Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171214
STATION
DATE
2016 113
2015 66
2014 57
2017 19
2013 3
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 258 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2014 12:01am EST
people in addition to celia. by 1860, he will own just celia and one other, a man named george we will meet later. he is typical in missouri. he makes his way as a subsistence farmer, raising crops and foodstuffs for his family, but also livestock. there is some suggesttion he is also a producer -- there is some suggestion he is also a producer of whiskey. but celia arise not to do agricultural work, not to do farm labor, but she comes to do domestic labor in the house, but part of what we know it's over the next five years she will become regularly and frequently 's sexualt of newsom assaults. newsom will build a small cabin for celia 60 paces from his home. 60 paces. far away, but not too far away, as we will learn, for him to visit regularly. she will come to live there, herself, with then one and another child that she will bear. children that were likely himself.by newsom children we come to know as vine and jane, later on in the story, and in 1855, celia is again pregnant for the third time. as the record explains, celia tells people she is sick. she is pregnant again. whether si
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2016 8:00pm EDT
of activists prisoners such as george jackson whose prison letters were published and shed light on the problems of the justice system. this talk is about one hour and 10 minutes. >> let's get started. pick up on the conversation we were having last time about civil rights and the black power movement. the second reconstruction. in we think about that relation to what now is called mass incarceration. we're going to do three big things today. talk about what mass incarceration is. complicate some of the ways it is often talked about. we will talk about where it came from and how we ended up with the world's biggest prison system. what that has to do with this time. the 1960's and 1970's and the second reconstruction. we will think about the role and people in prison formerly incarcerated people have played consistently as analysts and observers and critics of mass incarceration. big and work off our way to the human level. the u.s. incarcerates more people than anyone else in the world. in terms of absolute numbers more than 2.2 million people in prison, but also the rate of incarce
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2016 12:01am EDT
november 1795, john adams said in his diary," george washington, president washington, has dinner one week on four different occasions with different delegations of indian chiefs." this is 1795, when the united states has already won, if you like, the war for ohio. washington is not having dinner every other evening or afternoon with indian delegates because he likes having dinner with indians. i can assure you of that. he's doing it because it matters. because the nation is still young. it's still fragile. it's still threatened by foreign powers who were not too friendly. britain in the north, spain in the south. and it's still threatened by still formidable indian power. so washington understands that his foreign policy, the foreign policy of the new nation, must involve not only france and britain and spain, but also indian nations. and that's something i think we have forgotten about george washington. and this story did not have to unfold this way. so if we go back to the middle of the 18th century, non-indian view of north america looks like this. again, no indian nations th
CSPAN
Apr 2, 2016 8:48pm EDT
republican primary debate between ronald reagan and george h w bush. at 6:00 on american artifacts. it is the least of the classical buildings. the russo building is very neoclassical. the dirksen building is sort of a mirrored image of a neoclassical building. the heart of building is very modern. some people compare it to a large ice cube tray. ritchiee historian don takes us inside the newest of the three senate office the 1983 heart senate office building to learn about its construction and place in congressional history. smithsonian national portrait gallery senior historian david ward chronicles abraham lincoln's life through photographs and portraits. >> a rather exasperated lincoln takes time out from writing the inaugural address to sit for this last photograph. the eyese again disappear. his presence which in the public is suffering. >> for a schedule, go to www.c-span.org. all weekend, american history tv is featuring long beach california located on california's southern coast about 20 miles south of los angeles. c-span cities tour staff recently visited many sites, showcasing
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2014 8:51pm EST
