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CSPAN
Nov 8, 2016 8:00pm EST
reagan's victory speech. at 8:30, george h.w. bush and ross perot. then george bush and al gore's speeches. also the 1979 debate over the official title for george washington and subsequent leaders of the u.s. all of this tonight on american history tv on c-span3. >>> next, ronald reagan's election night victory speech from 1980 when he defeated jimmy carter with 51% of the popular vote to president carter's 41%. this coverage is from nbc news. [ cheers ] >> thank you very much. thank you. thanks very much. thank you. you know, here we are. this is -- [ cheers ] you know, we're all here but one n now. it's way past his bedtime. but let me -- let me just say first, let me just say first of all, this has been -- well, there's never been a more humbling moment in my life. i would have been -- [ applause ] not only humbled by the extent of what has happened tonight, even if it had been the cliffhanger that all of us, i think, were expecting, it would have been the same way. but just to have had the support of the people of this country. i consider the trust that you have placed in me
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2016 5:00pm EDT
presidential biographies. that's followed by a look at the books collected and read by george washington throughout his life, and we round out the night with a discussion about franklin roosevelt's mother sarah and her relationship -- ♪ >> 100 years president woodrow wilson signed the bill creating the national park service, and thursday we look back on the past centuries of caretakers in america's natural and historic treasures beginning at 10:00 eastern and throughout the day we take you through national park service sites across the country as recorded by c-span. at 7:00 p.m. eastern we're lived from the national parks services most visited home, arlington house, the robert e. lee memorial at arlington national cemetery. join us with your phone calls as we talk with robert stanton, former national parks service director and brandon byse, the arlington park site manager who will oversee the restoration of the mansion, slave quarters and ground. that's live thursday live from arlington house at 7:00 p.m. eastern on american history-tv on c-span3. >> next, on the presidency, we'll hear
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2016 1:00pm EDT
biography, people look at, you know, the already 7 0 volumes of george washington. to do an authoritative one life volume of washington i have to master 70 volumes and that's just a starting point. that's a problem we haven't really figured out. can i ask you a question even though you're the moderator. you're close to this problem. what should biographers do when there is such an immensity of material and well cataloged and classified available. >> one of the challenges you have with the modern presidency is the freedom of information act. people can file requests so that you have after reagan, you have libraries processing records not through a proactive agenda, but reactively to the requests they get. it's difficult to get the material you really want as a biographer. so sometimes that is not a problem. you know, i'm at the johnson library, and, you know, you have so many aspects of that presidency that are still germane today and we see frequently researchers delve into papers relating to civil rights or for education and so forth. most of those are available, but johnso
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2016 11:00am EDT
collected and read by george washington throughout his life. and later, a discussion about franklin roosevelt's mother, sara, and her relationship with members of her family. >>> american history tv airs on c-span3 every weekend telling the american story through events, interviews and visits to historic locations. this month american history tv is in prime time to introduce you to programs you could see every weekend on c-span3. our features include lectures in history, visits to college classrooms across the country to hear lectures by top history professors, american artifacts takes a look at treasures at u.s. historic sites, museums and archives. reel america revealing the it 20th century through archival films and news reels. the civil war where you hear about the people who shaped the civil war and reconstruction. and the presidency focuses on u.s. presidents and first ladies to learn about their politics, policies and legacies. all this month in prime time and every weekend on american history tv on c-span3. >>> tonight on american history tv in prime time, programs from our
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2015 9:00am EDT
>> richard george bruehert >> andrew brunn >> vincent edward brunton >> ronald bucca >> brandon j. buchanan >> greg j. buck >> dennis buckley >> nancy clare bueche >> patrick joseph buhse >> john edward bulaga jr. >> stephen bruce bunin >> matthew j. burke >> thomas daniel burke >> william francis burke jr. >> charles f. burlinggame, iii. >> thomas burnett jr. >> donald j. burns >> kathleen anne burns >> keith james burns >> john patrick burnside >> irina buslo >> milton g. bustillo >> thomas m. butler >> patrick dennis byrne >> timothy g. byrne >> daniel m. cavalero. >> jesus neptali cabezas >> lillian caceres >> brian joseph cachia >> steven dennis cafiero jr. >> and to my brother, michael whitenstein, michael, we miss you. not a day goes by that you're not thought about. you're in our prayers. we know you're up there watching over us and you're definitely proud of how your nieces and nephews are growing up and they share some of the qualities that you left us with. and we miss you every day. >> and my father firefighter michael j. lyons. i think about you every day and it's rea
