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CSPAN
Oct 26, 2012 2:00pm EDT
to say, a complement i paid to your dad, george mcgovern was a good and decent man. [applause] >> former senate will oh honor george mcgovern. he died at age of 90 this past sunday which while he was best known for losing to richard nixon he also established the modern day food stamp program. he let the congress to the vietnam war and brought many well-known figures into politics for the first time including bill clinton. this is live coverage on c-span. snothe ♪ >> ♪ [captioning performed by ♪ ♪ ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, if you're able, please rise for the [ation of the coffin -- >> flag. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> jesus said i am the resurrection and the life, those who believe in me even though they die shall live. i am alpha, the begin linging tapped end, the first and the last. i died and behold i am alive forever more and i hold the keys of life and death. because i have live, you shall live also. friends, we have galingtered here to praise god and witness our faith as we celebrate the life of george mcgovern. we come together in grief acknowledging our human loss and
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2014 1:59pm EST
is george, the enslaved man owned by newsome. george relates -- we'll come back to his testimony. but relates that perhaps they want to search in the vicinity of celia's cabin. celia herself, as we know progressively tells a story.o she denies whereabouts of what might happened to him. she begins to tell a story. we understand in a sense why that might have been. the consequences for her act are grave, as we know. and she begins to tell a story first about having newsome having put his head through the window. having struck him and his disappearing into the night. but eventually it seems particularly under duress, that is under the threat that in fact, she may be separated from her children. celia reveals to these neighbors, local farmers who have come to investigate the whereabouts of newsome. she reveals to them out of the earshot of the newsome children she reveals she in fact, struck newsome dead and disposed of his body in the fireplace. we can follow the story then as it makes its way through now a legal frame. there is an inquest. these local neighbors who have been at the
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2011 8:00pm EST
>> live up from mitchell, south dakota, the likes of george mcgovern profiled in the c-span series ""the contenders." >> in 1968, many americans thought they were voting to bring our whole -- our sons home from vietnam. since then, 20,000 of our sons have come home in coffins. i have no secret plan. i have a public plan and it is one whose heart has eight for the last 10 years or the agony of vietnam. i will halt the bombing of indochina on inaugural day. >> it was 1972, to a plot 30 in the morning when george mcgovern delivered his acceptance speech. a few months later, he would lose badly to president richard nixon. tonight, the candidacy and legacy of george mcgovern. we are live from the mcgovern museum in mitchell, south dakota. joining us is provincial author scott farris. it was 2:30 when he delivered the acceptance speech in miami. why? >> it was emblematic of the whole mcgovern campaign, which was it was an insurgent campaign run against the establishment. what happened was, as you heard from senator mcgovern, he was very strong on the issue of vietnam. one of the things a
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2011 10:30pm EST
. load her up. >> next is our c-span series "the contenders." tonight, the campaign of george wallace. later, a discussion of race in hollywood with a panel of african-american actors, including harry belafonte. >> good evening, and welcome to "the contenders." we come to you live from the governor of the mansion in montgomery, alabama, wartime -- as we look at the life and times of the political candidate george wallace. elected governor of alabama four times, george wallace lived here for 20% of his life. before we begin our conversation on george wallace and his legacy and introduce you to our guest, here is a look at his political style. >> if you cannot decision at -- distinguish at harvard harvard between honesty and -- honest dissent and being over active, you should -- and an overt act of treason, you should come down to alabama and we will show you some law down there. both national parties in the last number of years have about down to every group of anarchists that have roamed the streets of san francisco and los angeles. [applause] now they have created themselves a monste
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 10:30pm EDT
. >> george washington and george may sorry were very good friends. two wives, had anne, and she passed away. and then sara. wondering what the relationship was between martha and either of george mason's wives? >> they were friendly neighbors know, they never became intimate friends. friendship was a political casualty. but after the constitutional onvention, which, of course, washington sanctioned and mason it spelled in , many ways an end to their friendship. twitter, george and martha washington, quite the power couple. we close out bringing us full circle, what are the important things for people to the influence of martha washington. >> i think it's important to powerful she and on and how dependent he was her. his achievements were his achievements. him aving her there with made them much more possible. >> i think that's true. defined influence in a way that perhaps contemporary have difficulty understanding. but the fact of the matter is, she was the most influential of the earth face with the president of the united states. this says richard norton of george graphy washington patria
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2012 10:30pm EDT
today. deep down i know george mcgovern is in a better place. he's with eleanor and terri and steve. who knows, he may even be president. but for so many of us it is difficult to say goodbye. it was always comforting to know that he was around reminding us we can do better, making it seem possible we could end all wars, eliminate hunger and poverty and create a world where all god's children are respected valued and loved. in 1972 as a seventh grader in massachusetts i did what i could to elect him president of the united states which i remind you all he did win massachusetts. [applause] [applause] i was later an intern in his senate office and i had the privilege to work with the incredible staff he assembled in washington d.c. and south dakota, some of the finest people i have ever known. we weren't related it was just a co-incidence we both had the same last name. but people would tell me they were long-time supporters of my dad. and they always seemed shocked when i told them my dad owned a liquor store in massachusetts. i urged them to keep supporting him. for 35 years i have b
