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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101
BBC News
Mar 30, 2017 11:15pm BST
wead, who was a special assistant to president george bush snr and has written extensively on presidents and their families. very good evening to you. how often have presidents given a proper role, formal or informal, to close members of family? all through american history. i counted about 18 or 19, depending on how you define them, and daughters who have had very powerful roles in their father's white house. and you were there when george bush snr employed his son in the white house. he was not in the white house, he was in the campaign but we talked about that a lot and that was why i began my study of presidential children. he came into the middle of his father's campaign and what i learned is that even the white house, if you make a decision and you are wrong, you get fired. if you make a decision and you are right, you make everybody mad and you do not get credit for it anyway, the credit goes up, so no one makes decisions. the governments are present in this case the campaign suffered. when george w bush came into the campaign on march of 1987, he made decisions, and it
BBC News
Mar 8, 2017 11:15pm GMT
? yes, you heard tim farron was very proud of his joke of the day. a none too subtle reference to george osborne's omnishambles budget of 2012, that fuss over pasty tax. i don't think we are at that level of a shambles. nevertheless there is concern among ministers. 0ne minister said to me that the chancellor had been too confident in all those gags he was making. also this minister said to me, look, the chancellor has really undermined the tories' traditional reputation as the party of the entrepreneur, the party of the self—employed. this minister said to me, we are shooting our own people. and i was told that this idea is going down like a lead balloon on the backbenches. there will be blowback, this minister told me. i was told the government really needs to do a betterjob in admitting that it broke its election manifesto, concede and move on, and then there might be some space for the government to explain the merits in this change. thanks, nick. the chief secretary to the treasury is with me. do you concede you broke the pledge in the manifesto? no, i don't, actually. you just ru
BBC News
Mar 6, 2017 11:15pm GMT
. theresa may and philip hammond are saying they want to move on from the era of george osborne where we had big political announcements surrounding a budget. these are serious and earnest affairs. tomorrow's front—page headlines on all the papers are a big announcement that will allow theresa may to say she is pressing ahead for plans for grammar schools. speculation that was on the back burner. the chancellor will plough £320 million into expanding the government's free school programme. the key point is that will create extra spaces and those schools would be able to select on the basis of academic ability. that is obviously the big headline they want to get out tomorrow. the important thing to remember about this budget is that it is the last spring budget. in the chancellor's mind we will have the first autumn budget later this year. in his mind, that's the big moment where you would make any big tax changes. and you would have a bit of news about brexit by then. what would you look out for as the things he will be interested in either in this one or autumn? the key thing to r
BBC News
Sep 13, 2017 11:15pm BST
i'm concerned, the drummer. do you feel today that perhaps you and george didn't get quite as much credit as the others and it wasn't quite fair in that sense? i didn't ever feel it wasn't fair. because we had the finest writers and musicians, and vocalist. that was how it was. so, it was alwastohn, paul, george and ringo. that's how it is, you know? no, we were the band and i love those guys. i've felt love from the three of them. yeah, we had a few rows, but that was then, i think that's what everybody has. sure. and do you feel you've had your due from the critics? i mean, you're still much loved. you see, i'm getting it now. the remasters. no, "john, paul, george... and ringoooo." because you know, anyone can play like that. well, they can't. i knew that. and i knew when we went to america and i met a lot of drummers, they said they call us to the studio, theyjust want us to play like you. so, i had no problem with it. i didn't like it, but it didn't stop me playing. ijust played the way i played. i play emotionally, that's how i do it. is that the secret? is that the ringo sty
BBC News
Aug 18, 2017 11:15pm BST
trump's administration? i'm joined by richard painter, who worked in the white house under george w bush as his chief ethics lawyer. david willisjoins me now. why now? what is behind the timing? it's an interesting question. steve bannon was, of course, one of the architects of donald trump's victory in the presidential election last year. he was behind the right wing website breitbart news. in recent weeks, he has been accused of leaking to the press, he gave a controversial interview to a liberal magazine here. a few days ago. as you mentioned in your introduction, he appeared to contradict the trump administration's position on north korea. he is known to have clashed with others close to president trump. including his son—in—law, jared kushner. and his daughter, ivanka trump. people steve brannon brands" the globalists" in the white house, the new chief of staff, john kelly, has basically been looking to install a sense of discipline into the white house. he has apparently had steve bannon under review for several weeks. today, a very brief statement was issued, saying that steve
BBC News
May 5, 2017 11:15pm BST
, george michael mayoralt and liverpool decriesively. senior labourfigures in private are in despair. they think the party is heading to a heavy defeat next month. jeremy corbyn headed to manchester this afternoon to celebrate andy burnham victory, but the new mayor, well, he was otherwise engaged. on this historic day we decided to take a look at the five lessons we've learnt from today. the people of britain have spoken. the political ground has shifted and britain is on course for a realignment in next month's general election. butjust what have we learnt from the multitude of elections across great britain? crowing by ministers has been banned by number ten. they have little doubt that theresa may's decision to call an early general election will pay off. strange to think thatjust a few weeks ago some ministers were wondering whether her gamble was really that wise. now, ministers are drawing parallels with margaret thatcher's landslide victories in 1983 and 1987. she triggered those contests a few days after success in the local elections. theresa may had no such luxury. she had to go
BBC News
Jul 14, 2017 11:15pm BST
