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20090604
20171019
STATION
DATE
2016 5
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 6:10pm EDT
george henry calvert claims that the purpose of historical drama is to use imaginative power to give a more vivid embodiment than can be given on the literal page of history, no the to transform but to elevate and i mate an enacted reality. nickles miranda and other play writes have all used hamilton. immigrants and race to elevate and i mate the enacted reality of slavery's history in the united states. the 19th century stage shared the same uneasy relationship with representing slavery as many politicians and private sizs of the period. slave characters playing amusing electricsters and only very rarely voicing any open anger at their enslaved status. and with very few exceptions such as the african grove theater in 1820s new york where the historionic club of 1850s boston, none of the slave characters witnessed by american audiences were 0 portrayed by actors of color. no matter what the rhetoric, whether it was pro or anti-slavery, it was voiced by white performers. and taking a stand on slavery often proved dangerous for theater managers either in the form of box office failure or
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2016 8:45pm EDT
coniving, of the revolution and he is the would be assassin of george washington and thomas jefferson and come police sit in the uprising. nickels describes hamilton in terms very similar to miranda's opening lines but without irony and with fear about what hamilton's identity as a potentially racially marked immigrant outcider means for the future of the new nation. in seeing hamilton as the immigrant, nickels die verges sharply from the best known example of the character on the anglo american stage. his popular drama the west indian, the show that you couldn't kill with a meat ax written in 1771 it tells the story after a west indian plantation owner coming to london to meet his father. cumberland presents him as passionate as unrestrained. not like hamilton. he has little awareness of social niceties and literally lashes out when people refuse to make way for him in crowded streets excusing himself by saying accustomed to a land of slaves i proceeded a little too roughly to brush them away with my stick while slave characters a pier in the west indian they have neither lines nor n
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2016 12:06am EDT
playing hamilton and an african-american playing george washington. okay. that's just part of the conversation. and again, if that brings new audiences into the museums, like you all today, that's great. and i think that's what we should all think about when we think about the musical. here's your sneak peek, too. so talking a little about the room where it happened. so this is george washington's office at the morris-jumel mansion. if you've been there before it was the dark green color. this is what it looks like now. this is our phase one of our reinterpretation plan. it is this gray wallpaper with little tiny flowers on it from 1770 and this very bright persimmon trim which is historically accurate. we're going through a big rebranding. our new logo is on the left with the coining on the side of the mansion in that persimmon color. and just come back early and often. come to see all the really exciting things. our official/unofficial tag line is there's always something new at manhattan's oldest house. we really try to achieve that. over 100 different public programs a year. o
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2016 2:00pm EDT
another drama featuring alexander hamilton, this one from 1864. in the prolog play writes george henry calvert that the purpose of historical drama is to use imaginative power to give a more vivid embodiment that can be given. not to transform but to elevate and animate an enacted reality. nichols miranda and other playwrites have all used hamiltons, immigrants, and race to elevate the enacted reality of slavery's history in the united states. the 19th century stage shares the same uneasy relationship with representing slavery as many politicians and private citizens of the period. slave characters often fell into one of three categories expressing affection for their white owners and disavowing violence, playing amusing trick sters and only very rarely voicing any open anger at their enslaved status. with very few exceptions such as the african grove theater in 18th new york. none of the slave characters witnessed by american audiences were portrayed by actors of color. thus, no matter what the rhetoric, whether pro or anti-slavery, it was voiced by white performers. and taking a stan
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)