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2015 1:00pm EDT
another such update. we appreciate mr. george, mr. camu suchlt for being here with us. as we start this hearing i would like to walk through why we're here at this particular time. it was -- there was targeting of people who were trying to exercise their first amendment rights. this is done because of their political beliefs. dave camp of the ways and means committee did exceptional work unearthing this work. talking to them, the irs commissioner, mr. schulman about this. he had assured the committee and assured the congress, which when you talk to congress, you're talking to the american people, that none of this targeting had ever occurred. that's when the inspector general's office started to get involved and they started to look at it. later they came back and provided a report. that report happened in, i believe, 2013. now, keep in mind, when we had this information going on, there was a preservation order that was put in place. asking and requiring the irs to preserve these documents. governor issa issued a subpoena asking for this information and these documents. then you mo
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2012 8:00pm EDT
my camera. except for the guy over here looks sort of like george clooney. i don't think he knows anything about darfur. tom brokaw can now write an article about us. the greatest degeneration ever. generation ever. my colleague will be the chair person in 2013. we want to say hi to her. we have the rest of the head table to introduce. with that said, give me that scan. kin. ♪ at the end of the table, the director of the radio tv gallery, mike mastrian. we have the communications director to the speaker of the house, and all-around nice guy, kevin smith. he is very animated. we have the chairman of the house rules committee from the 26th rdistrict in california, david dryer. congressman david dryer. next is the assistant democratic leader of the house, a congressman representing the sixth district, a state where my mom lifts, south carolina. from south carolina state university, please will come congressman at james cliber. on at this end of the table, we have the director of the house of radio and tv gallery, a great friend of mine, olga ram . please give it up for a midian. na
CSPAN
May 18, 2013 6:00am EDT
was also appointed by president george w. bush. it is believed that groups like the naacp, progressive churches and environmental groups were targeted by the irs. mr. miller, while you were appointed acting commissioner at the irs, you are a career civil servant. is that not the case? >> yes. >> you are not a political appointee. >> i am not. >> what i'm trying to basically the blanc is the notion or idea -- tryin gto debunk are the nonfactual statements by chair camp to link these candles to the white house or solely targeting of conservative groups -- link these scandals to white house. i asked the questions of ms. lerner last week as to whether or not the irs was investigating political not for profit organizations. she got involved after she was asked a question at a press event and that is simply understandable. important, think is at least at this point in time, i would hope is in a bipartisan context because we want to find the facts. we want to find out who knew what and when and what steps were or were not taken. i was just as outraged when i was learned when she
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2011 8:00pm EDT
years, even george wallace could be the most important loser. i do not think that at all. i go back to the 19th century and henry clay. he ran three times, and that is one of the things that interests me about these folks. they are recidivists. they keep at it. it gives me new insight into defeat, which i would think one of the most humiliating things that can happen to you, if you are henry clay, you have arrived at the kentucky house of assembly, and almost immediately everyone is saying you are a leader. you go to washington. you are speaker of the house. what humiliation. and yet, he kept coming back. i do believe that he is one of these 14 who, had he been elected, either in 1824 or 1832 really would have made a difference in the history of the country. >> as a journalist, which of these contenders would you like to have covered? >> william james brian. >> why? >> she talked about recidivism. there are echoes of him even today. i was at a rally -- not a rally -- a republican event, with the republican establishment, actually, in the war room. all of a sudden, this chant breaks
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2013 6:00am EDT
you very much. mr. womack. >> mr. george, you have been inspecting the irs for the better part of -- >> eight years. >> characterize for me and the panel your relationship up to this point with the service you inspect. >> it is a symbiotic relationship in many respects. while there is no question that we have a unique role in terms of the ig relationship between an agency and that we were once part of the irs also that were structured and format in 1998. when that stood us up in our current capacity, we retained some of the responsibilities and that is to protect their current dutch integrity of the tax administration but also vested us with the response abilities of inspector general. >> and he made a recommendation back to the hierarchy -- not the shipment but his predecessor and others -- that have not been acknowledged, honored, put into effect? >> very few. >> but it has happened? >> yes. >> anything along this line? >> no. >> did this surprise you? >> yes, this is unprecedented -- unprecedented. obviously, during the nixon administration, there were attempts to use the inter
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2015 1:58pm EST
relationship between benedict arnold and george washington. then a discussion about russia, cold war spies and the u.s. nuclear program. later, espionage during world war i. >> peter enrheeenriques looks at how arnold's's failed plan to deliver west point to the british offers insights. he talks about british and american participants after the plot was uncovered. this was hosted by colonial williamsburg. it's about an hour. >> thanks so much for that warm welcome. i'm really pleased to see as many people in the audience tonight when i was driving down from northern virginia through heavy rain it might be a biblical quote but fortunately that's not the case. you have to keep checking your assumptions. if your assumptions are incorrect it can lead you to some very wrong conclusions. i would like to illustrate that by the following story which i hope you will find somewhat humorous although somewhat ribald as well. here's the story. the smiths were unable to conceive children and decided to use a surrogate father to start their family. on the day the proxy father was to arrive, mr.
