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CSPAN
Jan 25, 2014 7:00pm EST
author of one book on george bush's foreign-policy. we heard barbara bush talk about the fact that when she became first lady, her words were much more attention getting. that trend continues. we will see clips of an interview that she gave to us in october. one of them has been bouncing all around the news networks for several days because she talked about presidential dynasties, political dynasties, and the potential for jeb bush's presidential aspirations. barbara bush -- she had a reputation for a good quote and candid comments. >> she was always very aware of her public persona and i think she was always concerned about whether it would have political consequences for her husband. she also was very candid and sometimes a comment slipped out and she admonished herself or from time to time. >> the candid barbara bush had some pluses and minuses. >> she would really speak her mind and she was somebody who would speak her mind to the president, but not in a public way. she would tell him what she really thought. >> as we are working our way through the biographies of these women,
CSPAN
Apr 19, 2015 8:00pm EDT
image." this is about one hour and a half. ♪ >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was absorbed and capable but she did not like that definition. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> every step washington took, to find the office, -- washington took defined the office so, in a very real sense, can it be said that everything martha washington did likewise? >> it was a business-like relationship but not without respect and affection. >> she owned most of this whole block going back a couple of acres which means she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. >> there was a lot of tragedy and martha washington's life. she lost her husband. first >> she was raised a rich woman and what that meant in the 18th century is not what it means today. >> when she marries george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it took 10 days to travel here to valley forge from mount vernon in her carriage with her slaves and servants with her and this was a difficult journey. >> her experience ha
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 9:00pm EDT
washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley forge from mount vern oranges in her carriage with her slaves and servants with her. and this wa
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2014 11:59pm EST
point? >> i cannot remember. from the day to remember. i talked to george once i got there and my mother. she was the one i really wanted to call. i wonder her to say everything would be all right. i called her and said everything will be all right. >> how did she respond? how did she redefine her role? say, i was with her that day because i was covering her for the washington post. there was some confusion anybody was whether going to -- she and senator kennedy made a brief statement to the press over there. i can remember looking at her -- she twists her fingers at her sides when she is struggling with something that is very traumatic. she isber thinking getting her mother lost wisdom. -- mother-in-law's wisdom. what she kept a say over and over again, we have to make sure we tell our children we love them as america is a strong country and will get through. keeping with her as a library and teacher and she dedicated herself to that. things were very different. to thewrote a letter children of america a day after 9/11. some of what it said -- a personal message. as a nation, we
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2014 9:00pm EST
george w. bush and laura bush have a project or foundation that they both work on and i am wondering if you could talk about that a little bit. i am sorry that we do not know more about it. >> can you talk about how this works in the world of giving and finance and how one can be a public figure and except contributions like this and what it does politically? >> laura bush continues to work on the issues that are of importance to her. is aush center collaboration of a number of different institutions. including the bush library and the bush institute. the bushes continue to further they began to take initiatives towards in the white house. >> they do that with the help of donors. >> yes. they raise money that goes into the bush institute and the bush library as well. >> in the case of laura bush, her husband is not going to be running for president again and she is not going to be running herself. donors might gain if there were another bush, for instance, that might run for president. yes, i think that is possible. i think that they are sort of protected at this point from that. with m
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2013 11:30am EDT
. eastern. of an " first ies" -- when george washington was a way fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation and their home, mount vernon. that marthaar arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support system that enables him to volunteer his time and talents to run the revolution is clearly critical. manager, who during most li
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 7:00pm EDT
. her husband was appointed minister to russia and at the last minute, her older sons, george washington adams and john adams ii are going to stay ehind. she can't take her children with her to russia. they're going to stay behind with john and abigail to be raised as americans on american soil. you often get the sense of a woman who is powerless within her marriage to be making fundamental parental decisions, hat they were reserved as most decisions were for john quincy. >> but she must have had the innate desire, she worked her heart out to get her husband to the white house. then she gets there and how does she enjoy her tenure? >> not very. not very much. the white house years are very unpleasant years for the adams and was readily apparently to everyone in the family, charles francis adams, their son, talks about it in his own diary of ow sad the household seemed at the time. >> what made it that way? >> i think the cloud under which the presidency began, it never lifts. because this campaigning for 828 begins almost instantly, louisa feels very personally the attacks on her husband
