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PBS
Nov 1, 2014 5:30pm PDT
. >> reporter: it's exactly what's happening to democrats in state after state. as with george w. bush back in 2006, the president's unpopularity-- he's barely above 40% nationally and well below that in key senate battlegrounds-- is proving to be a very heavy burden. in alaska, senator mark begich, son of a congressman, is being hammered by dan sullivan for his votes supporting president obama. >> he pretted much voted with the president on just about everything. >> reporter: in colorado, senator mark udall, son of a congressman, nephew of an interior secretary, is trailing cory gardner in the polls. >> the brand of politics divides us. it keeps us from fixing obama's failures. >> reporter: in arkansas, senator mark pryor, whose father was governor and senator, is struggling against congressman tom cotton. >> a vote for mark pryor is a vote for more of barack obama's policies. >> what a way to wake nupt morning! >> reporter: what links these campaigns is the same question: can the family ties of these incumbents help define them as local champions, rather than as allies of an unpopula
PBS
Mar 12, 2017 5:30pm PDT
christopher booker has more. >> reporter: the actions taken by the george w. bush administration in the aftermath of the september 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, were, according to author mary graham, a recalibration of the role of secrecy in open government. a president who championed limited government approved the secret detention of foreign terrorist suspects and the eavesdropping on phone calls of american citizens. >> when his detention policies and interrogation policies and surveillance policies began to be revealed, this was then a few years later, i thought there must be some ground rules. there must be a law that tells us what a president can do behind closed doors in an emergency. but it turned out there really were no laws. one thing about our system of governance that makes secrecy so interesting is that there's really no way that to stop a president from doing something illegal, unethical, or just plain foolish behind closed doors. >> reporter: in her new book," presidents' secrets: the use and abuse of hidden power," graham finds modern presidential secrecy is paramount in
PBS
Apr 27, 2014 5:30pm PDT
putin told former president george w. bush in 2008. you have to understand, george, ukraine is not even a country. >> that also fits closely with putin's recent remarks in a call-in program. >> translator: i would like to remind you that what was called novorecea, donetsk, and odessa were not part of ukraine back then. these territories were given to u krin crane by the soviet government. new russia toic describe an area that's an arc larging change and that's just one small point in historical background that he's giving up, but it seems to be a justification to the russian people about taking further aggressive actions. when you start talking about novorecea on top of everything else and it is unclear what putin's next plan is going to be, including the big of the question of all whether those tens of thousands of russian troops masked on the ukrainian board will invade or not, like they have throughout history, ukrainians will have to wait and see what a more powerful nation will do. >> it was always a pawn between great powers throughout its history and that, i think, is something t
PBS
Dec 20, 2015 5:30pm PST
president george w. bush's re-election campaign did in 2004, when it looked for supporters in heavily democratic districts in the key swing state of ohio. in earlier times, this would have been futile; but now the bush campaign could find supporters scattered throughout hostile territory, kind of like finding raisins in a bowl of raisin bran. >> and so, the bush campaign and the republican national committee made a concerted effort between george bush's election in 2000 and his re- election in 2004 to build the infrastructure to make this work in politics. and one of their big things was saying, "yeah, let's, let's figure we know that even in the...the least republican county in america, 15%, 20% of the votes are...are ours. and i, if we know how to go find those people, we can be targeted and lower the risk of...of inadvertently mobilizing the wrong people." >> reporter: bush won ohio by 2%; a loss there would have cost him the presidency. it was a lesson the underdog barack obama campaign took to heart in the 2008 democratic contest. >> yeah, necessity is the mother of invention. >>
PBS
Nov 17, 2013 5:30pm PST
visitors. as once were the ancestors of us founding father and first president, george washington. george washington's family, before they left england, were connected with mine. the washingtons were frequent visitors here. socially, they were great friends of my family. narrator: for the first time, this most elegant of england's homes throws open its doors... allowing us to share the upstairs and the downstairs. secrets of althorp, the spencers.