announcement of the operation by white house spokesperson marlon fitzwater. then president george h.w. bush speaking from the oval office then video of the invasion. the president has directed united states forces to execute at 1:00 a.m. this morning a preplanned mission to panama to american lives, restore the democratic process, observed the integrity of the panama canal treaty, and upper hand noriega. the situation under general noriega has reached a crisis. have been elections thwarted. american lives of been endangered. the integrity of the pomo -- the panama canal treaty is under risk. general noriega is under indictment for drug-related charges and the president has peacefully toort resolve the situation through negotiations under the auspices of the organization of american states and latin american leaders. general noriega has rejected all of these efforts. last friday, noriega the a state of war with the united states. of the next day, the pdf shot down an unarmed american servicemen, one did another, seized another service man and sexually threatened his wife. under these c
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2015 3:00pm EST
that he takes at morehouse. it is taught by a man named professor george kelsey. i had the privilege of meeting george kelsey. he was a wonderful, well educated person who i could see a martin would see as a role model. because, from his own father, he gets this kind of religion that is what i would call "old-time religion." a lot of emotion, not too much emphasis on theology and reason and things like that. from george kelsey, what he gets is that you have to get behind the myth of the bible. a lot of the stories, you have to understand what is their deeper meaning. george kelsey is a well-educated person who had studied the bible, understood a lot of the practicingcontext, what we would call today it asical context, seeing a historical document, something that you could go back and question, "why did they write this the way that they did?" what you find from that is that here he is, doing this when probably most of us are not questing the way he did. the way that he is really striking is that he is doing to the mesh doing this at 13 years old, 14 years old, 15 years old,
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2016 12:00am EDT
modern presidents? we are going to put in the same system, barack obama and george washington. but their tasks of leadership, the resources they had to lead were very different. presidents were more clerks than they were leaders. in the 19th century, the main job of the president was to distribute patronage. they would appoint people to government offices. it was an entirely thankless task. and indeed a president gets assassinated in this role, james garfield. there is a institutional support for the president until 1857. they wind up paying their own staffers out of their own pocket. george washington hires his nephews to copy his letters. they have to take loans, like thomas jefferson. it leads to andrew jackson saying that being president was dignified slavery. it may be very unfair to compare premodern presidents with modern president. often the challenges are different. not until teddy result to the present even leave the country. --teddy roosevelt did a president even leave the country. our morals have changed. we will have normative impressions of presidential greatness. tha
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2015 8:00pm EDT
takes at morehouse. he is taught by professor named george kelsey. i had the privilege of meeting george kelsey. , well a wonderful educated person who i could see a martin would see as a role model. because, from his own father, he gets this kind of religion that is what i would call "old-time religion." a lot of emotion, not too much and reason theology and things like that. kelsey, what he gets is that you have to get behind the myth of the bible. , you havehe stories to understand what is their deeper meaning. george kelsey is a well-educated person who have studied the bible and understood a lot of the historical context and sees it as a historical document, something that you could go back "why did they write this the way that they did?" what you find from that is that here he is, doing this when probably most of us are not trusting the way he did. really that he is striking is that he is doing to set 13 years old, 14 years old, , at a time when most of us except things without much deeper thought. the ghost of his. of questioning -- he goes to this period of questioning. ke
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2015 8:00pm EDT
point, george the third really says, we are going to lay it to these guys./ all these wounded people come back into london, and their wives are standing at the dock. and the newspapers read huge casualties on the british side. guyslike, okay, you started this, we are going to finish it. it's just that moment the play,itory act comes into they close american ports. they confiscate all debt. he goes to the british ministry and says, i want you to raise an army to include at least 10,000 professional soldiers from prussia.ssia or they say, prussia is better. that it's so you get -- that is how you get the hessians. 10,000 navy. 42,000, 357 ships. they get ready to sail the largest expeditionary force effort across the atlantic. and the next time you ever get one this big is world war i, when we go across. this is a huge force. it's designed to deliver a massive blow and and this silliness once and for all. -- end this silliness once and for all. it very much comes in the wake of bunker hill. it was probably the most important battle of the war. and it happens before we even decla