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2014 7:00pm EST
necessary. i said, george, you either get the car or i'm going to walk. we went to the hospital. and mike met me at the hospital and said, he has been shot. and there were police all around. and there was a lot of noise. and they put me a little small room. there was one desk and one chair. that was it. i kept wanting to see ronnie. and they kept saying, well, he is all right. but you can't see him. and i kept saying, if he is all right, why can't i see him? finally, they let me see him. he was lying there with that thing on his face to help him breathe. he lifted it up and said, honey, i forgot to duck. >> how did this impact a brand- new presidency? >> i was a part of the press pool that day. it was a time i will never ever forget. it made her much more protective. she was all ready completely focused on him and his safety, but after this, it was her sole purpose, you could argue. at one point she said something like, when he left to go somewhere, i wasn't able to breathe deeply until he came back. >> that was in the movie. >> it was something she said in the documentary to us
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 9:00pm EST
her junior year abroad in paris, and finishing up the george washington university. a handful of first ladies at that time had an undergraduate degree. >> sometimes it is forgotten, her influence on historic preservation. now, we take it as a given, if there is a beautiful historic building, there better be a good reason to take that down. but years ago that was not the case, when the term urban or newly is used. if john kennedy in particular and jackie kennedy as first lady had not been the first lady in the 1960s -- the executive office building next to the white house would have been torn down, which white eisenhower was willing to do. he thought that this was an eyesore. part of the white house would be torn down. >> dolley madison -- the white house was lit up -- >> it would have been replaced by federal office buildings of the time -- a penitentiary and a prison yard. this really helped the historic preservation -- >> in the book you quote aldrich >> this was her schoolmate at miss porter's school. >> she wrote that mrs. kennedy designed her mission of first lady along the
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 9:00pm EST
campaigns. you see many politicians running as outsiders. george bush thomas the second bush --ush -- george the second george bush ran as an dashder going after their off his experience in texas. >> the carter family, mrs. , the son, the mother-in- law, all involved in making it a family affair. peoplentil this point wouldn't figure out you have to get outside of washington. one of my favorite stories from mrs. carter, she and a friend would go around and spend 75 days in florida, and they would and look for town an antenna because they figured it was a radio station, and they would say, would you like to interview us? a would ring questions they want a low-budgets campaign, but in that year with thatce laws of that kind was the way to do it. a different way of campaigning than we see now -- staying with areas people in the small towns a visited. >> they will do that in iowa and new hampshire, but after that it gets hard to do. aboute a little bit learning the mechanics of political science. they had only a little experience. biography, their systematic approach to learning mechan
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 9:00pm EDT
burned all of her papers, her letters, her correspondence with her husband george. only two of them remained. we have just the opposite here. thousands and thousands of them. explain the scope of the trove of materials that you have to work with as scholars through the writings of the adams family. >> the adams family gave to the massachusetts historical society a collection. we have never counted them individually, but probably 70,000+ documents over several generations, and probably about 300,000 pages. for abigail and john, which is the most important of the collection, there are about 1,170 letters they exchanged over the years. >> how frequently did they write to one another? >> it depended. when they were together -- for example, we do not have any letters after 1801 because after john leaves the white house, they're together almost all the time. for periods, for example, when there is fairly regular mail delivery between massachussetts and philadelphia, or later washington, d.c., they wrote at least once a week and sometimes twice a week. i almost like to think of it like pho
CSPAN
May 9, 2015 12:05pm EDT
she is saving the state documents, the important pieces of silver, the portrait of george washington for which she is so famous. but she is writing literally as everything is being packed to be carted off to virginia to safety. so she is very aware of what she is doing, and she writes a number of letters to her family members. catherine: susan, i want to weigh in, because this questioner knows that, as historians, this is the heart of what we do. these are the primary sources. and for a long while, to find dolley's actual letters and what she wrote, it was really hard to do. but in the 1990s and early 2000s, holly shulman and david mattern at the papers of james madison at the university of virginia began collecting her papers, and they published them in a lovely book called, "the selected letters of dolley madison." but holly shulman is now the web master of the dolley madison digital edition, which anybody can find in their library, and it has every letter to and from dolley. so these are the papers that are really crucial. and we also have this great account from her niece, mary c