, who wrote about george bernard shaw, alan wasn't close to many people. peter tausig lived two doors down the street from him. alan chappelow was part of downshire hill. he was one of the original characters. one would always see him wandering up and down the street in his grubby raincoat with his belt tied round his waist or on his old motorbike which he kept in the garden. but he was so incredibly proud of this ramshackle house. you used to see him up on the roof repairing leaks with sellotape. i felt terribly sad when i heard about his death. police found 86—year—old alan chappelow‘s body buried under half a tonne of his own book manuscripts after being strangled and beaten to death. over the past year, i've had a number of conversations with peter la nsdowne, the murder inquiry‘s senior investigating officer. he is portrayed in our film by an actor. it was a real whodunnit, it took two days of searching his house. we saw his foot. lansdowne believes alan chappelow had been the victim of fraud, which led to a burglary gone wrong. you have seen a lot of murders, have
BBC News
Jan 27, 2017 11:15pm GMT
tony blair perhaps appeared to write a blank check for george bush after 9/11. on russia, she made it clear she disagrees with donald trump and thinks that sanctions should remain in place. he was noncommittal on that. kellyanne conway was saying maybe the us would be lifting sanctions. think what she got on nato. essentially, donald trump has given that commitment and she can say to eu partners and nato partners in europe, who have doubts about the uk heading off to the us, she is able to say she got a commitment that he is 100% behind it. you may do well on the substance, but in the end it is decided, often, on the optics, and what will be the abiding memory of the visit? the handshake, the holding hands. thanks, nick. dr leslie vinjamuri is an expert in the transatlantic partnership. professionally, this must be a fraught time for you. what is the transatlantic partnership? it has been an interesting visit today. it was a meeting that could have gone very badly. but i think it is exactly right to say the optics, the symbolism of the visit have so far seemed to be very important. th
BBC News
Oct 13, 2017 11:15pm BST
lobster plot. how he and george osborne conspired at a seafood restaurant in chelsea days before the chancellor threw a spanner in the brexit works. in the guardian: brexit row breaks into war of words. hammond apologises for calling the eu enemy. both sides prepare for a new deal. and, finally, the daily express: this is storm ophelia, who is heading our way, and doing so almost 30 years exactly after the great storm of 1987. people are calling it a hurricane, ‘hurricane hell'. that's all for this evening. but before we go, the us postal service motto is ‘neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds‘. now northern california is currently being swept by wildfires. buildings, homes and countryside have in many cases been burnt to the ground, over an enormous area. but as aerial cinematographer douglas thron filmed the devastation, he unexpectedly spotted a us postie taking that motto to heart. goodnight. gentle piano music
BBC News
Jan 26, 2017 11:15pm GMT
public. i thought that you would mention tony blair and george bush. that ended pretty badly... there is a lesson about that. our alliances with america should be based on values and those what we hold in common, not simply on the idea that we want to be at the front of a notional queue. but the idea that you ideological agree with every leader around the world caused nonsense. you need to make priorities. i wonder if what you do, you say, if you are going to ban muslims from certain countries, we will not work together. if you consider torture, we will not work together. if you deny climate change, we went work together. really? i think it is time, this is about self—interest. i think it is tone, this is about self—interest. let me be clear, it is self—interest, that we are strong defending climate change. it is in our interests to defend a two state solution for israel and palestine, donald trump wants to overturn it it seems. there were good notes in theresa may's speech tonight, she had to mention those things but that was not the main thrust of the speech. britain voted for
BBC News
Feb 21, 2017 11:15pm GMT
george osborne for what they have done. i'm afraid ijust i don't buy the idea that, you know, there's a sort of centre where we are all the same. we have a different system. you aren't all the same, it's just that the differences between new two are smaller than those differences between your leaders. the natural coalition may not be between your leader, but it may more naturally be between you and other people in the centre. so where i think there is an important point to that argument is that the debate we are in in britain at the moment, is like, everything in politics is being flown to the ends. —— blown. brexit seems to have given a lot of power to people on the hard right and the far right and i think that's problematic because they don't represent the interests of the majority of people in our country. getting issues like, you know, schools funding, things like that, on the agenda can be really difficult because brexit is sweeping everything else out the way. that is where i think there's a very good point. do you think you should be in the same party as alison, ed
BBC News
Mar 28, 2017 11:15pm BST
with brexit. it pains me to say that. my name is george mont, and from ebbw vale, born and bred. i voted to get out with brexit. i would like to put the great back in great britain. because we are not governing ourselves, we are governed by people that we don't know. my name is maria williams. from ebbw vale, south wales. i voted out of brexit for two main reasons. to stop the illegal immigrants coming in and to get our justice system back. my name is maureen windmill from ebbw vale, south wales. i voted out for brexit. one of the main reasons being any monies that we've received from europe to be spent on our town was spent on the wrong things. fairly unanimous views from the bingo crowd, then. the next morning i met up with the leader of the ebbw vale business forum, phil edwards. he agreed to show me some examples of what people here feel has been misspent eu money. we started on the new £2.5 million lift that takes you up the side of the old steelworks slag heap. fantastic amount of money, over half a billion. half a billion? the dragon is european funded, is it? the dragon is
BBC News
Jan 24, 2017 11:15pm GMT
brave enough to give david davis a hard time as they did in the commons. the likes of george osborne, a lot of people remain silent. they know it is the wrong time to wave their flags. theresa may has momentum behind her. it will get a lot more difficult for her. at the moment it feels she is making the running. this is the early skirmishes of what will be giant warfare. do you agree? what theresa may has done has made brexit is like a cult. if you don't belong to it, you are shunned, you do not get on tv, do not get asked to parties and you are excluded. a lot of people are afraid to stick their heads above the parapet. are you optimistic for a post brexit britain? are you down on it? at the moment, the odds are it is a deal that prioritises jobs, the economy, not looking great. turning britain into a giant tax haven that would mean cutting public services would chill everyone. in british politics, if it is about our relationship to the european union, rather than say, like we have gone through the longest fall in living standards is the 19th century, that squeeze will come back. th