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2016 12:45pm EST
anaheim. first action, they hire george hansen to be the superintendent. his job is to bring irrigation here and plant hundreds of thousands of grapevines before the families would come down here. c-span cities tour, working with our cable affiliates, and visiting cities across the country. >> this weekend, persian gulf war veteran stephen wiehe recounts his experience and storm andert desert shield. >> if you can picture all these helicopters coming up in the air, at one time, and turning to intoorth, and racing operating base cobra, it sends chills up your spine to be a part of that list. to have been a part of the first lips of operating base cobra was exhilarating. i was thinking, this is probably going to be the last time i live, this will be my last day. what an exhilarating moment to go in and set up this operating base cobra in iraq. operating base viper -- the war started accelerating. we were taking advantage. we were not engaging so much the national guard, we were engaging the republican guard. we were keeping them off from coming back into baghdad. they were having a bad da
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2016 8:46pm EDT
discusses his book, first dad, parenting and politics from george washington to barack obama. >> looking at fathering is trying to capture the complexity of human beings, and father is away into character. we tend to think this is a bad guy or a good guy, but to see that a lot of these men who had been president had different parts. they were compartmentalize, and some of them could be laudable and do amazing things, and some could be really disappointing and horrify us. announcer: sunday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span's q&a. on americanp next history tv, the supreme court historical society hosts a discussion on the 1905 u.s. supreme court case lochner v. new york. in that decision, the court ruled a law that limited the hours a baker could work violated the 14th amendment. the decision ushered in the , with the court striking down regulations on working conditions over three decades. stephen breyer introduces this event. it is about an hour. let me now mention how much we appreciate the fact that justice breyer has agreed to host this evening. we are sincerely gratefu
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2016 8:10am EST
. author of barack obama, historian. >>> on lectures in history, westville state university george michael teaches a class on white supremacist groups in the mid to late 20th century. he explains the difference between white supremists and separate separatist groups. >> good evening. today we're going to take a look at the history of the white separatist movement in the united states. at the present time, white separatism is a very marginal political movement the movement could become more salient in upcoming years. white separatism should be distinguished from this notion of white supremacy. there are white separatives that are white supremacists. it denotes long term objectives. essentially separatists want to establish an exclusive ethnic or racial state. supremacists seek to dominate other racial or ethnic groups. now, supremacists might also be segregationists, that is to say they advocate separating different racial groups, within the same state. examples would include the jim crowe system of the american south or apartheid in south africa. >> there are some critics that clai
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2016 10:55pm EDT
bother george. >> almost finished with that report, george? >> yeah, just about. >> he's reading about indian boys, adolescents like him. >> why don't you grow up? >> grow up? i'm just as grown-up as you are, even if you are older. >> says who? >> mrs. baker. she said that girls mature about a year earlier than boys. >> i suppose that she said you were a genius, you'd believe her. >> yes, i would. >> now, george, i think josie is right in believing mrs. baker, she is a lovely person and a very good teacher. >> all the kids at school like her. >> hey, dad, here's something from my report. >> what's that, george? >> only the grown people have clothes on. >> say, mom, can i wear this skirt tomorrow? >> yes, josie, i have almost finished hemming it. >> it says here until they were 12 or 13 years old the children wore no clothes at all. the wearing of loin clothes and skirts was considered a sign of sexual maturity. >> that's interesting, george. and it ties in with the film josie was telling us about. >> sure does. we saw that film last year. >> i'm on the preview committee, dad. i'm going
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2015 8:00pm EST
