officers estimated would have probably cost them at least 50 men tokúy the take. it would have caused quite a bit of damage to some of the valuable british ships if there and the british gordon and his men wereébc expecting
CSPAN
Jun 20, 2014 3:00am EDT
. you know, going back to 1988, george h.w. bush said of michael dukakis my opponent sees the united states as another pleasant country out there, somewhere on the u.n. role call between albania and system babb with a. that's how barack obama sees it as well. he was asked on his first european trip, do you believe in american exceptionalism? listen to obama's response, because it informs what we've seen of his policies in the past five and a half years. the president said, yes, i believe in american exceptionalism. just as the brits believe in british exceptionalism and the greeks believe in greek exceptionalism. let's parse that sentence in the way the president would. yes, i believe in american exceptionalism, so all those people who say i don't, i've just proven you wrong. but then in the second two thirds of the sentence he takes it back. there are 193 countries in the united nations. the president could have continued just as the papa new guineas believed. you get the point. if everybody is exceptional. then nobody's exceptional. that's what he thinks. in his view, if america is
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2015 10:29am EST
the father of our country, george washington. this is george washington's bond and then about 60 years ago this is a sheriff's certificate and it's owned by howard hughes, signed right here and-- the point today is what do those two men have in common and the answer is that they both received a congressional gold medal. today we will hear from joel iskowitz who will tell us all about the process of gold medals because he has designed them, including one for the apollo 11 mission, the original moon landing mission. journal has an alumina's body of work and you could see his artwork in many periodicals, berks, coins, stamps. he has designed over 2000 stamps for 40 different countries. is artwork hangs in many places or his work does, the pentagon, the capital, the white house, but my favorite is was actually on the staged shuttle and it's my pleasure to introduce joel iskowitz. [applause]. >> thank you and good afternoon, everyone. i want to thank everyone for coming and thank you, david, for that very wonderful introduction i went to think a couple of individuals before i began. j
CSPAN
May 5, 2014 8:29am EDT
police, george kelling. george, where are you? george kelling, codevelop of the broken windows theory, senior fellow at the manhattan institute and professor at the kennedy school of government at rutgers university. tom tyler is a professor at yale law school. tom? okay, very good. and robert tracy, chief of crime control strategies for the chicago police department has stepped in for his boss, and please join me in welcoming these panelists. [applause] >> okay, we will take a five minute break, set up the chairs for the panelists. and five minutes. we will ring the bell. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> this is a two-day conference on crime reduction, hosted by the national association of attorneys general and the district attorneys association as well. moment ago they heard from attorney general eric holder. on capitol hill for senate and house are in this week. the senate coming in today at 2 p.m. eastern. that, of course, live here on c-span2. the house comes in tomorrow, and they're in at noon for morning our speeches 2 p.m. tomorrow for legislative work. t
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2013 6:00am EDT
governor jeb bush. we are also proud to our past chair that has included george w. bush and bill clinton.-- presidents george eight doug -- resident george h w bush and bill clinton. both are past recipients of the liberty medal. the liberty medal ceremony that we celebrate tonight exemplifies we haveadition. honoredindividuals from across perspectives that have furthered the constitutional values of liberty and equality around the at the national constitution center,we have three goals for fulfilling our congressional mission. we are the museum, we the people, the national headquarters for civic education. our three goals can be summarized in three words -- visit, learn, debate. as the museum of we the people, starting next year, we will-- construct a magnificent new gallery of freedom to display one of the 12 original copies of the bill of rights. it will be the foundation for her years of education and debate on the meaning of the bill of rights to coincide with 225thniversary.-- anniversary. as a center for civic education, we illuminate the history and contemporary meaning.
