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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 3,579 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jul 17, 2013 6:00pm PDT
quote george mcgovern and william fulbright, both refused to take that stuff and disclose it. you disclosed it instead to the new york times. >>brown: mr. ellsberg just in our last minute please come back to the snowden case. what would you like to see happen now? >> i'll tell you exactly. i would like to see russell tice, william benny, thomas drake and curt webe testify before congress under oath testify that these programs are unconstitutional and criminal, they have asked to testify and have been ignored by congress. that is exactly the debate that edward snoanld wante -- snowdend to have. that is the conversation that should take place in congress, not being involving the pfizer court, the thousands and thousands of acceptance, it's clearly a rubber-stamp court we need to change that.
PBS
Apr 26, 2013 3:00pm PDT
music lost one of its titans. we remember george jones who died today in nashville. >> ♪ he stopped loving her today >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." philanthropy acaegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the syrians insisted today that they have not used chemical weapons. president obama issued new warnings, while saying the u.s. and the world continue to seek conclusive evidence. all the while, the civil war in syria raged on. explosions and heavy fighting rocked damascus today as government forces pressed an offensive to retake parts of the syrian capital from rebels. at the same time, the war of words over chemical weapon
PBS
Feb 16, 2015 3:00pm PST
book on robert e. lee's connections to george washington. and remembering former poet laureate philip levine. >> ifill: the islamic state's gruesome attacks in libya over the weekend raises the specter that the militant group is expanding beyond syria and iraq. we take a look at that now with frederic wehrey of the carnegie endowment for international peace, he's recently returned from a trip to libya. and, michael leiter, he was the director of the national counter-terrorism center from 2007-2011. he is now the executive vice president at leidos, a science and technology company specializing in national security issues. michael leiter, what are we to take from this particular move into libya? this seems like an expansion of the footprint we've become familiar with i.i.l. >> that's right, gwen. we've really seen this expansion beyond just libya. i.s.i.s. has over the past several months gained some foot holds in egypt to the east in the sinai peninsula as well as smaller elements in algeria afghanistan and south asia and i think what this fundamentally shows is we have a messag
PBS
Jun 24, 2013 3:00pm PDT
our coverage of opening statements in the trial of george zimmerman, charged with second- degree murder in the shooting death of florida teenager trayvon martin. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to two authors who are tracking the shift of power from washington, d.c., to the cities and states, launching a "metropolitan revolution." i think when you have coalitions of mayors, civic leaders, business leaders all coming together and showing that change can really happen on the ground, that is a powerful example for washington. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> bradley: it wasn't an outright endorsement of affirm
PBS
Nov 5, 2015 3:00pm PST
. >> sreenivasan: plus, george h. w. bush reveals what he really thinks about dick cheney and donald rumsfield in john meacham's new biography on the former president. >> george h. w. bush said that he believed that cheney was responsible for a good bit of that hawkish image-- that he wished cheney had not had as much influence. dick cheney should have had his "own state department." all that and more on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. carnegie corporation of new york. a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> sreenivasan: the crash of a russian jetliner in egypt morphed into an international dispu
PBS
Apr 25, 2013 6:00pm PDT
gathered in dallas today for the dedication of the george w. bush presidential library. we explore how these libraries shape our understanding of history. >> brown: and we close with a behind-the-scenes look at the lobbying fight over gun control. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: new york city was reportedly going to be the next target for the suspected boston marathon bombers. mayor michael bloomberg disclosed that information during a press conference today. bloomberg said f.b.i. officials learned from dzhokar tsarnaev that he and his brother, deci
PBS
Nov 9, 2010 6:00pm EST
, some perspective on george w. bush's and other presidential memoirs from historians julian zelizer and michael beschloss. >> ifill: from flood-ravaged pakistan, special correspondent saima mohsin follows a team from doctors without borders still working to save lives. >> we have mostly skin diseases. we have upper respiratory tract infek shuns and we have about 6 to 8 malaria cases. >> lehrer: we look at the power shift in state capitals after the midterm elections with reporters from minnesota, ohio, wisconsin and maine. >> ifill: plus, ray suarez has the story of neighbors and classmates who remember barack obama's childhood days in indonesia. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: president obama spent this day in the capital of indonesia, looking to build up ties with that heavi
PBS
Dec 26, 2016 6:00pm PST
disgusting. >> brangham: and, remembering george michael, the '80s pop star and gay rights advocate who died at age 53. all that and more on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. ♪ love me tender >> we can like many, but we can love only a precious few, because it is for those precious few that you have to be willing to do so very much. you don't have to do it alone. lincoln financial helps you provide for and protect your financial future because this is what you do for people you love. lincoln financial-- you're in charge. >> supported by the rockefeller foundation. promoting the well-being of humanity around the world by building resilience and inclusive economies. more at rockefellerfoundation.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brangham: more fallout tonight from that u.n.