warned not to. this is the case of george w lee and lamar smith. it was the 1948 murder of isaiah alston.d the town of it is about three hours from here. voting.hot dead for he voted in 1948. i will talk about this extreme very. -- morebetween 1946 and theably, 1944 and 1948, highlights of which were two statewide races for governor in 1946 and 1948. 3 black men were killed for voting in that time. i will open the floor. why would white people go to such lengths to stop black people from voting? troubleyou think was so -- would so trouble white people that anytime they would murder someone for voting? yes sir? at that point, politics was a .ay to voice one's opinions there was a power structure in .he south politics, all, the mayors were white men. if there were black men voting, they could change that. people would have to give up their power, because they would go after white man killing people. --men killing people. prof. klibanoff: absolutely. >> if you have the right to vote, politicians have to cater to your needs because they are a part of getting you elected. prof. klibano
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 11:56am EDT
been reading is short excerpt of the diary of this new york republican named george templeton strong. george templeton strong is riding in the summer of 1862, goes downtown, new york city, there is major battle raging in virginia at the time and as strong describes what he sees in new york city, he says you would never know a war was going on. do you remember that? men and women are in their carriages. children are giggling. economy seems to be booming. no one seems to be acknowledging that men are fighting and dying. in a sense before conscription is added into the formula, it is possible if you live remote from the theater of war, for the war to be a total abstraction. conscription makes potentially every adult male in the military service. that's a factor. a final factor i would mention very quickly is the lincoln administration's record on civil liberties. one of the things that strong writes in his diary as well when he talks about the political opposition to the lincoln strax, he says that civil liberties may be as important as emancipation in some areas in promoting opposition
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2016 9:18pm EDT
mother is jack. jack ae father is -- i think his father is jack. jack's father is george. all right. those years are the years when those people were 8 years old. one of the many data points we could ask them to plot a map their home and the farthest place they could go to unescorted as an unaccompanied 8-year-old. he found that george could go six miles and did. he liked to go. jack was only going a mile. that was twice as much azzi who went half a mile in 1979. to me the clincher is 2007 edward is going 300 yards maximum unescorted as an 8-year-old. 300 yards. that's a major decline, as can you see. now, this is one family. it's a sample size of one or four depending on how you look at it. i'm not making any pretenses that this is conclusive data. i am claiming, however, that this is not at all atypical of a trend that you find both in britain and in the united sta s states. >> can you think of one? >> i would say the development of neighborhoods. the more densely -- houses are more densely situated now. >> houses are more densely situated now, so why would that make -- so it's no
CSPAN
Jul 13, 2014 12:01am EDT
king george's war, there had been dozens and dozens of french and native raids on frontier settlements that had been devastating. we talked earlier about the war of the spanish succession, how the villages were left sort of devastated on the french and british side. this happened again in the 1740's. not long after that they see the french moving in, attacking a native town, setting up a fort, and they fear that it will be a launching spot for a lot of those raids, and they start to demand the british colonies take interest and hopefully try to stop it. in 1754, there is a young military officer who was commissioned to go up and check things out. his job is really just a reconnaissance mission. he is supposed to go up, find out what is happening with the french. he does take a small group of soldiers with him. he joins up with some native allies. they go and they find a fort, a makeshift fort, that has army officers or militia and in confusion and panic, the british fire shots. there is a small skirmish, and this is seen as the start of actual hostilities. the name of this military off
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2016 5:04pm EDT
george. all right. and those years are the years when those people were 8 years old. and one of the many data points that william bird put together was when he asked them, and they are all alive so we he could ask them to plot on a map their home and the farthest place they could go to unescorted as an unaccompanied 8-year-old. he found that george could go six miles and did. he liked to go. six miles is a long walk. six miles each way on foot george would walk. jack was only going a mile. 1/6 of that. that was twice as much as vicki who went half a mile in 1979. to me, the clincher is 2007, edward is going 300 yards. maximum unescorted as an 8-year-old. 300 yards. that's a major decline as you can see in this bar chart. now this is one family. it's a sample size of one or four depending on how you look at it. i'm not making any pretenses that this is conclusive data. i am claiming, however, that this is not at all atypical of a trend that you find both in britain and in the united states over time. there are reasons for this. you guys have lived this yourselves. i have as well. and
