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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2016 7:00am EDT
think it george hw bush and 88 but has been democratic ever sense. if you've got a a portion of those votes by congressional district, so 13-18 gets you to senators which i believe is one democrat, one republican, so you would go 14-six republican instead of 24 the democrats. and that would would be while on the opposite side. so it's an amazing way to do the math. >> i know it depends on how it is done, but it strikes me that gerrymandering can make certain districts vulnerable to a real high turnout. that is a goes agosto a jerry benders plan. he said that i landslide would not help the democrats in the coming election, but are there districts that are vulnerable to unexpectedly high turnout and with that not create an incentive on the party to publicize that? >> there are some. there are some states where, i'm sorry where the republicans have gotten greedy. especially especially texas is a really interesting case. there are a lot of districts in texas where they drew the lines based on modeling of how they believed latino voters would turn out. so the goal was to make it look
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 2:00am EDT
second him on stage as king george iii you have trend the limit of the possible. two aspects of one american revolution, that's the israel we were going to tell and we would call hamilton. hough how did we do it? we had to work really fast. not alexander hamilton fast but at least as fast as the people that lin collaboratessed with to make the show. they're coming to town and might get to spend time with them so i should warn you that the director, the music director and the choreographer, the core four artists who made the showing. if you're going to talk to them, caffeinate heavily in advance because they think fast, talk fast, they even move fast. the creative metabolism of the people who methods this show is light speed and that's one of the things that is essential why it works. there are 32 chapters in the book. had seven weeks to draft them. i do not recommend this as a way of making books, for the record. there was head start of me having been around a lot to see things that were happening in rooms where no writer belonged but then i wasn't there as a writer. i was there as
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 12:00am EDT
trade agreement or nafta. and you remember what this was about. george bush sr. had negotiated it with canada and mexico, but he couldn't get it through congress because congress at the time was controlled by old school democrats. but bill clinton could do it. and he brought in your currentur mayor, rahm emanuel, who was his point man on getting nafta passed. come on now, folks. i remember this vividly, because i was living in chicago at the time, and i would watch this -- i lived down on 48th street. we'll talk about that another time, but i would watch the debates over this on my stupid little tv set in that house. on my stup anyhow, so nafta. this is a fascinating story if you think about it. when clinton got nafta passed, clinton rammed it through congress. he wasn't merely insulting his friends in organized labor who opposed nafta, he was conniving in their ruin. okay? he was assisting in then destruction of their economic power. he wasn't just insulting them, he was materially injuring them. he was -- right? doing his part to undermine his own party's greatest ally, to insur
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 11:00am EDT
thought that george bush's foreign policy, first george bush was against everything that america really stood for. he was worried about the first gulf war. he saw this as our first into american empire. he was -- he spent the first three years, i don't think-really successful and run out of the conservative movement, but he was very much against this. he thought bush betray it had entire reagan legacy. he did not believe in any form of overseas expansion, the idea that we have troops stationed in 150 countries, out of 100, roughly 96. something very different than 1991, he would have been very upset about that. he would not in any way recognize the people that we call, neocons, he would not have predicted that, he was very worried about the possibility but he also and i think this is maybe more important and i don't want to necessarily name names, but the idea that you have radio shows, dedicated to conservatism as art, not -- i'm sorry, let me rephrase that not as art but entertainment. the fact that you would be selling conservatism as a radio show or tv show, he is conservatism, what
CSPAN
Jun 11, 2016 3:00pm EDT
week and watch for the authors and that near future on book tv. >> george gibson is the publishing director of the bloomsbury. what is bloomsbury, mr. gibson? >> bloom's barry is a division of plc worldwide publisher founded in 1998. blooms very the company was founded in 1986 and after the publication of the first harry potter novel they opened a business in the united states and got the publisher of the adult division here. >> what kind of books do you publish them at about 110 books a year, and largely nonfiction, 20% of the list is fiction, but a lot of history and politics and current events and food related books, popular science. those are the core areas we publish. >> we went to catch up with you here at the publishing convention to talk about some the books coming out this fall and you have one coming up on lyndon johnson. >> we do. is by woman named joan mellon and it's really the story at the dark side of lyndon johnson. lbj accomplished an enormous amount, they had a dark side and this story is told through the lens of a man completely unknown to history named matt wall
