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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 258 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2009 12:00am EDT
explain the george washington you came to know through your research. >> guest: i actually lived with washington i think for 25 years. i wrote a biography of washington backend 1980's. i came back to washington early in this decade and wrote a comparative study of washington, john adams and thomas jefferson during the revolution and then i turned to washington and as a politician and looked at him in the ascent of george washington and from that standpoint, and i think in each of those endeavors what strikes me about washington is he is a very complex individual and a very difficult personal to get to know. he was very careful and anything garrote, and unfortunately his widow, martha washington, destroyed all of their letters and. so we can't really see a private side to washington. and i think that is what fascinates me more than anything about washington is to keep digging and digging to try to learn what i can about washington. >> host: to the viewers what makes "in depth" work is your calls and we are going to calls in about ten minutes for john ferling. we welcome your questions
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2009 1:29pm EDT
newspaper made the comment, only general howell could have failed to defeat george washington, and only george washington could have failed to defeat general howell. i think the first part was accurate, howell, i think, should have defeated washington in 1776. so washington, i think, was an extremely fortunate individual. i've forgotten the second part -- >> host: well, if you know the pref dense of the line from the star-spangled banner? >> guest: no, i'm not familiar with that, but i do know that a great many people at the time certainly felt that providence had been on america's side. washington usually didn't use the term god in his references. he did on occasion, but he more than, more often than not used the term providence meaning, i think, god or as jefferson says in the declarationover independence, nature or nature's god intervened on his side. and, in fact, when washington resigned his commission at the end of the revolutionary war, when he went to annapolis and resigned his commission, he says in his remarks that providence had been on, on america's side. and i think a
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2009 12:00pm EDT
turned to washington as a politician, and looked at him in the ascent of george washington from that standpoint. and, i think in each of those endeavors, what strikes me about washington, is he's a very complex individual, and he's a very difficult person to get to know. he was very careful in anything that he wrote. and unfortunately, his widow, martha washington, destroyed all of their letters. so we can't really see a private side to washington. and, i think that is what fascinates me more than anything about washington, is to keep digging and digging to try to learn what i can about washington. >> host: to our viewers, what makes in-depth work, are your calls, and, we will be going to calls in about 10 minutes, for john ferling and we welcome your questions, we especially would like to hear from readers of his books but, also, people who are interested in revolutionary war history an colonial america and george washington in particular and numbers or, eastern and central, 272-737-0001 and mountain and pacific time zones, 202-737 202-737-0002 and we'll mix in your calls and we'll
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2014 1:50pm EST
important to the city ever since then. .. >> next on booktv, president george w. bush discusses his biography of his father, president george h.w. bush with andy card who served as white house chief of staff for president bush 43 and secretary of transportation for president bush 41. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> today is a very special day in the life of the george bush presidential library foundation. it is special because we gather for the national book launch of "41: a portrait of my father," fittingly on veterans day. today we have both the author and subject, son and father, the 43rd and the 41st presidents of the united states here at the bush library center. this morning will consist of a moderated discussion about "41." our moderator served as deputy chief of staff to the 41st president and later as the 11th united states secretary of transportation. he also served as chief of staff to the 43rd president of the united states, and most recently as acting dean of the george bush school of government and public service here at texas a&m university. ladies and gentlem
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2015 12:00pm EDT
looking over -- looking on carefully and then george w. bush almost reading his mind saying what is happening tonight? >> yes, yes. it's an amazing drama and what is interesting about the family, one of the things i respect about the family, is that sense of loyalty that transcends politics. they have an amazing ability to convey loyalty but also to have an innate competitiveness within the family, has made them so successful as a political dynasty that's very different. i draw contrast in the book between the kennedy dynasty which i think was more top-down, you had joe kennedy calling the shots, as long as he was able to and directing the careers steering the careers of jfk and ted and bobby with the bushes it's more bottom-up. the sense and expectation you're a bush, and you are expected to in a essence contribute to american public life in one way or another and there's a competitiveness between them. so while the brothers love each other very much, there's also a fierce competitiveness to be the one that extend the family dynasty or extends the family brand as it were, more than
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2015 12:00am EDT
