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CSPAN
Dec 7, 2014 12:01am EST
people in addition to celia. by 1860, he will own just celia and one other, a man named george we will meet later. he is typical in missouri. he makes his way as a subsistence farmer, raising crops and foodstuffs for his family, but also livestock. there is some suggesttion he is also a producer -- there is some suggestion he is also a producer of whiskey. but celia arise not to do agricultural work, not to do farm labor, but she comes to do domestic labor in the house, but part of what we know it's over the next five years she will become regularly and frequently 's sexualt of newsom assaults. newsom will build a small cabin for celia 60 paces from his home. 60 paces. far away, but not too far away, as we will learn, for him to visit regularly. she will come to live there, herself, with then one and another child that she will bear. children that were likely himself.by newsom children we come to know as vine and jane, later on in the story, and in 1855, celia is again pregnant for the third time. as the record explains, celia tells people she is sick. she is pregnant again. whether si
CSPAN
May 1, 2016 12:01am EDT
prisoners. he also describes the role of activists prisoners such as george jackson whose prison letters were published and shed light on the problems of the justice system. this talk is about one hour and 10 minutes. >> let's get started. i want to pick up on the conversation we were having last time about civil rights and the black power movement. the second reconstruction. how we think about that in relation to what now is called mass incarceration. we're going to do three big things today. talk about what mass incarceration is. i'm going to complicate some of the ways it is often talked about. we will talk about where it came from and how we ended up with the world's biggest prison system. what that has to do with this time. the 1960's and 1970's and the second reconstruction. we will think about the role that people in prison and formerly incarcerated people have played consistently as analysts and observers and critics of mass incarceration. we will start off big and work our way to the human level. the u.s. incarcerates more people than anyone else in the world. in terms of absolu
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2016 2:53pm EDT
, george washington, president washington, has dinner one week on four different occasions with different delegations of indian chiefs. this is 1795 when the united states has already won, if you like, the war for ohio. washington is not having dinner every other evening or afternoon with indian delegates because he likes having dinner with indians. i can assure you of that. he's doing it because it matters. because the nation is still young. it's still fragile. it's still threatened by foreign powers who were not too friendly. britain in the north, spain in the south. and it's still threatened by still formidable indian power. so washington understands that his foreign policy, the foreign policy of the new nation, must involve not only france and britain and spain, but also indian nations. and that's something i think we have forgotten about george washington. and this story did not have to unfold this way. so if we go back to the middle of the 18th century, non-indian view of north america looks like this. again, no indian nations there. but look at all that blue. in the middl
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 12:00pm EST
this. dukakis gets the nomination, runs against the older george bush, the one who is 91 now. part of this is the framing of the issue. dukakis wins the nomination, and in an interesting move, the bush campaign goes on television early. we know about this now. they go on television early because they want to frame the debate. they want to label dukakis in a certain way. i have already told you, dukakis is essentially a moderate. he is not a mondale liberal, he is a moderate. he believes in economic growth, technocratic solutions to things, and he offers competency as part of his campaign. but the bush campaign goes at him right away and almost immediately frames him -- they use this word "massachusetts liberal." and by that, they are trying to link him to teddy kennedy. teddy kennedy, the brother of john and robert who is the senator from massachusetts, who historically is one of the most liberal members of the senate, who also has a little bit of a problem with drinking, driving cars off of bridges. liberalism is being framed, not just his policies, but the kind of recklessness, a
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2015 12:00pm EDT
the final day of the battle of gettysburg. robert e. lee and the confederate army and george meade and the union army have been fighting for two days and neither side has gained victory. the battle falls on the third day. robert e. lee believes his army is invincible. it is a quote he uses. and eager to gain success in pennsylvania on the third of july, he will assemble 13,000 confederate infantrymen in a final assault, a line that is a mile-long soldier to soldier. he preludes the assault with a big artillery bombardment. at 3:00 in the afternoon after the confederate artillery is quiet, the 13,000 infantryman step across the field, open field, we have been there, we have walked this. remember the distance, how long it took us to get across the field? it is a mile from cemetery ridge to seminary ridge. what happens when the confederate soldiers get to the center of the union line? do they break it? no, they hit the wall and are repulsed. this is the angle to be there -- their focal point on july 3. at the end of the day on july 3, 1863, by 4:00 in the afternoon the high tide of the co
