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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2015 10:14am EDT
school. >> so you take that heritage and you go to the george school for your high school years. >> the local public high school -- the lower grade schools were one room school's. s. you are really getting educated or three times over.two and they really weren't adequate schools. sent my sister to private school in cambridge, massachusetts. and myself and my brother as well. i went to the george school in pennsylvania. and my preparation was so poor that i had to repeat my first year. so i was at this school five years. because the work was just above me. i was smart. i could read and write. but i didn't have any kind of foundation to compete with these other kids who had had superior education all along. but that was a wonderful place. and ita quaker school began to a quite me with this philosophy. and i'm not at all religious. but the quakers believe there is some god and every person and their religious service doesn't have a minister. you could get up and speak. i can get up and speak. joe, mary, frank. if we think we have something to offer. and that kind of democratic thou
CSPAN
Apr 7, 2015 6:19am EDT
brarj and george trial for a book they were doing on the bay of pigs, actually. their publisher went bankrupt and branch and kryle had a fight over how they would split the royalties or something if they found another publisher. and it never did come out. and i was very anxious to get the files from branch, but they both -- it's a whole other story. but i didn't get it. houf, branch told me at the time a good deal about what they were after. and he said that they learned from the cubans that their objective was to find -- there were four objectives in this effort to neutralize me all together. to get information, basically, that i didn't want known. blackmail blackmail-type information. their highest hope was that i would commit suicide, which was what rather than have this material come out, which is what, of course, the f.b.i. did exact ly exactly with martin luther king. many others have discussed. their highest hope was he would commit suicide if he did that. otherwise, they would put it out and discredit him, hopefully. so their hope was that he would kmit suicide. second, that
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2015 12:38pm EDT
over to the george school in bucks county where peter was a student. i guess he was a boarder, and i suppose everybody who was at this picnic was aware that oppenheimer was somebody special and kept kind of looking at him and mother said she was really embarrassed because oppy got up from the table and said martha, i've got your very favorite thing and mother looked surprised. she said a heineken's beer and the quaker school picnic, that's not exactly the drink of choice, but it was a lovely thing to have done. any questions? follow-ups? >> yeah. these are great stories. i want to ask about everybody and everything. let's start back with what it was like to live on bathtub row. were you one of the only children there? >> oh, no. no. i think it's hard for me to remember the bradburies were just up the way. they were on bathtub row and lois bradbury, when i first knew her had two boys, james and john and then when the third child was with one of the scientists at the party said you have to keep with the jay js so how abo jesus and jamath, and it turned out to be, i believe, david, but
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2015 9:55pm EST
george million. a very fine individual. had been a member of the state assembly, his family ran a hotel in gilroy in the southern part of the district, and he had been appointed by president nixon to be the regional head for the environmental protection agency in san francisco, and then from there, they moved him back to d.c. as assistant secretary of army for environmental affairs. so, i mean, he had a long political heritage, and so i knew it was going to be a tough race. but when you look at it, the population was mostly in the san jose, santa clara, saratoga los gatos area and went down to gilroy, but gilroy was also a lesser populated area, so his name recognition was much higher in that part of the district, so the whole question about, you know, who do we have to work with down in that area, and i remember one of the fines that we had was a person who used to support george mileas in other races for the state assembly on the congressional race, and this fellow said, i'll support you. he was a very prominent fellow in gilroy and it was really a big boost when this fellow said, yea
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2015 7:58am EDT
living. all of these people, filipino and american, were waiting. general george kenney's far east air force were delivering bombs to luzon. anything worth hitting was hit. ♪ >> manila bay. luzon. power in theap philippines. january 4, the largest convoy in january 4, the largest convoy in history of the pacific. ♪ january 9, 1945. this is luzon. .our divisions landing abreast we had expected a very different kind of creating the least -- we had expected a very different welcome than the cheering filipinos who told us the japanese have pulled back two days before. ♪ these are guerrillas. don't let the uniforms fool you. these men kept the war going in the philippines, long after the japs said it was over. ♪ to protect the main thrust to manila, we pushed deep into the mountains in the north. some targets, a ground soldier cannot reach. some targets, they cannot see. mountains would have to be bought with battles like these. >> they are doing ok! [explosions] >> they are flying too much from northwest -- too much from northwest to southeast. that is good! that is right on th
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2014 9:15pm EDT