BBC News
Aug 21, 2017 11:15pm BST
the un under george w bush. he joins me from washington. good evening ambassador. reports coming out of the us of increased troop deployment. is that what you understand will happen? that is my understanding as well but we will have to wait and see until we hearfrom the president. he has inherited a difficult situation. he has been very deliberate taking his time, looking at the us objective going forward. looking at alternative strategies. and we will see what the result is. i hope the strategy he announces will be comprehensive as the review has been. the word is it could be roughly about 5000 troops. do you think that in this situation when the taliban seems to be back on the front foot that 5000 us troops will be sufficient for the task? the question is what is the task. if the task is as military leaders say, to stop the momentum of the taliban and also indicate unlike the previous administration in the us which set a timetable for reducing the forces that it had increased and was indicating it was anxious to get all troops out, which encouraged to tell about not to come to
BBC News
Aug 22, 2017 11:15pm BST
, george osborne, in a mischievous flourish, ended his opinion piece in today's ft by saying that theresa may could "relaunch her premiership" this autumn by backing northern powerhouse rail which would plug the northern cities into hs2, making it essentially high speed 3. the government responded by saying that they would go ahead with it. how does labour respond? does labour back the idea of a track which goes from liverpool— hull? we do. it is part of our shift into decentralisation. for too long we've had a need to chill out. if you back essentially a vanity project, you're giving no help to a lot of the smaller communities. they want help for retraining. that is much more valuable, they say. that assumes that they are mutually exclusive. there's no reason why you cannot do both. it could boost the northern economy. it has a knock—on effect. we've set aside £25 billion for investment. these things cannot be taken as individual items. you've got £25 billion for education plans. what about the electrification of the transpennine express to mark the interesting thing, the governmen
BBC News
Sep 12, 2017 11:15pm BST
george osborne, the government failed to show enough appreciation of servants of the public realm. it's great news that after seven very difficult years, recovering from labour's financial crisis, we are now in a position to end the 1% public sector pay cap, which is great for public sector workers. it is great remembering that although the cap is set at 1%, the vast majority of public sector workers have been getting more than that. in the nhs, nurses have averaged 3% as they progress through the pay scales. no doubt the government hoped that today's announcement would lead to a less hostile start of the conference season at the tuc in brighton. public sector workers had other ideas. ijoy that 18, so ijoin to become a firefighter, something i always wanted to do, so money wasn't necessarily the issue. now, i literally lived month—to—month, and so do my colleagues. ijoined at 18. we are feeling the pinch and we are in a situation where we're looking at payday loans, food banks, and especially in education, we are notjust feeding ourselves and providing for our own families, we're pr
BBC News
Oct 4, 2017 11:15pm BST
what i heard. i was speaking to her pps, george hollingby, and he said that she's got a really bad cold but she's really up for it. health problems like that, at a time like that, it's just a ghastly feeling. you didn't recognise the narrative we imposed at the top of the programme. i want to ask these two if they do. the papers tomorrow are certainly going with the narrative of the farce. i'm afraid that is what we will remember. a brave effort by margot to say she thought it was inspiring. the fact is, it was impossible to take the speech in whilst she was talking because you were thunderstruck. you got caught up in the narrative of extreme sympathy and horror at the whole thing. everybody is saying today, a politician doesn't want pity. that's a disaster. is that true? well, quite a few of my nonpolitical friends have said in recent weeks, i feel really sorry for theresa may. that's not a great place to be for any politician. today, that's been exacerbated. however, i did three hours of this on my radio show this afternoon. first, we concentrated on the disasters, and there were
BBC News
Oct 5, 2017 11:15pm BST
announced he would not go to the country to call a general election. it was five days after george osborne announced a conservative government would raise the inheritance tax threshold to £1 million. prime minister brown's announcement looked like fear. it wasn't untiljune this year we saw the consequences of an election that hasn't been bottled. in her conference speech yesterday before the coughing began, theresa may took responsibility for that campaign and said sorry to her party. today, a lot of talk about her party rallying around her, but how safe is herjob? nick watt, you remember that ten years ago. i was one of the journalists briefed on that announcement, it was leaked and the rest is history. but he did have 2.5 more years in downing street after that and this downing street says that it isn't over yet for this prime minister and we seem to have an operation tonight. amber rudd has an article in the daily telegraph tomorrow saying that bluntly, she should stay and it seems like theresa may's allies are flushing out rebels in the times newspaper. you do not do an operat
BBC News
Oct 12, 2017 11:15pm BST
—funded system so as the demographic shifts the burden does not following young people. george osborne went before tory conference on year ago to say he would raise inheritance tax to £1 million, one of the most popular policies the tories have come up with which stopped gordon brown from calling an election. you'll never put the british people of the idea of being able to hand on their house and wealth to their kids. there has been a fantastically successful programme of disinformation about this. house prices are stunningly high in relation to income. much higher now, even going back to the all—time highs, you know, the £5 trillion worth of housing wealth, and we have created this gigantic tax onshore haven that is the british residential property market. inheritance tax is minimal, there's no capital gains tax, the council tax is trivial and, actually, i would prefer a system of social insurance to deal with care in the old age, and it's a pity both things get conflated, but if you're asking the straight question, should some about housing wealth be hypothecated in some way to s
