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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 275 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2009 12:00am EDT
explain the george washington you came to know through your research. >> guest: i actually lived with washington i think for 25 years. i wrote a biography of washington backend 1980's. i came back to washington early in this decade and wrote a comparative study of washington, john adams and thomas jefferson during the revolution and then i turned to washington and as a politician and looked at him in the ascent of george washington and from that standpoint, and i think in each of those endeavors what strikes me about washington is he is a very complex individual and a very difficult personal to get to know. he was very careful and anything garrote, and unfortunately his widow, martha washington, destroyed all of their letters and. so we can't really see a private side to washington. and i think that is what fascinates me more than anything about washington is to keep digging and digging to try to learn what i can about washington. >> host: to the viewers what makes "in depth" work is your calls and we are going to calls in about ten minutes for john ferling. we welcome your questions
CSPAN
Jul 11, 2015 9:00am EDT
is going on here? we had george herbert walker bush looking on carefully and george w. bush, you can read his mind saying what is happening? >> guest: and amazing drama. what is interesting about the family, something i respect about a family is that sense of loyalty, that transcends politics, an amazing ability to convey loyalty but also to have an innate competitiveness within the family which made them so successful as a political dynasty. the kennedy dynasty was more talk down, you had joe kennedy calling the shots, directing the career steering the careers of jfk, ted and body. with the bushes is more bottom up, the sense and expectation that you are a bullish you are expected to contribute to american public life in one way or another and there is a competitiveness between them so while the brothers' love each other very much there is a fierce competitiveness to be the one that extends the family dynasty or extends the family brand as it were more than the others ended is a unique and effective model as far as dynasty's go. >> jim was the one who was supposed to win in 1994. >>
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2009 1:29pm EDT
newspaper made the comment, only general howell could have failed to defeat george washington, and only george washington could have failed to defeat general howell. i think the first part was accurate, howell, i think, should have defeated washington in 1776. so washington, i think, was an extremely fortunate individual. i've forgotten the second part -- >> host: well, if you know the pref dense of the line from the star-spangled banner? >> guest: no, i'm not familiar with that, but i do know that a great many people at the time certainly felt that providence had been on america's side. washington usually didn't use the term god in his references. he did on occasion, but he more than, more often than not used the term providence meaning, i think, god or as jefferson says in the declarationover independence, nature or nature's god intervened on his side. and, in fact, when washington resigned his commission at the end of the revolutionary war, when he went to annapolis and resigned his commission, he says in his remarks that providence had been on, on america's side. and i think a
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2009 12:00pm EDT
turned to washington as a politician, and looked at him in the ascent of george washington from that standpoint. and, i think in each of those endeavors, what strikes me about washington, is he's a very complex individual, and he's a very difficult person to get to know. he was very careful in anything that he wrote. and unfortunately, his widow, martha washington, destroyed all of their letters. so we can't really see a private side to washington. and, i think that is what fascinates me more than anything about washington, is to keep digging and digging to try to learn what i can about washington. >> host: to our viewers, what makes in-depth work, are your calls, and, we will be going to calls in about 10 minutes, for john ferling and we welcome your questions, we especially would like to hear from readers of his books but, also, people who are interested in revolutionary war history an colonial america and george washington in particular and numbers or, eastern and central, 272-737-0001 and mountain and pacific time zones, 202-737 202-737-0002 and we'll mix in your calls and we'll
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2014 1:50pm EST
important to the city ever since then. .. >> next on booktv, president george w. bush discusses his biography of his father, president george h.w. bush with andy card who served as white house chief of staff for president bush 43 and secretary of transportation for president bush 41. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> today is a very special day in the life of the george bush presidential library foundation. it is special because we gather for the national book launch of "41: a portrait of my father," fittingly on veterans day. today we have both the author and subject, son and father, the 43rd and the 41st presidents of the united states here at the bush library center. this morning will consist of a moderated discussion about "41." our moderator served as deputy chief of staff to the 41st president and later as the 11th united states secretary of transportation. he also served as chief of staff to the 43rd president of the united states, and most recently as acting dean of the george bush school of government and public service here at texas a&m university. ladies and gentlem
CSPAN
Apr 5, 2015 12:00pm EDT