with the officials basically saying what's going on here. we have george herbert walker bush looking on carefully and then we have george w. bush in two can almost read his mind saying what's happening. >> host: one of the things i respect about the family is a sense of loyalty that transcends politics. they have an amazing ability to convey loyalty but also to have an innate competitiveness within the family which i think has made them so successful as a political dynasty. it's very different. i draw a contrast in the book between the kennedy dynasty which was more top down. you have joe kennedy calling the shots as long as he was able to interact interacting the courier in steering the careers for jfk and ted and bobby. it's this expectation that you are to contribute in one way or another and there is a competitiveness between them. so why are they love each other very much there is also a fierce competitiveness to be the one that extends the family dynasty or family brand as it were more than the others and it's a unique and very effective model as far as dynasties go. >> host: h
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 12:05am EST
interviewed one of president kennedy's best friend, senator george smathers from florida, and i worked very, very hard to get the interview. at first he said no, and i kept writing them and calling him and finally the secretary i think felt sorry for me, and he agreed to see me. and i went to his law office. the interview was set for 11:00, and i arrived at 10:45, and i waited until 1:45. when he walked out, he said, hello. i'm on my way to the hill. i'm so sorry i can't talk now. maybe one of these days. and i kept trying, and finally the secretary said, all right, do you want lunch with him or do you want the end of the day with him? and you know, that's -- it's a tough one to decide. finally, i said i will come in at the end of the day. i had an extraordinary interview with him, in that he talked very openly about president kennedy and his private life. and at one point in the interview, he was talking about john f. kennedy sexually, how he made love. he described him as a rooster sitting on top of the in. and before i could shut my mouth, i found myself saying, senator, how
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2016 12:00am EST
a great deal in testing a president's character. i will make one exception, george herbert walker bush. there was a unique head of state not very partisan. one could argue he threw away his presidency seeing therese might be called ahead in the seh middle east. he should have explained why he did that later on but still, he's the one with the endless resume. martin van buren, terrible luck as president. i say that and stand by it. >> host: abraham lincoln had no business being president. when you look at his past. >> guest: yes and no. if you're looking at government experience, we have one term in congress. we forget he was the leader ofpt the party and we really forget he was the most prominent lawyer and his county or state or region he was a very famous defense attorney. so if we were to look at someone like david boyd comes to mind, he wasn't getting any attention in those days, but he certainly understood politics and how to get clients and how to cash in to some degree. he depends on a rich, but he certainly died middle-class for his time. if you are looking at are governme
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2016 12:00pm EST
testing a presidents character. ones with the inflated resid-- resumes don't always do well. george bush, the further we get away from him, there was a unique head of state, not very partisan. one could argue he threw away his presidency with that tax increase, going flat-- back on the pledge seen there might be called to head in the middle east he was willing to do that. he should've explained why he did that later on, but still he is the one with the endless resume that did very well. by the way, martin van buren did terrible luck as president. the magician, and the schemer, not much up to being a presidents and was much better as head of the democratic committee. i say that i stand by it? host: abraham lincoln had no business being president, ditty? i mean, when you look at his past? guest: yes and no. if you look at government experience, we had-- we forget he was the leader of his party in the state legislature in illinois. we really forget that the years out of office he was probably the most prominent lawyer in his county, his state, his region. he was an attorney for the ill
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2015 10:58pm EDT
reported it the scene, the daily minute of hatred in george orwell's 1984's 1984 when citizens are required to rise and hurl pictures of a man only known as goldstein, the great enemy of the state. i was goldstein. one of the enemy. what happened, zero. guest: i don't remember the scene with anything particular. i did as a conservative chairman of an agency that is closely connected to the academic community find that my name was used in that way. i also remember eminem did it. in other words, i felt quite cool. my children and grandchildren had no idea that i knew eminem, which i don't, but it was sort of an outrage. it was amazing to think an outrage there could be such a thing as truth. or i could believe they're such such a thing as right and wrong. i'm not sure how that is all laid out over the years. i found it outrageous. host: what in your view was not being taught in colle to admit i freely admit i'll make up the good side of the story growing up and it was when i went to college and afterwards and i began to understand that this country is made many mistakes, that we have
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2015 12:00am EDT