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2015 11:35am EST
george the third as we areiii release going to lay it to these guys. all these people come back into london and their lives are at the docks and covering it and it is like huge casualties. ok. you guys started this, we are going to finish it. it is at that moment that the prohibitory act comes, they close the american fork. debt, and hete all goes to the british ministry and says, i want you to raise an army to include at least 10,000 professional soldiers from prussia orsure -- russia. that is how you get the hessians . they create a 32,000 man army, 10,080, 337 ships. the next part is when we go across. this is a huge force. it is designed to deliver a massive blow and end this silliness once and for all. ok. where are we? abigail's personal career during .his time in march of 7076 she writes -- 1776 she writes this letter, and i now understand she talked about this afternoon. i do think we should talk about it as much as we possibly can. ladies"e "remember the letter. what page it on -- isn't on in the formal reading? i take it as page 110. it is a letter about buying stop at the
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 8:00pm EDT
of the diary of this new york republican named george templeton strong. i don't know if you recall that. but george templeton strong is writing the summer of 1862. he goes downtown in new york city. there is a major battle raging in virginia at the time. and as strong describes what he sees in new york city, he says you'd never know what is going on. do you remember that? men and women in their carriages. children are giggling. the economy seems to be booming. no one seems to be acknowledging that men are fighting and dying. in a sense before conscription is added into the formula, it's possible if you live remote from the theater of war for the war to be a total abstraction. conscription makes at least potentially every adult male liable to military service. so you can imagine how that adds a kind of level of significance to political debates about what the war is about and whether the war is going well. so conscription is a factor. a final factor i would mention quickly is the lincoln administration's record on civil liberties. one of the things that strong writes in his diary as
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2016 12:50pm EDT
excerpt of the diary of this new york republican named george templeton strong. george templeton strong is writing in the summer of 1862, he goes downtown, new york city. there is a major battle raging in virginia at the time, and strong describes what he sees in new york city as you would never know war is going on. he is acknowledging that men are fighting and dying. it is possible if you live remote on the theater of war, it was a total abstraction. conscription makes every adult male viable for military service, so you can imagine how that adds a kind of level of significace to political debates about war is about and if the war is going well. conscription is a factor, and the final factor i want to mention very quickly is lincoln's administration record on civil liberties. we dug about political oppositions of the lincoln administration. civil liberties may be as important as emancipation in some areas as promoting opposition to republican leadership. lincoln. early on in his presidency determines the will be times when he will need to take it short and very steps to crack down on voi
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 1:06am EDT
after the anville expedition, there's not a lot of major action in king george's war. british are also using privateers against the french. bottom line is it dies down. one reason is because the french lost the war by the end of 1747. in may and again in october there's two very famous naval battles disastrous for the french off the north western tip of spain. the first and second battles of cape finisterre. they are efforts by the french to get convoys across to help new france and in both cases french navy forces are destroyed and able to stop the convoys from crossing the atlantic. so with this, essentially by 1747 and into 1748 war extended. france still had the advantage in europe. of course at sea the royal navy and britain had achieved the upper hand. with this stale mate in place, the two sides, negotiations, maria teresa was allowed to maintain the throne. and although the war was fought over deep tensions it was a draw and both sides went back. we will see a new war known as the seven year's war will break out within a decade. that is october 1748 and we have seen this before
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2016 6:30pm EST
about the 1988 election between george herbert walker bush and bob dole. there was a governor, john sununu who helps president bush become vice president -- then vice president bush. he then goes on to become chief of staff for president bush. there is a real opportunity for somebody who really makes a president, or really contributes to a president's victory in new hampshire to have a much longer career in politics down in washington. chief of staff is a very important position. this isn't an actual ballot. it gives you an idea of what you are doing back in 1952. this was a flyer put out, it's like a sample ballot put on by the eisenhower people. it says "vote for ike." you can see the names of the people and the towns they are from. they are telling you to vote for the following 10 delegates who are favorable to eisenhower. it doesn't say they are committed, but they are favorable to eisenhower. the top the list is sherman adams. you can see some other names that are famous in new hampshire . foster stearns. bit. that come up quite a important people in the state. you get a sense