CBS
Feb 20, 2013 6:00pm EST
killed. as scott broom explains, that makes six student murders in prince georges county just this school year alone. >> police chief, mark mcgo announced the arrest of five suspects who are apparently cruising around in a white van looking for a victim to rob. they chose 15-year-old suitland high school freshman, c.j. walker, who was killed monday for a pair of timberland shoes. here's chief mark mcgal. >> most of these detectives have been up for the last 48 hours. most of this department has been up for 48 hours. it's been a trying time for all of us. >> this announcement this afternoon has come as yet another suitland student, 18- year-old aaron kidd, was gunned down yesterday in forestville, just over 24 hours after walker's murder. a cam uponon, 18-year-old andre, was also shot to death. >> the next generation, for no reason. >> at suitland high school, near disbelief that a second student has been murdered in a little more than 24 hours. >> everyone wants to be a gangster. it's not about that. you need to be focused on your school work. >> outraged by the teen murders, reach
PBS
Jul 11, 2013 5:30pm PDT
against george zimmerman today, charged in the shooting death of trayvon martin, an unarmed teenager. good evening, i'm ray suarez. >> sreenivasan: and i'm hari sreenivasan. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the trial, as the judge tells the jury it may consider a verdict of manslaughter instead of second degree murder. >> suarez: then, we continue our series of conversations about immigration reform. tonight, the view of arizona democrat raul grijalva on border security and more. >> sreenivasan: from egypt, lindsey hilsum has the harrowing story of women sexually assaulted in cairo's tahrir square. >> these attacks are planned and sometimes women think that the men coming for them are trying to save them from being assaulted but in fact they take them away and attack them again. >> suarez: we update the investigation into the fiery explosion of an oil tanker train that derailed in the canadian province of quebec with 50 people now confirmed or presumed dead. >> sreenivasan: and paul solman goes out of this world and into a virtual one to experience the holy grail of vi
PBS
May 18, 2012 6:00pm PDT
when neighborhood watch volunteer george zimmerman shot an unarmed teen. the documents are accessible online. last month, a special prosecutor appointed by florida's governor charged zimmerman with second- degree murder. his trial isn't expected to begin until next year. here to help sort through the documents and their potential impact on the defense and the prosecution is sari horwitz, justice reporter for "the washington post." sari, thank you for joining us. so big picture here this is really a treasure trove of documents and tapes, how much does it flesh out what happened that night? >> well, it's interesting, margaret. there are a lot of new details in this volume i'm news amount of-- volumeuous amount of materials we love these open record laws in florida which is how we were able to get this by filing a fro dom of information act and we were able to get these 200 documents and video and audio and crime scene reports. and there are a lot of new details. for example, we saw its ballistics report that shows us exactly where trayvon martin was shot, the left part of his
WETA
Nov 2, 2012 7:00pm EDT
mention when george bush followed the policies very similar to what mitt romney is proposing, they actually added more than 1 million fewer private sector jobs if george bush's first term than president obama has under his first term so i really do not think that the basic economics or the history says that just going back to deregulation and high rate-- high income rate cuts is the thing that leads to growth. >> brown: and do you think professor -- >> two decades of strong growth, we saw two decade, 80ous and 90s with extraordinary growth. economists called it the great moderation long boom and that's because the stable policies are put in place. tax reform, if you like, of 1986. a bipartisan reform president reagan worked with democrats in congress, that is the kind of thing we nude to get the strong economy back. >> back to you professor goolsbee, just this question about -- >> i agree with that i think tax reform and a grand bargain type budget deal if done in a balanced way would be a good achievement for both parties and whoever is elected on tuesday i hope they will do that
PBS
May 31, 2012 5:30pm PDT
states with just five members, all former presidents. >> george bush said it to barack obama, at that amazing moment when all the living presidents were together at the white house. "we want you to succeed. this office transcends the individual." >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea. adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time. >> good idea. >> it's the at&t network. providing new ways to work together, so business works better. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from v