when george h. w. bush was going to give a speech in oklahoma campaigning for reelection they talk to the local law enforcement and they said she's been incredibly reliable in the past. they said that the motorcade. this is on the record from one of the agents. this is going to come out of air force one. but you're not the next one. i'm always asked while they go to work if there is an overpass but the secret service agents are very, very impressive. fbi agents admired him more than any other law enforcement when they get threats for example they interview the suspects if they can't find them and put them into three different categories where it is believed if they had the capability perhaps they had firearms training in those cases when the president goes to the hometown to warn them to stay away from the president that they are going to be watched all the way through. he probably will not be prosecuted. >> host: what is crowd? >> guest: the secret service code name. these are names often generated by computer also an individual under protection can detail particular code names. geor
CSPAN
Feb 8, 2010 12:00am EST
also written about george washington, history of christianity. and the quest for god. a lot of mr. johnson's writings are infused with different religious thought, which will also talk with him about. and mr. johnson, before we leave america uniqueness in america in 2010 and want to read this quote from velasco, the former president of poland to you. mr. bolesta made this statement on january 29th, 2010 at a campaign event in illinois. and this is what he had to say. the united states is only one superpower. today they lead the world and nobody has doubts about it militarily. they also lead economically, but they're getting weak. but they don't lead morally and politically anymore. the world has the leadership. the u.s. has always been the last resort and hope for all other nations. there was the hope whenever something was going wrong, one could count on the u.s. today we lost that hope. >> guest: well, that is one man's opinion. and i don't share it. there are times, there have been many times in the last 50 years or so when american leadership has tended to flag a bit. when it'
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2010 12:00pm EST
. >> host: well, another thin volume that you've written is about george washington, the founding father. could anyone else have done, in your view, what george washington and winston churchill did can during their political lifetimes? >> guest: no. no. i think one of the great strokes of luck which the united states had was george washington. of course, it had the fundamental luck of occupying and exploiting a uniquely rich and fertile country, wonderful agriculture, all the minerals you could possibly want, and plenty of space. so that was the primary stroke of luck which the american people have had. but i think to have george washington was another very valuable and unique streak of luck. because george washington was two things. he was a general, and he was a statesman. and he pursued the kind of strategy during the long war of independence, and it was a long, very exhausting war, he pursued the only kind of strategy which was open to the american people, and he won the war. but he then went on to supervise the constitutional arrangements, and when the constitution was drawn up and
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2016 2:32am EDT
address. o-oscar george is college park, maryland. pigs are holding on. you're on with author, wil haygood. >> caller: it's really great to speak with you. i initially had questioned about an essay towards african-americans of the struggle but this kind of led me to want to more devotion about the other side where there is many african-americans you see that have promised an end to doing down there, myself is a perfect example. college come off all right, everything like that. i had a horrible home life. my mom is physically crazy, my father not working. i ago throughout this modern modern problems in addition to going to the problem of being an average american with these expectations and no site of any means to accomplish them. and that lead somebody to want to commit suicide. if you have no hope in this country with all the brain you can stay, i can do any class simply because i have to do with my parents situation and on top of that coming the lack of empathy towards the prejudice i get. but your experience with upper bound him and his that allow african-americans severe americ
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2015 4:50am EDT
reported and seen recalls the daily george orwell's 1984 when citizens are required to rise and pictures of a man known only as goldstein the great enemy of the state and i was goldstein. one of the enemies whose very name evokes tears from the assembly. what happened and where were you? >> guest: i don't remember that the scene was any -- the scene was anything particular but i did as a conservative chairman of an agency that is closely connected to the academic leader find that my name is used in that way and every member also that i'm an m did it. actually i felt quite cool. i had children and grandchildren and i had no idea. it was a sort of outrage and it sort of amazing to think an outrage that i believe there was such a thing as truth and whether i believe there was such a thing as right or wrong. i'm not sure how that has all played out over the years. i'm not so closely connected to it now as i was then but i found it outrageous. >> host: what in your view was not being taught in college in classes that were taught when you were in school? >> guest: well the good side of the sto
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2015 12:00am EDT
department come actually george mason university and they asked me are you married or are you really interested in the job? [laughter] that might have been a legalobrr then that there was no fervor to take people to account for such an amazing statement. >> host: and/or congressman husband was a congressman at the or a. point?as an >> guest: i think that he was to an aide to donald rumsfeld.at to >> host: and went on to thetre chief of staff so you wonent ont : shington. guest >> guest: until president ford sadly lost in 1976 and then wetn host:home. >> host: what was the goal after you got your phd and in which? >> guest: to teach 19thentury century literature in the romantic. though and victorian. host: in >> host: in blue skies nonces fences you talk aboutout discovering at the local library and casper ....>> gue >> guest: stindeed what a shocking thing. i was reading in the fictionficn section being very systematicatd and it didn't take me long tolo get toto the jays. and t i'd never heard of a book likel. that. >> host: you talk about how you hit it in a camper at home. >> guest