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 12:46pm EDT
program was recorded in 2005 during freedom fest in las vegas. i am currently a jr. at the george and to the technology in
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2016 8:00pm EDT
in the same system barack o, -- barack obama and george washington. the resources they had to lead were different. those premodern presidents, those before franklin roosevelt were more clerks. the main job of the president was to appoint people to government offices. it was a thankless task. i president even got assassinated in his role. james garfield was assassinated in 1881. there is no institutional support for the president. not until 1857, congress appropriated money for the resident to hire a clerk. they pay their own staffers out of their own pocket. george washington hires his nephews to copy his letters. presidents have to take loans like thomas jefferson. that leads to andrew jackson saying that being the president was a situation of dignified slavery. it might be unfair to compare premodern presidents to modern ones. forget about the leader of the free will -- free world, teddy roosevelt left the country. do we judge the president by the standards of their time, rrs -- or ours? that will play a role in how we interpret what they did in office. things that may have not b
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2014 12:00pm EDT
about king george's war which took place in the 1740's in north america between colonial powers. while the war was inconclusive, it did establish regional identities for the colonies. and again american colonies valuable experience for their own revolution in the coming years. this class is about 50 minutes. >> good friday. today, we are going to be discussing two separate conflicts that took place in the war of austrian succession. we talked about the french indian wars, we also talked about queen ann's war, and we're going to talk about separate conflicts. one is in the french indian war, i kind of added it to the powerpoint here, but we're talking about the war of jenkins' ear in north america between the british colonists of the south and spain, and in the north, once again it is a french and indian war, a war that occurred just before the french indian war. as always, i put up a couple of words appear for spelling. students like to get the right spellings. others will get the spellings off of slides. ht, the start with utrec piece that ended the previous war queen anne's wa
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2015 8:00pm EST
of the reverend george whitfield who may have been the best known and the most popular came over from england at the end of the 1730's. he worked his way up from georgia to pennsylvania to new england. giving these barn burning and mesmerizing sermons. sometimes whitfield was invited as local churches. sometimes the local minister was suspicious of him. the more sedate and sober ministers did not like this kind of rabble rousing. if a minister refused to allow whitfield to preach, he preached outdoors. god andonalization of his everyday presence in life. he was in the business of saving souls. the conflict that arose at this time was between those who worried about how their polite congregations being disturbed by .his excess of passion the new lights were the dissenting sects. just gaining followers at this time. the older ones tended to be the congregationalists of new england. successors to the puritans. aside from this enthusiasm of this great awakening, one of the interesting up shots was the establishment of denominational colleges. you have presbyterians founding the college of
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 8:00pm EDT
for the colonists. in discussing king george's war, what are things we can talk about? there are three things that we can take away from this particular conflict. the british colonist have once again banded together in times of crisis as we talked about before, and they came together in a feeling of solidarity. shared sense of community. maybe it would be like going to a big football game. by the end of the game, you are all one, you are all cheering for the team. this idea that this crisis comes in the eu are altogether, and there was also panic, the coast and you are altogether, and there was also panic, the coast is going to be rated. it increased a sense of community. that is one thing. that itnd thing is provides valuable military experience. as we know, because we have seen the future, there are some wars coming up, the french indian war, the american revolution, so whohere are colonists fought in queen anne's war, that they are not able to fight. placee next war takes just 10 years later, so there is definitely some valuable military experience that is gained because of th
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2016 8:00pm EDT