PBS
Apr 12, 2012 5:30pm PDT
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: george zimmerman appeared in court today after being charged yesterday with second degree murder for the killing of trayvon martin. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get analysis on the legal challenges ahead for both the prosecution and the defense. >> brown: then, margaret warner updates the crisis in syria as the government's guns appear to quiet. >> woodruff: from the pacific northwest, tom bearden reports on efforts to ready the region for the next b earthquak >> on the average, they occur about every 300 years. the last one was 312 years ago. >> do the math. >> exactly. >> brown: we examine the world of e-books after the justice department charged publishers and apple with price-fixing. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks to political editor christina bellantoni about six "must- watch" senate races this election year. >> brown: and we close with a profile of award-winning poet naomi shihab nye, whose family stories shape her work. >> the minute i could writ
PBS
Apr 8, 2013 6:00pm PDT
down. in 1990 when iraq invaded kuwait thatcher backed a tough response urging president george h.w. bush not to go wobbly on confronting saddam hussein. but back home, thatcher's own grip on power was wobbling after 11 years in office her public support flagged amid inflation and renewed recession. and the conservative party voted her out. >> after 11-and-a-half wonderful years. >> warner: even after her fall from power thatcher often drew large crowds at campaign events. nearly upstaging her successor john major at a conservative party conference in 1992. that same year she was named a baroness. for many of the '90s she made lucrative lecture tours. margaret thatcher's withdrawal from public eye began in 2002 when a series of small strokes prompted her to cut back on public appearances and speaking events. it was the first of many health problems, including a struggle with dementia that shadowed her later years. for a time thatcher did continue to appear at select private events and state functions. and in the summer of 2004 she returned to the united states for the funeral of for
PBS
Jul 16, 2013 3:00pm PDT
, culture and identity in the wake of the "not guilty" verdict for george zimmerman, charged in the killing of teenager trayvon martin. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the reputed leader of one of mexico's most vicious drug gangs was behind bars today. but it was unclear just how much that will do to ease drug violence that has raged for years. >> a mexican newspaper headline this morning said it all: intelligence action decapitates the zetas. a macabre method. the man named z 4 was captured monday without a shot being fired, in the violence wrakd city of nuevo laredo. >> de
PBS
Aug 5, 2010 6:00pm PDT
over the high court. >> woodruff: then professor robert george and attorney jennifer pi sk *rbgser talk abot what's next for same-sex marriage. >> suarez: tom bearden reports from the gulf coast where worries remain even after b.p.'s well was capped. >> they're still cleaning up the beaches but the big question in many people's minds is what happens when the oil stops coming ashore? >> woodruff: from flood-ravaged pakistan, jonathan miller of independent television news has the latest on the scram to believe help those in need of food and helter. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this
WETA
Aug 23, 2013 7:00pm EDT
behind it. >>> then, shotgun george zimmerman. >> is he really shopping for a $1200 high-tech shotgun? >>> and the embattled mayor of san diego. now even his ex fiance is denouncing him. >> why? why did you do this? >> and what this business woman says happened when she stood next to the mayor in this photo. >> he inappropriately placed his hand on my buttocks. >>> then, when cops wear cameras. every chase, and every arrest caught on tape. but es it help or hurt law enforcement? >>> and -- >> i have a dream! >> 50 years later, return to washington. >>> plus, first photo. kim and kanye's baby. northwest. >> how cute is that gorgeous baby! >>> now, "inside edition" in high definition with deborah norville. >> diane: hello and thanks for joining us. i'm diane mcinerney in for deborah norville. what would you think if money started raining down on you? we mean lots of money, thousands of dollars literally floating out of the sky. who was behind it? les trent has the exclusive story. >> talk about dollars from heaven, that's real money. thousands of bucks just raining down out of t
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 3:00pm PST