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2016 9:00am EDT
belief e briefly at news week and he had a bust of george hw in his office. >> it was the only bust of gorge w bush. >> then you came to know him. >> yes. >> what are the challenges in doing a portrait of a living person. >> well, distance, obviously. the kind of critical distance we're talking about. to me, the most fascinating overall lesson of doing it was i wondered how much i missed in books where i've written where i haven't known the person because, you know, i've never had dinner with thomas jefferson. never had dinner with andrew jackson. having had dinner with george bush, i would try to write what he was like as a literary matter and i would know what i was missing. >> right. >> that raised the literary bar rather higher than i would have expected. so if seems to me if you spent time with someone, you are able to judge what you've written and your conclusions by a different standard than what you've gotten out of the papers or you've gotten out of the archives. so to me, that was a surprise. i expected it to be somewhat easier, frankly, as a literary battle. go, have lunch,
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2015 3:00pm EDT
the footsteps of our founding fathers and great generals like george washington and patton. president obama, they are rolling in their graves in shame that america is represented by you, a weak ling, a coward and an incompetent. america is the home of the brave, not the spineless career politicians who lost their moral campus and backbone to the negotiating alter of iran who scream death to america. this treaty shall be undone and it will be undone and every single one of us here today is committed to see this through until victory. thank you for being here. go to act for america.org and join us. thank you. >>> thank you. next is my senator from georgia, senator david purdue. >> thank you. listen, thank you so much for being out here. god bless you. if feels like we're in georgia today, i got to tell you. i'm so proud of what the tea party patriots are doing and i'm proud they can claim their roots right in my home state of georgia. thank you guys for being here. this deal, this deal is the worst negotiated deal in american foreign policy history. in 1994, president bill clinton told
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2016 9:04pm EST
, you describe, after the attempt on the president's life, you describe being at george washington university hospital, and people in the emergency room and so forth, and you said, i have to get to my husband. they don't know how it is between us. people weren't listening and so forth. you said, they don't know how it is between us. how is it between you? ms. reagan: well, you have to the wholerstand was,on of that day, which which was tremendous, obviously, are notsay things that maybe as precisely as you would have said them otherwise. , it is alwaysas in a very close marriage, and i can go through most anything as long as i know that ronnie is there. and the same holds true for him. that is what i meant. they don't know how it is with us. he's got to know i'm here. there andf him lying not knowing where i was, or if i was even around, i knew that wasn't going to be well, going to sit well. carl: you also, at different moments, have gotten angry because he doesn't get angry. in politics, have you always had to sort of play the bad cop, and he was the good cop? ewell, in a sens ,
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2016 8:00pm EDT
american university. and veteran of incoming and outgoing transitions with reagan, george h.w. bush and george w. bush administration and senior fellow for the governor studies programs at bookings institution and veteran of bill clinton transition process. so this first session is 75 minutes. each of them will give a brief view of some of the most important things they see and that they've experienced in their transitions. then we will aim for 30, 35 minutes of q & a. i think that's what most of you want to do. we will start with david. david eagles. >> thank you for having us. appreciate your time. thanks for talking about presidential transition. what i want to do is take a quick step back here and understand that just the shear scope and magnitude of what we're talking about. these presidential transitions are massive. this is part of the message to the incoming teams. they are inherited a $4 trillion apparatus. hundreds of federal agencies. as chris mentioned, 4,000 political appointments. 1100 of those have to go through the senate. and there's only 73 days to your point. ther
CSPAN
Jul 25, 2016 9:00am EDT