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2011 8:00pm EST
great groundswell of people who loved him. >> george mcgovern is very much alive. he is close to 90 years old. unfortunately before the run-up of the program, he fell. been some of you who saw it have seen some of the press. he spent about five days in the hospital out in sioux falls, south dakota. he fell right before he came in to where the studio was set up in mitchell, south dakota. unfortunately, we never got him on the show. here is a clip that was not on the program i think you might find interesting -- an interview that george mcgovern gave us before that night. >> this is the most corrupt administration in american history. she said that on "meet the press." she was right. nobody believed that they figured it was just politics. open the door to china, which is good. i give them credit for it. i went to richard nixon's funeral. i figured he was president of the united states and did a lot of good things as well as bad. i was listening to all of the eulogies, including one by my friend, bob dole. i thought, gosh, even from nixon's standpoint, it would have been better if i ha
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2012 6:00am EDT
hear that mitt romney wants to bring back george bush policies. they have to say that we cannot run against george bush anymore. he is not on the ticket. the american people don't want to go back there. >> that's a great point. the message is that people cannot trust mitt romney or paul ryan. >> are you still there? >> i am. >> before our colleague had a baby, and early important story, she wrote that one problem with the obama campaign is that he has not said give me four more years and i will do x. what do you think? >> i think that is the hardest part about his campaign. they have a difficulty about what they will do another four years. if he wins, they will have to end up cutting a lot of deals in congress with republicans. those are things that delegates here may not like. he will try to define mitt romney as keeping taxes low and that may not give us the one word answer we're looking for. >> it is more of a-appeal rather than a positive appeal of what i will do. this convention is not exactly chicago, 1968. i was there, i know. let's look at some video of that. [video clip] >>
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2014 5:00pm EST
pakistan and egypt than it was even when george w. bush was president. the war in afghanistan, for which so many young americans and young canadians gave their lives has not, to say the least, been won. but here you say, oh, this isn't -- it isn't all obama's fault. he has been dealt a tough hand. the world is a complicated place. ladies and gentlemen, presidents are often dealt a tough hand. roosevelt got a bad hasn't from hoover and reagan got a bad hand from carter, and what makes a good ability to is meet the goals he sets and define events more than he is defined by events and leave the united states stronger and better respected in the world. this is not, to say the least, been the mark of obama's tenure. such is the gap between expectation and delivery that one might say to paraphrase a famous line that every in the field of political self promotion have so many been promised so much by someone who delivered so little. this is a confidence problem. this is the president calling isis the jv team until they took mosul. and the larger problem is that this is a president who thinks that
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 10:30pm EDT
institute. george priest will join us by conference call. he is a professor of law and economics at yale law school. chairman ofhe aei's our council economic advisers. he was supposed to be coming down from the cornea -- la guardia and his plane got cancelled. aei was a hotbed of the regulatory research in the 1980's that lead to regulation. it looks like we have a lot of work to do still. but it is good to have george even if just on the phone. also turning us is jeff eisenach. -- joining us is jeff eisenach. he is an adjunct professor at the george mason university school of law and is visit -- and is a visiting scholar here at american enterprise institute. we are also joined by randal picker. he teaches antitrust law at the university of chicago law school. he is the co-author of game theory and the law. here is how we are going to proceed. greg will talk about 20 minutes or so about his paper. then we are going to hear from our discussion, starting with george. and then jeff and randty and greg will have little time to respond. the everyone to have a q&a at the end. -- then we
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2014 4:00pm EST
there. and if you let him go, what happens? he goes all the way to nashville and he augments george thomas' numbers at nashville. so this is your only opportunity to get him before he withdraws, and gets all the way to the capital. so he makes this decision. now, was it an impulsive decision? i don't know. i know that frank cheatham advised him against it. i know nathan bedford forrest advised him against it and other officers had great doubt about it. but i just don't know that he felt he had much choice, in the sense that if you let schofield go, he'll be criticized by people later for that, too. i mean, this is sort of a damned if you do, and damned if you don't situation for hood. and then, you know, after franklin -- let me tell you this. when the battle starts, to be honest with you i think what happens and i see it primarily through cheatham who was closer to the batfield. he sent his staff officers in and not a one of them ever came back. once the smoke and the darkness came, those generals had no idea what was transpiring. all they knew was that there was still musketry goi
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2014 5:00pm EDT
have thought this was in any way surprising. the whole operation was organized by george coburn. he was the only man among those in command who had been long enough to work out the target and how to get there. the chronology is quite clear. the army with ross and alexander cochran arrives in the chesapeake, and the next morning they set off up the paw tuxant and cross towards bladens burg. he is responsible for everything that happens. he had no but he didn't have specific orders to do it. his boss, alexander cochran, was very supportive. cochran had lost his elder brother in the revolutionary war and harbored some dislike of americans as a consequence. it was a divisive war. there were many on the british side who were old enough to remember that conflict so the memories of the last war were quite raw for many people. >> you've mentioned the burning of the government buildings, but pamela scott showed me a drawing that i had noticed before, but hadn't thought about in this context. a drawing by latrobe in december of 1815 that shows george washington's buildings burned -- ruins of
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 10:00am EDT