in the center is george h.w. bush. and next to him he is shaking hands with george wallace, the famous segregational governor 6 alaska. i couldn't-- i turned it upside down trying to figure out where could this have happened where these three men were together. >> it is sort of like kennedy and johnson. a lot of people said is this photo shopped it couldn't be possible that this picture exist. a lot of the people who twoted about this said this must have been photo shopped too. because first george wallace is a figure out of the '60s and clinton bush '80s and 90s. plus 1 of the worse segregationists in american history so why would clinton and bush be at a picnic with him eating lobster. the other thing is they didn't really sort of see it in terms of bush an clinton being at a picnic years before they ran against each other why would they have been so friendly. plus bill clinton looks as if he is about 12 years old. >> ifill: plus bill clinton later went on to defeat george h.w. bush and their famous relationship came around, now they refer to each other as father and son. >> n
PBS
Dec 15, 2014 3:00pm PST
president george washington's life.ç >> woodruff: we return now to the deadly hostage standoff in australia. stuart cohen is a freelance journalist based in sydney. he's been reporting the story for npr. i spoke to him a short time ago via skype. >> woodruff: stuart cohen, thank you for talking with us. first of all, what more can you tell us about this incident and about the ending of t the way police stormed it this cafe at the very end? >> well, it was very much a real surpriseç ending to to this whole siege. it all happened in the middle of the night when it was looking like things had quieted down for the night. police were just sort of standing around holding their ground and kind of at the 1:00 in the morning, police released the name of the hostage-takerç, haron monis, and then that was a bit of a sur pris there because they were keeping that name under tight wrapped. and then just before 2:00 in the morning, there was a scattering of hostages that suddenly made a break for-- came running out of the building. and then within 30 seconds to a minute, that's when the chao
PBS
Sep 9, 2015 3:00pm PDT
was not prepared for this wave. we can see no end of this. >> brangham: george's friend of 20 years, abdul latif-zanda, is inigally from libya, but is now a hungarian citizen. he's says he's living proof that practicing muslims can integrate into european society. >> ( translated ): i've lived here for 30 years now. i've never had a problem with anyone, neither for political nor religious reasons. islam teaches that you should lead a decent life, and you should treat others fairly. there are many others, however, who use religion, money, or whatever else, to convince poor muslims to do stupid things. in europe, you can lead a normal life. and if you are normal, you will be accepted. >> brangham: many of the refugees and migrants we met this week in hungary agreed. said halabi, who fled syria with his wife and three children, said that their arrival shouldn't be the cause for alarm. >> we hope that the european people understand that diversity is good for them. we are looking for a new life for our children, where they can access schools, where i can get a job, support my family. >>
PBS
Oct 22, 2012 6:00pm EDT
statesman and a proud liberal, presidential candidate and senator george mcgovern. >> your colleague in the press, some of them referring to me as the conscience of the party. others talking about me as the peacemaker in the race. and still others as the elder statesman. that's quite a triple crown. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: with united health care i got help that changed my life. information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank
PBS
Jun 13, 2017 6:00pm PDT
you both. and we turn now to our panel of former justice department officials. george terwilliger served as former deputy attorney general and acting attorney general under president george h.w. bush. walter dillinger served in the clinton administration as assistant attorney general and acting solicitor general. and, carrie cordero. she served in the justice department under presidents george w. bush and obama, where she worked on matters of national security. now, first, one issue today was former f.b.i. director comey's testimony about a february meeting in the oval office, when everyone else left, and the president asked him to stay. democratic senator mark warner today pressed attorney general sessions on that. >> mr. comey's testimony last week was that he felt uncomfortable when the president asked everyone else to leave the room. he left the impression that you lingered, perhaps a sense that you felt uncomfortable about it as well. >> well, i would just say it this way. we were there, i was standing there, and without revealing any conversation that took place, what i do r
WETA
Feb 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
the son of san francisco mayor george moscone remembers his father's legacy, after he was gunned down in 1978. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: it was a big night and day after for rick santorum. he swept the latest round of republican presidential nominating tests and, in so doing, altered the complexion of the race. >> conservatism is alive and well in missouri and minnesota. >> ifill: the former pennsylvania senator scored decisive victories in both those states, plus a five-point win in colorado out gunning frontrunner mitt romney in all three of tu