route. one-time one george h. w. bush was going to give a speech in oklahoma when he was campaigning for reelection he advanced and people went out there, they talk to local law enforcement and law enforcement said no, there is this psychic in town who has been incredibly reliable in the past and let us to a body of the murder victims and she said that she had a vision that bush would be assassinated by sniper at an overpass. the secret service agents were embarrassed to take this seriously, but nonetheless they interviewed the psychic and after if she knew anything more about this alleged plot and she said i know that the motorcade vehicles are out at the air force base. they said can you show us where and they went there and there were five hangars and she pointed correctly to the hangar where the motorcade vehicles were. this was from one of the agents who is actually in charge and asked her a few other questions and she said this is going to come out of air force one wearing a sport jacket and sport coat, and i thought, that is absurd, but sure enough the next morning he came out
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2015 12:00pm EDT
looking over -- looking on carefully and then george w. bush almost reading his mind saying what is happening tonight? >> yes, yes. it's an amazing drama and what is interesting about the family, one of the things i respect about the family, is that sense of loyalty that transcends politics. they have an amazing ability to convey loyalty but also to have an innate competitiveness within the family, has made them so successful as a political dynasty that's very different. i draw contrast in the book between the kennedy dynasty which i think was more top-down, you had joe kennedy calling the shots, as long as he was able to and directing the careers steering the careers of jfk and ted and bobby with the bushes it's more bottom-up. the sense and expectation you're a bush, and you are expected to in a essence contribute to american public life in one way or another and there's a competitiveness between them. so while the brothers love each other very much, there's also a fierce competitiveness to be the one that extend the family dynasty or extends the family brand as it were, more than
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2015 12:00am EDT
with the officials basically saying what's going on here. we have george herbert walker bush looking on carefully and then we have george w. bush in two can almost read his mind saying what's happening. >> host: one of the things i respect about the family is a sense of loyalty that transcends politics. they have an amazing ability to convey loyalty but also to have an innate competitiveness within the family which i think has made them so successful as a political dynasty. it's very different. i draw a contrast in the book between the kennedy dynasty which was more top down. you have joe kennedy calling the shots as long as he was able to interact interacting the courier in steering the careers for jfk and ted and bobby. it's this expectation that you are to contribute in one way or another and there is a competitiveness between them. so why are they love each other very much there is also a fierce competitiveness to be the one that extends the family dynasty or family brand as it were more than the others and it's a unique and very effective model as far as dynasties go. >> host: h
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2015 9:00am EST
chair of george washington with the half moon and the sun on the back and touch the floor. >> host: you referred to your sister a couple times. >> guest: she was an incredibly intelligent and beautiful and delightful as human being. she was a politician, local politics in new jersey for many years, the mayor of princeton, died of cancer. >> host: you also had a brother tom. >> guest: a very prominent lawyer in washington and lobbyist and a very -- again very smart, funny, affable, well known person in washington, someone who is incredibly generous with his time and talent and died last year. >> host: from your book we are our mother's daughters, as children my brother and sister and i thought of lyndon johnson, hubert humphrey and gerald ford. who would come by for a casual dinner. >> guest: that was one of the great benefits of our lives. bobby and tommy, we might not have had the kind of money some of those people we knew had growing up in washington, had pleasure well beyond anything in the bank. >> host: is washington still like it was? >> guest: not even close. it is tragicall
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2016 12:00am EST
a great deal in testing a president's character. i will make one exception, george herbert walker bush. there was a unique head of state not very partisan. one could argue he threw away his presidency seeing therese might be called ahead in the seh middle east. he should have explained why he did that later on but still, he's the one with the endless resume. martin van buren, terrible luck as president. i say that and stand by it. >> host: abraham lincoln had no business being president. when you look at his past. >> guest: yes and no. if you're looking at government experience, we have one term in congress. we forget he was the leader ofpt the party and we really forget he was the most prominent lawyer and his county or state or region he was a very famous defense attorney. so if we were to look at someone like david boyd comes to mind, he wasn't getting any attention in those days, but he certainly understood politics and how to get clients and how to cash in to some degree. he depends on a rich, but he certainly died middle-class for his time. if you are looking at are governme
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 12:05am EST