PBS
Nov 6, 2016 5:30pm PST
and north carolina. donald trump campaigns in five states today -- starting in iowa, which george w-bush won in 2004, but mitt romney and john mccain lost. later, trump was scheduled to visit minnesota, michigan, pennsylvania, and virginia. he told supporters earlier today, he's "the outsider." >> if she ever got into the oval office, hillary and her special interests would rob our country blind-- that's what she's been doing. >> stewart: we're going to check in on both campaigns, and we begin in cleveland, ohio, where" the newshour's" john yang is following the clinton campaign. >> that's right, as they flew here from philadelphia, the communications director for the campaign spoke to reporters. she said we have seen director comey's latest letter to the we're glad to see that as we-- glad to see that he has found, as we were confident that he would, that he has confirmed that the conclusions that he reached in july, and we're glad that this mat certificate resolved. we're told that the fbi went through the emails that they found on anthony weiner's lap dop found that most of the e
PBS
Feb 5, 2017 5:30pm PST
george w. bush appointee, applies nationwide and has stopped customs and border control agents from refusing admittance to immigrants and refugees with proper visas. it has also cleared the way for visa holders to board flights from overseas bound for the u.s. iraqi fuad sharef, who worked for a u-s contractor in iraq, took off from istanbul, turkey, today, with his wife and three children, en route to nashville. >> yeah, we are very excited. we are very happy. we are...finally, we have been cleared. we are allowed to enter the united states. >> sreenivasan: with the ban blocked, cleared citizens from the affected countries have begun arriving at u.s. airports. hundreds of protestors of the immigration ban gathered this weekend outside president trump's home in palm beach, florida, where he and the first lady are spending the weekend. in interviews on four networks today, vice president mike pence said the administration disagrees with the ninth circuit appeals court and will pursue appeals in other venues. >> president trump's made it clear that our administration is going to put t
PBS
Apr 29, 2017 5:30pm PDT
. ronald regan's tax cuts were well on the way through the legislative process. and george w. bush's tax cuts and education plans were as well. i think they would have been better on historical grounds to say, look, we're not playing this media game. it's a ridiculous measurement. come back to us in a few months and see where we are." >> given your skepticism of what the first 100 days tell us what, have we learned? >> i think there are two things. in economic terms the idea that trump was going to be a populist president has to be cleared off the board. he said during the campaign, there are going to be higher taxes on the rich. it will hurt me. every proposal in that one-page set of bullet points, points the other way. what remains of populist approach is his attitude towards trade, those wicked foreign countries eating our lunch, and on immigration. but on economic grounds, this is a classic conservative republican presidency. the other thing i think we can see is the idea that trump was going to radically change how he decides is also, i think, a nonstarter. this is a unique presiden
PBS
Sep 10, 2016 5:30pm PDT
conspiracy to carry out attacks on new york city landmarks like the george washington bridge and the united nations headquarters. >> i think the most memorable, historically significant thing about it for me is the degree to which it indicated what was coming. >> reporter: michael mukasey was the judge who presided over the trial and used his discretion to sentence abdel rahman to life behind bars. >> it was not a great ordeal or a tough call. >> reporter: but mukasey worries the public disclosure of evidence at that trial aided america's enemies. >> the government was required to serve a list of unindicted co-conspirators that it knew about, and they did. one name on that list was osama bin laden. very few people had ever heard of him at the time. we later found out that within ten days or two weeks after that letter was served on the defendants, it had found its way to khartoum, where bin laden was then living, and so that he was aware not only that the government knew about him but also who else the government knew about. >> reporter: after bin laden soldiers truck-bombed u.s.
PBS
Aug 26, 2017 5:30pm PDT
administration of george w. bush. the pardon was unusual in that arpaio had yet to be sentenced and had not expressed any remorse for his crime, nor was any pardon application submitted for justice department review. this is the first pardon by president trump, and it comes much earlier into his time in office than the first pardons by previous presidents barack obama or george w. bush. some arizona republicans, including a former governor, applauded the pardon, while others like senator john mccain said the pardon "undermines" mr. trump's claim "for the respect of the rule of law." democratic senate leader chuck schumer denounced the pardon, saying arpaio "systematically" targeted latinos, which schumer called the "definition of racism and bigotry." another controversial, senior white house staffer has been fired. sebastian gorka worked on national security issues, but many critics had questioned his expertise and credentials. he appeared frequently on tv to defend mr. trump's policies, particularly on immigration. gorka had been allied with top trump strategist steve bannon, who was fired
PBS
Aug 16, 2014 5:30pm EDT
team of college students found thousands of artifacts from the mid-1700s near lake george in upstate new york. the area was the scene of military activity for nearly a quarter century, starting with the french and indian war in 1755, through the american revolution. among the objects found were uniform buttons and musket balls. >> sreenivasan: the first governor in texas to be indicted in a hundred years, those were the headlines late last night about governor rick perry and what a grand jury says was his abuse of power. to explain what's behind it all is tony plohetski from the austin american statesman. let's talk about the incident in question. what is it that rick perry allegedly did that was an abuse of his power? >> reporter: well, it all started more than a year ago in april, 2013. the sitting district attorney here in travis county, rosemary lindberg, was arrested and charged with drunk driving. two months after that, while the legislature was finishing their session, governor rick perry was about to sign the state's budget and during that time, he is accused of sending word
PBS
Mar 14, 2015 5:30pm PDT