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2016 1:00am EDT
. we end this program with george w. bush who goes about 20 pounds -- 20 minutes. clearly they speeches are getting longer. steve: ronald reagan was getting up there and was ready to go home. 20 minutes is about average now. to be fair, all of the presidents, one of the things they insist on is getting out and getting home. when we are working on a scheduled, the white house reminds us whether it is barack obama or ronald reagan, running the gambit in age, they want it done by 10:45 or 11:00 they can get out. bob: do they get me comfortable? do they enjoy themselves of their weirs -- as the years go by? steve: absolutely they get more relaxed. you can see it. the humor changes, particularly the last few presidents. barack obama often told jokes a littlee -- stung bit. as each goes on, they become more relaxed, more egalitarianism make fun of themselves, and everyone laughs a little more. bob: what about first ladies? how long have they been attending? to they take a role? -- do they take a role? attended before 1962 when john f. kennedy insisted he would not come unless they op
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2016 10:00am EDT
coast at least, it seems like valuations are down a little bit. george zachary of c.r.v. who you interviewed maybe last week was saying the one exception is celebrity investor meaning serial entrepreneurs who are creating companies in the space where they already have some expertise. is that true on the east coast as well? >> we've seen it on both coasts. we've seen valuations have taken a slight dip. but in the last four years the average valuation has almost tripled so even if it's down 10% or 20% it's still a very attractive time to be an entrepreneur. >> what do you think, andy? >> we don't really track valuations that much. every deal there's a moment in time where -- where there's a companies that desires to have an investor and has a certain price and an investor desires to invest at a certain price. so i don't see any generalizations that it's higher or lower than before. i do sense there's some uncertainty in the market. and so entrepreneurs maybe are more flexible than they have been in the past. but i don't really track valuation. >> and the v.c.'s you don't think are
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2016 11:30am EDT
his organization and worked with george soros and helped amass a substantial amount of wealth as well. he is a guy that knows a lot about finance and part of what we are going to be talking about is finance budgets and issues in the future and part of what investing is about is thinking about the future and what's going to happen in the future so he is concerned, deeply and profoundly about the future of people in america and you will see the degree to which he is concerned about the investments and how they are crowded out by other investments we do make. geoffrey canada is an educator, social activist and founder of the harlem children's zone he started in 1990. it was designed to try to help children, young people in harlem to get to college, graduate and get good jobs. it is an intriguing approach and it seems to be successful. it takes a while to evaluate some of the programs. we do know many people think this is a model for things we should be doing elsewhere and our president thinks that having put in some proposals and programs that are trying to replicate what's been done in
CSPAN
May 22, 2013 8:00pm EDT
same thing that mr. george found more than a year later. think about it. for more than a year, the irs knew it had inappropriately targeted groups of americans and other political these without withoutng it in onerous -- without answering questions that were a result of the internal investigation. many believe the irs is an independent agency. nothing could be further from the truth. we define it deliberately as less political. it has only two political appointees. carefully scrutinized have limited visibility to congress because we are protecting american people's right. the former commissioner with us today will tell us he reports to the deputy of treasury. he is a subordinate of a subordinate of a competent officer. it is not an agency they get to do what it wants to do with the canopy challenged by treasury. as a result, we discovered not pause know about the and participate in the iris 'until investigation, she also played an integral role in the ig investigation. sheere shocked to find that participated in virtually the interrogations or interviews with their own subordinates
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2015 1:00am EDT
act. the republicans presidents. you had former president george w. bush on the stage with this president. race matters. this is a part of the fabric of the american history.tage issues of race. bloody sunday was definitely a e pres piece.blac because, and in my book "the presidency in black and white" i have a piece about selma, chapter 4.ba andy young ambassador andy young, went on the record and rsatio talked tons me about the g conversations that he was involved in in with dr. king and lbj about pushing forward with the voting rights -- >> the congressman and the former ambassador? >> yes yes. and the former ambassador, aid, congressman, andy young, in the book, he said that lbj said thathave he did not have the power at the time to push for voting rights for it to pass. so what they did strategically, they said, wen okay. they went and went down to alabama at a time when you couldhave t not have three african-americanscaus on the street together because of an ordinance there. and they figured out a way. they met with amelia boy ton. and the rest is history. we talk about th