interviewed one of president kennedy's best friend, senator george smathers from florida, and i worked very, very hard to get the interview. at first he said no, and i kept writing them and calling him and finally the secretary i think felt sorry for me, and he agreed to see me. and i went to his law office. the interview was set for 11:00, and i arrived at 10:45, and i waited until 1:45. when he walked out, he said, hello. i'm on my way to the hill. i'm so sorry i can't talk now. maybe one of these days. and i kept trying, and finally the secretary said, all right, do you want lunch with him or do you want the end of the day with him? and you know, that's -- it's a tough one to decide. finally, i said i will come in at the end of the day. i had an extraordinary interview with him, in that he talked very openly about president kennedy and his private life. and at one point in the interview, he was talking about john f. kennedy sexually, how he made love. he described him as a rooster sitting on top of the in. and before i could shut my mouth, i found myself saying, senator, how
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2016 8:00pm EDT
that wouldn be the final nail in the coffin of white supremacy. ever since george washington had started nominated supreme court justices they had all been white men. for many people it was unthinkable that one of the nine would be african-american and marshall had fought in 129 cases before the u.s. supreme court. most lawyers never get one victory in front of the supreme court. so his place has already been made in history. he had been a federal appeals court judge in a general and lyndon johnson, i think if i can make this happen you'll be a dazzling moment in the nation of history, and it will be something that is both right and righteous and he started lifting the gears before that moment and made it happen. other enough, there is no vacancy when lyndon johnsonn started thinking of it and he had to convince associatedan justice tom clark to step down. it was very crude how he did that and i explained that in thr book.y i'll tell you quickly if you like, lyndon johnson was a master of the senate of course as he was called by the great writer robert euro. and so he called tom
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2016 12:00pm EST
testing a presidents character. ones with the inflated resid-- resumes don't always do well. george bush, the further we get away from him, there was a unique head of state, not very partisan. one could argue he threw away his presidency with that tax increase, going flat-- back on the pledge seen there might be called to head in the middle east he was willing to do that. he should've explained why he did that later on, but still he is the one with the endless resume that did very well. by the way, martin van buren did terrible luck as president. the magician, and the schemer, not much up to being a presidents and was much better as head of the democratic committee. i say that i stand by it? host: abraham lincoln had no business being president, ditty? i mean, when you look at his past? guest: yes and no. if you look at government experience, we had-- we forget he was the leader of his party in the state legislature in illinois. we really forget that the years out of office he was probably the most prominent lawyer in his county, his state, his region. he was an attorney for the ill
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2015 9:00am EDT
detail of the motorcade route. one time when george h. w. bush was going to give a speech in oklahoma, campaigning for reelection, local law enforcement a local law enforcement said there is a psychic in town is incredibly reliable in the past, sent letters to the bodies of murder victims. and a sniper, on an overpass. secret service agents were embarrassed to take this seriously. do we know anything more about the alleged plot, the motorcade vehicles at the air force base they said could you -- they went to the air force base, where the motorcade was. this was on the record from one of the agents that was in charge. they asked a few other questions and said this will come out of air force one wearing a sport jacket or sport coat and they said that is absurd, he is always wearing a suit, she doesn't know what she's talking about but the next morning he came out wearing a sport jacket and judge chill wind down their spines. they went to an alternate route that did not go under an overpass and george bush was safe. he was not told that the time but knows about it now. did they go to loo
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2015 10:58pm EDT
reported it the scene, the daily minute of hatred in george orwell's 1984's 1984 when citizens are required to rise and hurl pictures of a man only known as goldstein, the great enemy of the state. i was goldstein. one of the enemy. what happened, zero. guest: i don't remember the scene with anything particular. i did as a conservative chairman of an agency that is closely connected to the academic community find that my name was used in that way. i also remember eminem did it. in other words, i felt quite cool. my children and grandchildren had no idea that i knew eminem, which i don't, but it was sort of an outrage. it was amazing to think an outrage there could be such a thing as truth. or i could believe they're such such a thing as right and wrong. i'm not sure how that is all laid out over the years. i found it outrageous. host: what in your view was not being taught in colle to admit i freely admit i'll make up the good side of the story growing up and it was when i went to college and afterwards and i began to understand that this country is made many mistakes, that we have
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2015 12:00am EDT