ollivant, former national security council director for iraq during the presidencies of george w. bush and barack obama. he is a senior national security fellow at the new america foundation and a partner at mantid international. so first, why the pause in fighting? >> well we're not sure. that's a single-source report. we're not confident that is what's happening. although knowing what's going on in the fog of battle is often difficult. what we do know is the battle has been going fairly successfully. it's possible they've taken a pause to call for more reinforcements. but in general they've opinion pushing through the city of tikrit, and we do expect them to control it in days to, you know a week or 10 days at the outside. >> sreenivasan: you know, i referenced a comment from army general martin dempsey, he said this week any fight against isis is a positive thing but he worried: >> that's a legitimate concern. the good news today is that the initial indications are good. we have a front page story in the "wall street journal" today about the sunni residents around tikrit being overj
PBS
May 30, 2015 5:30pm PDT
. it all started when i saw the 1943 film "girl crazy", with music by george and ira gershwin. i loved the songs in that film so much i wrote a fan letter to ira gershwin. he answered me and we became "pen pals" for several years. through ira i met johnny green the longtime head of the mgm music department winner of 5 academy awards and the compo
PBS
Jun 22, 2014 5:30pm PDT
. her conviction was later overturned on appeal. >>> earlier george zimmerman relied on stand your ground to be acquitted in the death of a teenager trayvon martin. in moscow today russian president vladimir putin expressed support from cease-fi cease-fire ukrainian sources. they conferred about the lingering crisis. for more about the situation in ukraine we're joined by andrew. let me ask you, what is life like now that we have you here. does it seem like a city at the heart of a crisis? >> you know, allison, this has been happening for a little while now. i think there are towns more at the epicenter of the fighting and in places like slovyansk, rebel stronghold not far from here. life has changed a lot. there's serious problems with water, lack of electricity. you know, more than 200, more than 300 people have been injured in the fighting so far. donetsk feels very empty, quiet. a lot of closed shops and a lot of people who found a way to get out of the city for the summer. >> it's interesting that you should mention that because i was surfing moscow times website and there's a
PBS
Jan 10, 2015 5:30pm EST
seek an indictment. george zimmerman, who, in 2013, was acquitted in the shooting death of trayvon martin, is in trouble with the law again. he was arrested last night for aggravated assault in connection with a domestic violence incident. during a court appearance this morning bond was set at $5,000. zimmerman was also ordered to stay away from the woman involved. he reportedly was involved in two similar incidents in 2013, but no formal charges were ever brought. a judge in santa barbara, california, has admitted into evidence internal files from the boy scouts of america documenting sexual abuse allegations within the organization, which means they could become public. the judge is presiding over a lawsuit brought by a man who alleges he was sexually molested when he was a 13-year-old scout. internal boy scout files previously made public showed that the organization failed to report a third of all abuse allegations to police. the proposed takeover of family dollar stores by rival discounters is running into opposition. attorneys general from 20 states have joined a federal anti
PBS
Oct 20, 2013 5:30pm PDT
weekend. >> pbs news hour weekend is made possible by louis b. and louise hirchfeld coman, george b. hail, the wallach family, the cheryl and phillip millstein family, rosalind p. walter, pacific islanders and communications. corporate funding is provided by mutual of america designing customize joint and individual insurance products. that's why we're your retirement company. brought to you by the corporation of public broadcasting and for contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. from the tish wpb studios in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> good evening. thanks for joining us. we begin tonight with a closer look at the tentative deal reached yesterday between the justice department and jp morgan chase. the agreement would require chase, the nation's largest bank, to pay a record $13 billion penalty. it stems from allegations that chase knowingly sold mortgages to people. it was between direct talks of jamie diamond, the chief executive officer. we're joined with the reporter from bloomberg news, has been following the chase story for some time. beside the $
PBS
Jun 14, 2015 5:30pm PDT
different than george; jeb is who he is. my life story's different. >> sreenivasan: from california tonight, a report that accidental gunshots by los angeles county sheriff's deputies have more than doubled in the last two years. this according to the los angeles times. the number of incidents reportedly jumped from twelve in 2012 to thirty last year. the increase coincides with the department's switch to a new kind of handgun that does not have a safety lever and that requires less pressure to pull the trigger. also in los angeles this weekend, mayor eric garcetti has signed into law a bill, which, during the next five years, will increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour. the current minimum wage there is $9 an hour. an estimated 600,000 people in los angeles earn the minimum wage, the vast majority of them minorities. the increases will be phased in businesses with fewer than 25 employees will roll out the increases more slowly. and good news from space today. the first robot ever to land on a comet has reawakened after falling silent for almost seven months. the european space ag
PBS
Oct 13, 2013 5:30pm PDT
president theodore roosevelt. george wallace won 13.5% and won four states. ross perot won nearly 19% of the vote in 1992. is there a serious third-party candidate who could emerge by 202 2016? >> i think every so many years there is that candidate. i think in order to -- it's going to have to be more than that in order to get a third party, a major third party across the country. you have to have senate candidates, candidates for the u.s. house in place and ready to, you know, win seats. that's where the electoral power is going to come. so right now, in most cases, you see third-party candidates that can get a significant chunk of the vote, maybe in a presidential race, maybe winning a governorship or two. but it's going to take more than that, more organization, i think more money to -- in order to have a major, widespread change across the country. >> all right. nathan gonzalez, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ♪ >>> this is pbs "news hour weekend" sunday. >>> finally, a development in the fight against malaria. the world health organization says the disease kills an
PBS
Mar 7, 2015 5:30pm PST
. president george w. bush is going to represent republicans but you don't have republican leaders in congress going down. although interestingly, senate majority leader mitch mcconnell himself was a supporter of civil rights at the time of selma as was some of the republican politicians that he worked for in kentucky at that time. but we've seen a pretty dramatic shift in the party's stance on civil right-related issues. republicans have become almost entirely a conservative party. democrats left of center and that is the-- those are the contours that they're going to resume when they get back to washington. >> sreenivasan: how have some of the receipt haven't the 2013 supreme court decision, and the voting rights amendment act that are trying to work their way through congress, how are they impacting this conversation? >> well you've seen southern states try to get out from under the aegis of the voting rights act, and they've had some success in the courts at doing that, reducing the burden of proof on southern states to justify their electoral arrangements and processes. while tha