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2015 9:00am EST
chair of george washington with the half moon and the sun on the back and touch the floor. >> host: you referred to your sister a couple times. >> guest: she was an incredibly intelligent and beautiful and delightful as human being. she was a politician, local politics in new jersey for many years, the mayor of princeton, died of cancer. >> host: you also had a brother tom. >> guest: a very prominent lawyer in washington and lobbyist and a very -- again very smart, funny, affable, well known person in washington, someone who is incredibly generous with his time and talent and died last year. >> host: from your book we are our mother's daughters, as children my brother and sister and i thought of lyndon johnson, hubert humphrey and gerald ford. who would come by for a casual dinner. >> guest: that was one of the great benefits of our lives. bobby and tommy, we might not have had the kind of money some of those people we knew had growing up in washington, had pleasure well beyond anything in the bank. >> host: is washington still like it was? >> guest: not even close. it is tragicall
CSPAN
May 7, 2016 9:00am EDT
george washington had started nominating supreme court justices, they had all been white men. and so for many people, it was unthinkable that one of the nine would be african-american. and marshall had fought and won 29 cases before the u.s. supreme court. most lawyers never get onehad th victory in front of the supreme court. so his place had already been made in history. he had been a federal appealsisy court judge and a solicitor general. and lyndon johnson, i think, knew if i can make this happen, it will be a dazzling moment in the nation's history. and it will be something that is both right and righteous. and he started shifting the gears before that moment and made it happen. oddly enough, there was no vacancy when lyndon johnson started thinking of it. and he had to convince, he haddn to convince associate justice tom clark to step down. and it was very shrewd how he did that. i explain it in the book. i can tell you quickly, if you'x like. lyndon johnson was master of the senate, of course, as he's been called by the great writer robert caro. he was. and so he called tom cl
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 12:00pm EDT
for our first 180 years of existence from george washington and alexander hamilton who fixed the dollar to gold until nixon blew it up with the applause of economist and so-called specialist. go back 13 years, 12 years before going after the rails big time, a gallon of gasoline was like $1. imagine what life would be if you could pay $1 for a gallon of gas. for centuries, gold and silver had the same relationship. 15-16 onces was worth one ounce of silver. people started using more payable money. small coins were convenient. h with the rise of paper you didn't need coins as much, though. so the demand for silver fell so today is about 60 to 1. so gold has held up better than silver. but your point money has a value and concern certain things stay stagnant. rising cost, like energy, is really the devallation -- devaluation of the dollar. with that silver dollar you have, if you flip it on this table, you will hear a loud sound and that is how we got the phrase "sound money" >> i will do one more for you. >> hi, mr. forbes, what are thought thaunts on the consolida consolidaco cons
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2009 1:15pm EDT
any way. if you read george -- no one reads that book anymore. but nonetheless, he talks about how this donner will forgo his dinner to buy an old edition he loves of the decline and fall of the roman empire, if i'm remembering correctly. while i am not want to forgo my dinner because by god i like a good meal and wine, please, but nonetheless, i would scrape my money together to buy books and art that i couldn't afford. but why not. if all this appears to mauro god forbid i will be fine without the material possessions as long as i has got my wife but since i've got them i try to enjoy them. the other thing about books i think if you own a really good guitar you got to play. can just let it sit, a good acoustic guitar. the need to be played. it helps develop the wood and the age. likewise with books i feel you shouldn't just collect them. i don't think of myself as a book collector. i read them and i like to read the nice additions. if i am travelling to africa or iraq i might take a paperback or something because i don't want to destroy the good books but i like to hold a good bo
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2014 12:00pm EST
nominees under george w. bush like no senate in american history. period. then they complain when they're in power and they can have the majority about the republicans not confirming executive officials quickly enough and not pushing through obama's legislation fast enough. and the very people who abused the filibuster rule -- and taught the republicans how to do it should the republicans choose to do it -- have now eliminated it for purpose of judicial nominees, the appellate level as well as executive officials. look, what the senate is today, today, is a rubber stamp for obama. harry reid might as well be in obama's cabinet. and this is a very odd thing because rather than protect the institution of the senate and the institution of congress which is what the framers intended, you actually have the majority in the senate today doing everything it can to support the executive branch in any way it can even if it means diminishing its own authority. this would be crazy to the framers. matter of fact, it would have been crazy during franklin roosevelt's period. you may remember fra