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2016 1:00am EDT
he thought george bought bush form policy wasica against everything that america stood for the first goal for and saw this as the first for re into the american empire building she was very successful he was run out of the conservative movement he did make remarks that were not very judicious he thought bush betrayed the entire reagin legacy he was fine with the big military but you don't use it and he did not believe in any overseas expansion so the idea that we have troops stationed in 150 countries that is something very different he but have been very upset about that in a way recognize the people the nes neocons he would not have predicted that but he was very worried about that possibility but maybe even more important not to name names but to have radio shows them dedicated to conservatism as entertainment they you so that as a radio show or tvervatt show what we're doing here having a discussion and your letting me talk taking 45 minutes to actually think about an idea to him that is what we should be doing you may disagree but that was a proper way to do then in this i
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 6:00am EDT
. the list starts off with pulitzer prize-winning calm as george will, the pursuit of happiness and other sobering thoughts, which is a collection of essays written in 1978. william f buckley junior is next on the list with an exploration of his roman catholic faith in nearer my god. third on the list by margaret thatcher discusses her time as prime minister of the united kingdom. in the way of the wasp, richard for kaiser examines is personality and dies of george a shall be of bush and views on public service and tradition. the autobiography, undocumented mark stein's fifth on the new boston post list of suggested summer reading followed by the closing of the american mind, which is allan bloom's critique of american culture. next on the list is former oklahoma senator tom coburn of the death bomb which lays out his plan to make the government more fiscally responsible. "wall street journal" column this peggy noonan in the time of our lives, it collection of her columns and comes in eight on the list. finishing off the new boston post list of suggested summer reading are randy bar
CSPAN
Jun 11, 2016 11:00am EDT
. george bush senior had negotiated it with canada and mexico, but could not get it through commerce because carvers at that time was controlled by old school democrats, but bill clinton could do it. he brought in your current mayor, ronnie manual who was his point man. come on now, folks. i remember this vividly because i picture the time. i lived on 48 street and we will talk about that another time, but i would watch the debates on my stupid little tv set in that house. so, nafta, fascinating story if you think about it. when clinton got nafta passed he rammed through congress. he wasn't merely insulting his friends in organized labor who opposed nafta, he was conniving in their ruined. he was assisting in the destruction of their economic power. he wasn't just insulting them, he was materially injuring them. he was doing his part to undermine his own parties greatest ally. to ensure that management would always and forever now have the upper hand over workers whenever they tried to organize or go out and complain about something or basically anything because now management can al
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2016 3:00pm EDT
considers george cleveland hall, the local representative of booker t. washington and a physician at providence hospital, and ed wright whereas a great attorney and took one look at the warrant that the pinker tons produced and said this is a warrant from georgia to arrest an editor in the state of emand he tore up the warrant and ordered the pinker tons out. explaining to them that chicago was a city with 40,000 african-americans. that there were african-american police officers, african-american elected officials, and an african-american national guard unit, and there was no way that these pinkerton detectives were going to take the african-american editor of the newspaper of that community anywhere. the pinkertons were toso frighten bed thees incurrenter the put ed wright on the payroll for several decades until he passed away. i think it's a great incident to bring up because it shows the strength of chicago community that the chicago community really was behind this newspaper in a way that i don't think you would find in another community. >> i brought it up because i think it a
george wallace, stood in the schoolhouse door to keep african-americans out, now a lot of politicians are standing in the schoolhouse door of failed schools trying to keep them in. it is and immortality and something that needs to be broken. people need to rise up. the catholic archdiocese took a survey of parents whose children, mostly minority parents whose children were in public schools and ask them if you had a choice, would you put your child in a catholic school over the public school and the overwhelming percentage chose the path which school. i would say like moses let my people go. >> you, repeated that line when we were on a radio show yesterday and i was hoping -- i am happy to have groundhog day with you. in your book, you reference a previous book you wrote, blinded by might. it is a point that gets lost a lot in the static of washington. i will read it back to you. in blinded by might i am not calling for retreat from the public square. i ask only for a more realistic view of what the matted things government can achieve and the unlimited power of god's king them. colet