PBS
May 2, 2015 5:30pm PDT
, prince george. >> sreenivasan: something different tonight. we're going to use most of our remaining time to offer you a detailed look at life in one of the poorest sections of baltimore. our focus is sandtown/winchester-- the impoverished neighborhood where there was rioting this past week following the death of freddie gray. he grew up and was arrested there. so let's begin “sandtown by the numbers.” it's a community of 14,000 thousand people on baltimore's west side that like so many others was hard hit by the loss of manufacturing jobs after big companies like bethlehem steel left town. the latest available numbers put the unemployment rate in sandtown at more than 21%-- about four times the national average. almost a third of the residents there live in poverty-- that's twice the national average. we begin by looking at health care in sandtown. for more about this we are joined by dr. robert blum, the director of johns hopkins urban health institute. the institute is less than 5 miles from sandtown. so, there's this phrase about this genetic lottery. we don't choose who we'r
PBS
Jan 3, 2015 5:30pm EST
child left behind, the education law passed under president george w. bush. stephanie simon is the senior education reporter for politico and joins us now from boston. so, this was approved in a bipartisan manner. what's wrong now, 10 12, years later? >> it was a very bipartisan bill as you said, had huge support. to give you some idea, ted kennedy and john boehner was coauthors of it, so that gives you a hint of how widely it was approved. and now 12 years later, people are looking back and thinking that there are huge problems with this bill. it mandated annual testing in reading and math for students in grades 3-8 and again in high school, and there's a huge backlash now against so much standardized testing. and it also set out strict sanctions for schools that did not continually improve their students' performance on those tests and that also has created a huge backlash and kind of an idea there's too much federal interference in local schools expwhrar one of the critiques in between periods was schools were trying to teach to the test just to get those numbers up, right? >> e
PBS
Feb 4, 2017 5:30pm PST
. district judge james robart, an appointee of president george w. bush, granted washington state's request for a temporary restraining order on the trump administration's 90-day ban on citizens of the seven countries traveling to the u.s. >> the state has met its burden of demonstrating that it faces immediate and irreparable injury as a result of the signing and implementation of the executive order. >> reporter: outside court, washington state's attorney general said the ruling proved the u.s. is a nation of laws. >> i said from the beginning it is not the loudest voice that prevails in a courtroom, it's the constitution. and that's what we heard from judge robart today. >> reporter: the white house immediately called the ruling" outrageous" and vowed to appeal. spokesman sean spicer said: tweeting from his home in palm beach, florida, this morning, president trump criticized the ruling and the judge, saying: the president continued: for the third saturday in a row, trump protesters were out across the country, from washington, d.c., to philadelphia, to boulder, colorado. trump p
PBS
Feb 14, 2016 5:30pm PST
," which ended the 2000 presidential election recount and sent george w. bush to the white house. he also voted with the majority in striking down campaign finance laws as a restriction on free speech. scalia shaped landmark majority decisions like the second amendment case that enshrined the right of individuals to own a gun for self defense and cases affirming the sixth amendment right of criminal defendants to confront witnesses against them. scalia was equally caustic and ssents.en writing colorfulosing he was in the minority when the court struck down a virginia military academy's policy of admitting only men and decided guantanamo prisoners could challenge their detention. he opposed decisions upholding abortion rights, same-sex marriage and president obama's healthcare plan. the cornerstone of scalia's legal philosophy was "originalism", a strict interpretation of the constitution as the framers wrote it in back in the 1780's. >> they never took out these issues: abortion, homosexual conduct. nobody ever thought that they had been included in the rights contained in the bill of rig
PBS
Dec 20, 2014 5:30pm PST
georg town. he says from what he's seen of groups like isis and al qaeda, he can't trust the intentions of any muslims. do you know the people who are behind this mosque? i mean,hey say, "we've been living in this communy for decades, we've raised our families, gonto schools, and we've never shown a trace of violence." does that example not convince you that they might have different inteions than you think? >> like i said, prove it. go on record condemning isis. i haven't seen it. and definitely not on a idespread level. y are christians running around scared? why did they... why did they need to put a mosque inside a shopping center? what's the next step? wal-mart's? we going to have a mosque at every wal-mart? >> what they've seen in the news media is a small, you know, group of people acting upon themselves, calling themselves muslims and doing the things that are heinous crimes. and we as muslims in america, you know, definitely do not condone those acts atll. we condemn those acts. we are against those as much as anybody else. >> reporter: you mentioned that you condemn
PBS
Nov 23, 2014 5:30pm PST
this morning with abc's george stephanopoulos, president obama said the interim deal reached last november had slowed iran's nuclear program. >> the good news is that the interim deal that we entered into has definitely stopped iran's nuclear program from advancing. so it's been successful. >> but a deal would be a rollback, wouldn't it? >> well now, so the question is, can we get to a more permanent deal? and the gaps are still significant. >> sreenivasan: the president also commented on how a nuclear deal might change overall relations with iran. >> what a deal would do is take a big piece of business off the table. and perhaps begin a long process, not just between iran and us, but the relationship between iran and the world, and the region begins to change. >> sreenivasan: we'll have more about the negotiations after the news summary. in afghanistan, a deadly suicide attack. at least 45 people were killed and dozens more wounded when a bomber targeted spectators at a crowded volleyball tournament in a province of eastern afghanistan. no one immediately claimed responsibility.