when george h. w. bush was going to give a speech in oklahoma campaigning for reelection they talk to the local law enforcement and they said she's been incredibly reliable in the past. they said that the motorcade. this is on the record from one of the agents. this is going to come out of air force one. but you're not the next one. i'm always asked while they go to work if there is an overpass but the secret service agents are very, very impressive. fbi agents admired him more than any other law enforcement when they get threats for example they interview the suspects if they can't find them and put them into three different categories where it is believed if they had the capability perhaps they had firearms training in those cases when the president goes to the hometown to warn them to stay away from the president that they are going to be watched all the way through. he probably will not be prosecuted. >> host: what is crowd? >> guest: the secret service code name. these are names often generated by computer also an individual under protection can detail particular code names. geor
CSPAN
Feb 8, 2010 12:00am EST
also written about george washington, history of christianity. and the quest for god. a lot of mr. johnson's writings are infused with different religious thought, which will also talk with him about. and mr. johnson, before we leave america uniqueness in america in 2010 and want to read this quote from velasco, the former president of poland to you. mr. bolesta made this statement on january 29th, 2010 at a campaign event in illinois. and this is what he had to say. the united states is only one superpower. today they lead the world and nobody has doubts about it militarily. they also lead economically, but they're getting weak. but they don't lead morally and politically anymore. the world has the leadership. the u.s. has always been the last resort and hope for all other nations. there was the hope whenever something was going wrong, one could count on the u.s. today we lost that hope. >> guest: well, that is one man's opinion. and i don't share it. there are times, there have been many times in the last 50 years or so when american leadership has tended to flag a bit. when it'
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2010 9:00am EST
? >> professor of public science at george washington. >> also brookings? >> yes where i wrote the filibuster book. non't for a it away. >> up next, historian and journalist paul johnson joined booktv for three our in-depth interview. >> paul johnson, in your book modern times you kick it off rais way. cle modern world began on 29 may 1919 when photographs of a oolar eclipse confirmed the proof of a new theory of the universe. two questions. why it that date and why that event as the beginning of a modern world? >> the world had always been governed for 250 years by newtonian physics and professor einstein introduced an important pdification of that. this was his general theory of relativity which he produced in 1916. he also said there are three tests by which this theory can be tested. if it fails any one of them, mpor we must scrap it and look again. he laid down these three tests and the first and most important of them had to be made by observation during a solar eclipse and that will wait until the end of the boar and wasn't until 1920 that an expedition was sent out to watch
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2010 12:00pm EST
. >> host: well, another thin volume that you've written is about george washington, the founding father. could anyone else have done, in your view, what george washington and winston churchill did can during their political lifetimes? >> guest: no. no. i think one of the great strokes of luck which the united states had was george washington. of course, it had the fundamental luck of occupying and exploiting a uniquely rich and fertile country, wonderful agriculture, all the minerals you could possibly want, and plenty of space. so that was the primary stroke of luck which the american people have had. but i think to have george washington was another very valuable and unique streak of luck. because george washington was two things. he was a general, and he was a statesman. and he pursued the kind of strategy during the long war of independence, and it was a long, very exhausting war, he pursued the only kind of strategy which was open to the american people, and he won the war. but he then went on to supervise the constitutional arrangements, and when the constitution was drawn up and
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2009 5:30pm EDT
. skip gates's book was here next to nelson george, where did our love go? nelson george is perhaps the most gifted african-american man of the letters of our time. what can't this guy do? he is a novelist, he writes great novels, he writes superb cultural criticism about hip-hop, basketball, this history of motown, one of the earliest books to take a critical look and appreciative look at motown, he is a movie director, a film director, producer. the guy is amazing, one of the most remarkable men of letters of our generation, one of the most distinguished because he has mastered so many different genres. this book, the location of culture, than theoretical's but -- explications, postcolonialism, which is very important. he is a very sharp guy. he was in debt recently. he was on in-depth recently. i disagree with a lot of what he says but he is a very sharp guy. >> how many books do you read 3-year? >> a bunch. you have to keep reading. you can't stop reading. this is a great book. this is craig warner, higher ground, spv wonder, aretha franklin, the rise of african americans sold. i sa
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2016 10:00pm EST