night, he called me. i called george shultz i said he wants to fire the head of the bureau of labor statistics. schultz said don't do anything until i come back. he flew back and spoke directly with the president. there were many times when i did not do what he said and got the person involved who should do it. there were a lot of things he would ask you to do you knew you couldn't do. >> you say he didn't know how to unwined? >> i remember one time after -- i guess it was after the teamsters endorsed nixon, which i arranged in '72. i went up there to be there for the teamster meeting i was there when they made the decision to endorse him. that next morning he was exuberant. and he says, let's go for a ride, and we'd go outside into the golf cart, which he then drives. i was never more nervous in my life, he's driving up and down the roads and he's not a good driving and he's not paying any attention, we're in a golf cart. but it was his way of celebrating. it was as far as i saw nixon go to take the time out to celebrate something. another time in san clemente i was there for zinne
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2015 5:00pm EDT
name of george white. politicians and historians describe him as a militant negro congress. just before he left the congress, he made a brilliant speech and a historic speech. in that speech he said this, mr. speaker is perhaps the negroes temporary farewell to the united states congress. i was right. we would rise up and come another day. but it took 28 years with no blacks sitting in the united states congress, from 1900 to 1928 before another black would come into the united states congress. in 1928, arthur mitchell from chicago came in. and then between 1928 and 1968 when bill and shirley and i were elected, there were a total of six blacks elected to serving in the united states congress. this was an historic day. a lot of attention was focused on me and bill and shirley. as a consequence of it, because all three of us had been involved and enacted the civil rights movement, the flee of us immediately were working together. we were getting a lot of press, and we were -- we came into congress trying to change things that we raised a lot of sand. but in that context we had thr
CSPAN
Apr 7, 2015 2:39am EDT
fielding would go on to be both ronald reagan and george bush ii's white house counsel. i'm told that fred is still using the questionnaire as in the nixon years refined it some but how do you flush out the appointees or nominee's darkest secrets that could be an embarrassment to himself and the administration? and there were some pretty probing questions and they are still applicable. so those were sort of the mechanical things. >> how did john connolly handle your conflict of interest questionnaire? >> very nicely. we dealt with his attorney. he knew of those problems before he had gotten there. he put everything in a blind trust before he arrived and really had his stuff -- it was in order. the one who was a disaster was bill casey who nixon appointed to the s.e.c. reagan would later make him head of the cia. casey was a -- was very entrepreneurial. he would invest in small businesses just across the board. he had some dubious business practices. and getting his affairs in order was a true mess. in fact talk about a memorable moment. casey had an interesting habit, too, that only a
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2015 11:09pm EDT
, including -- i have a list here. george thompson, marcus oliphant, philip moon -- now, it turned out that p.b. was a student of rutherford's, not chadwicks. he did his work at cambridge and did his work with rutherford, and then ended up at birmingham with marcus oliphant, who is another nuclear physicist. he was assigned jumbo too. i worked for him. i started my actual research. my research consisted of blowing up containers to see how strong they were. so i became an expert in explosives for two reasons, we did not do the work on the los alamos pace. the first reason was that they did not want us going up anything at los alamos because it was pretty dangerous. the second reason was that it was too disruptive, too many wires and electrical sparks all over the place, so we were really destroying some delicate work going on at los alamos, so they put us on two-mile mesa. i worked at two-mile mesa with philip moon and one or two other seds blowing up things. we used gauges to study the actual distortion of the metal by the explosive. we would install small explosives inside small containers
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 3:00am EDT
training of professionalism that no mistakes were made. steve: so president george w. bush in air force one coming in late afternoon on september 11. how an usual is it for you and other fighter jets to guide air force one into andrews? major penney: he is -- the president is constantly escorted. -- there'sce one is always a level of safety. now the types of escort and whatnot, that's, you know, that's up to the secret service and that's part of the -- part of their plan. it was unusual for us though, because that's not a typical mission that we had -- well, we had never done anything like that before. so it was -- it was fairly unusual. but to be honest, that was ethical mac to compared to what had been asked of us during the first mission, because we had spend, you know, sufficient amount of time during the course of my first short a and thenmission sortie guys had taken off after me. so by the time that evening came around, things were fairly quiet. everyone who was on the ground except for the first responders. so it really wasn't -- really wasn't that busy when we were given
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2015 10:30am EST
was a lesson i had to learn. ms. swain: during george bush's presidency, barbara bush used the office of first lady to promote literacy and to raise awareness about aids and homelessness. she also earned her way into the history books. she and abigail adams are the only women in our histto
CSPAN
May 16, 2015 2:00pm EDT