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 7:00pm EDT
portrait of george washington for which she is so famous, but she is writing as everything is being packed to be carted off to virginia for safety. so she is very aware of what she is doing, and she writes a number of letters to her family members. >> i want to weigh in. we know as historians, this is the heart of what we do. these are the primary sources. for a long while, to find dolley's actual letters was really hard to do. but in the 1990's holly shulman at the university of virginia and another person began collecting her papers and published them in a lovely book. but there is now a web master of dolley madison, so these are the papers that are really crucial. we also have writing from her niece. mary writes about her aunt. a lot of those stories, which must have come from dolley herself, which tells us that later in her life, she is getting a sense of her legacy. she cannot intrude upon the public notice as a man would, but she gave her these memoirs, which have now been published for the first time. people can read those. >> we have a video to show you throughout the night
CSPAN
Mar 9, 2013 7:00pm EST
row that martha washington burned the papers of her correspondence with her husband, george. only two of them remained. we got the opposite here. thousands and thousands of them. explain the scope of the trove of materials that you have to work with as scholars through the writings of the adams' family. >> the adams' family gave two of the massachusetts historical society a collection. we never accounted them individually, but probably 70,000-plus documents over several generations and probably about 300,000 pages. for abigail and john, which is, i think, the most important of the collection, there are about 1170 letters they exchange. >> how frequently did they write? >> it depended. we don't have any letters after 1801 because after john leaves the white house, they are together almost all the time, but for a period, for example, when there is fairly regular mail delivery between massachusetts and philadelphia, or later washington, d.c., they wrote at least once a week, and sometimes twice week. i almost think they were like phone calls. >> this letter is an interactive one. we
CSPAN
Mar 4, 2013 9:00pm EST
you see evidence for that? >> i think john and george washington got along pretty well all the time. and john adams was extraordinarily supportive of washington and was personally injured when some of the press turned on washington. couldn't believe it. this is one of the things. martha and george were a hard act to follow and they knew they were going to be difficult. >> we will move into the years of their one term presidency. before that video, it's a time when in one of your books you called it a splendid -- using abigail adams' word, a splendid misery being in the white house. explain what that phrase meant? >> it meant that they -- it was splendid in that they were at the pinnacle of his political career and her career. i mean, they had risen to the top. and it was nothing but trouble. and agonizing trouble from the very beginning. at very first, john was enthusiastic about becoming president and abigail said, well, i'm going to say in -- stay in quincy because i have things to do and she was taking care of john's mother and said i won't be there until october. he said that's
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2013 12:00am EST
example i like to give is george eastman had some fantastic ideas about photography. he was very successful, and along with his success, the city of rochester supported a thriving middle class for two generations. steve jobs, equally fundamental innovation or more fundamental innovations, produced even greater success for him, and for his shareholders, but there was no comparable, large-scale, middle-class job creation. >> china has named competitiveness and gained shares. it has innovated efficiency as much as any country will. there are fewer countries -- there are fewer workers in chinese manufacturing than there were 20 years ago. comes,, if and when it ofl come from various kinds service work and greater customization. they it is a tragedy that are saying and you are right, that's there is not enough work to do. there areer hand, several million kids in this country who profoundly need and theyl attention are not close to getting it. we do not have a way of bringing the people who want to work together with those. i do not think it is traditional government that will do it a
CSPAN
Apr 8, 2013 9:00pm EDT
george bush was in the office. is that true? >> i don't know. good question. >> as our series progresses, as we get it barbara bush, we'll that question for you. we'll go back in time and learn about how that political together.p came you told us sarah polk was from a wealthy family in tennessee. she and james polk meet? >> they ran in the same circles. probably through -- either through andrew jackson or through her own father's family. polk went to the -- graduated from the university of north then went into law and studied in nashville and the legislature and they met there or they met jackson's because the polk girls were often at the jackson's home. certainly jackson is known or we think that he advised polk to marry her. this is who you need as a wife, he would say. commonly said that she told polk she wouldn't marry him unless he ran for course he did of and he won and they were married in 1824. so andrew jackson played something of a matchmaker here? he and his wife did not have children of their own and had many, many different young took in.at they jackson would write to sarah