at george mason. >> guest: in microeconomic theory, and in the fall i teach our first ph.d course, teach them the microeconomic theory, and the spring i teach intermediate, an ungraduate course in economic theory. >> host: what too you want your students to learn by the time they leave class? >> guest: i think if -- i would love for my students to share my values, but i don't talk about my values in class. what i hope that they gain from my class is to learn how to think. that is, to learn how to engage in dispassionate analysis and hopefully if they get out in the world and get into policy commissions, if they can engage in dispassionate analysis they can come up with compassionate policies or ideas. >> host: what kind of education did you have and. >> guest: i think i -- well, i tell people -- it's not nice of me to say this, but i tell people that i am very happy i received virtually all of my education before it became fashionable for white people to like black people. now, what i mean by that is that when i earned a c in high school or in college, that was a real, honest to g
CSPAN
May 3, 2010 12:00am EDT
entitled the gospel of george bush you write that ideologies is the golden calf. ideologies is the substitute for religious faith. as ideologies that? >> guest: i can't know that it's bad but it is a substitute for faith and political religion. it is a system when foot of which is rooted in morality and the other of which is rooted basically in this idea concept of what the world was all about and what ought to be, and i think it is the great rival to conservatism. conservatism is traditionalism and a system of belief that comes out of wisdom and experience. there's people and the human race and basically out of the natural law philosophy what mankind human nature is like. let me give you one example of that. woodrow wilson said in 1917 we are going to war to make the world safe for democracy. it was nonsense. we went to war because our ships were being sent by the germans and that's what drove us to war bigot secondly the principle or the british empire in the world and french empire, the russian empire and the japanese empire and the austrian hungarian empire and they wanted to c
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2015 4:50am EDT
reported and seen recalls the daily george orwell's 1984 when citizens are required to rise and pictures of a man known only as goldstein the great enemy of the state and i was goldstein. one of the enemies whose very name evokes tears from the assembly. what happened and where were you? >> guest: i don't remember that the scene was any -- the scene was anything particular but i did as a conservative chairman of an agency that is closely connected to the academic leader find that my name is used in that way and every member also that i'm an m did it. actually i felt quite cool. i had children and grandchildren and i had no idea. it was a sort of outrage and it sort of amazing to think an outrage that i believe there was such a thing as truth and whether i believe there was such a thing as right or wrong. i'm not sure how that has all played out over the years. i'm not so closely connected to it now as i was then but i found it outrageous. >> host: what in your view was not being taught in college in classes that were taught when you were in school? >> guest: well the good side of the sto
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2016 2:32am EDT
address. o-oscar george is college park, maryland. pigs are holding on. you're on with author, wil haygood. >> caller: it's really great to speak with you. i initially had questioned about an essay towards african-americans of the struggle but this kind of led me to want to more devotion about the other side where there is many african-americans you see that have promised an end to doing down there, myself is a perfect example. college come off all right, everything like that. i had a horrible home life. my mom is physically crazy, my father not working. i ago throughout this modern modern problems in addition to going to the problem of being an average american with these expectations and no site of any means to accomplish them. and that lead somebody to want to commit suicide. if you have no hope in this country with all the brain you can stay, i can do any class simply because i have to do with my parents situation and on top of that coming the lack of empathy towards the prejudice i get. but your experience with upper bound him and his that allow african-americans severe americ
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2015 12:00am EDT
department come actually george mason university and they asked me are you married or are you really interested in the job? [laughter] that might have been a legalobrr then that there was no fervor to take people to account for such an amazing statement. >> host: and/or congressman husband was a congressman at the or a. point?as an >> guest: i think that he was to an aide to donald rumsfeld.at to >> host: and went on to thetre chief of staff so you wonent ont : shington. guest >> guest: until president ford sadly lost in 1976 and then wetn host:home. >> host: what was the goal after you got your phd and in which? >> guest: to teach 19thentury century literature in the romantic. though and victorian. host: in >> host: in blue skies nonces fences you talk aboutout discovering at the local library and casper ....>> gue >> guest: stindeed what a shocking thing. i was reading in the fictionficn section being very systematicatd and it didn't take me long tolo get toto the jays. and t i'd never heard of a book likel. that. >> host: you talk about how you hit it in a camper at home. >> guest
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2014 9:00am EST
place. i reject this idea that these men are to be dismissed, one of the reasons george mason didn't sign the constitution was he didn't think it went far enough on the matter of slavery. as a matter of fact the issue of slavery came up early during the constitutional convention and georgia and south carolina threatened to withdraw so here they were trying to put a nation together, they couldn't resolve some of these very difficult issues at the time, and i would say one other thing. if the constitution had failed there wouldn't be united states, there wouldn't have been a civil war. in the southern states. these states are awful on their own, what the future of those states would have been. because we had a union, ultimately because of the civil war ended slavery. not just in parts of the northern states but throughout the united states. >> host: todd the a twitter wants to know if you would never run for office. >> guest: no. >> host: y? >> guest: from my own perspective i think i can be more effective not being in office and imagine all the sound bites they pull up from my radio s