either one of the most or the most liberal voting records in the house. the late george mcgovern said he was a proud liberal. why are you not willing to embrace that? >> we have a tradition i ism.onsin of progressiveis sometimes the words liberal and conservative have lost all their meeting at the national and state level. when i say i'm a proud progressive, a republican of his party because he felt that the powerful special interests of those days had too much control in washington and madison and he wanted the people to have a voice. i feel we are very much in that same place now. if i feel my opponent represents a lot of those powerful interests who have legions of lobbyists in washington and that the people of wisconsin need a voice once again. it seemse who say like tammy baldwin is tracking towards the center, wonder what happens if she gets to washington? what do you say to them? but i want to be a voice for the hard-working middle class people in this state, to help rebuild our economy. i am not going to go there to be a voice for wall street or the big insurance companies or
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 6:00am EDT
main reasons record surpluses under bill clinton were turned into record deficits under george bush is because we put two wars and two tax cuts on a credit card. and now governor romney wants another $5 trillion in tax cuts that he can't pay for? not if i have anything to say about it. that's not going to happen. [applause] we are not going to let this country fall backward. not now. not with so much at stake. we've got to move forward. we need to invest in small business and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. we need to -- [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half. create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choic
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2014 9:00am EDT
6:00 and 10:00 p.m. eastern, a discussion about british admiral george coburn and how he used washington, d.c.'s waterways to invade the city. all here on c-span3. >>> next, how general sherman brought the war to the south and the impact of the union army's capture of atlanta. as sherman's troops set towns on fire and destroyed the countryside, he established a code of conduct for how the union army was to behave. anne sarah rubin discusses the march hosted by the u.s. capitol historical society. this is an hour. >>> thank you very much, paul. and thank you all very much for coming. merchant of terror, demon, a atill la. if you type was sherman a into google the auto complete includes war criminal, hero or villain. and if you add a couple more letters you get terrorist. the urban dictionary, a popular website, describes general william t. sherman as having employed the vicious tactic of targeting civilians. continuing, such tactics had previously been deemed morally unacceptable. the deliberate targeting of civilians for attack was taken up in world war ii ending in the deaths
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2014 9:00am EDT
of religion to understand the type of persecution that the bahai -- and dr. george, as you pointed out, other religious groups face in iran. and mr. alizadeh, to think that for americans to stop a moment and think about what it would be like to be persecuted, to be subject to death, frankly, because of your sexual orientation, and mr. etamadi, for you to help us understand for students, for people who just are engaged and take views that are in opposition to the government, the threats, the possibility of going to jail, the persecution that they face, that's, i think, how we need to think about it here. these are tremendous violations of universal human rights. and finally, to journalists who face the same thing in iran. to journalists am thin this cou i would suggest the same thing. think about what it would be like for you in iran and let all of us be guided by those notions of how our own lives could be turned upside down because of what we believe, who we are, the way we voice our opinions. i'm so grateful for your being here today to help shed light on that for us. it's very m
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2012 6:00am EDT
in george zimmerman's hands, many of the hands that caused these tragedies we heard of today and we will hold them accountable. [applause] any questions? >> to have wage your battle. now you have trayvon martin. the think any of that will change a thing is in view of his issue moving forward? >> we are very hopeful that the tragedy of trayvon martin will be different. it is not just an example of the american public temporarily being concerned about one tragedy of gun violence. the trayvon martin tragedy points directly to the culpability of the gun lobby and the legislatures that do their bidding in terms of putting guns in the hands of dangerous people. we blame george zimmerman for shooting trayvon martin, but we blame the gun lobby of the florida politicians to do their bidding for putting the gun in his hands that he was carrying that night, an armed man with a violent past and an arrest record, illegally carrying a loaded hidden gun that he had used to take that life. we intend to take this and hang it around the neck of the politicians that have passed these laws of the gun l
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2012 10:30pm EDT
celebrities here. i looked. except for this guy that looks like george clooney. i do not think he knows anything about darfur. he is over here going, what about me? he can write an awesome article about us. >> the greatest dinner generation ever. one of our members who could not be here tonight is my cnn radio colleague, she will be the chair person in 2013. we want to say hi to lisa. we want to keep the energy going. we have the rest of the table to introduce. with that said, give me that skin. the director of the gallery, mike. we have the communications director for the speaker of the house and all-around nice guy, kevin smith. you have to watch out for kevin. he is very animated. we have the chairman of the house rules committee from the 46 district in the foothills of the great state of california, david dreier. next is the assistant democratic leader of the house and congressman representing the six district from a state where my mom lives, south carolina. from south carolina state university please welcome james clyburn. on this end of the table we have the director of the house
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2013 8:00pm EDT
republican george bush appointee, great regulator, had a major role in it. i want to be your opinion, what about too big to fail -- here is the deal, first of all, the people who say we did not result to be to fail are the best friends of the doctrine because this is a matter of perception, and when people read that too big to fail is still there, some of them are going to invest their money that way. legally in fact, it is very clear, no secretary of the treasury, no federal official campaigning the debt of one of these institutions without first abolishing it. the secretary of the treasury would commit a felony. no, he won't. especially since we have provided a way to do it that is systemic impact by advancing the money, wiping everybody out as we have noted, and then testing the large financial institutions. moody's is now apparently going onto this, and it is talking about reducing the ratings of the very large financial institution. quoting them makes me very unhappy because they think they know -- they were the biggest screwup. >> we're never going to get through it -- >> i thi