PBS
Feb 18, 2017 5:30pm PST
conspiracy included a subsequent foiled plot to bomb the george washington bridge, the lincoln tunnel, the united nations headquarters, and the new york f.b.i. building. omar abdel-rahman was 78 years old. the woman known as "jane roe," the plaintiff in the supreme court's 1973 "roe v. wade" case that established a woman's constitutional right to an abortion, has died. jane roe's real name was norma mccorvey. she used the pseudonym to protect her privacy. shedding her anonymity years later, she became an abortion rights advocate, but in 1995, she declared herself a born-again christian and opposed abortion rights. mccorvey died today of a heart ailment in katy, texas. she was 69. >> sreenivasan: the federal government owns roughly 640 million acres, or about 28% of the land that forms the u.s. most of that is in the western u.s. and alaska, and held for preservation, recreation, and development of natural resources. in tonight's signature segment, we look at how that land ownership equation occasionally creates conflicts between states and washington. our focus is a swath of land in n
PBS
Feb 13, 2016 5:30pm PST
musical karma. classical composer george friedrich handle lived next door in the 1700s. magazine photographer barry wents of wentzell visited hendrix in this apartment. >> he said i got the. i wonder what it would be like to jam with him. >> hendrix moved back to new york in in 1969. he died in london at 1970 at age 27. the handle house trust spent $3.5 million ren vaight the apartment and is making handel and hendrix in london open to the public permanently. >> thompson: and finally tonight, oklahoma experienced the 30 strongest earthquake in state history today. the u.s. geological survey says the 5.1 trembler could be felt throughout the northwest part of oklahoma and seven other states. oklahoma had more than 900 quakes that could be felt last year. and the national weather service has issued a wind chill warning tonight for nine states where temperatures will feel below zero. officials in baltimore, buffalo, philadelphia, and new york city have declared a code blue, alerting emergency officials to prepare and help get the hoimless indoors. and that's all for this edition of
PBS
Oct 22, 2016 5:30pm PDT
the election, helped turn that into a landslide. the campaign of george w. bush has always argued that they lost the popular vote because of a late-breaking story about bush's youthful drunk driving arrests that cost him, they think, a few million evangelicals. but by and large, this is the period-- debates are over-- when the race stabilizes, which is why a five-point lead with one week to go means much more than a five-point lead with a month to go. so the hope of the trump campaign is that there are these people who have not told the pollsters they are going to vote for trump. they point to the brexit results. the problem with that is the brexit polls were actually very, very close. so while it's possible, it's also possible that, you know, women who were on the fence may have been pushed to vote for clinton by trump's various comments. but by and large, you wouldn't want to bet the farm or even the chicken coop on a sudden late shift this late in the campaign. >> sreenivasan: is there a possibility for over-confidence on the clinton side? i mean, they say "we're not taking anything
PBS
May 29, 2016 5:30pm PDT
of voting for republicans for 20 years, ending with george hw bush in, bush in 1988 when you consider this is a majority minority state, a huge number of latino voters here, large population of asian voters, and also it is a very strongly democratic state expected to retain the senate seat, boxster reretiring, so i would say that is a pretty big long shot in addition to that a the republicans in california which is are the largest number of republican voters, they are moderates, not the most conservative republicans in the country so all of those factors think donald trump is not likely to spend a lot of time campaigning. >> desjardins: we will watch either way. christina bellantoni chris, thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >> >> reporter: more painful numbers on the migrant crisis in europe. today, the united nations and "doctors without borders" estimated as many as 900 migrants drowned in just the last five days when their overloaded boats capsized. more than 10,000 have been rescued. that includes this group brought to shore by the italian navy today. the ship also ca
PBS
Jan 14, 2017 5:30pm PST
president george w. bush at the u.s. naval base in guantanamo bay, cuba. on his second full day in the white house, president obama issued an executive order to close guantanamo within a year. eight years later, that has not happened. mr. obama's ambition was largely thwarted by congressional restrictions, but also by the difficulty in reducing the 242 prisoners he inherited to zero. today, 55 remain, including five accused of organizing the erica.ber 11th attacks on no reporter has spent more time on the base than the "miami herald's" carol rosenberg, covering detainees issues and military court proceedings. she was there this week and returns again next week, and joins me today from boston. carol, thanks so much for being with us. >> thank you for the invitation. >> stewart: you have been following the story and been at guantanamo since the very beginning. when obama took office, there was some bipartisan support for closing guantanamo bay. when did that change and, ultimately, why did he fail to close it? >> i think it changed right around the time there was discussion of talking so
PBS
Dec 28, 2014 5:30pm PST