CSPAN
May 1, 2014 10:00am EDT
. cardin: mr. president, i rise today in support of the nominations of george hazel and theodore chuang to be united states district judges for the district of maryland. let me say from the beginning that i am very proud in the manner in which senator mikulski, the southern senator from maryland, and i have established a process to review and make recommendations to the president for the vacancies in the united states district for maryland. we've used the process that we think works. iit get us the most qualified individuals and the two today are certainly an example of highly qualified individual whose want to be judges for the right reasons. they have a demonstrated track record of public service. i particularly appreciate their commitment to pro bono. they understand that the courts need to be open to all and that we have a special responsibility as lawyers and members -- as judges to make sure that there is equal access to justice. and that they understand the appropriate role of a judge in our system, to be objective and to carry out the laws of this land. george jarrod hazel recei
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2016 6:00am EDT
in 37 different houses before the white house, but, of course, so did george h.w. bush and mrs. bush. they just moved all of the time because of the military. >> katie talked about categories and eisenhower might be in the category. major job as support for the president. >> she left an impact. how many out there have a pink bathroom? [laughter] >> you know, when they moved to the white house the chef went to the president and president, we have to work out a menu for one of the dinners, she saw the menu later in the day and hit the ceiling and said i will plan meals at the white house and entertainment. eisenhower is in the office and i'm at the white house. the first open bar at the white house after eisenhower turned victoriously from europe. anyway, she was a trip. [laughter] >> she was. >> i always got a chuckle. i'm sure many of you have made the trip to gettysburg to the eisenhower farm and mainly everything is pink and i always had this chuckle imagining the great general of world world war ii surrounded by pink. >> she was probably tired of all that khaki. >> she reall
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2015 5:06pm EST
schools in segregated rural george in the 30s and 40s were not very good then. but all of that was a great imprint on me because my parents were committed to my brother and myself getting a good education. i finished high school in atlanta and one on two morehouse college in atlanta and then the university middle school school. vera graduated in 1954 was the same year brown versus board of education came out from the supreme court. when i graduated from college i could not go to medical school in georgia so i went to the university and did very well. that was my first experience in 1954 when i went to boston. living in a non- segregated society. the bottom line was i was accepted without any problems whatsoever and a great experience. i became class president and finished third in my class and went on to cornell and harvard for postgraduate training and ended up on the faculty at bu. then in 1955 morehouse college my college alma mater helped found the morehouse school of medicine. that then led to my meeting vice president bush whose dedication of the building we constructed back in
CSPAN
May 26, 2015 8:51pm EDT
relationship. the first president, george washington articulated an additional approach in his letter to the synagogue, which has been cited as the basis for the concept of religious pluralism. a definition that is more inclusive and perhaps more appropriate in today's united states than the term "tolerant." washington said it is no more than toleration that's spoken of. if the worthy indulgence of one class of people enjoys happily, the united states requires only they live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support. our speakers have dedicated their careers to considering issues of the appropriate interaction between religious liberty and u.s. lost. greg lipper is council on key cases in the u.s. supreme court. michael bursten writes about the intersection of religious believe in politics. greg is with the americans united for separation of church and state. before that, he worked at a law firm. christina ariaga is with the beckett fund. she tells me she has quite an eclectic collection of pets at home. we learne
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2015 12:50pm EDT
in washington. george pataki is running for president. in 1998 the former new york governor released, "pataki" he looks back on his path to the governorship. kentucky senator rand paul calls for smaller government and more bipartisanship in his latest book taking a stand. another entrant into the 2016 presidential race is former texas governor rick perry. in "fed up," he explains that government has become too intrusive and must get out of the way. in "american dreams," florida senator marco rubio outlines his plan to advance economic opportunity. independent vermont senator bernie sanders is a candidate for democratic nomination of the president. his book, the speech, is a printing of his eight-hour long filibuster against tax cuts. in blew collar conservatives, presidential candidate rick santorum argues that the republican party must focus on the working class to retake the white house. businessman donald trump has written several books. in "time to get tuff" he criticizes the obama administration and outlines his vision for american prosperity. james webb looks back at h