rankings of prosial greatness, we're going to put in the same system barak obama and george washington. but their tasks of leadership, the resources that they had to lead, they were very different. those premodern presidents, presidents before franklin roosevelt, were more clerks than they were leaders. the 19th century, the main job of the president was to distribute patronage. they would appoint people to government offices. it was a thankless task since a president even gets assassinated for his role. james garfield assassinated in 1881. there's no instin institutional support for the president. it's not until 1857 that congress appropriate aides money for the president to hire a clerk. they wind up paying thur own staff, the few staffers they have, out of their own pocket. george washington hires his nephews to copy his letters. presidents have to take loans like thomas jefferson. it leads to andrew saying being president was a situation of dignified slavery. it may be very unfair to compare premodern presidents to modern presidents. off the was different, challenges were different
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2016 1:10pm EDT
is george. all right. and those years are the years when those people were 8 years old. and one of the many data points that william bird put together was when he asked them, and they are all alive so we he could ask them to plot on a map their home and the farthest place they could go to unescorted, as an unaccompanied 8-year-old. he found that george could go six miles and did. he liked to go. six miles is a long walk. six miles each way on foot. george would walk. jack was only going a mile. 1/6 of that. that was twice as much as vicki, who went half a mile in 1979. to me, the clincher is 2007, edward is going 300 yards. maximum unescorted as an 8-year-old. 300 yards. that's a major decline as you can see in this bar chart. now this is one family. it's a sample size of one or four depending on how you look at it. i'm not making any pretenses that this is conclusive data. i am claiming, however, that this is not at all atypical of a trend that you find both in britain and in the united states over time. there are reasons for this. you guys have lived this yourself. i have as well
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 8:00pm EST
reasons. george and, as we know, george -- or we'll find out -- george w. bush, when he had been a congressman and representing senate was head of oh population committee in the republican party that pushed richard nixon to push for federal family planning and international family planning. the republican party stood strong on this issue. but roe v. wade and the fight over abortion laws and the idea of abortion on demand really brought in -- one does have to wonder whether the supreme court decision really takes the battle out of the states and whether we would have been better off having the fight in the states and not having a court ruling that basically kind of polarized. what would have happened. my guess is other states wouldn't. anyway, that's how it was introduced. if i may add one more thing since i have the the podium here, it should be pointed out that abortion was not illegal in america before roe v. wade. most states had laws allowing for medical abortions. they were restrictive laws. but in order to save the life of a mother a doctor could perform an abortion. the issu
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 3:52pm EDT
guys have been reading is a short excerpt of the diary of this new york republican named george templeton strong. he goes downtown to new york city. there's a major battle rages in virginia at the time. strong describe what is s what n new york city. he says you'd never know the war is going on. men and women in their carriages, children giggling, the economy seems to be booming. no one seems to be acknowledging that men are fighting and dying. before conscription is added into the formula, it's possible for the war to be a total abstraction. conscription makes at least potentially every adult male liable to military service. so you can imagine how that adds a level of significant to political debates about what the war is about and whether the war is going well. conscription is a factor. a final factor i would mention quickly is the lincoln administration's record on civil liberties. one of the things that strong writes when he talks about the political opposition of the lincoln administration, he says that civil liberties may be as important as emancipation in some areas in pr
CSPAN
Jul 12, 2014 2:50pm EDT
a dictator under the first george bush, and then the larger war under george bush, the first toward bush, the persian gulf war to throw iraqi out of kuwait when saddam hussein invaded kuwait. in those three engagements, the press was a very tightly restricted because of the vietnam syndrome in the pentagon 's mind. reporters get in the way. reporters undermined american military effort. therefore they must be kept away from the battlefield. that changed in the war in iraq, even though, especially in the persian gulf war, the press policy had seen it a great triumph because it was a quick war, a short war, in which american forces were very quickly victorious. the pentagon managed all of the imagery of the war. this was seen as successful, for a time. then some people in the military said, you know, i lot of great stories about what our guys did in the persian gulf were never told. so, if we ever go to war again, we should open it up and encourage what came to be called "embedded reporters." that is the term we have become familiar with in our generation. embedded reporters who, like
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2016 8:00pm EST