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2014 9:00pm EST
have to final decision in the future on the george washington aircraft in the 2016 budget. if sequestration levels remain 2016,ce for fiscal year she would need to be retired before her scheduled nuclear refueling and that would leave the navy with 10 carrier strike groups. keeping the george washington and the fleet will cost $6 billion. we would have no other choice than to retire due to sequestration levels be reimposed. at the president's budget a level, we would pay for the overhaul and maintain 11 carrier's. inventoryo keep the ready and modern under the president's plan, half of the cruiser fleets or ships would be laid up and reduced while they are modernized and eventually returned to service with greater capability and a longer lifespan. this approach enables us over the long term to sustain the modernize of our fleets of cruisers which are the most capable ships. fleet would navy's be modernize under our plan which continues buying two destroyers and two attack submarines per year as well as one additional floating base. we preserve the fleet's modernization program
CSPAN
May 13, 2013 9:00pm EDT
couple in the presidency were martha and george. >> another call. delighted to have people watching in venezuela. lindsay is in pennsylvania. what is your question. ? have a question either, but i thought it might be fun for your viewers to know i am a relative. my made in middle name was burchard -- my made in middle my maiden name was burchard. theund out he had quite sense of humor and ended up riding a bicycle through the white house. i thought your viewers might get a kick out of knowing that. >> thank you so much. did he have a sense of humor? >> he did. it was a bit understated. he cut up apples at the dinner table and tossed the people at -- the pieces at the people at the table. he could also tell a joke. lucy hayes gave birth to eight children, five of whom went to adulthood. >> we have more than 100 hayes descendents in our databases. we have four members of the family on our board of directors. we had a reunion a couple of years ago. a couple of the descendents came. entertaining at the white house, it was a dry white house but they used it a lot to entertain. talk about th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2013 9:00pm EST
were done. they wanted to tear it down. that was the easiest thing to do. george washington had built the walls and truman would not hear of it. they were never touched. they wanted to take a bulldozer in through one of the doors. they wanted to open the with pick axes. he said stop and they took the bulldozer down. they reassemble them. that house was rebuilt in steel and concrete. and then, that is a steel frame on the inside. it was believed to be bomb proof. they moved over to blair house where they lived most of the time. they loved it. they thought it was beautiful. it had never been decorated or anything. >> more intimate. she won at the original structure to remain. he consulted with her because of why it was falling down in the first term. there were convinced somehow the present would blame the white house. they waited until he was reelected. >> did living in the blair house have any influence on his presidency? >> it might've allowed him to relax a little bit more. >> he ate every meal by himself. on the silver stuff like that. >> one of my favorite stories, when she was in
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2013 9:00pm EDT
set up the senate so the house would act rationally and responsibly on a consistent basis. george washington warned us against factualism. they urged us to pay our debts and underscored that when you have a disagreement it should be resolved democratically. so we have a bill that passed the house and senate, we have two national renchda, presidential elections, president obama wins by five million votes, we don't have the right to repeal obamacare, it's the law of the land. but now i understand that unless you gut this legislation for an entire year that the republican majority will not even fund the government for 45 days? really? what kind of deal is that? that's not reasonable. the idea that you would send 800,000 people home tomorrow, not knowing when they come back to work, not even allowing them back to their offices, take billions out of this economy, erode the confidence that people in the united states and around the world ought to be able to have in the united states government, and you're going to do all this because you want to repeal a bill that is the law of the land
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2013 7:00pm EST
george washington's confidante. >> she was very capable. she did not like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so can it be said that everything martha washington did, likewise. >> it was a businesslike relationship. but not without affection. they had a deep respect for each other. >> she owned most of this whole block, going back a couple of acres. she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. >> there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life. she lost her first husband. >> she was raised a rich woman. what that means in the 18th century, that is not necessarily what it means today. >> she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves. that is almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes for 10 days to travel here to valley forge from mount vernon in her carriage with her slaves and servants with her. this is a difficult journey. >> her experience had prepared her to become the first lady. >> martha washington was 57 years old in 1789 when she and george washington left their beloved virgin
