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20090604
20171214
DATE
2016 5
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
purpose. when the a.d.a. was signed into law by president george h.w. bush in 1990, it was to provide the disabled equal access to public facilities. in large part, the a.d.a. has worked. it has been hailed as the most sweeping, nondiscrimination legislation since the civil rights act of 1964. unfortunately, enterprising plaintiffs and their lawyers have abused the law by filing a flurry of a.d.a. lawsuits aimed at churning out billable hours and extracting money from small businesses rather than improving access for the disabled as the a.d.a. intended. these predatory lawsuits are possible for two chief reasons. first, 100% compliance with the a.d.a. is very difficult to achieve. even though good faith efforts such as bringing or hiring an a.d.a. compliant expert, a business can still find themselves subject to a lawsuit for almost any minor or unintentional infraction. according to one a.d.a. compliant specialist, quote, i rarely, if ever, see circumstances or instances where there isn't an access violation somewhere. i can find something wrong anywhere, unquote. this makes
understand. i've been disabled all my life and i'm grateful for president george bush to recognized the need to do when he signed it into the law. the public buildings should have a federal entrance door and tables should be high enough for wheelchairs to sit but eating areas should be just for the disabled people. and eating area shouldn't have a sign that says for wheelchairs only. buildings that allow people with disabilities allow people to become more independent and self-sufficient. for me, i appreciate the businesses but personally it doesn't matter if it is at 37 inches or 32 inches. all business have to recognize the need for all customers. for example many have been able [inaudible] many business owners are not aware of the changes or regulations related. not all businesses are up to date, up to code with the guidelines of the regulation was due to a lack of information from the city and the state's regarding the changes. my mother has two doughnut shops and has been sued at both locations for the violations. it isn't fair for business to receive a law firm that is out of our
business owner to incur legal costs. -- overall purpose. when a.d.a. was signed into law by george h.w. bush, it was to provide the disabled with equal access. it's hailed as the most sweeping, non-discrimination legislation of the act of 1964. enterprising plaintiffs and their lawyers have abused the law by filing a flurry of a.d.a. lawsuits aimed at churning out billable hours rather than improving access for the disabled as the a.d.a. intended. these predatory lawsuits are possible for two chief reasons. first, 100% compliance with the a.d.a. is very difficult to achieve. even though good faith efforts, such as bringing or hiring an a.d.a. compliance expert, a business can find themselves subject to a lawsuit for almost any minor or unintentional fraction. according to one a.d.a. compliant specialist, i rarely, if ever see circumstances or instances where there isn't an access violation somewhere. i can find something wrong anywhere. this makes compliance a challenge, even for those with the very best of intentions. second, unlike title ii of the civil rights act, it does not re
into law by president george h.w. bush in 1990, the goal was to provide disabled to equal access. in large part the ada has worked. it's been hailed as the most sweeping nondiscrimination legislation since the civil rights act of 1964. unfortunately, enterprising plaintiffs and their lawyers have abused the law by filing a flurry of ada lawsuits aimed at churning out billable hours and extracting money from small businesses rather than improving access for the disabled as the ada intended. the predatory lawsuits are possible for two chief reasons, first 100% compliance with the ada is very difficult to achieve. even though good faith efforts, such as bringing or hiring an ada compliance expert, a business can still find themselves subject to a lawsuit for almost any minor or unintentional infraction. according to one ada compliance specialists "i rarely if ever see circumstances or instances where there isn't an access violation somewhere. i can find something wrong anywhere." this makes compliance a challenge, even for those with the very best of intentions. second, unlike title two
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)