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2014 1:00pm EDT
george bush's. >> h.w. or w.? >> no, h.w. 1989, in essence, is 1946 but in a good way. 1989 his vision of world order, we're finally going to get rid of this albatross around our neck, the cold war, which kept fulfilling u.n. mandate in world war ii of states working together cooperatively and respecting sovereignty. consequently for him there's a sense 1989 is a chance to sort of finally do what we were supposed to do and do it right. now, one criticism of that view one could make, it doesn't take into account some of these broader global trends. no one in bush's vision of a new world odor articulated manifestation of 1945 and u.n. nowhere in there is a sense of nonstate actors. he can only conceive of the world in terms of states, which i think is one of the reasons why something like nato continues to persist because when one considers how to defend one's self, of course one thinks about other states. states are still the most powerful force in the world today, i think, with the exception of google. but they are simply more powerful than other nonstate actors which bush was not ready t
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2014 5:00pm EDT
ronald reagan. george h.w. bush in contrast is much more skeptical of gorbachev. his national security adviser always liked to point out that either gorbachev was a fraud on which the u.s. should be on its guard, or gorbachev was for real and he may have good intentions but russia could be dispatched with a single bull eat and the soviet union had the ability to destroy the united states. the bush team once it took office, once george h.w. bush became president, when i'm speaking of bush i'm speaking about george h.w. bush was much more cautious. one of my surprises is how much tension there was between the reagan team and bush team. political scientists who are not interested in this topic but work on presidential transitions used the reagan-bush transition as a particularly vicious one. some scholars described it as bush fired everyone. in the internal sources i was surprised to see bushl+avómyr d saying mush for brains reagan e reaganites. all kind of phrases. you see it's good that adults are back in charge. you see a little attempt to return to a more traditional cold war stance.
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2013 7:30pm EDT
. >> they had a tremendous role and talking about martha and the thing she gave george. that going to camp every winter was huge. it wasn't just valley ford, it was every winter of the ability long -- eight long years. she hated it. she was key to troop morale. he felt that very strongly. she would organize the other officers wives and they would have -- they would cook for the soldier, they will sew for the soldiers and pray for the soldiers. during the war, the washington genius was keeping the army together. washington would say he couldn't have done it without martha. he begged her to come to camp every year. the troops adored her. >> as we continue our conversation on first ladies, leslie stahl, cokie roberts discuss first ladies from martha washington to michelle obama. tonight at 9:00 eastern on c-span. >> former morgan stanley trader alexa von tobel. this is from the atlantic magazine and the aspen institute. this is half hour. >> i'm executive director for the center of quality. on behalf of the caq, we are thrilled to be a supporting underwriter of new york ideas. the caq
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2012 10:30pm EDT
george washington and said we had to help france. he said it was not a good revolution. the people are not the same as the american citizens. it will and horribly. thomas paine rejected george washington. without him we would not have had the declaration of independence. he then says that george washington does not know what he is talking about. he says a go at your own risk and apparel. in the paine and up and th bastile. george washington that new about divine providence. spiritually and morally god- fearing people were missing. he is scheduled to be executed, and through divine providence he is saved. they thought they would take him to the infirmary. he was too sick to be executed. [laughter] they left his door opened to his cell, and that was a sign that the person had died. then, he wrote this. this is a copy of his letter that he published after words. it says to george washington, i never thought you would be the one to be dreamy. -- betray me. what you are seeing in egypt is a repeat of history. we had ngos in jail. americans on the ground there. the president and mrs. clinton
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2013 2:00pm EDT
george orwell wrote in 1984 where you have a surveillance society and the government has access to everything. it's absurd to think that this is a great deterrent to terrace him. i mean, why didn't -- to terrorism. i mean, why didn't they prevent the boston bombing if it's such a great program, how about the underwear bomber or the times square bomber? the u.s. has had a really bad record in terms of preventing these terrorist incidents and for one reason is because they have too much information, not too little information. here you build the hay stack, the more difficult it is to find the needle. and all it keeps doing is building the haystack bigger and bigger and instead of hiring people to put more hay on the stack, they should be hiring more analysts to analyze what's in the stack. and instead of just acquiring more and more information. after reading this article about the prison is that they nine anting -- not only major companies but trying to get information from more companies. if it's so great, why do these bombings keep happening? all i heard is it may have been some t
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2014 3:00pm EDT
path to war occurred between march and july of 1811. in march of 1811, madison learned that george had lapsed into what was going to be his final bout of sanity and it was assumed he'd have to -- he despised his father and his cabinet and his policies. it was assumed that he would replace his father's ministers with new ministers who might then modify the harsh infractions that had characterized british policy towards the united states up to that point. now madison read these reports and he sensed that there was a chance for a change in american relations. and to take advantage of that possibility, he brought into his cabinet james monroe as secretary of state. there were a number of reasons why he did this. one reason was that monroe had previously served as the american minister in london and he had formed some personal relationships with some of these british politicians who were expected to become cabinet ministers in a reconstructed british ministry. now, this was a window of opportunity that pretty soon closed. he never changed his father's ministers despite what he felt abou