discusses george mason and thomas jefferson and alexander hamilton while also addressing how the bill of rights were eventually ratified by the new states. the new york historical society hosted this hour-long event. >> so tonight's program is james madison, father of the constitution and its part of our lecture series in american history. i would like to thank carl mangus for helping create the series and normal society board of trustees. thank you. i'd like to thank lon jacobs and sternburg and all of the council members with us for all of their great work and support as well. let's give them all a hand too. the program tonight will last an hour and include a question and answer session and there will be a formal book signing following the program and our speaker's books can be found in our museum store. he'll be signing on the central park west side. we are thrilled to welcome richard brook highser, renowned historian and author back to new york, mr. brookheiser is evseni editor of national review and 2004 acted as historian curator for new york historical exhibit alexander hamilto
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2016 12:00am EST
. road to the white house rewind continues with the concession speech from president george h.w. bush in november 1992. he lost to bill clinton. this was reported in houston. it's about ten minutes. >> thank you very much. hey listen, you guys -- >> thank you, george! thank you, george! >> thank you so much. here's the way i see it. here's the way we see it and the country should see it that the people have spoken, and we respect the majesty of the democratic system. i just called governor clinton over in little rock and offered my congratulations. he did run a strong campaign. i wish him well in the white house, and i want the country to know that our entire administration will work closely with his team to ensure the smooth transition of power. there is important work to be done, and america must always come first so we will get behind this new president and wish him well. and to all who voted for us, voted for me, here -- especially here but all across the country, thank you for your support. and we have fought the good fight, and we've kept the faith. and i believe i have upheld the
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2016 12:57am EST
. chief of staff george c. marshal. arguing his skills transformed the army. >> this man with a beautiful manners with a was incorruptible, aun astonishingly calm considering the pressure is on him. >> then the 1921 silent film honoring the unknown soldier of world war i. >> it was tremendous. the streets of washington were lined with thousands of folks who waited for the casket to be removed and brought by the honor guard down pennsylvania avenue and then across the bridge into virginia. and i think what i've read is one of the largest turnouts for any parade in the city. >> sunday evening at 6:00 eastern, when american artifact. >> beautiful building. from the moment it opened, it was already too small for what it was about to face. constructed to handle about half million people a year and ended up handling in 1907 alone, 1,200,000 people. >> toured ellis island to learn about the experience. just before 9:00, in 1916 president wilson nominated boston lawyer louis to the united states supreme court becoming the first jew to sit on the nation's highest court. in commemoration
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2016 2:20am EST
" for seven years. i went from covering -- i started covering prince george's county. once again, politics and government. the interesting thing about prince george's county and this whole region is that everything was always changing. everything was on the verge of changing. the county was about 50-50 black-white, which means power was shifting hands. it meant that people were taking jobs for the first time. that means there was conflict. conflict is always good for the news business. it is what i call my, when chickens fly theory of journalism. if a chicken walks across the street, that is what expected. that is not news. if a chicken suddenly flies, that is news because it is unusual. that is my thought about what was happening in the prince george's county schools. and in the prince george's county government. i covered montgomery county. i covered the district. i covered, i guess it was the first administration of marion barry, which was an interesting time. i did that for my first several years and then i went to the national staff and covered my first presidential campaign
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2016 5:42pm EST
website, studentcam.org. ffrmt fdr and truman insider george elsey passed away. he wasserconsidered one of the living links. he sat down for an oral history. the interview focuses on mr mr. elsey's knowledge of the waning days of lyndon johnson presidency and nixon's 1968 presidential campaign but talked at length about his own white house career. this is a 15-minute portion of his interview. but in april of '42, my boss in naval intelligence was transferred to the white house, and he took me with him to a place called the map room. the map room was a small room on the ground floor of the white house which had been just a reception room. it had been converted into an intelligence and communications center where fdr and his close associates could at any hour of any day come in and get a complete briefing on the current status of the war, because the map room staff received information from the navy and war departments on a 24-hour-a-day basis. information was constantly flowing in. we also served as the secretariat for all of fdr's communications with winston churchill, uncle joe sta