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2013 11:10pm EDT
room in the south wing of the mansion that was started in 1775 right before george washington left to participate in the continental congress and the revolutionary war. george washington always referred to it as open quote mrs. washington's chamber" and -- as "mrs. washington's chamber" and it is always referred to as her area. she spent time in that chamber, doing her hour of spiritual meditation. perhaps later in the date writing letters, talking with her coax -- her cooks to plan menus for the day, giving assignments she also use that room for teaching the children, elling them stories. you can imagine how wonderful it would have been in that room. one of the most notable pieces is the bed in that bed chamber. that is the bed on which george washington died. but we also know that martha washington's had a role in acquiring that bad. another piece in the room had a very close connection with martha washington, her desk. although very little of the correspondence between george and washington -- george and martha washington has survived, because they savored their private correspo
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 7:00pm EST
student at george washington. i would like to know now that the president's wife is running for president, she is actually going out there and campaigning for him -- is that in modern conception or is there someone from the past, 19th century or earlier, that we would have been surprised to know played a huge influence in getting her husband nominated. >> in the late 19th century, you had some new campaign techniques. one was the front porch campaign which had not been used in the earlier part of the 19th century. and you had a whistle stop campaign. the early front porch campaigns were garfield and harrison. what you find is that type of campaigning brings up the party's base full to the home -- brings the parties faithful up to the home. the wife becomes invisible partner on the ongoing campaign, even though at that point she, herself, did not become politicized. she is very much in her home. she was very much a part of her husband's campaign. you find a lot of women in the 20th century who were campaigning behind the scenes. certainly eleanor roosevelt was extremely active in
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2014 8:30pm EST
writing executive orders. many ast written as george w. bush. he has one signing statements and executive orders, which are didn't -- different animals, and if he writes one that creates the dream act, that is one executive order, but it is a sweeping one. tinyorge bush wrote five ones, and barack obama creates the dream act, i take the five over the one. this entire concept of the numerical thing doesn't add up. that henow, he called had a hand in you have a phone. he called 2014 a year of action. 2012 is a year of action. biden's summary of -- summer recovery, this is going to happen. -- remember when he said there was more than one way to skin a cat. after the election of 2010, he was asked about cap and trade. he couldn't get cap and trade through the democrat congress. it died in the south. this is an important point. the founding fathers were right. law sets the boundaries of which they have to operate. if the agencies operate all by themselves, they do not have any boundaries. they go as far as they want. that is what we have been dealing with. the examples, i'm going to
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2013 9:00pm EDT
the time of franklin or james beard, in the 19th century. >> or even martha washington and george. >> yes. >> certainly, she rose to that occasion, but i do not know that she ever thought, well, who would have thought when they got married that there would be a revolution? a change of government. line of a prisoner saying anything else, and i am personat every sympathizes with that. more it has become a accessible prison, if i can use that, and, perhaps, in some ways -- >> much more invaded by the media. much more theatrical. much more scripted. and unscripted. >> you referenced pat nixon and the contribution she made to the white house itself, and that is another role, the partnership with the white house. thank you, jacqueline. id that is a final theme that wanted to return to, which is the first lady or the first family are custodians of the white house. some responsible for an enormous change greeted talk about what she did to the white house. >> it is very simple. she turned it into a home, as opposed to an office building. today is house you see partly jacqueline kennedy's a
CSPAN
Mar 11, 2013 9:00pm EDT
pieces of silver, the portrait of george washington, but she is writing has everything is being packed to go off to virginia for safety. she is aware of what she is doing. she writes a number of letters to her family members. >> i want to weigh in. we know as historians, this is the heart of what we do. for a long while, to find the actual letters, it is really hard to do. at the university of virginia, they began collecting her papers and published them in a lovely book. but there is now a web master of because dolley madison -- of dolley madison, so these are the papers that are really crucial. mary writes about her aunt. a lot of those stories, which must have come from dolley herself, later in her life, she is getting a sense of legacy. she cannot intrude upon the public notice as a man would, but she gave her these memoirs, which have now been published for the first time. people can read those. >> we have a video to show you struck the night. the place is important to dolly madison -- dolley madison. let's watch. ♪ >> the portrait of dolley madison hangs in the red room.