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2009 7:45am EDT
apartment every single word george orwell ever wrote including his expenses reports to the bbc. it's a lot. everything that's ever been published by him. most of james joyce. not all of p.g. wodehouse because i have to say there's some books that aren't worth keeping. it's seems bad. noam chomsky and it's a bit different. i like to think that i have a life rather than a job or a career. and it's also due with reading and writing. the only two things i was ever good at and public speaking which i can also do. and that's how i make my living but it's also what i am, who i am, what i love. and i'm fortunate at that it's nothing like i can do. it's not like i could have been a lawyer and a doctor. i didn't choose it. it chose me. >> in depth airs live at noon eastern on the first sunday of each month on book tv on c-span2. log onto booktv.org for information about upcoming guests. >> we're at the 2009 bookexpo america booksellers convention in new york city. we're here with johnny temple, a publisher. do you want to tell us what you have coming out this fall? >> this fall one of the books we'r
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 9:00am EDT
the high court decade later. 2005 george w. bush would nominate robert >> justice in the 1990's, and crafting legal positions and writing briefs, but roberts was a smart political operator whose judgment was soft throughout the administration, for her part sotomayor learned to work two side of the nomination process. as a nominee and the conduit for information. >> she was so politically savvy. the chief justice of the united states, john roberts, a buttoned down individual, he did not put it on facebook. and always been much freer with her movements, feeling like she can assert her identity, a much more reserved man, they're both politically savvy and i love discovering that in the >> host: 90s when he was in the solicitor general's office he actually advised george h. w. bush administration, low and behold what name comes before him, for district court seat, if they receding here is a would probably say i wasn't very ambitious but no one gets to the supreme court without an addition. the one person maybe should have an asterisk by his name would be david souter who should succeeded
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2014 12:05am EDT
george w. bush would nominate roberts to be the chief justice in the early 1990s roberts worked in the u.s. office of the solicitor general, nearly involved the eagle physicians writing briefs for that office. roberts was a smart political operator whose judgment was sought throughout the administration. for her part of the sotomayor worked the two sides of the nomination process. as a nominee and as a conduit for information. >> guest: she was so politically savvy and they are stylistically very different. we have the chief justice of the united states john roberts very buttoned down individual. i could probably do not give he had before he did and put it on facebook. she is much more out there and she has always been much more free with her movement and with her feeling like she can assert her identity. he's a much more reserved man but they are both incredibly politically savvy. and i love discovering that in the early 1990s when he was in the solicitor general's office, he actually advised george h. w. bush administration on the judicial candidates and blue and the behold name
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2015 9:37pm EDT
theatre against george schultz and madeleine albright. henry kyser there. and you flow. are ways to know ones feeling about kissinger's decisions. do i not think that he was a war monger if i did, i would hope that i would find a better way to fry to convince others of that than doing that i think, not very useful by the of theatre. and i did thank you know. i did admire. and i read the testimony of had notary kess ger. if you are looking for the books to read and if you want to understand kissinger, where is he coming from. read a world order. the great book that was of last year. you would say he is a war monger. is he a structure of thought that will lead to his sense of what will make for a stable and good order. and you can disagree with it. and then push back in an interelectricly. in that of which i found disturbing. david is calling in from st. thomas virgin islands. david, you are on with walter issacson. mr. size accurate son. i am a new fan, since i saw you on book tv the other day. if you are will indulge me for a moment. i will make a comment to our friends in connectic
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2015 12:00am EST
so she sat in a chair in george washington's and her feet didn't touch the floor. [laughter] >> host: you've referred to your sister a couple times. >> guest: my sister was a really incredibly intelligent and humorous and beautiful delightful human being. she was a is a politician, local politics in new jersey for many years and she died of cancer. >> host: and you had another brother tom. >> guest: a prominent lawyer in washington and a lobbyist and he was again very smart, very funny. he also met a well-known person in washington again someone who was incredibly generous with his time and talent and his treasure and he died last year. >> host: from your book we are our mothers daughters. as children, my brother and sister and i thought of people like sam rayburn, lyndon johnson, hubert come to the end gerald ford as friends who would come by for a casual dinner. >> guest: that is one of the great benefits of our lives. barbara and tommy also both said we might not have had the kind of money that some of the people we knew had growing up in washington, but we have to treasure well b
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2016 12:00pm EST