. >> sreenivasan: and doctors in houston say former president george h.w. bush's condition is improving. he was taken by ambulance to the hospital tuesday after complaining of shortness of breath. the former president is 90- years-old. >> sreenivasan: and now to our signature segment, our original in-depth reports about significant but often under- reported stories. tonight, we take you to alabama where civil rights advocates say hundreds of people have been jailed because they couldn't afford to pay their fines. critics say the practice is tantamount to the restoration of debtors' prisons, which were outlawed in the 1830's. newshour special correspondent john carlos fray has an updated version of our report, which first aired in april. ♪ >> reporter: timothy fugatt, the minister of music at this church near childersburg, alabama, says that it's his deep faith in god that got him through some tough times. his son cole, was born with a rare brain disease. >> the spheres in his brain didn't divide properly. so pretty much when you look through a c.t. scan, it was nothing but f
PBS
Sep 11, 2016 5:30pm PDT
: in his home on long island, an hour from new york city, ken george keeps a box of mementos from his time as a first responder to the september 11 terrorist attack on the world trade center. >> first night i was there i was walking there and i took pictures. my eyes were burning, man the smell was unbearable. that's all the ash, and it's like papers flying in front of you that you can actually touch. >> reporter: in 2001, george worked for the new york city department of transportation, which sent him to ground zero. he wears sunglasses for sensitivity to light. >> i thought i was going to be like blocking traffic. for the first couple of hours, i was on bucket brigade, passing buckets around, stuff like that. >> reporter: removing debris? >> yeah, debris, or whatever we found. i wound up stepping on, i say a torso, part of a torso. >> reporter: so you were finding body parts? >> a lot. a lot of body parts. >> reporter: george worked 750 hours on site, exposed to airborne toxins and dust, rarely wearing a mask over his face. he developed a bad cough, and his doctor diagnosed him with
PBS
Jul 10, 2016 5:30pm PDT
-year-old paul george is a third generation dairy farmer who voted to leave the e.u. >> i believe that our government will look after cornwall just as well as the e.u. has been looking after it. >> reporter: george sells all his milk to a european cooperative called arla, which pays george 20% below the price of his production costs because global milk prices have been depressed for years. ironically, an e.u. subsidy helps him stay afloat. it's called the "single farm payment," which is paid to a farmer based on how much land he owns. george says the one size fits all approach isn't fair and that the subsidy should be based instead on how much farmers produce. >> i don't value the basic payment scheme in my business as highly as some other people. however, every little does count at the moment, and no, i wouldn't want to be without a support package. i think it's supporting the less efficient farmers more so than the more efficient farmers. >> reporter: rather than a handout, george is hoping milk prices may rise. >> the e.u. money is welcomed in any form, of course it's welcomed. i'm
PBS
Nov 7, 2015 5:30pm PST
illnesses out of jail. and actor george takei-- his personal journey from "star trek" to broadway. next on pbs newshour weekend. >> pbs newshour weekend is made possible by: corporate funding is provided by mutual of america-- designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we are your retirement company. additional support has been provided by: and by the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. from the tisch wnet studios at lincoln center in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: good evening, and thanks for joining us. the head of egypt's investigation into last week's russian airliner crash in the sinai peninsula said today while the plane was on auto-pilot, the cockpit recording registered a noise in its last second. >> all scenarios are on table. it may be the lithium batteries or one of the passengers, it may be an explosion in the fuel tank, it may be fatigue to the body of the plane. it may be that something exploded. >> sreenivasan: the head of the investigation told reporters t
PBS
May 14, 2017 5:30pm PDT
credits that are in place today. >> reporter: at 96, george shultz, a former cabinet secretary to presidents reagan and nixon, whose administration created the environmental protection agency, is weighing into the debate. >> use the marketplace. do it the reagan way. >> reporter: he's touting a solution to curb carbon-dioxide emissions consistent with what he considers "republican principles." >> you don't have to rely on any fancy science to figure out that the globe is warming. that is a fact. but if you have questions about it, why don't you take out an insurance policy, because the consequences are considerable. >> reporter: for shultz, the insurance policy is a plan he's put out as a member of the climate leadership council-- "a conservative case for carbon dividends." the proposal is to charge energy companies a tax, say $40, for every ton of carbon that comes out of mining coal or refining oil. the proceeds would be distributed back to americans,"" carbon dividend," worth around $2,000 a year for a family of four. the tradeoff? the plan would strip away much of the e.p.a.'s
PBS
Jul 12, 2014 5:30pm PDT
are concerned that number will drop even lower if the st. george proposal succeeds. >> that is not fair to the children who remain behind. >> reporter: belinda davis, a local activist with three children in the baton rouge schools, is vowing to prevent the creation of the new city of st. george. >> you were automatically going to be creating a city that is less diverse than the one you are leaving. and we have all kinds of specialized services in schools that we are able to provide, because of the size of our school district. >> i mean, this is about lives, there is about potential that we are squashing by continuing to carve up our school districts, that we could do wonderful things together. we are stronger as one than we are broken up into pieces. >>> the former british leader tony blair met in cairo today with egyptian presidentialsysy in an effort to end problems with israel and hamas. in iraq, government forces and slight militias are battling for control of a military base 60 miles north of baghdad. gunmen killed at least 20 people in the capital today, almost all women. >>>