BBC News
Oct 24, 2017 11:15pm BST
their benefits first start being reduced. this would bejuiced george osborne's cup to the worker allowance, costing around £2 billion. changing the rate at which benefits are reduced as someone earns more money, the chancellor cut the tape rate from 65 to 63% in the budget. some cabinet ministers want this to go down to 60%. this would cost around 500 million per percentage point cut. one of the main tory backbench critics says the government will have two move. with universal credit, it is a cobbler kate did benefit. with universal credit, it is a complicated benefit. i pick everybody will blame everybody else. my understanding is a huge number of people leading the project lost theirjobs, some resigned and some couldn't cope. the problem is, for me, the waiting time of six weeks, we want it reduced to four weeks, and we want to see the taper rate reduced. step—by—step, the government is pressing ahead with universal credit. the challenge is to ensure that the eventual merits of the system will overcome memories of its troubled birth. we did ask the government to join us to
BBC News
Jul 24, 2017 11:15pm BST
fate of the northern powerhouse. it was george osborne's pet project, designed to upgrade the trains of northern england, but did it almost get shunted into a siding? i was a minister when it was pretty obvious that those two advisers to theresa may were purely, out of animosity, trying to discourage her from continuing it and apparently doing things without her knowledge. we'll ask the mayor of manchester, andy burnham, what he makes of that. and... we're all talking about women's cricket. we'll be talking about women's sport more generally, and how fast it can grow its appeal. we'll ask a sports executive and a former ashes winner what needs to happen now. good evening. washington is reeling from an extraordinary public appearance from someone they hear much of, but see very little. jared kushner is president trump's senior advisor. he's also his son—in—law, husband of ivanka. today, he was called to give evidence over four meetings he had with russians before the election. meetings critics say could have interfered with the democratic process. we'll ask whether the sound and fury
BBC News
Mar 9, 2017 11:15pm GMT
a style of politics he hoped to end. that was the habit of george osborne and gordon brown to lay traps for their political opponents. it was george osborne who outlined the tax lock at the last election. no increases in vat, national insurance contributions, or income tax. this was a political trap, the so—called tax lock, to try and catch labour out, but actually it has ended up catching out the tories and they have fallen into their own trap. probably the best comparison for gordon with the 2015 budget was gordon's 2001 pre—election budget, where he framed the election question as more investment, not less, and he invited the conservative party to oppose his spending plans. the difference was that gordon was almost certain to be back in downing street after that election, so he could only make commitments like that if he was certain that he could deliver on them. the difference with george osborne was that he probably wasn't ever expecting to be back in downing street to have to implement this tax guarantee, which made him far more reckless than he otherwise would have been
BBC News
Apr 6, 2017 11:15pm BST
about china. it's almost the norm in american presidential politics, and george w bush, who i worked for, said in the first months of his presidency, he would rise up and defend taiwan if it is attacked, which goes beyond the us position. and over the next years, he had a very productive relationship with his chinese counterparts. but there is also that small matter of nuclear warfare. last week, trump told the financial times that if china were unwilling to "solve" north korea, he'd go it alone. the us is looking to china to implement sanctions against north korea as punishment for its recent bout of missile testing. the meeting of these superpowers, visualised so powerfully by the 1972 after a 25—year freeze, has become a thing of global significance. they expected that he, and the other deputy premier, should wear the texan hat. dong xiaoping, magnificently incongruous at a texas rodeo, paved the way for the next china trip — reagan in 1984, and by the time obama met his counterpart, the pivot to asia seemed complete. the united states is a pacific nation, and we are very inte
BBC News
Oct 2, 2017 11:15pm BST
unfold. close your eyes, and you might think you'd stepped out of the time machine into george 0rwell‘s catalonia. and then, it was the communist whose chartered no passed around as they fought the fascists at the gate. today, that chance, they shall not pass, has been co—opted to the cause of catalan separatism. the target — the spanish police, whose methods seemed indeed to echo the dark days of franco's dictatorship. but this was not a demonstration against a despotic regime. this was the police force of an eu nation in 2017, snatching ballot boxes and attacking citizens waiting peacefully to cast their votes. if the government in madrid thought it would break the resolve of the catalans. .. then it miscalculated. news of the police crackdown at some polling stations spread to others on social media. tell me what's going on? we are trying to prevent the police from coming in here, because we know that they are trying to take the boxes. and we basically don't... all we need is a big crowd to hang on, because they might come with weapons, they might come and hit us. we just want to
BBC News
Feb 1, 2017 11:15pm GMT
labour shadow cabinet who resigned in a few minutes. speech of the day george osborne? i think we'd have to say that. he did say that while he supports remain he will vote for triggering article 50 because it would be a constitutional outrage if he tried to thwart the will of the people. but then he made a pointed intervention by saying that the government has decided not to prioritise the economy and they are prioritising controls of immigration and taking the uk out of thejurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. that's quite a thing for a former chancellor to say who obviously he believes that elections are decided on the economy. then there will be battles over what form brexit will take and he ended with the words, i will be in those fights in the couple of years ahead. nick, thank you. having given us the referendum most mps felt they could not ignore it. most mps voted in favour of the referendum and then 47 of them voted against invoking article 50 is a way of accepting the result. and some like ken clarke didn't want a referendum in the first place and voted against the
BBC News
Oct 17, 2017 11:15pm BST