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2011 1:00am EDT
george tenet, who was then the cia director, called me personally, and he said, "do not write that story. you will get my guys killed." so i did not write the story, and then 9/11 happens, and i finally wrote the story after 9/11, but then over the next couple of years, as you may remember, a lot of the big debates in washington once the created the 9/11 commission and you had the senate-house joint inquiry into that, it was why did the cia not do more prior to 9/11 to get bin laden, and after going through all of the documents and all of the history on that, i later wondered was that operation that the cia was doing just a token operation in order to avoid -- in order to say they were doing something when they really were not doing anything, and if i had written about that at the time, would it have caused a debate to happen in washington about should we get more aggressive about bin laden or not, because i now know -- he knew everything about them. one man was killed two days before 9/11 to get him out of the way. that made me think about how much should you listen to them versus
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2011 8:00pm EST
presidential campaign of george wallace. now on road to the white house, republican presidential candidate mitt gingrich at a town hall meeting at a coffeehouse in the boyne. the former house speaker sat down with a pollster to talk about issues important to mothers. cafemom posted the discussion. it is a little more than one hour. >> welcome, everybody. how are you doing? [applause] how many of you only have one child, raise your hand. two children? four or more? raise your hands? who has five or more? how many kids do you have? how old are your children? wow. thank you for being here. this is the first time that cafemom has been able to bring together a group of moms. you care more than the average american. this is your opportunity to ask the presidential candidates direct questions that will affect your parents, your kids, your families, your career, everything. cafemom has brought this together to give you a chance to be heard. in the end, what they decide to do over the next four or eight years will affect your son and the people like you. i want to point out our mom in uni
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2014 6:00pm EST
was taken by george barnard. and one of them accompanied the army on the campaign where he took the first real seminal photographs of the war. this is a stereograph. i've just shown you a little bit of the right-hand side. you can see the image begins to repeat itself. this is a hopt camp at savage's station. harper's weekly wrote about this photo. it is a picture that is more eloquent than the speech. so brady took these photographs sold these photographs that his men took. he also copied and added to his collection photographs that others had taken. some of which he appropriated with per mix and some of which he did not. by any means available, brady accumulated images from the civil war and the prominence of many of them is not known and probably never will be. because brady has kept the collection together, we have him to thank. it worked for brady at one time or another. in the same sense, it wasn't true that they were all working for him at the same time. that he got credit for work taken by others and that he accumulated photographs that were in no sense his. plusz, there was
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:00pm EST
spellings, educational secretary and george w. bush's second term. coming up in a couple minutes, a discussion on women and politics. tonight our new series, first ladies, influence and image with historians secret staff, chefs and curators, from martha washington to michelle obama. season 1 begins tonight at 9:00 eastern and pacific. on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. and you can also watch it again tonight at midnight. on this presidents' day, we talk about historian doug brinkley on the second terms of presidents. >> douglas brinkley, here is congressional quarterlies weekly and they have a graphic here. second terms tend to be more difficult. why is that? give us the history. >> well, i don't know if i totally believe that. and i know it's so popular right now that i hate to be the contrarian where we're saying second terms are a curse and that they're so much more difficult. i think any president would rather be in their second term than having to be in a first term with a huge election looming. so i think you get a lot of relief when you're president in the second term th
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 10:00am EST
includes former senator george mitchell and former senator kit bond. the recommendations include a new system for housing finance, affordable housing and rural housing. this is live coverage here in washington d.c. this will get underway in just a moment. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. it's my pleasure to welcome all of you here today. i was telling my current bosses that i think have six or seven of my former bosses in the audience, so i need to behave for sure. this impressive gathering as proof that housing really does matter in america. i was going to introduce the commissioners. later you will hear from one of our cochairs. i want to recognize four of the commissioners and able to join is due to a scheduling change. we originally scheduled bill launch for the same day as the state of the union and so they thought was a good idea to move the date. i'm grateful for all be sitting here in the front row and for the cochairs for the time and effort to have devoted to this. when
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2015 11:00am EDT
senator sheldon white house in the 2006 election. he made his announcement at george mason university in arlington, virginia. >>> good evening and thank you for coming. i'm the dean of school for policy and government and international affairs here at george mason university. this is the beginning of a speaker series that we have. politics, people and issues. tomorrow morning former senator jim webb will be here. at 10:30. i don't know if he'll make any significant announcement s, but he will be talking about important policy issues. so i would like to turn this over to bob gutman, the director of our center for politics and foreign relations, and he will introduce our distinguished speaker for this evening. thank you. bob? >> i want to thank everybody for coming. we have a new center on politics and foreign relations. and we have invited all the presidential possibilities, not candidates, and we'll have a series of events through the next year. and so we'll be covering this. m so anybody interested. contact us at gmu.edu. tonight we're going to launch a series. invited former governo
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2012 10:00am EST