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2016 5:00pm EDT
democratic party that george clooney hosted for hillary clinton. and just to get a good seat at the fund-raiser, you had to contribute $300,000. it is worth asking, why could anybody contribute $300,000, if the maximum contribution in a primary is $2,700. that's because the supreme court said well you can string it together, pile these committees, write one check and it is all fine. so stuff is really honored in the breach. that's kind of like, i think, sort of the lay of the land of some of the key elements of this. but some of the consequences make aren't sufficiently recognized. there is two that are dominant. obvious but maybe less obvious than first appears. the first one is that all this money that's coming in, it is provided by an incredibly small number of individuals and corporations. make sense to think about them together as a corporate class, a really small number. so i would say that occupy wall street, which did a great service to the country, kind of got it wrong, write. all the discussion about the 1%, right, the other 99, the 1%, it doesn't explain what's going on in cam
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2016 9:00am EDT
inspector general of the irs. russell george. no targeting of any group, no order to destroy any e-mails, no obstruction of any investigation. i didn't say that. mr. george, republican ig said that. republicans may want to ignore these findings, but they are right here in black and white. finally, let me make one final observation. on the committee's official website, there's a section called, "getting results." twenty employees called on to resign or be fired. mr. koskinen is on that list with tbd next to it. creating a hit list to knock off federal officials is not something to be proud of. publicly defaming a public servant who came out of retirement to take the helm of an agency in turmoil is not a positive result. it is a travesty. we can and we should be proud of the bipartisan pro active reforms we work on together and will continue to work on, as we'll do this afternoon with regard to the postal reform. so i hope we can return to focusing on those issues that have the potential to deliver real results to the people who sent us here. one of the things i say to my personal st
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2016 4:00pm EST
me for a long time. i didn't know, i didn't know let me start at the beginning. george washington is my hero. george washington is a man who makes me want to be a better man. he's a man who makes me believe you can be a better man. he's a man that puts things for me into perspective. that your whole life really is about service. it's not about you. it's not about your name in lights. it's not about fame. not about fortune. it's about service to others and a greater cause. george washington, his life of service started when he was 13 years old. at 13 years old, he knew what he wanted to do and thank goodness, he didn't do it, but he wanted to serve as a sailor in the royal navy. and he actually joined the navy. in those days, you could just do down to the ships and go on, i'm in the navy. and he joined the navy and he took his steamer trunk and he brought it up and sat it there on the deck of one of the, the english ships. and then he listened to his mother. who was down by the plank and she was making a scene. she was like, oh, george, please, no, please, oh, no, george, don't lea
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2016 8:00pm EST
, george vi concerning the future, if -- if something went wrong. if either he or his heir presumptive anthony eden, the foreign secretary, should perish on the way to or the way back from the crimea. now in that letter, churchill said if tragedy befell him there was only one man, the king should send forth to replace him as prime minister, and here he is, sir john anderson. back still in the uk is met with a sir john who quite often. his pick was sir john anderson. john anderson in 1945 was an independent mp, capital "i." the member of the war cabinet since 1940 and presently a member of the -- churchill was giving praise for anderson. anderson was not only well adapted by character and outlook but to shoulder the burden of the premiership but also because of the, and i quote, the general regard attaching to him from all political parties. as you know, he also was code named argonauts. and they returned safely. and history, whether it's churchill's or britain's or the worlds was what it was. nonetheless, i still think we ought to ask the question, what was it about this man, john ande
CSPAN
Sep 18, 2015 3:00pm EDT
served on numerous boards to including the homeland security policy institute at george washington university. please welcome josh filler. josh, thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you, joe. good afternoon, everyone. again i'm josh filler. i'll be serving as the moderator on today's panel. when we think about emergency preparedness and response, we generally tend to think of firefighters and police officers and sheriff's deputies and the like. and while that makes a lot of sense, it's also true that lawyers for the agencies that those responders work for also play a very, very important role. and we're privileged today to have an outstanding panel of lawyers from various agencies at the federal and local level, some now in private practice, who have served in those important roles or do so today. and to give us some insights about the role of a lawyer in emergency preparedness and response. and with that i'd like to introduce the panel by having them introduce themselves to you and then we'll get right into it. >> good afternoon, i'm adrian sevier. i'm the chief county of the emergenc