, where we knew george the line? students have a lot going on in their lives. there has been a phenomenon on social media where people have been posting their experiences of sexual assault. some women are brave enough to come forward with the harvey weinstein investigations. why we talk about safe spaces is to make it easier for people to have these discussions are they feel like they don't have to be silent and keep everything inside out of fearful being dismissed or radical. it is up to us to draw the line where we think it is necessary. a question, and the points have been well made. the question is, sometimes if you draw a line too close to where you are, you just go to extremes, we basically push the line into an unreasonable place. kate, you are a comedian. tell us about your december take in to perform at goldsmiths college? —— disinvitation. i had performed there every year. it was routine to tour my solo show. the day before they said there might be a protest, so we are going to cancel. what are they going to protest? initially they were not clear. it is ridiculous
BBC News
Sep 18, 2017 11:15pm BST
. some people will feel you're in character. we're just around the corner from gilbert and george, who i'm sure you're familiar with. are you a bit like the gilbert and george of pop? we like them and their art a lot. there's no separation between the perception of them and also what they're doing. i think, in that sense, we're similar. brothers with a very singular view of the world, russell and ron have produced a long and inimitable discography. just don't call them quirky. i think the term "quirky" is really lazy to impose that term. it's just too easy to say that about someone, about sparks. so, you know, ithink there are more nuances to what we do. even at the very beginning, when we were playing with bands in los angeles before we moved to britain that were sincere in the wrong kind of way, we felt. earnest. very revelatory of their personal ideas through the music. we thought, you don't have to be that direct and having it couched in humour sometimes, you're running the risk of people thinking you're a comedy band. we always try to have another subtext to the lyrics where it is
BBC News
May 18, 2017 11:15pm BST
were put on notice to avoid any talk of an ism but there was plenty of what george bush senior memorably called the vision thing. sojoin me on thisjourney, come with me as i lead britain, strengthen my hand as i fight for britain and stand with me as i deliverfor britain. by inviting former sparring partner david davis to introduce the commission shows that she believes that brexit is the defining challenge of this generation. our future prosperity, place in the world, standard of living, the opportunities we want for our children and children's children, each and everyone depends on having the strongest possible hand as we enter those negotiations to get the best brexit steel for families across this country. my prime ministerial dressing down shows that theresa may abhors what she described in her little blue book as the caricaturist idea of placing people on the left or the right. but it would be remiss not to identify the clear lessons we learned about her today. she believes she is the only party leader who truly understands the cry of anguish that drove the brexit vote. t
BBC News
Jul 25, 2017 11:15pm BST
line is that george w bush first encountered vladimir putin as president back in 2001 and said he was a man he could do business with. there have been a long arc of four presidents, because bill clinton also had a brief overlap with vladimir putin. it's fair to say that both democratic and republican presidents have come in believing that they could work more closely with russia, that we had national interests that would converge on key issues around the world, and all of them have found themselves disillusioned. donald trump is a huge outlier in that he is the only one of them who has come in fawning over vladimir putin's anti—democratic tendencies, fawning over putin as a leader, and basically saying that he admires him and wants to work with him. inside united states, in a partisan sense, it's both democrats and republicans who have an enormous amount of hypocrisy to go around. both have switched their positions based on nothing to do with russia but having to do with the partisan politics of russia changing in the united states, so that does make it, i think, very complicated in
BBC News
Feb 2, 2017 11:15pm GMT
electronic version, as the bbc‘s george greenwood did, it appears to have been finished at about 4:15am yesterday morning. just right—click on the pdf in adobe, and look for document properties. a late draft is normal, but it suggests that a lot of thinking is still under way. the document raises multiple issues, from civil nuclear regulation to data protection, just to say they'll be resolved as smoothly as possible. other specifics, such as the erasmus higher education exchange programme or the pet passport scheme get no mention. yes, the future travel status of millions of dogs, cats and ferrets remains unresolved. now this white paper is just the british view. we may get our way, or we may be about to be hit bya european freight train. our political editor nick watt is with me. nick, the prime minister will be heading to an eu gathering tomorrow. tomorrow, theresa may will attend what may well be one of the last european council meetings before she triggers the article 50 brexit negotiations. she wants to do that early next month. that will take place in the maltese capital o
BBC News
Jan 12, 2017 11:15pm GMT
there was not a coup, was there an invasion? one of them is one victim's younger brother, george. he was killed on the front line. he was a very peaceful man. he was a nice, good—looking young man. 2a years old. this is a very deep wound which will stay there. the wound may close but the big scar will stay there until the affected people die. i don't believe a solution will come in the next two generations probably. if they start changing the education system, if they start changing things, even now they are spreading hate instead of love. but hope does remain. so what we have here is exceptional, if you think of what this country has been like in the past. half of this table is turkish cypriot and the other half, greek cypriot. they are drinking their traditional drink and toasting to the future of their country. this is not the last chance for peace. we, the new generation, we create the piece. i am waiting for this all of my life. i'm so excited and the same time, emotional. this time, they woke up from the ten years sleeping and now it's time for us to have a change in our isla
BBC News
Oct 19, 2017 11:15pm BST