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2015 12:00pm EST
who was assigned to preside over it so she sat in that big chair of george washington with the half moon on the -- the sun on the back, and her feet didn't touch the floor. >> host: you referred to your sister a couple of time. who is barb. >> guest: my stir barbara was a really incredibly intelligent and humorous and beautiful and delightful human being. she was a politician. she was in local politics in new jersey, for many, many years, ending up as the mayor of princeton, new jersey, and she died at 61. >> host: you had a brother tom. >> guest: my brother tom, very prominent lawyer in washington and lobbyist, and he was really a very -- again, very smart, very funny, very affable, hail fellow well met, well-known person in washington, again, someone who was incredibly generous with his time and his talents and his treasure, and he died last year. >> host: from your book "we are our mother's daughters" as children my brother and sister and i thought of people like sam rayburn, lyndon johnson, hubert humphrey and gerald ford, at family friends who would come by for a casual dinner
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2015 9:00am EST
the 1700s and the founding fathers were people like george washington, thomas jefferson the founding fathers determining what the rest of the country is like, how to allocate power and determine who represents whom. >> host: lift every voice, where does that term come from? >> guest: it is a song that is very important black community. the black community is -- its great strength is its sense of community. it has a sense of community in terms of what makes it the community is the feeling blacks have not been respected. the feeling that slavery dominated the united states and punished black people in ways that are still being felt 200 years later, 50 years later. i fink for in terms of my experience as a litigator when i was working for the naacp it is a tremendous sense of community in the domain of a particular state or city that there is also interested in not just improving life for black people but in making things more fair for all people. one of the potential opportunities or options that have not in my view been taken advantage of war developed is find ways to encourage poor b
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 12:00pm EDT
for our first 180 years of existence from george washington and alexander hamilton who fixed the dollar to gold until nixon blew it up with the applause of economist and so-called specialist. go back 13 years, 12 years before going after the rails big time, a gallon of gasoline was like $1. imagine what life would be if you could pay $1 for a gallon of gas. for centuries, gold and silver had the same relationship. 15-16 onces was worth one ounce of silver. people started using more payable money. small coins were convenient. h with the rise of paper you didn't need coins as much, though. so the demand for silver fell so today is about 60 to 1. so gold has held up better than silver. but your point money has a value and concern certain things stay stagnant. rising cost, like energy, is really the devallation -- devaluation of the dollar. with that silver dollar you have, if you flip it on this table, you will hear a loud sound and that is how we got the phrase "sound money" >> i will do one more for you. >> hi, mr. forbes, what are thought thaunts on the consolida consolidaco cons
CSPAN
May 7, 2016 9:00am EDT
george washington had started nominating supreme court justices, they had all been white men. and so for many people, it was unthinkable that one of the nine would be african-american. and marshall had fought and won 29 cases before the u.s. supreme court. most lawyers never get onehad th victory in front of the supreme court. so his place had already been made in history. he had been a federal appealsisy court judge and a solicitor general. and lyndon johnson, i think, knew if i can make this happen, it will be a dazzling moment in the nation's history. and it will be something that is both right and righteous. and he started shifting the gears before that moment and made it happen. oddly enough, there was no vacancy when lyndon johnson started thinking of it. and he had to convince, he haddn to convince associate justice tom clark to step down. and it was very shrewd how he did that. i explain it in the book. i can tell you quickly, if you'x like. lyndon johnson was master of the senate, of course, as he's been called by the great writer robert caro. he was. and so he called tom cl
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 8:00am EDT
calvin coolidge refers to himself as an administrator. >> guest: i like that. he read george washington a lot and coolidge referred to washington and the bible -- he was steeped in the bible. he said i don't want to be king or monarch but he thought of his job as presider. the united states, plural, is led by a president. >> host: devon, harbor springs, michigan, you are on the air with mitt. >> caller: thank you for answering my call. i was wondering about the depression. wasn't one of major problems deflation that they had the taxes and wages to get people to spend money because the prices kept going down? my mother and father are children of the depression and they admired franklin roosevelt and i think the major thing he did was keep the country was tipping into extremism left or right. thank you. have a good day. >> guest: thank you. and devon hit on the two things we have heard. one is deflation can be d devastating and the other is that roosevelt kept us from going somewhere horrible. he was better than hitler. and we are lucky we have that. that is what we group and m