PBS
Jul 15, 2013 6:00pm PDT
saying the federal government would file civil rights charges against george zimmerman. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: then, jeffrey brown examines plans from u.s. retailers to improve factory safety in bangladesh, on the heels of a disaster that killed more than a thousand people in april dead. >> ifill: ray suarez has the story of singers and songwriters in austin, texas, the live music capital of the world, struggling to find affordable health insurance. >> i have financially been completely devastated to walk with with million medical execs expenses. i couldn't pay for that. >> we look for doping scandal ploong threetle. american >> ifill: and margaret warner gets an author's up close and dangerous view of corruption and drug wars in his native mexico. >> it's not that i have a death wish. i'm staying because i really believe in the mexicans themselves and i believe that the story has to be told. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. su
PBS
Apr 11, 2012 5:30pm PDT
against george zimmerman, accused in the killing of trayvon martin in florida. >> brown: from elkhart, indiana, correspondent elizabeth brackett reports on the comeback of the recreational vehicle industry now offering jobs in a tough economy. >> i need immediate quick recovery and it's right here. don't turn your back on the r.v. industry. they know what they are doing. they have been through this cycle many, many times. watch and see what happens. >> woodruff: we assess north korea's capabilities and amtionas it reads a long- range rocket launch. >> brown: margaret warner has the story of a high level political scandal in china, involving corruption, murder and the ouster of a communist party official. >> woodruff: and from the ivory coast, special correspondent jeff sapienza explains how new water-taps are bringing together communities once divided along ethnic lines. >> water committees in the villages are a step forward. they just need support now, to be backeby the government to go ahead and ge peace a chance. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding
PBS
Aug 29, 2016 6:00pm PDT
is joining counter-terrorism efforts from a perch at george washington university. >> this analysis will come from the inside, first hand from someone who has lived it and haa played a prominent role in that scene. >> sreenivasan: all that and more on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. lincoln financial is committed to helping you take charge of your future. f >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, helping people build immeasurably better lives.loda >> supported by the rockefeller foundation. promoting the well-being off humanity around the world by rockefellerfoundation.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions: and individuals. >> this program was made t possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. l thank you. >> sreenivasan: the united states warned turkey today over its military drive against kurdish forces in northernfo syria. turkish tanks and planes are backing syrian rebels in attacks
PBS
Jul 4, 2013 6:00pm PDT
parade down constitution avenue. at george washington's mount vernon on the banks of potomac river, crowds enjoyed early daytime fireworks, ahead of tonight's show on the national mall. in his weekly address, president obama urged americans to live up to the words of the declaration of independence and thanked u.s. troops around the world. >> you have defended us at home and abroad. and you have fought on our nation's behalf to make the world a better, safer place. >> sreenivasan: some of the 68,000 u.s. troops stationed in kabul, afghanistan celebrated the holiday with song. and at bagram airbase, outside of kabul, more than 30 troops took the oath of citizenship. some military bases in the u.s. were forced to cancel or scale back celebrations because of the automatic budget cuts known as the sequester. one place the celebrations didn't stop was boston, where security was tight as large crowds gathered for the first time since the boston marathon bombings in april. crews at the scene of a deadly wildfire in arizona made more progress today containing the blaze. the yarnell fire--
PBS
Mar 18, 2013 3:00pm PDT
doctor or my wife tells me i ought to stop, i will stop. >> solman: 75-year-old former george washington university president stephen trachtenberg still teaches public service there. >> you guys are all working well togetherm and that's wonderful. >> solman: at george mason university, 71-year-old writing professor don gallehr is still teaching too. >> if the kids are happy and learning and i'm happy and learning, i'm here. >> solman: and how long does 69- year-old boston university particle physicist larry sulak plan to keep blowing up protons? >> i have no idea. shelly is a good model. >> solman: that would be his 80- year-old colleague, nobel- winning physicist sheldon glashow. and when do you intend to retire? >> that i don't know. >> solman: america's work force is graying, and academia along with it. professors over 65 have more than doubled since 2000. some 40% of all workers say they'll work past 65. in academia, however, a full 75% plan to work past a normal retirement age. historian claire potter is at the new school in new york. >> most of us believe that we should