inside? of course. the reason is simple. there is great work being done at st george's park, the centre, coaching, diversity, leadership. the top tier of management, for me, needs to go. more crucially, the county associations need a massive overhaul. three years ago i was asked to give evidence. part of it was this comment. currently there are 55 county associations. the army, navy, 0xford and cambridge universities, independent schools are all part of the system. yet large parts of the massive english demographic, the english, asian, black population have no direct representation. we have a 19th—century body, with independent schools, the army and navy having a say, but no black or ethnic minority, all women? that is absurd. you would put women in that as well? women absolutely a minority, they onlyjust have the first ever woman in 150 years and now they have got to add three more to the board. to say it is not institutionally, there was no institutional problem is ridiculous. women in football have been working for ten years in this field. we constantly receive complaints from wome
BBC News
Sep 7, 2017 11:15pm BST
times, britain criticised for delaying help. and a picture of prince george looking nervous before his first day at school in the times, minister in firing line over mps' brexit letter. and in the daily mail, as eu insults the british people yet again, don't treat us with contempt. that's it for tonight. we leave you with good news for fans ofjurgen 0tto, aka the peacock spider man. mr 0tto's mission in life is to capture the mating dance of obscure species of australian peacock spider on film and set them all to music. and he has a new release this week. of course it's not quite as good as his masterpiece, which we leave you with — the legendary maratus speciosus. goodnight. dance music with didgeridoo hello. the caribbean is battling three hurricanes so quite a contrast with us where it is very quiet. weather is driven by this area of low pressure which stays close by through the weekend. what that means for us to end the week is that many of us have a windy day and there will be frequent showers blowing from west to east. some showers merging together more persistent speu merging
BBC News
Sep 21, 2017 11:15pm BST
. essentially the uk and the eu signed with george treaty that lists citizens rights in a lot of detail. and then there is a new bilateral caught between the uk and be you which citizens can go to if they think that the uk has and then there is a new bilateral court between the uk and the eu which citizens can go to if they think that the uk has discriminated against them. these issues are the key tests. if the speech does not convince the 27 on them, the talks will remain exactly where they are. that was chris cook reporting. we are nowjoined in the studio by daniel hannan. he was one of the architects of the campaign to leave the european union. and from rome the mep roberto gualtieri. he is a senior mep who chairs the economic and monetary affairs committee in the european parliament. he is also on the group that is scrutinising the brexit deal. good evening to both of you. good evening. daniel, theresa may blinked. i would not say that at all. she has been cleared she wants us to be the eu's that and best friend. she's putting flesh and what she said that the beginning that w
BBC News
Sep 19, 2017 11:15pm BST
with george w bush and barack obama's ideas of spreading democracy and human rights. but this president also set out the limits to his acceptance of other systems. we do not expect diverse countries to share the same cultures, traditions or even systems of government, but we do expect all nations to uphold these two sovereign duties. to respect the interests of their own people, and the rights of every other sovereign nation. it seemed almost among tory trump doctrine. his team seem to be explaining why it america first and nationalism was consistent with leadership in the world. but i think what we saw was an echoing of many of the things putin has said about sovereignty, his critique of the international order has been that it doesn't respect the sovereignty of its members. the rubric of threatening others can certainly be extended to north korea and kim jong—un was duly threatened. now north korea's reckless pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles threatens the entire world with unthinkable loss of human life. the united states has great strength and patience, but if it i
BBC News
Nov 20, 2017 11:15pm GMT
to get a date with charles manson or scott peterson than it is with brad pitt or george clooney. the only type of people in our society who are celebrities are either bona fide celebrities or notorious killers and criminals. so these women are basically looking for their 15 minutes of fame. were you happy when you found out you were not going to go to the gas chamber, charles? i knew i wasn't going to go to the gas chamber because i hadn't done anything wrong. are you scared to die? sometimes i feel i'm scared to live. living is what scares me. dying is easy. stephen smith. "we now know we were wrong," the high street stationers paperchase wrote to customers today. "we are truly sorry and won't ever do it again." their crime? an advertising campaign over the weekend that ran in the daily mail. readers of that paper were offered two free rolls of wrapping paper by paperchase. but the promotion was spotted by online activist group stop funding hate which targets companies advertising in the sun, express and mail, arguing that they promote divisive and hateful views. stop funding h
BBC News
Oct 25, 2017 11:15pm BST
trump is a threat to national security. there was the speech of former president george w bush, making all of these speeches about the destruction of civil society by donald trump, without naming him. and there were the comments and the speech of senatorjohn mccain, who was a former republican presidential candidate, and who is critically ill and feels unbound, now, to say whatever is on his mind. so we have four distinguished republicans now stepping forward, making a consistent case about donald trump and what we are seeing is a party that is fracturing before our eyes. sidney blumenthal, thank you. for some, annie leibovitz is most famous as the photographer who took portraits of the queen ten years ago, and who unwittingly featured in a bbc documentary film scandal in which footage was edited to falsely look as though the queen had stormed out in a huff. it would be a pity if that's all you know of leibovitz, though. her portraits are highly valued by subjects and viewers alike, from the beautifully intimate, to lavish, over—the—top constructions. and a new book of them has jus
BBC News
May 17, 2017 11:15pm BST
door. he does not get into the half past eight downing street meetings which george osborne used to go in when david cameron was prime minister. he says he is perfectly happy with that and has a direct line to the prime minister. nevertheless, there has been some friction over the things he said about exit and the economy. he wants more wiggle room with the economy. there have been arguments over taxation policy. this little slip, talking about boris johnson taxation policy. this little slip, talking about borisjohnson having a gaff, philip hammond said one as well, saying sometimes he is reduced to swearing. there have been attempts to host that down like len mccluskey is hosing down his own gaffe. —— mccluskey is hosing down his own gaffe. — — hose. mccluskey is hosing down his own gaffe. -- hose. is that because they don't see eye to eye philosophically about the way that theresa may is moving the party, a bigger role of state, and so on, cutting down on private enterprise, whatever, that kind of classic tory thing, or is it all so to do with brexit, that philip hammond i