different than a george soros on the left doing the same thing through their donation. >> guest: in some ways he got into counterbalance to this. he is kind of the johnny-come-lately to this. one thing he does is his money that he gives is disclosed money. the book is called tran 11 because it is about money that is given behind the scenes by people who don't want you to see fingerprints on it. in order to hide their money shows, the kochs in some of the others give money to this philanthropic groups that don't show who the donors are, 501(c)(4). they're supposed to not be principally of politics. that's debatable i would say. this is about the active in particular and how important it's become. soros gives some of the money in an undisclosed way through an organization in the past of the tides foundation. i did do a piece about soros. when you read about the kochs in this country, inevitably what you hear about is people state why don't you write about soros? what a nice at this on the table. i wrote a very long piece in "the new yorker" about solaris 82,004 which was the year he s
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 8:00am EDT
calvin coolidge refers to himself as an administrator. >> guest: i like that. he read george washington a lot and coolidge referred to washington and the bible -- he was steeped in the bible. he said i don't want to be king or monarch but he thought of his job as presider. the united states, plural, is led by a president. >> host: devon, harbor springs, michigan, you are on the air with mitt. >> caller: thank you for answering my call. i was wondering about the depression. wasn't one of major problems deflation that they had the taxes and wages to get people to spend money because the prices kept going down? my mother and father are children of the depression and they admired franklin roosevelt and i think the major thing he did was keep the country was tipping into extremism left or right. thank you. have a good day. >> guest: thank you. and devon hit on the two things we have heard. one is deflation can be d devastating and the other is that roosevelt kept us from going somewhere horrible. he was better than hitler. and we are lucky we have that. that is what we group and m
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2014 12:00am EST
look at article five is george mason said. and here is your recourse. and so if you're living in kentucky and the support mitch mcconnell. >> welcome i couldn't support him, not that he's not necessarily a nice person and so forth. but he is an ineffective republican leader and senator and that whole immigration bill, he sat back trying to fight it and then he shows up in votes against it. and there is a whole notion of them to veto congress and so mitch mcconnell said that it should be temporary, of course. but nothing is temporary. and many don't have the ability to confer constitutional power. to any person or anything. >> remember when we talked about this. we were so proud. but that was the first and last thing that i could remember. >> you are onbooktv with mark levin. welcome. >> caller: hello, i think mark would call me a kook as well. and i think the person that she was referring to are those who fund this heritage foundation which pays for half of the commercial situation and those that create the bestsellers and then they give them away because nobody really wants to s
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 12:00pm EDT
george h. w. bush administration on judicial candidates. lo and behold what name comes before them but that sonia sotomayor for district court see. and they are crossing paths, if they were sitting around they would say i wasn't that ambitious. but face it, no one gets to the supreme court without impatience. one person i would say maybe should have an asterisk by his dimwitted in david souter, who she's succeeded he was all a bit more of an exit of justice but i think he still did not lack for ambition. but here you have john roberts who seem to be always making the right moves, and, obviously, quite effectively, and sonia sotomayor who came from a quite a bit different background but you really picked up on the political channels. what you have to do is remain visible, and nomination politics. and she learned a lot from that first nomination to i also have to say that she did acknowledge in her own memoir that once she set her feet on the path of the federal judiciary, and once she knew that she would be in some ways giving her career more emphasis than her own life, she did not spin
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2015 12:00am EST
know george schultz, madeleine albright henry kissinger sitting there. i think that there are ways to express and study one's feeling about kissinger's decisions. i do not think he was a warmonger, but even if i did i would hope i would find a better way to try to convince others of that than doing that i think not very useful bit of theater. and i did, you know, i did admire and read the testimony of henry kissinger. and if you're looking for books to read and you want to understand kissinger where he's really coming from read "world order." it's a great book. you may say well, he's a warmonger. no be, here's a structure of thought that leads to his sense of what makes for a stable good order, and you can disagree with it, but then push back intellectually instead of this thing that i found kind of disturbing. >> host: david is calling in from st. thomas, virgin islands. david, you're on with walter isaacson. >> caller: mr. isaacson, i am a new fan since i saw you on booktv the other day. if you'll indulge me for a moment, i'd like to make a quick comment to our friends in connecticu
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2017 12:00pm EST