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2016 11:57pm EDT
same system barak obama and george washington. but their tasks of leadership, the resources that they had to lead, they were very different. those premodern presidents, presidents before franklin roosevelt, were more clerks than they were leaders. the 19th century, the main job of the president was to distribute patronage. they would appoint people to government offices. it was a thankless task since a president even gets assassinated for his role. james garfield assassinated in 1881. there's no instin institutional support for the president. it's not until 1857 that congress appropriate aides money for the president to hire a clerk. they wind up paying thur own staff, the few staffers they have, out of their own pocket. george washington hires his nephews to copy his letters. presidents have to take loans like thomas jefferson. it leads to andrew saying being president was a situation of dignified slavery. it may be very unfair to compare premodern presidents to modern presidents. off the was different, challenges were different. forget about being leader of the free world. it's not
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2014 8:00pm EDT
from george washington on have news organizations. because that is the only way they can get to the public. thethey have always needed public to understand what it was they were doing, because after all, this is a representative government and the people who are going to elect officials, me so it did not seem to of the publicneed for a president and presidents are in a situation where power is divided. you have what one political scientist said was separated institutions that share power. the president cannot do a lot on his own. if you look now at president talking in the last few weeks and months that he was take executive actions, if he cannot get congress to pass things, he is going to take executive action. that is nothing new. presidents have long used their executive power in instances where they can't get congress to do what they want. in that kind of situation, they have to build support for themselves and their programs. and they have done that why getting to the public, as close to the public as possible. and there is really no other way of doing that other than news orga
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2016 12:01am EDT
diary of this new york republican named george templeton strong. i don't know if you recall that, but he is writing the summer of 1862. he goes downtown to new york city, there is a major battle raging in virginia at the time. describes what you would see, you would never know what is going on. dear number that? o you remember that? be booming.seems to no one seems to be a knowledge inc. that men are fighting and dying. in a sense, before construction is added to the formula, it is possible that if you live remote from the theater of war, the war could be a total abstraction. conscription makes at least potentially every adult male rival to military service. you can imagine how that as a kind of level of significance to the political debates about what the war is about whether the war is going well. is a factor.ion a final factor i would mention, very quickly, the lincoln administration's record on civil liberties. one other thing that strong writes about in his diary as well, the political opposition to the administration, he says that civil liberties may be as important as emancipation
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 1:00pm EST
many republicans. in the 1940s, 50s and 60s, they supported abortion for various reasons. george and, as we know, george -- or we'll find out -- george w. bush, when he had been a congressman and representing senate was head of the population committee in the republican party that pushed richard nix son to push for federal family planning and international family planning. the republican party stood strong on this issue. but roe v. wade and the fight over abortion laws and the idea of abortion on demand really brought in a polarization of american politics. one does have to wonder whether the supreme court decision really took the battle out of states and whether we would have been better off having the fight in the states and not having a court ruling that basically kind of polarized. what would have been happened in it was fought in the states? my guess is that some would and other states wouldn't. anyway, that's how it was introduced. if i may add one more thing since i have the the podium here, it should be pointed out that abortion was not illegal in america before roe v. wade.