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2014 10:30pm EDT
a man. this man is standing up and being a man. he said his father had voted for george wallace in the first election to the region under the influence of what he heard he voted for george mcgovern in the next election. so people in prominent positions, i mean, can be influential. depends on the story they're telling. i don't think it's one or the other. i think it really is matter of the story. >> i think also it becomes important to us to understand that there are certain fundamental principles "in islam such as the belief in the universality of humanity, human brotherhood a sister that life transcends the his ago and that there are some things worth dying for. i think that was the power. and there are certain things worth losing all four. and so it's not a question of having people in prominence. it's having people in providence who are willing to give their lives and to move it all to be faithful to those high richardson believes. that's why mom's belly was so powerful police he was willing to give up the fame, the wealth of the notoriety, his career, everything to advance a se
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2014 2:00am EDT
first grand baby. exactly. our darling -- [applause] -- our darling little mila. george and i are just gaga over our baby. >> how old is she now? >> 16 months. >> oh, she's doing real things. >> yes. >> 16 months. she's doing great. >> so we just saw that very important video and mrs. obama, you spoke last week to the young african leaders and you were very strong in your statements about the need for educating girls and treating women and girls with dignity and equality. why did you choose to do that? >> well, so often what we find in our positions is you can -- you have to change attitudes before you can change behaviors. one of the things i said to the young people, we can talk about the need for more resources when it concerns girls' education, the need for school fees, and need to improve transportation, but the bottom line is that until men, leaders, women, until we value women and girls, we won't tackle those other problems. until we prioritize our girls and understand that they are as important and their education is as important as the education of our sons. then we will
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2014 9:50pm EDT
bush. then former president george w. bush on fighting disease in africa. then president obama holds a news conference to close the summit. >> this month, c-span presents abates on what makes america great, evolution, and genetically modified foods. issues spotlight with in-depth looks at veterans health care, irs oversight, student loan debt, and campus sexual assault. new perspectives on issues including global warming am a voting rights, fighting infectious disease, and food tour,, and our history showing sights and sounds from america's historic places. find our history schedule one week in advance at www.c-span.org and let us know what you think about the programs you are watching. .all or e-mail us join the conversation, like us on facebook, follow us on twitter. >> as part of the u.s.-africa leader summit in washington, first lady michelle obama and former first lady laura bush hosts the program on opportunities for women. this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning. good morning. thank you so much. thank you so much, everyone. i name is michelle obama and i am an african a
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2015 5:00am EDT
detail of the motorcade route. one-time one george h. w. bush was going to give a speech in oklahoma when he was campaigning for reelection he advanced and people went out there, they talk to local law enforcement and law enforcement said no, there is this psychic in town who has been incredibly reliable in the past and let us to a body of the murder victims and she said that she had a vision that bush would be assassinated by sniper at an overpass. the secret service agents were embarrassed to take this seriously, but nonetheless they interviewed the psychic and after if she knew anything more about this alleged plot and she said i know that the motorcade vehicles are out at the air force base. they said can you show us where and they went there and there were five hangars and she pointed correctly to the hangar where the motorcade vehicles were. this was from one of the agents who is actually in charge and asked her a few other questions and she said this is going to come out of air force one wearing a sport jacket and sport coat, and i thought, that is absurd, but sure en
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2016 11:30am EDT