the first things that became george. -- deucht. we were not too far from auschwitz. it was allegedly self-rule. we immediately became of the same rules as germany. the people -- most of the german-speaking people, were shouting heli hit --heil hitler, thank you for the liberation. they saw the austrian empire was coming back to i think there was a lot of habs misguided feeling on behalf of the people. maybe not so much pro-nazi at that point, but they had changed. >> over the next few months what happened to you and your family and how did things change? klein: that, i can unfortunately tell you. fairly soon, in order came that all men between 15 years old and 60 years old, my father that point was 50 years old. but since he was ill, he did not have to register for transport. my brother was 19 years old. of course, every day, we would hear that england had friends had declared war. we were occupied sunday morning sunday afternoon, england and france declared war on germany. most of the family had fled, however, my father's sister, who had been separated from her husband and daughter
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2015 8:12pm EDT
list here. just a minute. let me read them to you. george thompson, marcus, james chadwick, phillip moon, and p.b. blackett. now it turned out p.b moon, i was slightly mistaken in my memo memoir. he did his work at the cavendish lab. then ended up in birmingham with marcus, who was another nuclear physicist. he was part of this maude group, and he was assigned jumbo too, just like i was, but i worked for him. so i started my actual research. my research consisted of blowing up containers to see how strong they were. so i became an expert in explosives. for two reasons, we didn't do the work actually on the los alamos mesa. the first reason was they didn't want us blowing up anything at los alamos because it was pretty dangerous. the second reason was it was too disruptive. there were too many wires and pulses and electrical sparks all over the place, so we were really destroying some delicate work going on at los alamos. so they put us away on a two-mile mesa. so i worked at two-mile mesa with phillip moon and one or two other seds blowing up things. we used what are called strain g
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2015 4:58pm EDT
orbit including george will and bill schneider. paul had not yet come into the scene. he was recruited later by freddie clay, when fred was appointed head of acta, around 1972 -- 1973. paul, at the time, was it nail -- was at yale. our group -- bill schneider worked for senator buckley and george will worked for senator alan in colorado. and i worked for kissinger. we used to play poker regularly we were good social friends. we worked together because these were all players on the hill. fighting to end war amendments, getting trident through and so it was an initial -- an interesting time with interesting people. everybody is still involved one way or another. >> [indiscernible] john lehman: all of us were concerned about the agreement that provided -- it had codified a disparate balance they gave the soviets and numerical advantage, they could be transmitted into political leverage. kissinger knew of my views on it , and that is why he asked me to negotiate with jackson ideal to get jackson support. that gave him plausible deniability. but everything i did with regard to off
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2015 11:04pm EDT
information, there was a man named george bell who was anything sort of a tough guy. mild-mannered, very successful businessman, working on a dollar a year basis for the white house. just volunteering. and colson said to gather the names of the people that were less than our friends. and got shortened down to the enemies list. it started out with the people we don't want to invite to white house functions and expanded. then there was an enemies project to try to screw these people in essence. so, i learned by going through files at haldeman's aides, they're the ones that are constantly putting pressure on me to come up with the so-called enemies project. i wrote a memo that i put into the report during the senate hearings on how to screw our enemies, was the title. i used it and it was as blatant as possible, that it was ridiculous, but haldeman loved it. i learned i was almost fired, because one of the things i had made it clear, the counselor's office had nothing to do with it. maybe you can get someone to take it on. but i had no interest in it, and didn't think it was the right thing
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2015 8:02am EST
liddy, were interviewed at great length right taylor branch and george trial for a book they were doing on the plumbers operation, the bay of pigs. their book never came out because their publisher went bankrupt. branch and crile had a fight over how they would split the royalties or something if they found another publisher and it never came out. i was very anxious to get the files from branch -- that's a whole other story -- i did not get it. however, branch told me at the time a good deal about what they were after. , what he learned from the cubans. he said to me that the cubans -- i think they had talked to martinez and barker and some of the others and i cannot identify who told what -- but they had learned from the cubans that their objective was to find -- there were four objectives in this effort to neutralize me altogether. to get information basically that i did not want known blackmail type information. their hopes were dashed the highest hope was that i would commit suicide. rather than have this material which is what the fbi and co-intel program due at martin luther
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 5:47am EDT