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2014 9:00pm EST
. he took george mcgovern out to to meet with lbj. clinton learned a lot in that campaign. learn how you can lose. from that moment on, bill clinton's concept was how you could be a moderate progressive and still hang onto something in america as it was changing. >> during his term as governor, the clintons increased their national profile, leading to the 1992 presidential campaign. the mentioned earlier that it was a bruising one. of rossg the arrival perot's candidacy in the campaign. it brought bill clinton and hillary clinton to the white house. after they arrive, there was the announcement about health care. we have a couple of clips to show you that help demonstrate the intention of the first lady's involvement in health care. let's watch. [video clip] hillary has agreed to share this task force and she will be sharing some of the heat i expect to demonstrate. in the coming months, the american people will learn that we have a first lady of many talents, but most of all who can bring people together around on flex issues to hammer out consensus and get things done. >> as the pr
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 10:30pm EST
are important. it is not just one guy at the top. >> george washington university. you make a strong case for looking at public diplomacy in the field and for the most part look at the state department's role in the field. you have also served in large type for embassies where there are a variety of departments and
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2013 12:00am EST
to the george w bush administration, what does it look like? , president obama's nominees have seen a wait time of around 140 days. under george w. bush, those same nominees saw a wait time about a quarter of that amount. for district nominees, they have waited around 100 days. three times the weight time of george w. bush's nominees. you have seen significantly longer wait time from court approval. the difference was the senate democrats had it different strategy mixing the process up. they would try to hurt the nominee's chances before they even got to committee. when harry reid went on to the floor in the midst of this nuclear debate, they talked about how half of the cloture motions have come under president obama's term. which is a startling statistic. i think only for cloture motions were ever invoked the past 13 years. >> these nominees were on the floor and they had to bring this to a vote? >> right. they nominated what they thought would be the best candidate possible. >> those people passed the committee. >> they are approved in that process within they have to wait to get
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 9:00pm EST
. in 1975 it was president gerald ford. in 1982 it was ronald reagan. and in 2006 it was george bush. it was the current house majority held in different form but when republicans were in charge of the chamber who allowed the re-authorization to move forward through the judiciary committee on a bipartisan basis. this may seem strange in the current poisonous environment of washington that we exist in right now, but there was significant cooperation, tremendous leadership shown by then chairperson and the ranking memberle it john conyers. it passed in the house of representatives 390-33. it's also interesting to note historically that prior to this year if he ever time section 5 and the voting rights act has been used to address alleged concerns with redistricting, which traditionally take place two years after the completion of the census, when it was used by the justice department to block or modify redistricting reforms or changes, prior to the obama administration, every other occasion since the passage of the voth rights act in 1965, it was a republican justice department charged
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 6:00am EDT
stop the next boston type attack. >> from george washington university, i will direct the question to matt. eight days after benghazi, you said benghazi was an act of terror. we have had a significant political and bureaucratic debate about talking points and what happened prior to that point, but what goes into the formal determination that something is an act of terror? depending on the political agenda, it could be active thuggery or an act of war or an act of terror. for those who have been inside the system, eight days is not necessarily bad. >> important point after benghazi is -- i was in a hearing that was prescheduled. in the intelligence community, i think i can speak for all of the analysts that were working on this. we proceed of presumption it was a terrorist attack. you had a mortar attack that killed americans and a government facility in benghazi. they were clearly targeting our presence there. it was violence and result in death. there are number of legal definitions, the practical common sense of you that we all proceeded on from the outset was this was a terroris
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2013 10:00am EST
, the editor of the eleanor roosevelt papers project at george washington university and an historian. another historian, doug brinkley who is an author from rice university. thank you for being here with us. doug brinkley, it's march 1933, inauguration and entered the white house. what are they walking into? >> fdr did not get to walk in. he came in a wheelchair. the fact that somebody was crippled in the lower half said there's nothing to fear but fear itself.. that's perhaps the most famous phrase of the inauguration. what people were fearing was unemployment, chaos, hooverville's, unemployment, agricultural angst. dust bowls, october 1929 crash of the stock market. our country was in tatters. and there is franklin roosevelt, this man has overcome such odds in his personal life, dealing with polio and now ushering in a new progressive era and offering 100 days of the new deal programs right off the bat where what people called the alphabet soup of the new deal, trying to get banks to run properly as starting a civilian conservation corps that would plant a billion trees. create wpa