race to the top and some was doubled up on bush economics, double down on george w. bush is education policy. so much so that he had to in some ways backtrack. excessive weight on assessment, overburdened teachers, interrupt the actual teaching experience. what you saw with race to the topic pullback but they only pulled back to the no child left behind. the only thing i'm saying is that this can not try to design that president obama hasn't been good over his eight years, but i think part of what we're going to have to do in the post obama era as my mom would say, as we look at the back of his head -- >> oh, my goodness. >> we have to take a hard look at his policies and would like to say what were the ideas, animating the way in which he governed, how might those policies have sent a pathway to benefit the most vulnerable in our society. and we will accept the pattern -- >> when education, the numbers of those graduating are higher and you are having less issues with the drop out there and also on of criminal justice. i have been dashed but i remember we're on a show befor
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2010 12:00am EST
minutes here, and not far away to george washington university. in the way he jokes with his nurses. hollywood could not have written such a script. between the assassination attempts in the air traffic controller strike a few months later, it says this but the birth with obvious geopolitical consequences. it's hard to believe we are just nigel hamilton, this is one fascinating. we took one on afternoon. the book is called american caesars come alive for the president with resident roosevelt to george w. bush. highly recommended. thank you so much. >> guest: it's been a pleasure. >> up next, in depth with jonah goldberg, the editor at large of review it on an american enterprise might say syndicated column. a pulitzer prize nominated columnist is the author of "the new york times" bestseller, transport and editor of "proud to be right." >> host: jonah goldberg, in trade for, you write that fascism is a religion of there state. >> guest: first of all, nice to be here.ea what i mean by that is it is -- alain much of my thinking fromb mcclellan. he believes that all of the progressive
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2016 1:00am EST
per dollar letters. >> guest: just today i was reading a review of a newh book of martha and george and highlighted the fact she is illusive because she has burned herwhat own letters so what we- have is riddled snippets of theirer relationship and letters from other people about themun that you can piece together. the mount vernon ladies' association has done a very fine job to find everythinga p they can to flesh out a portion of martha washington. >> host: good afternoon. this is our "in-depth" program. once a month we invite to antica author to talk about their body of work this month it is cokie roberts who has written several books in a couple little autobiographical books as well. there are several ways to participate. please note calls. can also send a text message. this is only for text please don't call this number if you want to send a text if you can't get through on the phone lines and want to make a comment try social media. e-mail booktv@c-span.org. twitter has back booktv is a reporter handling and you can leave a comment on facebook.com facebook.com/booktv. you'll s
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2014 8:00pm EST
impugned by people who are fearful. >> host: where do you teach? >> guest: george washington university and part time at georgetown. hello to my terrific students. i teach pretty much everything required for the miner and major, introductory women's history, specialized class on women's sport. over enrolled since 1996 i teach a survey course in women's history which has about 120 first-year students. right now i have athletes from every sport. i have a lot of people in th >> guesi have people in the first year and then graduating seniors who have waited just to take a women's studies class >> host: what is women's studies? >> guest: it has been in schools since 1969. it looks at all of the humanity from how women's lives are shaped. many people go through their education without learning about women's contribution and be educated still. so if you want to look at the role of women in every society because of law, religion or warfare and education and opportunities as well, this is a chance to make that the center of your research. we cover just about everything. it is just like any other
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2015 9:00am EDT
was published in 188i 3. publhed it was george roundtree hughes w and it had a long title. in fact, he was the guy that tit came up with the phrase boston tea party. they had all sworn an oath of silence to each other and this was 50 years later and pretty much everyone else was dead and he had been 16 or 17 years old when he participated. so, he wrote the book and it wos remarkable. it was an act ofve vandalismhe e against the largest corporation re in the world. so, when you say why would jefferson be horrified by the idea that a corporation was a personso, after the boston tea party jefferson stop talkinga about how to be a good citizens in the united states of the uk and started talking about separation and this led right to 1776th, so in a very real way america was founded by a revolt against corporate power. >> host: that's what you write i ti on equal protection, theotec american revolution was intact provoked by the misbehavior of a the british corporation. our nation was founded in an anticorporate power fury. >> guest: it's true. >> host: one of the things i picked up in your
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2015 12:00am EST
the founding fathers did in the 1700s and the founding fathers were people, like george washington thomas jefferson, who owned slaves. you have the founding fathers determining where the rest of the country's life -- how to allocation power and how to determine who represents whom. >> host: lift every voice. where does that term come from. >> guest: from a song "lift every voice and sing." a song that is very important in the black community. >> host: why? >> guest: because i think the black community is -- its great strength is its sense of community, and it has a sent of community, unfortunately, in terms of what makes it a community is this feeling of exodus, the feeling that blacks have not been respected, the feeling that slavery dominated the united states and really punished black people in ways that are still being felt 200 years later under 50 years late -- 150 years later. so i think for at least in terms of my experience especially as a litigator when i was working for the naacp legal defense fund, that there's a tremendous sense of community in the black domains of a pa