PBS
Jul 28, 2015 6:00pm PDT
takes: george hirthler has been a communications strategist for ten olympic campaigns, including atlanta's successful 1996 bid and vancouver in 2010. and andrew zimbalist, a professor of economics at smith college and author of the book "circus maximus: the economic gamble behind hosting the olympics and the world cup." and we welcome both of you. so let's talk about boston first. andrew zimbalist, to you, what would you add to what was just reported about what went wrong in boston? why were they chosen and then what fell apart? >> i think from the very beginning when boston was selected back in january -- and by the way, it was said boston was selected because it was the most walkable of the four competitors. ever since the announcement was made that boston was selected the boston '24 committee came out with a lot of incomplete, deceiving and misdirection-oriented information and, over the last several months every couple of weeks, some new piece of information has been released that i think has lessened the trust of bostians and sit sens of massachusetts, who, after all, just a
WETA
Sep 26, 2012 7:00pm EDT
disincentives for the rescue. jacob kirkegaard at george mason university, thank you very much. >> my pleasure. >> woodruff: still to come on the "newshour": the battle for young voters in ohio; the push to get ballots cast early; the syrian refugee crisis in turkey; the teacher of the year and crooner andy williams. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the unrest in europe unsettled wall street as well, and stocks struggled in vain to prevent another day of losses. the dow jones industrial average was down 44 points to close at 13,413. the nasdaq fell 24 points to close at 3,093. two massive explosions rocked syria's army command center in damascus today, killing four guards. it was a strike at a key symbol of the regime and demonstrated again, the reach of the rebels. we have a report from bill neely of "independent television news" in damascus. >> reporter: syrian troops show their loyalty and their relief. some don't bother to chant. they've just survived a direct attack on army headquarters. two bombs striking the very heart of the regime's power.
WETA
Nov 22, 2011 7:00pm EST
of the republican presidential field are richard norton smith, scholar in residence at george washington university, and michael gerson, a columnist for the "washington post," who also served as chief speechwriter to former president george w. bush. gentlemen, good to have you both back with us. michael gerson, let me start with you. we know they are all critical of president obama, but is there an underlying philosophy for all of these republican candidates? >> well, it's interesting. on economic issues they generally agree on tax policy, on size of government issues, but there's a division, a philosophic division among republicans on that stage tonight for some like ron paul and jon huntsman they want to be more inward looking focused on the american economy, less engaged in the world. then there are people like gingrich and romney who are more hawkish internationalists. self-consciously adopt the reagan mantle so i guess the thing that won't be very interesting is that the two front-runners share a lot of ground as we saw on iran and other things but there are serious philo
PBS
Dec 27, 2016 6:00pm PST
george w. bush. and, jason greenblatt will be special representative for international negotiations. he's now the chief legal officer for the trump organization. in the day's other news: shinzo abe became the first japanese prime minister to visit the u.s.s. "arizona" memorial at pearl harbor. more than 2,300 americans died there in the japanese attack on december 7, 1941, hurling the united states into world war ii. today, abe joined president obama in a wreath-laying ceremony before making statements on the occasion. >> ( translated ): i offer my sincere and everlasting condolences to the souls of those who lost their lives here, as well as to the spirits of all the brave men and women whose lives were taken by a war that commenced in this very place, and also to the souls of the countless innocent people who became victims of the war. >> sreenivasan: the abe visit came six months after president obama visited hiroshima, where the u.s. dropped the first atomic bomb. an outbreak of bird flu in south korea is now that country's worst in a decade. the government said today that the n
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