he on george washington. she has her sixth ellis the elephant book coming out in october called "hail to the chief." i have my second novel about , "treason," coming out in october. so we're fairly busy. it's not like we're hanging out hoping somebody will give us a job. we would want to sit down and talk it through. i think if it was a position that in trump's mind that would have a cheney-like significant role we'd certainly have to consider it. if you get to go to lots of funerals, we would probably pass. >> who has redefined the java vice president? cheney more than anybody in modern times. for the first term, he was enormously strong and involved in everything. johnson played a bigger role than people think. he was never an insider with the kennedy clan but they gave him , some pretty good portfolio, for example, he was in charge of space. i would say george h.w. bush played a significant role. i think reagan did including him on a regular basis. i think al gore played a significant role. if you go back and look there , was a very good chemistry between gore and clinton which unf
CSPAN
Jun 16, 2016 2:00am EDT
amendment to recognize the bindings on the inspector general of the irs. mr. george identified no political targeting of any group , no order to destroy any e-mail , no obstruction of any investigation. i did not say that. mr. george, the republican ig did.ent -- appointed republicans may want to ignore these findings, but they are right here in black and white. finally, mr. chairman, let me close by making one final observation. on the committee's official website, there is a section called getting results. it allows employees to be called on or to be fired. inen's name isosk , theat list with a quote quote next to it. creating a hit list on federal officials is not something to be proud of. a publicdefaming servant who came out of retirement to take the helm of an agency in turmoil is not a positive result. it is a travesty. we can, and we should be proud of the bipartisan, proactive reforms we have worked on together and will continue to work on, as we would do this afternoon with regard to the postal reform. so i hope we can return to focusing on those issues that have the pot
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2016 4:11am EDT
george. hideaway sound? has my my voice can you hear me okay? >> when we put down. what a pleasure it is to be introduced by george. >> i'm going to speak for just a few minutes and then after i introduce you to the magazine and institutional background that has gotten us to this point, then i hope we can have a conversation because as george suggested, this is a topic of a very focused, rich substantive discussion that's important to have and it would be a shame if i did all the talking. let me start off with the baffler catechism. it's a program issued four times a year imprint and it offers a mix of poems and satire. also lots of art and as you can see from this issue which is out in the center, this particular cover displayed and a rocky artist that was displaced by us and it comes at a nice time for a discussion on form policy. throughout we keep our focus on the money power. where money talks to itself, and what it generates in our culture and what it produces in our politics. in the magazine, we identify concentrations of power and challenge consensus thinking and we propose re
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 12:00pm EST
still facing the country. we see it manifest in everything from the george zimmerman trial to focus on voter id card to paint voter id as a racist thing and caution voter fraud. the question on the motivation of the american people at least his opponents is something president obama likes to do on a frequent basis and it pays tremendous dividends and the only sector of the racial population that showed up in larger numbers than the previous cycle in 2012 is the black community that showed up in numbers far outweigh in the portion of the population which is great they showed up and a lot of folks showed up that they were convinced by voting for president obama they were stopping a great racist tide that has kind of swarmed up to the surface against president obama and people opposed him politically. >> host: when you hear the term post-racial, what does that mean to you? >> guest: the idea that we live in a country everyone is free to make their own way and the obstacles the space should be identified and targeted on an individual level. i think that we get into ghost hunting pretty qui
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 9:59am EDT
who writes for "national review," conservative, fact, george bush created isis. hmmm. why on earth would you say that? that sounds like something i would read in salon.com or the "huffington post" but bear with me for a moment. there are some undeniable historical events occurred in 2003, 2004 and 2005 we have to grapple with. historical event number one is obvious, an invasion iraq by american-led military forces. what is less discussed and often intentionally left discussed is that invasion was undertaken with a invasion force that was pressured, consistently pressured from senior officials in the pentagon to be smaller and smaller and smaller. where there grew to be a real concern that the goal of the invasion wasn't so much to topple saddam and create stability in his wake but to prove a theory about military strategy and tactics, particularly what was called a rma, revolution in military affairs. you could do more with less than ever before. and the first six weeks or so of that invasion vindicated donald rumsfeld and vindicated the rma notion of the war in iraq. how so? ameri
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2013 10:40pm EST