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2013 7:00pm EST
of george washington in 1814. she saved two canvasses. the other was the portrait of herself and pat nixon brought it back to the white house. >> chilecothe, ohio, hi, bill. >> i was a butler with the nixons. i was there at the house all the time at camp david. >> what would you like people to know about the first lady? >> please do an oral history with the nixon library. >> i want to get to the library and i haven't been. we sent stockings -- mrs. nixon, they were somehow misplaced. she sent them to the library at the time, my sisters had made them. i was there during the panda years also. i know she brought it back the tie. she brought it back to david and it was out of style and she'd given it to me. >> what would you like the audience to know about mrs. nixon since you had a way to know her the way few people did. >>> i would talk to her at breakfast. she would get up a little before the president. she was always so kind and nice and treated me with such respect that i loved the whole family. >> what were their final years as the pressure increased on the presidency, were you
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2013 9:00pm EST
george washington was the wealthiest of all of the residents if you can calculate everything was based in the plantations and slavery. but herbert hoover, i think, had about $4 million that he had 1914 which in today's $75 ars is anywhere from million to $90 million. than have been wealthier his successor, fdr, who inherited his wealth. herbert hoover made it from scratch. he was one of the wealthiest but wealthiest. >> next from your town, charlotte, west virginia. on the air. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. i always wondered why the was in -- >> dan, i'm so sorry. i pushed the button at the wrong time. that's my fault. charles, santa fe, new mexico. in, we'll get back take your questions. my apologies. harles, your question from santa fe. >> thank you for taking my call. i'm enjoying this series. i'm a native of iowa. my only real experience with the a television series called back stairs to the white house. and in that series, they did not really portray the hoovers very well in terms of how they servants.he >> charles, i'm going to stop you. we had that question early in t
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2014 12:00am EST
. he was the 43rd solicitor general of the united states under george w. bush. i became familiar with him because he was the attorney arguing against obamacare in front of the supreme court. i attended all four of those sessions. i am very grateful that these two gentlemen have joined me today. this is a lawsuit that i am filing against captain archuleta and the office of personnel and management to overturn their ruling that gives members of congress and their staff special treatment under the health care law. why am i doing this? there are two basic reasons. the first is, i think it is a basic issue of fairness. i really do believe that the american people expect and have every right to expect that members of congress should be fully subject to all of the rules and laws that congress imposes on the rest of america. it is not the case with the health care law. particularly with this office of personnel management ruling. you all have received a press kit. we provided a detailed timeline. a history of the legislative history of the past health care laws. to take you back to that momen
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2013 9:00pm EST
them were antiques. madison, is famous for saving the canvas of george washington. she saved two canvases. the other was a portrait of herself. pat nixon brought it back to the white house. i was his butler at camp david. i was at the house with a nixons -- with the nixons all the time at camp david. >> what would you like people to know about the first lady? an oral history with the library. --we sent stockings that that she missed placed had sent them to the library at the time. i was there during the panda years. >> what would you like the audience to know about mrs. nixon? >> i often talk to her at breakfast. so kind and so treated me with such respect. i loved the whole family. >> what was their final years as the pressure increased, were you working for them at that point and what did you see? >> i worked until 73. i left a few months before he did. -- i was not there at the end. >> do you remember how they felt during the christmas bombings? >> i believe that was the year they say -- stayed at camp. they were going to go to california. instead they stay there at the camp.
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2013 9:00pm EDT
to protect. ur constituents. in his farewell address, george washington said, we may choose peace or war as our interests guided by justice shall counsel. there is nothing just or in our interest in lobbying -- lobbing a few bombs into a country and walking away. the secretary of state and the president have both stated that we need to go to war because assad broke a treaty that the entire world supports. the u.n., they say, cannot act. mr. speaker, i am asking the same question my constituents are asking, why do we spend billions of dollars supporting an international organization for peace that cannot enforce a treaty supported by the entire world? if the u.n. is so ham strung that it cannot rally the world to stop assad, and we have to unilaterally attack syria, what exactly is the point of having a u.n.? the secretary of state also had the gall to tell both the senate and the house foreign relations committees that bombing syria is not a war in the classic sense. let me tell you something, mr. speaker, if another nation attacked us the way our president wants to attack syria,
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