CSPAN
May 30, 2014 8:00pm EDT
using the filibuster to block nominees under george bush li bush like no other. and now they are complaining about not pushing through obama's legislation enough. and the very people that abused the filibuster rule have now eliminated it for purpose of nominee at the appellate and executive officials. what the senate is today is a rubber stamp for obama. harry reid might as well be in obama's cabinet. and this is a very odd thing because rather than protect the institution of the senate and congress, which is what the framers intended, you have the majority in the senate doing whatever it can to support the executive branch in whatever way it can. this would have been crazy to the framers and in fact it would be crazy during franklin's days. he tried to pack the court with people that agreed with his agenda. the vice president is the one who fought it the most. many democrats wouldn't go along. so you have to have people in virtu and we don't have that. >> host: is is fair a state like california and wyominging, for example, have the two senators? >> guest: that knows to the poin
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2014 12:00am EST
look at article five is george mason said. and here is your recourse. and so if you're living in kentucky and the support mitch mcconnell. >> welcome i couldn't support him, not that he's not necessarily a nice person and so forth. but he is an ineffective republican leader and senator and that whole immigration bill, he sat back trying to fight it and then he shows up in votes against it. and there is a whole notion of them to veto congress and so mitch mcconnell said that it should be temporary, of course. but nothing is temporary. and many don't have the ability to confer constitutional power. to any person or anything. >> remember when we talked about this. we were so proud. but that was the first and last thing that i could remember. >> you are onbooktv with mark levin. welcome. >> caller: hello, i think mark would call me a kook as well. and i think the person that she was referring to are those who fund this heritage foundation which pays for half of the commercial situation and those that create the bestsellers and then they give them away because nobody really wants to s
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2015 9:00am EDT
was published in 188i 3. publhed it was george roundtree hughes w and it had a long title. in fact, he was the guy that tit came up with the phrase boston tea party. they had all sworn an oath of silence to each other and this was 50 years later and pretty much everyone else was dead and he had been 16 or 17 years old when he participated. so, he wrote the book and it wos remarkable. it was an act ofve vandalismhe e against the largest corporation re in the world. so, when you say why would jefferson be horrified by the idea that a corporation was a personso, after the boston tea party jefferson stop talkinga about how to be a good citizens in the united states of the uk and started talking about separation and this led right to 1776th, so in a very real way america was founded by a revolt against corporate power. >> host: that's what you write i ti on equal protection, theotec american revolution was intact provoked by the misbehavior of a the british corporation. our nation was founded in an anticorporate power fury. >> guest: it's true. >> host: one of the things i picked up in your
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2014 8:00pm EST
impugned by people who are fearful. >> host: where do you teach? >> guest: george washington university and part time at georgetown. hello to my terrific students. i teach pretty much everything required for the miner and major, introductory women's history, specialized class on women's sport. over enrolled since 1996 i teach a survey course in women's history which has about 120 first-year students. right now i have athletes from every sport. i have a lot of people in th >> guesi have people in the first year and then graduating seniors who have waited just to take a women's studies class >> host: what is women's studies? >> guest: it has been in schools since 1969. it looks at all of the humanity from how women's lives are shaped. many people go through their education without learning about women's contribution and be educated still. so if you want to look at the role of women in every society because of law, religion or warfare and education and opportunities as well, this is a chance to make that the center of your research. we cover just about everything. it is just like any other
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2014 12:00pm EST
nominees under george w. bush like no senate in american history. period. then they complain when they're in power and they can have the majority about the republicans not confirming executive officials quickly enough and not pushing through obama's legislation fast enough. and the very people who abused the filibuster rule -- and taught the republicans how to do it should the republicans choose to do it -- have now eliminated it for purpose of judicial nominees, the appellate level as well as executive officials. look, what the senate is today, today, is a rubber stamp for obama. harry reid might as well be in obama's cabinet. and this is a very odd thing because rather than protect the institution of the senate and the institution of congress which is what the framers intended, you actually have the majority in the senate today doing everything it can to support the executive branch in any way it can even if it means diminishing its own authority. this would be crazy to the framers. matter of fact, it would have been crazy during franklin roosevelt's period. you may remember fra