wars place not a formal declaration, starts with the beginning of the republic. george washington's wars against native american tribes, all the way down to wounded knee. presidents do not go in ask permission, can we go to war against the sioux, apache? theoretically, the war against the apache in the southwest, they were the longest american military engagement -- in terms of a hot war -- in american history. we do not really list those as wars, we think about wars. john quincy adams, a quasi-war against the french. he consult with congress, people were aware of it. but there is no declaration of war. thomas jefferson, barbary pirates, no declaration of war against the pirates. thelook at them as terrorists in this regard. examples in the first three presidents of going to war in different ways that which do not involve the declaration. president, james madison is the first to ask for a declaration of war against the british. the u.s. almost was to war against france, too, at the same time. which is interesting. we are going to go to war against everybody. but that is how american
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2016 10:23pm EDT
on this guy. this is george, our so called expert on all things soviet and all things stalin. george kennan probably knew more about the history of the soviet union, the current status than anybody else. he came to truman with basically a couple of themes, if you will. he told truman first that there can never the soviet union. we are simply two different countries. so don't even try. roosevelt tried to cooperate with them, and he's saying we're simply too different. the second thing that he told truman is that joseph stalin is determined to undermine and overthrow free and democratic countries around the world. if you thought hitler was determined to take over the world, joseph stalin probably is. he will use every opportunity he can to spread communist around the world. therefore, what truman was hearing was a change in foreign policy. kennan is going to recommend that the united states not cooperate with the soviet union anymore but we need to contain the soviet union. this is a dramatic shift in u.s. foreign policy. containment. if stalin is trying to infiltrate this area
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2016 8:00pm EST
go home and perhaps face retaliation on the part of the government. president george herbert walker bush objected to these initiatives because he feared it might strain diplomatic relations with beijing. in the end, his administration vowed to pressure and allowed students to remain in the u.s. and become citizens. the is another example of importance of advocacy. during the 1990's, many found asylumcubans in the u.s. in large part because of the advocacy of the very local and politically influential cuban american community in south florida. haitian boat people by comparison were more likely to be called economic migrants despite the fact they were fleeing equally or more repressive conditions. nations were much more likely to be detained and deported then where the cubans and this did not change until the congressional black caucus took up the cause and forced a more humane response from congress. one final example. the neck or rob wittman adjustment and central -- the nicaraguan adjustment act allowed hundreds of thousands to remain in the u.s. and this legislation was the combin
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:02am EDT
to provide alcohol. george washington's army often ran out of food for long stretches of time. his army never ran out of alcohol. and washington understood, as did all other commanders, if you wanted to keep men in the ranks the number one thing you could do, even better than paying them, was to provide alcohol every day. same thing in the navy. we will see that this will start to change in the 1830's and it will produce a great deal of strain in the relationships between employers and employees when employers try to cut off providing alcohol. elections promoted alcoholic consumption. we might like to think people would be sober when they were making their very important political decisions, but in the early republic, most voters were not sober. and indeed, the friends of different candidates would be at the polling places and they would have a glass of whiskey with them, and they would be up slapping people on the back, offering them free whiskey, and encouraging them to cast their vote for the candidate providing them with the alcohol. it was -- for example, a traveler reported "
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2015 12:01am EDT
against the union and lincoln, lincoln equals george iii. that from a purely conventional perspective, there is no way they could defeat the british army and navy. i know we have great pride in our military and continental army, all of that stuff. but that this was a no-win situation, if they fought the war in conventional terms. so that on the one side you can make the case that it is a miracle. and actually washington said this at the end. he called a standing miracle that we won the war. he said with all of these ragtag groups, all amateurs -- he always called it a standing miracle. what does a sitting miracle look like? a lying down miracle? [laughter] that is true. but i did not say this last time, it was implicit. i think our own experience in vietnam and more recently in iraq has made us more aware of then we were of the intractable problems the british faced in winning this war. they are fighting what we now call a counterinsurgency operation, with a force at any given time of 50,000 or 60,000 troops spread out. in order to win this war, they need 500,000 troops and they neede