PBS
Aug 27, 2016 5:30pm PDT
chipping away at the injustice of h.b.-2." judge schroeder, appointed by president george w. bush, also said the plaintiffs are likely to succeed at trial this november in arguing that h.b.-2 violates title-nine, the federal law that prohibits gender discrimination in schools. today, hillary clinton received her first official national security briefing, as the democratic presidential nominee. the two-hour session with intelligence officials occurred at an f.b.i. office in westchester county, new york, near her home. republican presidential nominee donald trump received his first security briefing earlier this month. trump campaigned today in iowa, now rated by the associated press as one the six closest" toss up" states in the election. the other close states are florida, ohio, nevada, new hampshire and north carolina. >> sreenivasan: members of the university of north carolina community react to this week's ruling on the state's h.b.-2 law. learn more at www.pbs.org/newshour. >> sreenivasan: with the economy occupying a central place in this year's election, both presidential candidat
PBS
Jun 4, 2017 5:30pm PDT
arts and sciences, nine george foster peabody awards, the broadcast equivalent of the pulitzer prize, three george polk awards, and the dupont-columbia golden baton. he's introduced us to some of the world's most remarkable people in his one-on-one interviews and shared with us a world of ideas.
PBS
Jan 24, 2016 5:30pm PST
, and serves as a recruitment tool for america's enemies. president george w. bush opened guantanamo in 2002 to hold foreign fighters captured overseas, mainly in afghanistan, in the war on terror that began on 9/11. for the past 14 years, "miami herald" reporter carol rosenberg has covered guantanamo full time, spending more than a thousand days on site. she sat down yesterday with the newshour's hari sreenivasan to discuss the legal and logistical obstacles to president obama's goal. >> there were at one point 780 men there, now we have less than a hundred, i think 91 or so as we talk, and that might change. but why are people still there? >> people are still at guantanamo because despite president obama's desire to close it, congress won't let him am congress has decided that guantanamo should continue to exist. members of congress like guantanamo. and they have systemically thwarted his efforts to close that detention center in cuba. closing guantanamo at this stage and the obama administration view is really moving guantanamo to u.s. soil. the idea is not to open the cages and l
PBS
Jun 4, 2016 5:30pm PDT
younger, hard- hitting george foreman, who had beaten frazier. >> round 1: the heavyweight championship of the world at stake. >> reporter: this time, he used a strategy he named "rope-a- dope" to wear out foreman. >> the punches aren't doing any damage, though! >> reporter: it worked. late in the 8th round, ali landed a combination that sent foreman to the mat, and once again, he was champion. >> i told you, all of my critics, i told you all that i was the greatest of all time when i beat sonny liston. i told you today i'm still the greatest of all time. >> reporter: less than a year later, in the philippines, ali was back in the ring with frazier for the rematch called the "thrilla in manila." this time, the champion took a beating, but finally won on a technical knockout in 14 rounds. after that, ali lost the heavyweight championship to leon spinks in february 1978, then reclaimed it one more time, before losing his final fight in 1981. he retired from boxing at the age of 39 with a record of 56-5. poet and author nikki giovanni knew ali well: >> ali was not a politician, he had no a
PBS
Sep 26, 2015 5:30pm PDT
president george w. bush. >> sreenivasan: for years, the british government has reportedly tracked and stored billions of records of internet use by british citizens and people outside the u.k., in an effort to track every visible user on the internet. that finding comes from the intercept website, which is publishing findings from national security agency contractor edward snowden's leak on government surveillance practices." intercept" reporter ryan gallagher wrote the story and joins me now, via skype, from brighton, england. first of all, explain the scale of surveillance that was happening from the british equivalent of the n.s.a., the g.c.h.q. >> well, the skill is quite phenomenal. i mean, it's hard to translate it when you just see the numbers. but you're talking about 30 to 100 billion metadata records of phone calls and e-mails every single day, so vast, vast quantities of information they're sweeping up. and they're talking by 2030 having in place the world's largest surveillance system, surpassing what the n.s.a. and u.s. has built. >> sreenivasan: when somebody hears that
PBS
Jan 29, 2017 5:30pm PST
. jonathan tu rly at george washington says he doesn't like this plan at all. he says it might be legal. others said it violates the 1965 immigration reform. whatever the legalities, politically, it's a different story. but one that i think requires some subtle distinctions. clearly the image of syrian christians being thrown back on a plane and being deported out of the country, a contractor from iraq who risked his life to help the united states military being put in handcuffs. that is not the message the white house wanted nor does it like the fact that a fair number of republicans in congress, national security experts who served in both republican and democratic administrations are saying this is almost a recruiting message for isis. like the abu graib prison scandal. but i think the other part of this is that to trump's core supporters what this signals is we are going to do what we promised you we were going to do. we're going to crack down very hard on all kinds of people seeking to come into this country. we want to protect you even if it means barring a student from coming hom