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 12:00pm EST
problem of industrial capital. think of henry george, right? he had a solution to this. which was to tax land. carnegie had a solution to this, which was philanthropy, and the careful administration of wealth. what is taylor's solution? >> he seems very -- he is trying to create a place within the changing modernization of the workplace for the worker and the manager, and i got that from frederick as well. things are evolving in terms of how humans fit in this place? >> definitely creating a place. you could even say a wage. -- a wedge. importantly college educated. a different kind of man. right? even though he himself had occupied those positions on the floor. but a place for the manager. >> he talks that presently 90% or 95% of the work is done by the workers doing all the jobs, but he proposes if it could be more 50%/50% workers doing their job and 50% manager is taking over with the training and explaining how it should be done and correcting people, soap -- so making a much bigger role and much more responsibility for the manager. >> what was the old way of doing things? the wo
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2016 8:00am EDT
invasion. president george h w bush praised truman's tough, calculating decision. he says it saves millions of american lives. it started with thousands and end up with millions. the justification was we were the good guys and drop the bomb in order to avoid an invasion in which so many americans would be killed. this was the heroic narrative. the tragic narrative, the second narrative, argues that the atomic bombs were not necessary. the japanese were already defeated and were trying to find a way to end the war. the united states dropped the bomb unnecessarily and killed hundreds of thousands of innocent victims, mostly women and children. it was a tragedy for those who were killed, for those who survived with the results of the bombings for the rest of their lives. i would add a third narrative which i call the apocalyptic narrative. the apocalyptic narrative says that dropping bombs unnecessarily is a war crime, and seriously to be condemned. what truman did was even worse. he knowingly began a process that threatened the future existence of all life on the planet. killing some
CSPAN
Jun 28, 2014 9:00am EDT
should be able to drink, too. in the military, the army and the navy had to provide alcohol. george washington's army often ran out of food for long stretches of time. his army never ran out of alcohol. and washington understood, as did all other commanders, if you wanted to keep men in the ranks the number one thing you could do, even better than paying them, was to provide alcohol every day. same thing in the navy. we will see that this will start to change in the 1830's and it will produce a great deal of strain in the relationships between employers and employees when employers try to cut off providing alcohol. elections promoted alcoholic consumption. we might like to think people would be sober when they were making their very important political decisions, but in the early republic, most voters were not sober. and indeed, the friends of different candidates would be at the polling places and they would have a glass of whiskey with them, and they would be up slapping people on the back, offering them free whiskey, and encouraging them to cast their vote for the candidate provi
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2016 8:00pm EDT
watch any time on c-span.org and listen on the c-span radio app. >> on lectures in history, george michael teaches a class on white supremacist groups in the mid to late 20th century. he describes the difference between white supremacists and white separatists groups. he discusses the relationship between the extreme right self culture and current politics. his class is 50 minutes. professor michael: today we are going to take a look of a history of the way the historyst -- the of the white separatist movement in the united states. it is a marginal movement. in light of some very important trends, the movement could become more salient in upcoming years. white separatism should be distinguished from this notion of white supremacy. to be sure there are white separatists that are also white supremacists. i think there is a distinction. separatists denotes different long-term objectives than supremacist. essentially separatists want to establish an exclusive mono state. supremacists seek to dominate other ethnic groups. supremacists might also be segregationists. they aggregate -- adv
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2016 8:00pm EDT
>> george mason university tin-pilawajoseph gene argues during the reconstruction era, native americans frequently the u.s.rectly with government but the advance of sellers to the west was an overwhelming force that still cost native americans there went. -- their land. his classes about an hour and 15 minutes. mr. genetin-pilawa: today, we are going to pick up with u.s. federal tribal relationships. ithough you will notice and did warn you we are jumping forward slightly. last class, we were speaking about removal and the establishment of reservations in the 1830's, 1840's. we are going to jump forward a bit into the civil war and after. the things i want to try and do is think about the ways that native history and the development of the west were directly connected to the civil war and reconstruction even though we don't always think of those things as related to one another. i think we kind of separate westward expansion and the civil war from one another but what the people who lived through that, i don't think they would have separated it. get intoing to try to that mind
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2015 8:00pm EDT