BBC News
Nov 22, 2017 11:15pm GMT
chief of staff to george osborne at the treasury. he now works for blackrock. fraser nelson is editor of the spectator, and faiza shaheen is the director at the centre for labour and social studies. we'll get to them in a moment but first, nick watt is here. nick, what are you hearing tonight? how has this gone down on the tory benches? i was talking to one member of th ecabinet, someone who is a fan of philip hammond he said at last we have a political philip hammond, there was the disaster of his budget earlier this year when his poor political antenna got into trouble and this member of cabinet said he could see the job he was needing to do, which was answer that roar to persuaded to people who voted labour and the brexiteers reasonably happy. let us look at the headlines tomorrow. financial times grim outlook overshadows housing drive. the guardian he struggles to meet the gloom. two with a gloomy air about them. the times goes hammond eases off austerity. and the mail is the most interesting. the mail dubbed him eeyore. i think that is significant. the is very rescind, we are taking
BBC News
Oct 30, 2017 11:15pm GMT
today, george papadopoulos has pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi about contacts with a russian professor, who he knew was connected to the russian government. paul manafort is the best—known of the characters in the news today. he made himself rich by busying himself in the ukraine helping the pro—russian president yanukovich. but he went on to help trump. in fact, to lead his campaign. the charges today all relate to activity before he was working for candidate trump. money—laundering and tax fraud, they are. and all have been fiercely challenged by his lawyer. he was seeking to further democracy and to help ukraine come closer to the united states and the eu. those activities ended in 2014. over two years before mr manafort served in the trump campaign. the difficulty for the president is that everyone expects there to be more — special prosecutors often interpret their brief widely. and these indictments show robert mueller is no exception. it's very unlikely that these are the charges that they will face. prosecutors will often bring a superseding indictment. so the
BBC News
Sep 4, 2017 11:15pm BST
sponsored programme of regime change in the middle east for one thing, george w bush was too distracted by iraq and al-qaeda to pursuit the north korean issue and barack obama similarly got fixated on the possibility of a deal with iran, while the north korean part boiled away. —— north korean pot. for a leader is still only 33 years old, the pursuit of nuclear weapons has validated his grandfather's ideology of self—reliance and demonstrated the impetus of the united states. the main question now is whether kim jong—un knows how to de—escalate this crisis. as recently as a few weeks ago perceived wisdom in many western capitals was that north korea was several years away from developing long range nuclear weapons. in the last fortnight, pyongyang has shown it has long range missiles and appears to have hydrogen bombs. whether it has yet found the technology to combine the two is unknown. but how did they do it so quickly — and why didn't the predecessors of the current administration in washington spot it was happening? laura rosemberger served under president obama as nati
BBC News
Mar 2, 2017 11:15pm GMT
ethics adviser to george w bush. good evening to you. jeff sessions has recused himself — is that enough, in your view? well, it is a step in the right direction. but we have a very serious problem here in the united states, and this problem has spread to europe as well. the russians are actively seeking to destabilise our democracies by appealing to far right political parties and engaging in espionage. for years they appealed to the commonest party and the far left in espionage. we have been fighting this battle with the russians for a very long time. and it's critically important to know what happened in 2016, what spying was going on inside the united states and who was assisting the russians, who benefited from it, who was negotiating with them, perhaps offering them something in return for their swaying an election? this is a matter of national—security for the united states, just like what's going on in france right now should be a matter of concern to the french and other countries that russia seeks to infiltrate in this way. the attorney general was asked questions by the judi
BBC News
May 3, 2017 11:15pm BST
george osborne legacy. these are seen as the big names that will develop city regions around the country. one of the hardest fought of those contests is for the new west midlands mayor. katie razall has been there to see how that battle is playing out. it is the only manufacturer of litmus test paper in the uk and is based just outside dudley. here they produce the testing papers used in school chemistry and laboratories across britain and beyond. with voter apathy an issue, will workers here vote in the region's first mayor? i don't think one person can make a massive change. it is an important step for us, something we cannot take light—heartedly. it depends what they stand for as to whether i will vote. you only have a day or two to find out. that is enough time. with the west midlands mayoral election is seen as a litmus test for what might happen onjune the 8th, where better thanjohnson test papers to test out whether this significant political battle ground might change from tory blue to labour red come the general election. the conservative candidates had a heftier war c
BBC News
Oct 9, 2017 11:15pm BST
daughter. they had both escaped down the stairs. the other primary source is george clarke, he lives near grenfell. he was woken by the noise of the fire around 1am. i met him the next afternoon. he had been up all night and he was clearly very tired. one guy caught a kid. a kid was thrown out a window from like the eighth floor and the guy caught him. it's amazing. really? yeah. you saw that? yeah. it'sjust unbelievable, you know. when we contacted george clarke he told us that he did not wish to make any comment on the matter at all, because he said, "it's such a contentious issue and i think it's so hurtful to so many people." talk to people on the streets near the tower and chances are they'll tell you that yes the baby story is definitely true, but they themselves didn't see it. newsnight‘s attempted to contact every single person quoted as saying they did see the baby thrown and caught. some told us that they had been misquoted. others we couldn't find at all. there's no evidence that they actually exist. none were prepared to do an on—camera interview. we can hear people s