PBS
Jul 23, 2016 5:30pm PDT
were casting about, who are we going to run? because the republicans had rudy giuliani and george pataki, at the time both quite formidable figures. and the democrats didn't really have anyone of that stature. so they approached her and said, "why don't you consider doing this?" and at first she said, "what are you talking about, i'm not a new yorker." how she finally did it? perseverance and steady, you know, somewhat boring stick-to- it-iveness. she just kept her head down and went and gave her speech about the issues, and ultimately she won over people, won their respect. >> sreenivasan: if you had to compress her legislative achievements in the senate, what would those be? >> she was in the senate for eight years. she had a part in a number of pieces of legislation, and of course she was the senator from new york when 9/11 happened, so she and chuck schumer were by all accounts that i know of, very active in helping first responders and other victims of the 9/11 attack. so i think she would probably point to that as a high point, a few things she did on education. there is no
PBS
Jun 26, 2016 5:30pm PDT
. >> sreenivasan: george, who gave only his first name, is a regular customer here, and sees e.u. membership differently. he voted for britain to leave, hoping his future might be more like his past. >> i voted for it. >> why? >> why? well, i don't think we should be doing what others countries tell us to do. i think life was better before 1974, when i was younger. >> sreenivasan: george believes immigrants, often willing to work for lower wages, cost the native british jobs. >> i think there's too many immigrants over here. i don't mind them. they're doing their job, but they're still doing english people out of work. >> it is absolutely incorrect to say that 'ie.u. immigrants that are taking my jobs away from me.' >> sreenivasan: london school of economics professor swati dhingra says historical evidence shows otherwise, and actually foreign-born restaurant workers are among those likely to feel the "brexit" effects acutely. >> the service sector is 80 percent british economy, so we're talking about something happens in services it will be felt everywhere. >> sreenivasan: paul scully is a
PBS
Apr 2, 2017 5:30pm PDT
as "the frontier." george bassadone employs 70 spanish workers converting suv's into ambulances used by the united nations and aid organizations all over the world. >> the work that we do is very specialized, involving a lot of electronics, mechanical work. so, we tend to find that expertise in spain. >> reporter: his business is dependent on one of the cornerstones of the european union, free movement of people and goods across open borders. gibraltar imports almost everything from its food to timber over its one mile land border with spain. bassadone was among the 96% of gibraltar residents who voted to remain in the e.u. in last year's referendum, when the overall majority of voters in the united kingdom voted to leave. >> the biggest fear we have is a potential closure of the border. we would have to reevaluate our spanish workforce and look at possibly getting rid of the majority of our spanish workers and trying to train up locals, which would be very disruptive and take up a huge amount of time to do. >> reporter: are there locals who want to do these jobs? >> that would
PBS
Oct 30, 2016 5:30pm PDT
headed for a landslide. the use of george w. bush's youthful drunk driving arrests, his camp, and 2004 hurt him. the most on point example of example was back in '92 when a special prosecutor, looking at reagan's dealings this iran, pointed a finger to george bush who was up for reelection, citing he might have known, he was very angry about that. we never know with had those october surprises could have made a difference but those are plausible candidates. >> there are contenders, and could there be october surprises this time around, plural? >> you know you can start with that access hollywood tape. you can talk about the wikileaks drip drip drip that seemed to raise questions about the be clinton foundation. certainly fbi director comey's statement so close to election could qualify. but who is to say we couldn't have november surprises? we have a week to go. >> revealing e-mails on uma abedin's computer, not much more than that. what position did that put candidate clinton in in terms of her response? >> it puts that campaign in an extremely difficulty position. they don't know wha
PBS
May 8, 2016 5:30pm PDT
. and i knew he was treasury secretary for george washington. and that's it. >> reporter: at bronx engineering and technology academy, malcolm grant, christian gowan, and danny ingrassia spent several weeks immersed in the subject. >> when i was introduced to this, i was like history on hamilton, i wasn't really interested that much. but then you know, you take a feeling of what we have today in this generation, and then add that to something that's centuries ago with hamilton and our founding fathers. and that's very interesting. >> i enjoy music a lot, mainly hip hop and rap and everything. so having it be displayed to me this way. it stuck in my head. >> anything with a hip hop, flavor to it, it's definitely more interesting than opening a dusty history book and trying to, like, fish out old information. >> they feel like what we do here is sort of outdated. >> reporter: dana holness is their english teacher. >> and giving the kids those kind of options just to me makes education seem relevant. >> reporter: after engaging with the hamilton material, the curriculum hones the kids
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