they would settle into a stalemate that would then have george washington arrived and that would change everything. eventually, in march 1776, the british wood he forced to evacuate with the arming of george esther heights and i will get to that later but that was the arc i wanted to tell them the story. with the up tick up tensions with the arrival with the boston port act and then with the evacuation. so when i began this research almost immediately i realized i was going to -- the characters i was going to focus on were not the characters most of us are familiar with is what was happening as tensions were building with boston was the continental congress met for the first time in philadelphia in the fall of 1774 which meant that leaders such as john adams and sam adams were out of town when all of this was beginning to unleash. and tensions were escalating with the boston port act but it was really an act that followed this, one of many acts, the massachusetts government act which brought vitale not only of its commercial way of life but of its government, the entire province
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2014 8:00am EDT
>> good afternoon, everybody. i'm mark kennedy, the director of the graduate school here at george washington university, and we welcome everyone here from george washington university to our panel on digital complaints, 2012 and beyond. we give a special welcome to our c-span audience that's joining us. we also give a special welcome to those from the american political science association that have come to all day seminars here in advance of their conference study tomorrow. at the graduate school of political management, we are very pleased that one of george washington's trustees, mark shenkman who is with us here today has funded a series of research an digital campaigning. as we've all seen, the world in all aspects of our life is going more digital and we want to make sure that our students are at the forefront of understanding how you apply big data for political success. so today's seminar is very timely. i'm very pleased to be collaborating with this with the school of media and public affairs and frank sessna will be leading the conversation here. frank has a great backgr
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2015 2:00am EDT
nuclear agreement at the carnegie endowment. his remarks are 35 minutes. george: good morning, a few people settling in. my name is george, vice president for studies here at the carnegie endowment. it's my pleasure to welcome all of you back from the end of summer, lamentably, and the beginning of the work year here in washington, but we have a great occasion which we are honored to present to you to start it off. and that is an address by senate minority leader harry reid. and to introduce senator reid we have a dear friend and former colleague of his, congressman howard berman, who is also a friend of ours. we had the pleasure and honor of working together on a number of issues when he was chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. he's still very active in international affairs. so it gives us extra pleasure to ask congressman berman to come up and introduce senator reid. congressman berman: thank you very much, george. just before i introduce the speaker, i just want to let our host know that, host of carnegie, that really how incredibly valuable your work has been to
CSPAN
May 6, 2014 4:00pm EDT
. versus george killing. george is the codeveloper the broken windows theory as professor bruckner's university at harvard university. a senior fellow at the manhattan institute. george is a professor at the school of criminal justice at rutgers university. he is currently researching organizational change in police and development of comprehensive community crime prevention programs. killing us back to his social probation officer administered residential care programs for aggressive and distribute. in 1972 he began work at the police foundation and conducted several large-scale experiments in policing. most notably the kansas city prevention control experiment on newark for patrol experiment. the latter was the source of the contributions to the most familiar publication. broken windows with james q. wilson. during the late 1980s time develop the water maintenance policies of the new york city subway that ultimately led to racial radical -- radical crime reductions. later he consulted that the police department fixing broken windows distract water which he developed his wife cather
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2014 11:32pm EDT
five directors. i would look and see that george stephens made no hollywood movies between 1943 and 1948 or wyler between 42 and 47. that got me curious about their war lives that we often ignore and what it went to them. >> capra was known for it's a wonderful live but he was also asked to put these films together by general martial. why question is why did he get to directors like capra and not have the military produce them. >> it's a really interesting counter intuitive moment. he didn't have the military produce them because he knew and most of the most tedepartment's top brass knew that military movies had been terrible. many were in use since the late 1920s. they were really clumsily made on a communication level. there's a real question why he did not turn to the makers of news reals to document the entire war effort instead look to hollywood, creators of fiction. i think it's because marshall really understood the power of narrative film. he had seen its effect during the great depression when, you know, i think his movies were shown often on the sides of trucks to people i
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