the union and lincoln, lincoln equals george ii> i. that from a purely conventional perspective, there is no way they could defeat the british army and navy. i know we have great pride in our military and continental army, all of that stuff. but that this was a no-win situation, if they fought the war in conventional terms. so that on the one side you can make the case that it is a miracle. and actually washington said this at the end. he called a standing miracle that we won the war. he said with all of these ragtag groups, all amateurs -- he always called it a standing miracle. what does a sitting miracle look like? a lying down miracle? [laughter] that is true. but i did not say this last time, it was implicit. i think our own experience in vietnam and more recently in iraq has made us more aware of then we were of the intractable problems the british faced in winning this war. they are fighting what we now call a counterinsurgency operation, with a force at any 60,000ime of 50,000 or troops spread out. in order to win this war, they need 500,000 troops and they needed to be able to
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2016 12:40pm EDT
on your desktop, phone or tablet for the presidential debate. on lectures in history, george washington university professor chad heap teaches a class about the origins of the gay rights movement. he describes how participants found common ground with antiwar protests, the black movement and other groups fighting against the status quo of american cold war society. he also talks about different groups within the gay rights movements, which were focused on more specific issues, like removing the ban on lesbians and gays from holding governmental jobs. his class is about one hour. professor heap: so welcome back to class. today, we -- our topic is going to be gay and lesbian liberation. i want to spend a bit of time setting that up for you and we will move right into discussion of some of the issues. for the last couple of weeks, we have been talking about the ways that cold war conformity gave rise to new forms of sexual and social order in the first decade or two after the second world war. we talked about how the cold war conformity established a white suburban, middle class
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 12:00pm EST
this. dukakis gets the nomination, runs against the older george bush, the one who is 91 now. part of this is the framing of the issue. dukakis wins the nomination, and in an interesting move, the bush campaign goes on television early. we know about this now. they go on television early because they want to frame the debate. they want to label dukakis in a certain way. i have already told you, dukakis is essentially a moderate. he is not a mondale liberal, he is a moderate. he believes in economic growth, technocratic solutions to things, and he offers competency as part of his campaign. but the bush campaign goes at him right away and almost immediately frames him -- they use this word "massachusetts liberal." and by that, they are trying to link him to teddy kennedy. teddy kennedy, the brother of john and robert who is the senator from massachusetts, who historically is one of the most liberal members of the senate, who also has a little bit of a problem with drinking, driving cars off of bridges. liberalism is being framed, not just his policies, but the kind of recklessness, a
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2015 12:00pm EDT
the final day of the battle of gettysburg. robert e. lee and the confederate army and george meade and the union army have been fighting for two days and neither side has gained victory. the battle falls on the third day. robert e. lee believes his army is invincible. it is a quote he uses. and eager to gain success in pennsylvania on the third of july, he will assemble 13,000 confederate infantrymen in a final assault, a line that is a mile-long soldier to soldier. he preludes the assault with a big artillery bombardment. at 3:00 in the afternoon after the confederate artillery is quiet, the 13,000 infantryman step across the field, open field, we have been there, we have walked this. remember the distance, how long it took us to get across the field? it is a mile from cemetery ridge to seminary ridge. what happens when the confederate soldiers get to the center of the union line? do they break it? no, they hit the wall and are repulsed. this is the angle to be there -- their focal point on july 3. at the end of the day on july 3, 1863, by 4:00 in the afternoon the high tide of the co
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2015 8:00pm EST
, guys, a pram lincoln very -- abraham lincoln greatly admired george washington, thomas jefferson and it struck him that slavery was completely opposed to the principles of the declaration of independence. he says this repeatedly between 1820 and 1850. how can we believe all men are created equal and do this at the same time? so, guys, there is no real question about slavery. he always hates the institution. everybody has gotten that, right? the other questions though are much more consultative. what did he think of what people -- black people? that matters, right? first of all, here is a very big question. you would think it would not be hard to answer, but it is. how many black people did he actually know? who did he know that was african-american? illinois birth -- ordering kentucky. you would think he would run across an african american living in kentucky. probably did. but talking about the gaps in the record, there is no reliable account of him ever encountering an african-american. on the other hand, he only lived here until the age of six. quite a few black people are living
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2016 12:00am EST