george little. [laughter] >> he is always looking over my shoulder. well, good morning. i will open with a few remarks on afghanistan, and i'm joined by my fellow spokesman via video link from kabul. since we third last week that isaf forces mishandled religious materials, including the choly koran, political and military leaders from the president to the secretary of defense move quickly and forcefully to express apologies for this incident. american and afghan leaders have met with a muslim religious leaders over the past several days to elicit support in conveying that message. tragically, many in afghanistan have been killed or wounded as a result of a violence there. extremists have killed four americans, including two officers within the confines of the afghan interior ministry. they demonstrate that we will experience challenges within the course of this campaign. let me be clear -- first, secretary to attenpanetta and chairman dempsey are fully committed to a strategy in afghanistan. they believe we have achieved significant progress iagainst te and they momentum, believe th
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 10:00am EST
". host: george washington university law professor jonathan turley joining us to discuss his views on president obama's use of his executive powers as he begins his second term in the white house. why don't you start with your take on obama's inaugural address last week and what you described in your "usa today" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not ne
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2014 1:30pm EDT
george washington university students. would you please welcome to our stage, seth gold, class of 2016, from the milken institute school of public health. >> good morning, madam secretary. on behalf of the student body, i would like to congratulate you on your new role of secretary of health and human services and thank you for being here this morning. i would like to kick off our q and a with a personal question. you mentioned you are a mom. do you have any tips on how to achieve the ideal work life balance? >> i think ideal is something i'm not sure any of us hit. in terms of an approach to this, one of the things that i think is important harkins back to something i said in the speech about prioritization. the prioritization that one does in the work so that you understand the key things that you are focused on. that prioritization for the work, i think, is one of the things that helps put the work in the order that this t should be and contain it in the way. there's the other part which is making sure that people know that your family is a priority. and being clear about that
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2014 3:00pm EST
was constitutional is the same foundation president reagan and george herbert walker bush acted on? >> absolutely. they have all including presidents reagan and president bush senior used prosecutorial discretion to provide -- at the time it was voluntary departure. here, it's the same thing, a different type of prosecutorial discretion and different type of >> you said you agreed and maybe differed a little bit, you threw in reagan and president bush the second they were wrong and four wrongs don't make a right. >> presidential violations don't get better with time. i don't see an underlying statutory basis -- you can be sympathetic what the president is trying to do. >> let me ask you this. i know you're not a politician, why is it all the other four instances nobody came out and questioned the president's authority from either side and nobody came out and filed a lawsuit and nobody suggested a possibility of impeaching presidents bush, reagan, clinton, they did get to clinton for whatever else and then bush? what's the difference? why does this president get it different from al
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 8:00pm EST
times in a row now. mitt romney, he can win. if he said it won enough, it must be true. george w. bush, who won two terms, as a republican president, i would ask people politely in 1997, who delights in 2000? george w. bush, that is terrific. why? he can win. you are right. he raised all of that money. how did he raise all that money? it becomes circular. he can win, the democrats never asked that question. jimmy carter, bill clinton, barack obama. they were all told, you cannot win. how many told -- how many times was jimmy carter told, you cannot win? how many times was barack obama told you cannot win? they all won. two of them twice. the 01 with people you had never heard of before. we do not have anything like that in the republican party. we throw good money after bad. dole and mccain and romney use the same people. staff infection. it will not matter to do you put in front of them if you have the same people pulling the same strengths. [applause] >> how do we make a compelling argument? from a conservative point of view, how can you even make the compelling argument to rep
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2012 10:30pm EDT
- s0pan 3. >> the fifth annual clinton global initiative at george washington university, wadding about it this week. what is behind the initiative? how did it start, what is its purpose? dr. bill clinton came up with the idea five years ago. it is connected to the clinton global initiative to bring world leaders together to talk about the big problems of the day. the first group gathered in new orleans after hurricane katrina, and they looked out a whole bunch of different service projects that students have come up with all over the world. the idea is that president clinton wanted to take these projects and help students figure out how to make them available and turn them into reality. it is community service that has caught on. >> what is his role with the initiative? is it fund-raising, reaching out to the students that attended this weekend's events? >> they create the venue for it. the idea is that the people meet each other. a woman from new york university for kids that have night terrors. one in washington university, you have other team that is working toward health care needs in
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2014 3:00pm EST
the president of george h.w. bush's foundation. she worked for the republican former president for a long time. purdue ran an ad that said that foundation gave money to terrorists. now they didn't. they built habitat for humanity homes. it was not on president bush's agenda to fund terrorists. it was a despicable ad. that was the only one i can think of. i'm for it, but i help run a super pac. 100% were negative and i lobbied to run one more so we could surpass 100%. i love negative ads. if they are fair and factual about your life, then i think they are great. i'm sorry to be mean, but toughen up. you say the most vile things to each other. the first tweet i got, i was on for 30 seconds and someone said drink rat poison and jump in a wood chipper. >> he retweeted it. >> i do. >> it's redid you not ant. i was happy to retweet it and happy to not do it. there was science behind it. uc san diego. he has done research on this. the more negative the campaign, the higher the voter turn out. highest turn out was many years ago when win edwards recently of the federal penitentiary was runni