the evening and the other activities. as it turns out, the former president george bush and barbara bush had spent the previous night at the white house. we were going to see them off in the morning. i had been requested by some of the staff to say goodbye to them that morning. so, we were organizing a little going away get together for the bushs. bush was going up to testify on the hill. we also had the president's brother neil there overnight. we were taking care of his activities during the day, because he was going out for business. we were generally just getting things squared away for the day. the president was not there. he was down in florida. it was a relatively active morning. when it came time for the former president to leave, he came down he came down and left his bags in the diplomatic reception room and went over to the west wing to say hello to a number of people over there. 7:30 a.m.,was around because they were going to leave at 8:00 if my memory serves me correctly. around 8:45 a.m., the former first lady came down and met with some of the staff that she had been
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2016 1:00pm EST
incredible for words. dr. george laitner: ever since i 3, i had an idea about going to see in seeing the world. i am listed for basic training ndd decided that aloha la would just be wonderful. hula girls and all that kind of thing. 1941, there were about 13 of us who were still together who had enlisted in omaha, who would come to port townsend. we are talking 17, 18-year-old kids. we decided we were going to the bar and we really going to celebrate. that was the black cat. the black cat had a huge menu above the bar. a is for something, b is for something, g is for g. a night of will have this. we started with the a's, and we would all have around, what ever we are talking 17, 18-year-old kids. they did not care. if you have the money to buy it -- that is the way it was. :55 a.m., i was7 in sick bay and i was talking to a friend of mine who was a pharmacist mate. at i said, what do you have that is going to take care of this? and then the bombs started coming and i really did not know whether this was something i was imagining. there was the pounding and all of themind. playing, clang,
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2015 5:15pm EDT
gone on to the george patton museum, that got him into world war ii, which led him at norfolk at the macarthur memorial. but he still goes to bed at night and dreams about the civil war. [laughter] so it is my great delight to introduce to you migrate polish -- my great polish brethern, chris kolakowski. [applause] murray good mr. kolakowski: good morning everybody. i have been introduced in many ways over many years. consistently the most interesting, not the most embarrassing, but some of the more chuckle-inducing introductions, from my polish -- come from my polish brother here. i encourage you all to come down to norfork and visit the macarthur memorial. it's a fantastic place and i am proud to be leader of the team that preserves the life and times of macarthur memorial. if that gig doesn't work with you, i can probably find you a spot on the staff. i think you are doing ok up in new york. [laughter] day,you go first in the it's a bit of a responsibility. i set the pace for everybody else. it also presents a challenge for me. because i'm going first, you are still waking up. it
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2015 6:25pm EST
revolutionaries and british loyalists mingle on the streets, the house of burgesses where george washington once served. we'll hear about colonial slave life, hear from a master black smith, and go behind the scenes of williamsburg costume center. and viewers can ask questions throughout the day. live from colonial williamsburg saturday, december 5th beginning at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3. >>> on road to the white house rewind, we look back to ronald reagan's presidential campaign announcement in the 1980 election. the former california governor talks about the economy, taxes, energy, and foreign policy. ronald reagan won the 1980 republican presidential nomination with george h.w. bush finishing a distant second. he went on to defeat incumbent democrat jimmy carter in the general election carrying 44
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2016 10:05pm EST
to go to george washington university, university of maryland. i even took courses from uva. and if that had happened ten years ago, ten years earlier, i would not have been able to do so. it affected me by really focusing on equal educational opportunities and that you shouldn't judge a person's ability to learn by the color of their skin. and so when i finally taught in those integrated schools, i treated my children as equals. and i say to my children, that's who they were, that they can learn just like anyone else. i tried to use the opportunity to help all sides learn more about one another. respect one another. appreciate one another. and understand that we can learn. because you've got to remember too that i came along at the time when basically the impression was, we couldn't learn. that we didn't have the intelligence to learn. and i can remember sitting in classes and the white kids thinking that the black kids couldn't learn, the black kids thinking that white kids were arrogant and racist. so as a teacher you're trying to bring all that together. i appreciate brown becau
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2015 2:02pm EDT
reagan's and george bush ii's white house counsel. i'm told that fred is still using the same questioner we developed during the nixon years, refine some, but how do you flesh out -- how do you flesh out the nominee or appointees darkest secrets that could be an embarrassment to himself in the presidency and the administration? there were some pretty probing questions. they are still applicable so those were the sort of mechanical things. >> how did john connolly handle your conflict of interest questionnaire question mark >> very nicely, i dealt with his attorney. he knew of those problems before he had gotten there. he put most everything in a blind trust before he arrived. he had his stuff in order. the one who was the disaster was bill casey nixon appointed to the sec. reagan would later make them head of the cia. casey was very entrepreneurial. he would invest in small businesses just across the board. he had some dubious business practices. getting his affairs in order was a true mass. - mess. casey had an interesting habit that only a few people did and eight meeting. h