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2015 8:01pm EDT
labeled obama critics. chuck todd asked questions. is george stephanopoulos a critic when it i think that it' is george stephanopoulos a critic when it i think that it's almost reverse racism in the sense that the black eye that critiques the black president continues to be called an obama critic as opposed to doing his job and i frankly don't like it but i'm dealing with it. >> host: you have generated quite a bit of conversation on our facebook page booktv. and this is a typical comment and you've gotten both sides. this man's picture is that of an african-american man, he says that tavis smiley is a smart opportunist who with cornell west thought they should have special access to the president and when it didn't happen they turned against him with all their success. >> guest: i have a first amendment right to free speech i do not have one cannot be criticized and express my point of view, i tell the truth as i see it i don't have a monopoly on the truth. i think we are always on the way to the truth. so i do not believe that i have a monopoly but i believe in the truth that i do
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 12:00pm EST
sickness and death. in it he describes george washington efforts for cutting at mount vernon. the estate. bringing home the cough and subsequent decline in health and unexpected death in december of 1799. being at the house committee describes the comings and goings of the doctors of the family, describes washington's mood and statements, rather extensive description. the description, if i make. the statement regarding washington's death in december 14 to 1799. he writes, about 10:00 he made several attempts to speak to me before he could effect it. at length he said, i am just going. have me decently buried and do not let my body be put into the vault and less than two days after i'm dead. he lifted me again and said, do you understand me? i replied yes sir. about ten minutes before he a spired, his breathing became much easier. he felt his own pulse. he spoke to dr. craig to set by the fire. he came to the bedside. the generals and fell from his rest. dr. greg put his hand over his eyes and expired without a struggle or a side. the library is a premier repository for the study of early
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2016 12:00am EST
about him and after that, he was very disappointed. he was trying to defeat george w. bush and he withdrew from the electoral politics somewhat. the reason i'm focusing on the kochs, they stepped up their role in politics. they are currently putting together a jackpot they themselves have described as having $889 million potentially for this cycle. at its height he spent something like 20 million of his own money so we are talking $889 million. even now you're talking about a kind of money and a few hands that nobody has seen in this country before. >> host: let me show some video and you will know what it is. this is something you write about in your book. >> very soon after i discovered that there had been kind of an opposition research project on me and the people at kochs industries had organized it and they have hired a private eye that turned out to be the police commissioner, the former police commissioner, not current, exactly, with his son and daughter who'd been at the fbi and they have a private firm in new york and i eventually pieced together the story just as a repor
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2015 12:00pm EDT
original book which was published in 1883 and it was george roundtree hughes. it had a long title. in fact he was the guy who came up with the phrase boston tea party. you know 50 years later but a much everyone is dead and he had been 16 or 17 years old he participated in it. he wrote the book and it was remarkable. this was an active and alyssum against the largest corporation in the world. so when he say why would jefferson be horrified by it, it be the corporation as a person. after the boston tea party jefferson stop talking about how to be a good citizen in the united states and started talking about separation. this led to 1776. so in a very real way, america was founded on a revolt against corporate power. host: that's what you write on equal protection. the revolution was the vote, the misbehavior of corporation, our our nation was founded in anticorporate policy. guest: sure. host: you also a theme i picked up in your book was that we were not an aristocracy. the white men who formed our nation were not necessarily an aristocracy, or rich aristocracy. host:. guest: that was
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2015 9:00am EST
has a great revolution weather is the american revolution, we know about george washington ben franklin or the french revolution or the industrial revolution or the scientific revolution and i had a feeling we were living through this revolution and had a chance to meet all these people. in the 1990s i started interviewing people, got a cover story on bill gates talking about the -- when i was focused on this book for the last six seven years off and on finishing the steve jobs book i would see gordon more or mark andreas or talk to him at least or the world's largest -- absolutely truly wonderful guy who actually with another wonderful person write the internet protocols. how do you make an internet out of it? i got a chance to be up close with these people and as i said earlier on the show what i hope to bring to the parties do a little reporting, to find these people and have them talk to me because there are a lot of people who can do better analysis than i do. to sit around and talk over dinner and tell me exactly why the original protocols were written the way they were.
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