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2015 12:38am EDT
to george washington hospital where dick's life has been saved many times, a lot to the university of wyoming, some to an organization in the district of columbia that helps put kids who are not in good schools into better situations, and so that, i think those were the main contributions. >> host: vicki is in meridian, mississippi. hi, vicki. >> caller: hello. >> guest: hi, vicki. >> caller: hey. i'd first like to thank c-span for booktv. it's a wonderful window for so many people. and mrs. cheney, your family for all your public service. my question is during your research of james madison, was there anything that surprised you? that you weren't expecting to find? >> guest: well, i certainly didn't know at the outset that he had epilepsy, and i am now convinced he did. i always knew that dolley madison would be fun to write about, but i was surprised at how much fun she was to write about. when you're, when you write books, you're always trying to give people images, you know, so they can see it as well as just understand it intellectually. and dolley has some great images. one of m
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2009 1:15pm EDT
any way. if you read george -- no one reads that book anymore. but nonetheless, he talks about how this donner will forgo his dinner to buy an old edition he loves of the decline and fall of the roman empire, if i'm remembering correctly. while i am not want to forgo my dinner because by god i like a good meal and wine, please, but nonetheless, i would scrape my money together to buy books and art that i couldn't afford. but why not. if all this appears to mauro god forbid i will be fine without the material possessions as long as i has got my wife but since i've got them i try to enjoy them. the other thing about books i think if you own a really good guitar you got to play. can just let it sit, a good acoustic guitar. the need to be played. it helps develop the wood and the age. likewise with books i feel you shouldn't just collect them. i don't think of myself as a book collector. i read them and i like to read the nice additions. if i am travelling to africa or iraq i might take a paperback or something because i don't want to destroy the good books but i like to hold a good bo
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2016 7:00pm EST
. but it was george rowntree there was a long title. in fact, he came up with the phrase boston tea party because they had all sworn an oath of silence to each other and pretty much everyone else was dead because he was 17 when he participated so he wrote the book and it was remarkable it was an act of vandalism against the largest corporation in the world say if he was horrified but after the boston tea party he stopped talking about how to be a good citizen he had a separation that led straight through to 1776 of america was founded on therica results of power. host: that is what youou w write in unequal protection was provoked by the misbehavior of a corporation the nation was founded from the corporate power. >> it is true. >> one of the themes is that we were not the aristocracy the white bin were not necessarily rich landowners. >> that is one of the most fascinating things i got out curve reading jefferson intended digging deep into the history thinking what would jefferson to the myth of the rich founders. there is of a couple of good histories about that. the wealthiest man
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2017 3:30pm EST
not to judge him against obama or george w. bush but to use the constitution as a standard. and sometimes he is good, sometimes not so much. and so that is how we view what goes on in washington, dc, not based on political party or personality but based on the standard by which all americans should hold their federal government, the constitution. >> host: when you use that measuring stick, which presidents in your view have adhered to the constitution, which haven't? >> guest: it's been a very long time since we had a president that was truly constitutional. you look at article 2 of the constitution, and that -- >> host: which is. >> guest: the delegated authority for the executive branch, and when we look at that, we realize how little power the president has, especially autonomously, constitutionally speaking. i always show my students, you look at the constitution, article 1 is the powers delegated to congress, it's like this. then you go to article 2, delegated to president, and then article 3, delegated to the judiciary, and in america we've gravitated measure towardston al
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 9:00am EDT
the high court decade later. 2005 george w. bush would nominate robert >> justice in the 1990's, and crafting legal positions and writing briefs, but roberts was a smart political operator whose judgment was soft throughout the administration, for her part sotomayor learned to work two side of the nomination process. as a nominee and the conduit for information. >> she was so politically savvy. the chief justice of the united states, john roberts, a buttoned down individual, he did not put it on facebook. and always been much freer with her movements, feeling like she can assert her identity, a much more reserved man, they're both politically savvy and i love discovering that in the >> host: 90s when he was in the solicitor general's office he actually advised george h. w. bush administration, low and behold what name comes before him, for district court seat, if they receding here is a would probably say i wasn't very ambitious but no one gets to the supreme court without an addition. the one person maybe should have an asterisk by his name would be david souter who should succeeded
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