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2016 7:00pm EDT
professionalism that no mistakes were made. >> so president george w. bush and air force one. how unusual is it for you and other fighter jets to guide air force one into andrews? >> he is the president and is constantly escorted and air force one is, there's always a level of safety. now, the types of escort and whatnot, that's, you know, that's up to the secret service and that's part of the -- part of their plan. it was unusual for us, though, because that's not a typical mission that we -- well, we had never done anything like that before. so it was -- it was fairly unusual but to be honest, that was anti-climactec compared to what had been asked of us during the first mission, because we had spent, you know, sufficient amount of time during the course of my first sortee and then guys had taken off after me so by the time that evening sortee came around, things were fairly quiet. everyone was on the ground except for the first responders, so it really wasn't -- really wasn't that busy when we were given the call. >> a couple of personal questions. you talked to your parents at what po
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2015 8:53am EST
is but went on to to the democratic nomination face george h.w. busin
CSPAN
Jun 28, 2014 2:22pm EDT
fought the state, we fought the local folks to make sure that happened. george fontaine was involved with that. jim walker, those are the people who handled that part. we backed them up and they backed us up when they needed it. those are the two most exciting. they produced a whole new set of characters that had not happened before including myself to become involved with the federal program of that magnitude. $5.6 million. and we had a joint veto. if we do not like with the city wanted, we could veto. and of course that they did not like what we wanted, they could veto. all of this came under the agreement. i do not think we have that anywhere else in the country. elected in 1970. you were obviously very close to the mayor. what is your feeling about how you managed through the late 1960's and where you stood at that point, and how did you feel about prospects for further change and building the world you were trying to build? >> i was high on the result of a medical school fight we were doing, the street organizations that we had, the fact that it was not a democratic party, it was not
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2015 9:02am EST
at the campaign of george walker bush. america," theel last minutes of john f. .ennedy's trip to texas then, we're backstage with the american history guys. they discussed the film, "the birth of a nation" and its significance. american history tv, all we can, every weekend, on c-span 3. >> all weekend, american history tv is featuring syracuse, the matilda gage, one of the nation's early feminist. in the became involved national women's rights convention, thepa
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2016 4:22am EST
interviews with such presidential candidates as john anderson, howard baker and george h.w. bush. again, that all starts thursday night at 8:00 eastern here on c-span 3's american history tv. join us thursday for washington jury room. our guests will include james antle. he'll discus the impact antonin scalia's death will have on the 2016 presidential race. then a look at the proposed 2017 defense budget with todd harrison for the centsencenter strategic and international studies. and later, national urban league president mark morial will talk in maryland. for the complete american history tv weekend schedule, go to cspan.org. >> american history tv on c-span3 features programs that tell the american story. and this weekend we continue our special series on the 1966 vietnam hearings, 50 years later. we'll hear special consultant to president johnson, general maxwell taylor's opening statement followed by committee member questions. >> our purpose is clear and defined. from his speech in 1965, president johnson did so in the following term. our objective is the independence of south vie
CSPAN
Mar 29, 2015 8:00am EDT
when i revealed this information, it was assembled by a fellow by the name of george bell, who was anything but a , sort of a tough guy. he was a mild-mannered very successful businessman who was working on a dollar a year basis at the white house just volunteering. colson had given him one of many assignments, which was to sort of gather the names of the people who were less than friends. it got shortened down to the enemies list. it's genesis may very well have been to people we don't want to invite to white house functions. it expanded out. at one point there was no question, it gets halderman's attention. and he thinks it is a great idea to see if we can't get an enemies project going where we can use the power of the federal government to screw these people in essence. so there is pressure, and i actually learned much more about this by going through files. oh halderman's -- of halderman's aides, they are the ones who are constantly putting pressure on me to come up with this so-called enemies project. i finally in essence wrote a project that would become -- i put into the re
CSPAN
Apr 7, 2015 8:04am EDT