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 12:00am EST
laws an in favor of drafting women, for example? >> well, i've read the yale law george very closely. and also i'm a lawyer and have practiced very heavily in this area. i think she's misinterpreting it and taking it out of context. let me basically say what the equal rights amendment will do. and i think almost everyone in the country agrees. right now there are support laws, but there's no court in the country that will enforce support laws while the marmg is going on. if you don't believe me you can ask anyone who has had trouble with their husband supporting them and you go into court and say my husband is not taking care of me and they'll say we don't touch that, lady. once the marriage is going along the will never step in to help marriage. if it's unfortunate enough that it comes to that kind of situation, the courts won't step in and i think understandably so. sometimes it's regrettable. but if the do step in, what instantly happens is you go to a divorce. so if a woman is married to a man who refuses to help support her, she's really forced to go to work, anyway, or seek a d
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2016 11:30am EDT
google play. >> on luxury -- lectures in history, westfield state university professor george michael talked about white supremacist groups in the mid to late-twentieth century. he described the difference between white supremacist and white separatist groups and looked at events that attracted media attention to the topic. he also discussed the relationship between the extreme right subculture and contemporary politics. his class is about 50 minutes. ok, good michael: evening. today, we are going to take a of the whiteistory separatist movement in the united states. time, whitent separatism is a very marginal political movement. however, in light of very important demographic and political trends, the movement could become more salient in years. that are also white separatists. separatist denotes different long-term objectives then supremacist. separatists want an exclusive ethnic or racial mono state. now supremacist might also be segregationist. that is, they advocate separating different racial troops, but within the same state. examples would include the jim crow system of racial
CSPAN
Mar 22, 2016 10:30pm EDT
this one got, there were two other murders in the weeks leading up to it in ms, a man named george w. lee and lamar smith, different parts of the state of mississippi and they had been actively involved in voter registration, trying to get black to the polls and had been warned not to do it. and they did it anyway. so this semester we're going to explore a case that's actually more similar to george w. lee and lamar smith. that's going to be the 1948 murder of isaiah nixon in the town of alston, montgomery county. it's three hours from here. he was shot dead for voting. and he voted in the 19 -- in 1948. and i'm going to come back to this in a little bit and talk to you about the extraordinary period of time in georgia history between 1946 -- actually more broadly 1944 and 1948, the highlights of which were two statewide races for governor within two years of each other, one in 1946 and one in 1948. two and possibly three black men were killed for vote in that time that we know of. now, why -- just i want to open the floor for a second. why would white people go to such lengths to st
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 8:00pm EST
midnight eastern. next, george mason university professor john turner talks about how the book of mormon in early america. he talks about how the book of mormon compares to other religious texts and how early mormons, under the leadership of joseph smith, attempted to create a “new zion” in the american west during the 1830's under the leadership of joseph smith. this class is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good morning. it seems to me we have spent a lot of time studying the great ism's of the world -- hinduism, buddhism. then we get to a couple of non-isms --christianity and islam. and now we begin mormonism. really the story begins at the end of the early chapter of mormon's history in the united states. we began on june 27, eight team 34. on that day -- 1834, on that day, the mormon prophet joseph smith sat in jail in carthage, illinois. this was just little bit east of this red dot in western illinois. it was near the mormon gathering place, headquarters of sorts, a city in western illinois. joseph smith was the president and prophet of the church of jesus christ of lat
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2016 12:00pm EST
sherman's armies marched through that area of george's former slaves -- still slaves they see liberators. they don't react with terror and trepidation. they react with elation. freedom is on the way. -- whatwhat have been happens? andman's troops come, sherman's troops keep going. he is not looking to occupy georgia. the elation of what the slaves when they see the blue coated troops, they see the power to make it real, they see the power to away. marchso slaves in georgia do what they have done elsewhere. they run away. in other cases, where we talked about they ran to union forts and union posts, to safe locations behind union lines. in this case, those slaves are running after sherman's army. they are trying to keep up with him as he presses his men to march 2 atlanta. sherman doesn't like this. but also because it is impractical. it is a nuisance for sherman. he wants his men to move fast. he is trying to move at a place for ebenezer creek in georgia about 20 miles above savanna these difficulties are going to come together with fatal consequences. one wing of sherman's army crosses