BBC News
Oct 23, 2017 11:15pm BST
century. she once worked for david lloyd george on his farm. she is the sort of person for whom the words national treasure were invented. but today, her 95th birthday, she is stepping down from the lords. they have been marking the end of her era with a party this evening, here is a picture of her celebrating with prime ministerjohn major and the lords speaker. i sat down with her on friday, to talk about her life and approach to politics. i began by asking her whether life is better now or when she was growing up. betterfor some. not so good for others. better for who? well, better for those who have money. i think. i think it's amazing the way people climbed out of the mud and did wonderful things. like who? well, i can think of betty boothroyd, for instance. she was a great success and she had to fight to begin with. another big woman in your life was margaret thatcher of course? yes. and you still think of her with affection because you often argued with her, i think? oh yes, like mad. but that was my value to her and she realised it and i realised it. and we were really good f
BBC News
Apr 27, 2017 11:15pm BST
? might we have an echo of the formula that philip hammond helped george osborne draw up in the years when they were in opposition before the financial crash, which was that a future conservative government would share the proceeds growth to fund tax cuts and spending increases but the hammond version would be simpler, it would say as the economy grows, the tax burden should fall, but, he may go a step further, there of the treasury, called fiscal drag. what that means is do you raise the threshold at which people pay higher tax and that means more people would pay that a0% higher tax rate. thank you. 0n on saturday donald trump will have been president and commander in chief for 100 days. he's got very little legislation through congress and his approval - lower than good, 32%, substantially lower than any modern president at i stage. any modern president at this stage. but how is he faring among the working class white voters who ditched the democrats and propelled him to the white house on the ditched the democrats and propelled him to the white hfgaitazn the ditched the democrats
BBC News
Jul 17, 2017 11:15pm BST
blair. his tory successors david cameron and george osborne revered his political judgment so much they called him the master. you've obviously reflected quite a lot over the last month on the election result. was there anything about it which made you question what you thought you knew about politics? erm, yes. in the sense that, and notjust this election result, but brexit, the trump victory in the us, what's happening all over europe. did you see any of the other two coming, by the way? nope. so you've had three surprises? exactly. i feel a bit better. for most of my political life, i've been saying, i think this is the right way to go, and what's more it's the only way to win an election. i have to qualify that now. i have to say, no, i think it's possible you end up with jeremy corbyn as prime minister. so you except that he could possibly win on the platform he is on? i think you can't rule anything out in today's politics. but it doesn't stop me believing that if we deliver brexit and at the same time are delivering the programme that he has at the moment, unreconstructed, u
BBC News
Jan 23, 2017 11:15pm GMT
phrase northern powerhouse is a phrase associated with george osborne, the conservative government in particular. we didn't ignore it, we did one thing that was wrong, in my view. we had regional development agencies. we now have local enterprise partnerships. in the case of our agencies, we put a shed load of money into the regions, but we didn't create the point of decision making fun of accountability, that i think local enterprise partnerships... that the northern powerhouse is trying to do. we had money, but we didn't have local power, accountability, and i think they are important. another potential mistake, did you try to send too many people to university? absolutely not. now it is more about skills and vocational skills, rather than degrees? no. we were absolutely right to widen opportunities for those that wanted to go to universities, not just straight from school but from colleges, further education, following different routes into university. what we now need to do is to create the equivalent excellence in the technical education, the skill raising, that we create for the
BBC News
Oct 10, 2017 11:15pm BST
may was the equalities minister she wrote to the chancellor of the exchequer george osborne injune of 2010 and she said, i fully share the objective of spending cuts, equally important is fairness of the heart of those decisions. there are women, ethnic minorities, disabled people and older people who will be disproportionately affected. in other words she saw all those years ago that some of the policies of austerity implemented by your government work disproportionately affecting black and ethnic minorities and yet your government went ahead with them. while we had to take those economic decisions, what we did also though, and you can see this in some figures there is make sure that the spending we did was spent effectively and in the right areas. one of the things we've seen is much better performance for instance in schools by many children from ethnic minority backgrounds. a disproportionate number of young black men in need of mental health assistance, your own statistics show minorities more likely to be a lower income. now your freeze on benefits has disproportionately hurt th
BBC News
Dec 6, 2017 11:15pm GMT
passed through here? gosh, there‘s so many. boy george was a regular here. martin fry and mark white of abc. dexy‘s midnight runners, kevin rowland, genesis p—0rridge, leigh bowery came down at one time. there was one time, he walked in down these stairs with his famous look with the light bulbs on, and the security guy, eric, said "light bulb chops is here." my brother said, "it‘s £5. there is no guest list in here." he said, "darling, i don‘t pay to get in anywhere!" you might never know it to look at it, but to many this is one of the most story doors in music history. within a few weeks of shoom opening 30 years ago, people were queueing right down this street in the wee small hours to join in the scene and the fun. # acid, man # acid, man... of course, the smiley face was a ‘60s symbol that they put on the third shoom flyer, i think it was, and caught the moment. they had happy, happy, happy banners up in the shoom, in the corridor. and it was very much like a family vibe that they had, and that‘s part of the reason that it caught the imagination of people. time out
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