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2014 1:00pm EDT
, donald leroy adams. >> pat pick adams. shannon lewis adams stephen george adams ignatius udo adanga christy a. addamo terence e. adderley jr. sophia b. addo lee adler daniel thomas afflitto emmanuel akwasi afuakwah alok agarwal mukul kumar agarwala joseph agnello david scott agnes joao alberto da fonseca aguiar jr. brian g. ahearn jeremiah joseph ahern joanne marie ahladiotis shabbir ahmed terrance andre aiken godwin ajala trud i m.alagero. andrew alameno margaret ann alario gary m. albero jon leslie albert peter craig alderman and my father, the aforementioned john leslie albert. he was a dedicated father, a loving husband, a respected colleague. he is sorely missed. >> and my sister, dorothy r. morgan, you stand tall in our hearts. jacquelyn delaine aldridge david d. alger ernest alikakos edward l. allegretto eric allen joseph ryan allen richard dennis allen richard l. allen christopher e. allingham anna self-allison. janet m. alonso anthony alvarado antonio javier alvarez victoria alvarez-brito telmo e. alvear cesar amoranto alviar tariq amanullah angelo amaranto james m. amato j
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 10:00am EST
. people forget how many bailouts there were in the last two years of george w. bush's term. he himself said he had to give up his free-market ideals to save the economy. what did he save? you guys will be graduating in a couple of years. what kind of market are you going to be saving? i do not think so. and yet it is considered really strange. it does not get brought up in the debate. neither major party address this at all. like me, who say, we do not need to change the medicine. the medicine is what is killing the patient. the inflation question. generally speaking, inflation is in check. food and energy. that can give you the perception of prices being out of hand. you go to the supermarket or follow up your car once a week or more. that gets under your skin. it creates an index that separates them from energy because that is a noisy, up and down figure. core inflation is the price of everything else. that is pretty stable. to your keynesian point, the basic keynesian argument that john maynard keynes pushed during the great depression -- at the time, people had the notion t
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2012 6:00am EDT
end of 2006. but neither george bush nor barack obama gave main to those who wanted to overthrow the current government because they were afraid it might upset the iranian government. and when the time came for a revolution which did in define where they were bleeding in the straits holding the signs, saying please, president obama, help us overthrow these people killing americans with i.e.d.'s, overthrow the folks that have been holding americans captives almost continuously since 1979. overthrow the people who threaten the state of israel with annihilation. overthrow the funders of hamas and hezbollah and the funder of assad in syria. and barack obama said no, we're going to join with the radical islamists and legitimatize this election. ladies and gentlemen, in this race, we have one person, served eight years on the armed services committee, has a track record on iran that got it right on what to do to avoid a war in iran. over the last eight years. and we have a president who has gotten it wrong on every call. [applause] >> i don't know what the most important issue is going to
CSPAN
Jun 5, 2012 6:00am EDT
to the entire bush family for their guidance and example during our on transition. george, i will remember the gathering you posted for all living former presidents before it took office three your kind words of encouragement plus you also left made a really good tv sports package. [laughter] i use it. [laughter] >> last week, portraits of george w. bush and first lady laura bush were unveiled at the white had sprayed it was the first visit since leaving office. >> as fred mentioned, in 1814, dolly madison famously saved this portrait of the first george w.. [laughter] now michelle -- [laughter] if anything happens -- [laughter] there is your man. >> watch the entire event online at the cspan video library. >> here's a look at what we're covering tonight at 10:00 eastern. the senate homeland security subcommittee will hold a hearing on employing u.s. veterans live on c-span. on c-span 2, the senate will continue work on a measure that would require companies to pay men and women the same wages for doing the same job. on c-span 3, the senate finance committee looks at anti-poverty
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2011 6:00am EST
good example of how i operate. because we actually brought in the governors, george allen and george engler and others and their staffs actually helps write the bill. so it was a very practical bill because we have the people who implemented helping right at which frankly offended me of the federal staff who didn't like the idea that we brought in these outsiders. go ahead, yes maam. >> thank you for being here two days before christmas. [applause] we understand how hard you're having to work at this and we appreciate immenselythat your foe is obama. one thing i would suggest to you, don't call him a target. that gets all of us in trouble. he is your adversary. i agree with you 100%. two things that i wanted to point out is you can have your researchers verify this. 60 gallup, 65% of l the nation are not concerned about big business. we are concerned about big government. i think you are right on with all of your proposals. that is something that should be hammered home along with the fact that you are opposing obama. secondly, i heard and again i don't know if this is true, it was r
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2013 6:00am EDT
worked with a lot of different folks here for many years. terrific programs. in 2004, george bush. 98 of the 100 fastest-growing counties. after the 2004 election, the debate was about the problem facing the democratic party, because the fastest-growing parts of the country -- 98 out of a hundred is beyond the margin of error. of course we had a great recession since then, and those recessions have changed the counties, and that is something the partners have done a lot of work on. it is a cautionary tale, and over my long career i keep being asked at different times to look at long term party change, meaning whether or not there is alignment. i have been asked to do this several times in my career, and every time there is a predicted realignment, i keep saying, there are too many independents. those are conflicting views that restrict long-term realignment. but this work is very important. the other thing about data, and this is what is so powerful about the data set being created, is you can add test data, with the test hypothesis. for example, this is why the exit polls are such a
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