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 12:00pm EDT
george wallace. wallace was perhaps one of the most fiery segregationist figures of the era. and wallace also went to gettysburg. but wallace, of course, was already famous for one particular line, the one we associate with him. when told that the university of alabama had to desegregate, he gave a speech, and i will quote it. in the name of the greatest people that have every trod this earth, can you hear the echoes of the american race there? i draw the line in the dust, and toss the gauntlet at the feet of tierney and say segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever. of course, by the time that wallace went to gettysburg in june of 1863, or actually, slightly after, the federal government had already forced the university of alabama to desegregate. wallace had to sort of stand aside as the national guard admitted two students into the school. but wallace went to gettysburg. hef attended a redead tags of the alabama monument, which had been placed in 1933. he gave a speech which i won't quote at length. but wallace's speech was very, very clear. the country should
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2016 11:00am EST
presidency. historian george nash talks about herbert hoover's humanitarian efforts during world war i and world war ii. >> in the course of these exertions, herbert hoover working voluntarily and without pay, became an international hero. the embodiment of a new force in global politics. american benevolence in the form of humanitarian aid programs. >> for a complete american history tv schedule, go to c-span.org. >> each week, american history archival films that provide context for today's public affairs issues. ♪
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2016 2:41am EST
tiananmen. now they were afraid to go home and face retaliation on the part of the government george herbert walker bush objected to these congressional initiatives much because he feared it might strain diplomatic relations with beijing. in the end, his administration bowed to domestic and congressional pressure. the emergency chinese relief act allowed some 80,000 chinese students and faculty to remain in the united states and be permanent residents and citizens. here's another exam of the importance of advocacy. many cuban boat people, found asieh them in the united states in large part because of the advocacy of the very vocal and politically influential cuban american community in south florida. haitian boat people by comparison were more likely to be called economic migrants despite the fact that they were fleeing more oppressive conditions. haitians were much more likely to be detained and deported than the cubans. this did not change until the congressional black caucus took up their cause and forced a more humane response from congress. the nicaraguan adjustment and relief a
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 2:28am EDT
, more coverage with republican candidates ben carson at 5:00, followed by george pataki. c-span2, saturday night, 10:00 eastern, missouri senator claire mccaskill. and dsouza talks about his latest book. on american history tv on c-span3, sunday morning, 10:00 a.m. eastern with many presidential candidates, the fair's history and its tradition on a stop to the white house as we look at the 2008 presidential race. and saturday evening at 6:00, on the civil war, historian and author john core stein the results victory and the closing of one of the confederacies last ports. c-span.org. >>> next, virginia commonwealth instructor chris officer saladino to the cold war nuclear women's. he talks about mutually destruction which kept the u.s. and soviet union from engaging in open war. this history lesson is 50 minutes. >> let's to recap a little bit. we have segued. we are talk building international community. we have talked about war. we have talked about this overdetermined war, the first world war. we talked about the second world war. how military force was organized. kind of histo
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2015 8:00pm EDT
, met george. family,e with the moses a mother and son and a wounded soldier they were taking care of. the patriarch moses said he had lost 8000 men on the 21st of july. patriarch moses had crossed eyes. he looked both ways, seeing things into points of view at once. came home with a fever. absolutely in shame and disgust. woman what frantic i've seen somewhere, the most unhappy people are the people who have bad dots. >> so she comes -- bad thoughts. >> she comes home, she is sick. she has a fever. she is confined to her bed and dots.ith a bad -- thoughts. what kind of bad thoughts are possible in october 1861? >> not a good start in the war. >> it seems to start off ok but there are lot of people complaining we have not followed up but it's possible to think not going so well. what else? loyalty of slaves. >> is that possible to conceive of? we see that more after the murder. professor anderson: south carolina is populated by a black majority, and this is true in the low country, where we know there are movements afoot, federal invasions. what other bad thoughts? what are possible b
CSPAN
Feb 28, 2016 12:31pm EST