clinton discusses her new memoir at george washington university in washington d.c. that's a look at some of the author programs booktv will be covering this upcoming week. for more, go to our web site, booktv.org, and visit "upcoming programs." >> booktv asked, what are you reading this summer? >> well, i'm going to read, basically, two books. i'm going to finish "the warmth of other suns." i got about halfway through that book before i stepped away from it to finish my own. but i'm going to go back to it because it's a book about three families in search of a better life leaving the south and where they went and how their experiences were. so i'm going to finish that book. isabel wilkerson, i think, did a great job with that book. and then i'm going turn my attention to this book, the st. roots of african-american -- south carolina roots of african-american thought. basically because this book is sort of a compilation of speeches and writings of south carolinians, most of whom i knew. and still know. i've been ahazed, one of my -- amazed, one of my heros, mary clark bethune, jesse jacks
terrible and i kissed her and said all right. i'm sorry. first to people were george and alfred. george, who i believe is now a bank officer was head of our high school black panther party. and he came in, god bless them to watch over the table and said all right. alfred. the actual guests were not thrown by it. so yes of course, we had some of those distances. looking back on them in her last days there were mostly for, purposes. yes, ma'am. cedar street. one of my aunts lived there. >> yes. >> well, yes. the question is question is talking about cedar street. it's all co-ops i should think. >> myself, about. [inaudible] the book. [inaudible question] [inaudible question] >> let me try and begin to rephrase this with the c-span audience. a nice will last if i should write a book about rush street in chicago in a certain time because it really was a certain separate part of america and society you know, that had a lot of grace notes to it. and i don't think i will write anything like that directly but as was noted chicago gets and everything i write. so it sometime maybe. i would not ru
very clear from the book that it was george wallace who was votethe loose cannon in alabama. you attended a meeting with him and earlier with president johnson. tell me about those two men. >> interesting personalities indeed. i was chosen at the end of the selma, montgomery march. i missing infant and dexter avenue baptist church with my wife joyce who is in the audience today, and here was dr. king on this stage, winding out a powerful event, dr. king gave one of his greatest speeches even greater than the i have a dream speech, is not well known but they were winding everything down and dr. king and announces the 15 clergy who were to meet with george wallace. george wallace would not meet with dr. king, said that is off-limits and king said okay, meet with the leaders of the movement. clergy had been involved in the movement and when he read off my name, the only white clergy in the group, i was quite surprised. it was an interesting meeting to meet with the man who said in front of the university door, trying to -- previously trying to shutdown integration of the university
for the replica. barack obama was the starkest sort of antidote to george w. bush. he was kind of reflective and deliberative the peoples of people saw bush was impulsive. he was not seen them as a partisan figure. there are a range of reasons and he was not a washington person. now people are looking for someone a little less deliberative less ponderous command i say that. and they will be looking for someone who can manage or maybe navigate washington pres. someone who promises to change washington. >> washington. >> hillary clinton known as the remedy to barack obama? >> in so many words. not that directly. remember eight years ago now i was predicting that the nomination, the nominees would be hillary and read giuliani. people have not run to me for prediction since then. [laughter] >> you remember those. that was conventional wisdom >> pataki. >> what's today? i'm still hanging in with hillary clinton and jeb bush both of them are going to worry now. remarkable that bush approval just saw this week. just before he was about to announce his candidacy. that seems to be the way
on some prominent people in the community, ed wright, civil right attorney, and considers george cleveland hall, the local representative of booker t. washington and a physician at providence hospital, and ed wright whereas a great attorney and took one look at the warrant that the pinker tons produced and said this is a warrant from georgia to arrest an editor in the state of emand he tore up the warrant and ordered the pinker tons out. explaining to them that chicago was a city with 40,000 african-americans. that there were african-american police officers, african-american elected officials, and an african-american national guard unit, and there was no way that these pinkerton detectives were going to take the african-american editor of the newspaper of that community anywhere. the pinkertons were toso frighten bed thees incurrenter the put ed wright on the payroll for several decades until he passed away. i think it's a great incident to bring up because it shows the strength of chicago community that the chicago community really was behind this newspaper in a way that i don'
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)