fellow by the name of george bell who was anything but a -- sort of a tough guy. he was a mild-mannered, very successful businessman who was working on a dollar a year sort of basis at the white house just volunteering. and colson had given him -- one of many assignments was to gather the names of the people who were less than our friends. it kind of on the shortened down to the enemies list. it was people we wanted to make sure didn't get invited to white house functions. it expanded out. at one point there's no question it gets holliman's attention, and he thinks it's a great idea to get sort of an enemies project going where we can use the power of the federal government to screw these people, in essence. so there's pressure -- and i actually learned much more about this by going through files of holliman's aides, higby, strong and curli because they're the ones that put pressure on me to go through this list. i had put on the record during the senate hearings on how to screw our enemies was sort of the title. and i used it and was as blatant as possible to try to make it lo
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2014 1:25pm EDT
, at that had an affect on street. >> i remember asking george mitchell if he could describe, is, whatever qualities dole had that made him succeed in the leadership position. he said it was a combination of thing, almost a sixth sense, but what combination of personalities and legislatives change. what mix would work? that you canething quantity fie. is not something you can learn in a textbook. personality arrangement. you sense these things rather and understand them. you sort of guess and if you right, you win. >> a psychological gift? based on how you evaluate this person's basic views and beliefs. that is a quality of leadership it inthink dole had spades. >> that suggests that you get to colleagues?your >> you have to know them but it that.e than it is hard for me to tell you this. think about in some strange way, you have to understand. be able to anticipate what they are going to say on a particular issue. referral for to this circumstance but that is i think. >> that is not something you can teach. canhat is not something you immule crate. ambitious and sometimes critti
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2015 3:17pm EST
foreign policy. ronald reagan won the 1980 presidential campaign with george h w bush finishing a distant second. he then went on to beat jimmy carter. this is about 25 minutes. announcer: ladies and gentlemen, ronald reagan. mr. reagan: good evening. i'm here tonight to announce my attention to seek the republican nomination for president of the united states. i am sure that each of us has seen our country from a number of viewpoints depending on where we lived and what we have done. for me, as a boy growing up as a small man in iowa trying to get a start in the years of the great depression and later in california, for most of my adult life. i have seen america from the stadium press box as sportscaster, actor, officer, soldier, officeholder and as both democrat and republican. i have lived in an america where those who have had too little to eat outnumbered those who had enough. i have seen our country face financial ruin and depression. i have also seen the great strength of this nation as it pulled itself up from that ruin to become the dominant force in the world. to me, our
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2015 10:01am EST
north carolina and general greene wanted to stop that. nathanael greene was george washington's most trusted general. he was picked by general washington to come south and save the southern army. the southern army had lost two major battles at charleston and camden, south carolina. last many men. there were few soldiers left. general washington sent general greene south to stop general cornwallis. charles cornwallis was the commander of the british army in the southern department. at guilford courthouse, he commanded the army made of veteran british soldiers. this was the first battle in which cornwallis and greene met each other on the battlefield. both of the generals were
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2014 3:45am EDT
operations, george herbert walker bush i think in his memoirs mentioned in '73 when he was head of the rnc, you wanted him to do some mail order -- some mailings that he refused to do. do you remember having a clash with later president bush, in '73, just before he left? >> no, i don't -- he wasn't there very long, was he? >> well, you didn't overlap very long. he replaced dole as head of the rnc. he wasn't there long. >> when i went out of the white house, he was not head of the rnc. and i don't think i had any role after i left the white house. i'd be surprised. >> let me ask -- >> could have been. no. >> i think you overland just a month or two. >> could be. >> let me ask you about where you were on june 17th, 1972? where were you that day? >> i was at home, sitting in my swimming pool. it was saturday afternoon. and i had noticed in the paper an article about the break-in of the democratic national committee. i think that morning. i think i had seen that morning. i'm not sure right now. what i remember vividly is a telephone call from john erlichman on the white house phone saying
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2016 8:00am EST
, when you are the leader of a group like vea, nea or education international or george washington university school of ed, you're not representing any one group. and what you've got to do is bring all the groups together. now, how do you bring the groups together? you have to do that because you have to role-model what you want to happen and how do you get them to work to support certain issues. but does it happen? yes. you're too union. classic example. the colleges and universities are now dealing with unionizing t.a.s, teaching assistants. i am the only person in the room who has a union background. and so as they start talking, everybody is kind of like watching me. and i'm feeling very uncomfortable because everybody is watching me. they don't know what i'm going to say. so i finally devised the strategy is i'm not going to say anything. if you ask me, however, i'm going to be very honest with you about i think they have the right to organize. that's a part of the freedom of speech, you know. but you feel very uncomfortable. everybody is sitting there looking at you, and you
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