think of as important in the background. that is george washington here in the center. he is sort of overshadowed by lady washington. the title was, "lady perception," a formal reception that was held and hosted by the first lady, martha washington. she was standing on a platform. and you notice the opulent attire. frankly, this was a scene that could have taken place in a european court, as much as in america. the next image i think you will find more familiar. this is county elections from 1851. what do you see here? how does it differ from the last ?mage ta >> you see a guy at the top left. prof. balcerski: there's actually more than one drunk person. good. speaking. prof. balcerski: stump speaking. vote for me for president. anything else? >> it is working-class people. prof. balcerski: that is all good. you are seeing a diversity of people. you're also seeing the white male electorate. this is going to stand for democracy. it is a diverse thing. the whole town. note the african-american to the left of the picture. children as well. although it would be the white male voter, the
CSPAN
Apr 25, 2015 8:00pm EDT
the agenda, the other thing i must say and it comes out in a letter to george washington for april 16, which you already for today -- madison's is the first thing we have to do is solve the problem of representation. that means that madison was firmly committed to majority area and -- majoritarian principles in the legislature. it has to be bicameral. there have to be two houses. madison says some federal proportionality has to apply to both houses, in terms of allowing each state to have an equal vote. we have to figure that out before what the national government can exercise. another delegate said, why do we do it the other way? they are not that expensive. maybe we do not have to alter the structures? madison took a different position. if we cannot agree on what powers we determine the allocation of representation whether it will be respective or not. in that is what drives the convention. when we get into philadelphia what we know best, of course, we see one issue. the apportionment among the states in both houses is really the one dominant issue. and then we come to the so-ca
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2016 8:00pm EST
. that is george washington here in the center. sort of overshadowed by lady washington. the title of lady washington's reception, a formal reception that was held and hosted by the first lady, martha washington. she was standing on a platform. nd you notice the opulent attire. image i think you will find may be more familiar. this is county elections from 1851. what do you see here? >> you see a guy at the top left. prof. balcerski: there's actually more than one drunk person. good. >> some speaking. prof. balcerski: stump speaking. vote for me for president. anything else? >> it is working-class people. prof. balcerski: that is all good. you are seeing a diversity of people. you're also seeing the white male electorate. this is going to stand for democracy. is a diverse thing. the whole town. children as well. although it would be the malveaux to her -- although it would be the white male voter, the constitution encompasses many and women, whites and african-americans alike. ones not a question about -- whether one can participate or if one can participate more broadly in politic
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2016 10:45pm EST
. and to sell it in a different way i had i is very difficult. let me give you an example. george w. bush early on when he talked about the war on terror, argued that it would be a different kind of war. there was a war without any final resolution. it was a war without an appomattox, a surrender ceremony. that this war would continue and that beak america's engagement with the world had fundamentally changed because there would always be terrorists. you could never quite -- you could still do this group but you wouldn't subdue other groups. and i mean historical examples of that. including the american reconstruction. you could subdue the ku klux klan as a terrorist group but it was replaced by other supremacist groups like the red shirts in south carolina, the knights of the white camellia in louisiana. in other words, you think just because they're no longer wearing their bed sheets, that they're out. well, no, there are other people and you know, instead of white sheets there were red shirts in south carolina. same thing. american terrorists. all right. >> so bush makes this arg
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2016 1:18am EST
head that commission, george william curtis. and it went into operation in 1872 there was strong opposition in the congress, however. built up through the ability. the civil service commission needed appropriations to operate. year after year, they would ask for an appropriation. grant would ask for an appropriation for them. and year after year, it got less and less, until finally it was cut off all together and grant gave up the experiment. grant had great sympathy for the american indians. he wanted to improve their lot as president and adopted the so-called peace policy. clean up the indian bureaus, get rid of the appointees who were the indian agents who were really the front line people out in the west, and he turned to religious organizations to recommend people to serve in those federal indian agencies out in the west. although it was a great approach, it had a flaw, and the primary aim was to change the indian's culture. grant hoped one day all the indians would become self-sustaining farmers and they would be eligible to vote and be just like white people. the indians r
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