george book.gton in his new >> what they want to do was recruit washington. hamilton had already talked to washington before about democracy. of course, washington is a true republican. he believed in republican government. announcer: sunday night on c-span's q&a. on lectures in history, hadley arkes teaches history lesson on the laws of government. he describes the influence of aristotle and ibrahim lincoln. the class debates how moral truth relates to law decided by majority. this class is about and hour and a half. prof. arkes: let's do a bit of a recap, because we have people joining us now, and an audience coming in for the first moments of this course when we are still setting the groundwork. remember, this course is called political obligation." it takes its title from the defining cutting-edge of political life. the defining mark of the political order is the presence of law, the task to make decisions that are binding and everyone that comes in the territory. the root of obligations, obligare, the latin, the same as bind. the defining character of the law is it does bind
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2016 9:55pm EDT
seceded states back into the union. welcome, everyone. >> realize george mason had three student union, did you? >> freed peoples themselves took a really active role in reconstruction. so former slaves took a really active role in the reconstruction process. but there are big questions. this is just at the aftermath, at the end of the civil war. and there are big questions that the nation as a whole faced. would reconstruction result in a kind of revolution? would this be a second revolution that was resulting in an entirely new nation? or would it preserve the old republic somehow, right? these questions weren't decided right at the moment that the civil war ended. and for the people who lived through the war and sacrificed so much, these were hugely important questions. people didn't want to believe that they would have made the sacrifices they did over the previous years, and then come out of it at the other end without some major change, right, some positive good. again, we oftentimes think about this in relationship to freed slaves and reconstruction. but native people play
CSPAN
May 3, 2015 8:00am EDT
thing i must say and it comes out in a letter to george washington for april 16, which you all read for today -- madison's is the first thing we have to do is solve the problem of representation. that means that madison was firmly committed to majoritarian principles in the legislature. if you are going to have a national legislature capable of acting for the american people it has to be bicameral. there have to be two houses. medicine insists in some rule of proportionality has to apply to both houses, in terms of allowing each state to have an equal vote. we have to have his first before we decide which powers the national government will exercise. we have to figure that out before what the national government can exercise. another delegate said, why do we do it the other way? they are not that expensive. -- expansive. maybe we do not have to alter the structures? madison took a different position. if we cannot agree on what powers we determine the allocation of representation whether it will be respective or not. in that is what drives the convention. when we get to the debates i
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2015 11:35am EST
george the third as we areiii release going to lay it to these guys. all these people come back into london and their lives are at the docks and covering it and it is like huge casualties. ok. you guys started this, we are going to finish it. it is at that moment that the prohibitory act comes, they close the american fork. debt, and hete all goes to the british ministry and says, i want you to raise an army to include at least 10,000 professional soldiers from prussia orsure -- russia. that is how you get the hessians . they create a 32,000 man army, 10,080, 337 ships. the next part is when we go across. this is a huge force. it is designed to deliver a massive blow and end this silliness once and for all. ok. where are we? abigail's personal career during .his time in march of 7076 she writes -- 1776 she writes this letter, and i now understand she talked about this afternoon. i do think we should talk about it as much as we possibly can. ladies"e "remember the letter. what page it on -- isn't on in the formal reading? i take it as page 110. it is a letter about buying stop at the
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2016 12:01am EDT
he could have liberated andersonville. why didn't he? this is a map of george appeared the store -- this is a map of georgia. wherear represents andersonville prison was located. ofyou recall, in september 1864, atlanta falls to sherman army. ,etween september and november he is planning his march to the sea it will take them to savannah. directiont going the of sumter. could he have done so? certainly he knew about andersonville, prisoners have escaped from there. they knew things were back there. bad there.were however, i think it is an assumption the thing that he could have done anything, simply because of the timeline. by the time atlanta falls and sherman against his march in by that time the vast majority of men who died in andersonville have already died. time that sherman does begin his march out of atlanta towards sabrina -- savannah, the population of the prison has fallen to about 1500 men. once the city of atlanta falls, confederate officials, because andersonville is relatively close, they begin moving a lot of the prisoners out to other reason camps. transport them
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 258 (some duplicates have been removed)