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2015 11:00am EDT
christopher moran john michael moran kathleen moran lindsay stapleton morehouse george william morell steven p. morello vincent s. morello yvette nicole moreno dorothy morgan richard j. morganpa+áñ nancy morgenstern sanae mori blanca robertina morocho leonel geronimo morocho morocho dennis gerard moroney >> and my cousin, fndy firefighter, michael t. carroll. i love you, and i love you, and love you. love you. love never dies. >> and my son, ryan daniel fitzgerald. as then, so is now, we continue to love you and miss you so very, very much. god bless our troops, god bless our first responders, and god bless new york city and god bless america. [ applause ] >> lynne irene morris odessa j. morris. seth allen morris steve morris. christopher martel morrison ferdinand v. morrone william david moskal ryan a. moss. marco motroni cynthia motus-wilson iouri a. mouchinski jude joseph moussa peter moutos damion o'neil mowatt christopher michael mozzillo stephen vincent mulderry richard t. muldowney jr. michael d. mullan dennis michael mulligan peter james mulligan michael joseph mullin
CSPAN
Mar 11, 2016 9:00am EST
the recent attacks in paris. also global counterterrorism challenges. george washington university center for cyber and homeland security is hosting this event set to get under way in just a moment. >>> again we are awaiting remarks from france's interior minister as he discusses the topic of terrorism, combating terrorism after attacks in paris. he'll also touch on global counterterrorism challenges. this is hosted by george washington university center for cyber and homeland security. republican presidential candidate donald trump is holding ace news conference at this hour. he'll receive the endorsement of former rival ben carson during the event taking place this morning at mr. trump's estate in florida. this conference continues live on c-span2. we also have more live programming on our other networks at 11:00 eastern on c-span, it's a discussion about what the u.s. government is doing to prevent the spread of the zika virus. it's hosted by the bipartisan policy center and the u.s. leadership coalition, live at 11:00 eastern today on c-span. >>> nancy reagan will be laid to re
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2016 1:52pm EST
policy activists. prior to joining heritage, she served in the cabinet of governor george allen as secretary of natural resources. she has also been a senior official in the reagan administration serving in the office of presidential personnel as the deputy assistant director. and special assistant to the president for his cabinet office. she's been a special assistant to attorney general ed meese and for purposes of today's program as well, she was deputy undersecretary of the department of the interior and an assistant secretary for fish, wildlife and parks. please join me in welcoming becky norton dunlop. becky? >> thank you very much, john. let me add my words of welcome to the group we have here today on belaugh of the heritage foundation. you know the heritage foundation is an organization, a research and education organization that spines its policy roots in the constitution of the united states of america. that's a very important point when it comes to having a discussion such as the one we're going to have today. we think that if you're an originalist, that you don't look
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2016 2:30pm EDT
security and a conversation with steven hadley, a former national security advisor to george w. bush. he talked about his experiences in that role, the president's utilization of intelligence to make policy decisions, and he offered advice for the next national security council staff. >> let's try to set the stage for our discussion and if you could, paint a broad picture for us regarding how the president gets intelligence information. obviously he doesn't just turn on the news and watch it, although i assume presidents watch the news. but since you served president bush, let's focus on your time in the white house and president george w. bush's routine. what was his intelligence routine, the daily routine that he had with respect to receiving intelligence briefings. what was your role in that? >> so, my sense is that it varies president to president. the presidents i know well are george h.w. bush and george w. bush, and certainly george w. bush even better. president bush and vice-president cheney, you had two people who were avid consumers of intelligence, believed in the importa
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2016 11:37pm EST
for the position. it has been done once before with george marshall. -- got a waiver, but it is not customary. it does seem that with the public is in control of the house and senate, and with the johnrt of general -- of mccain, it does appear that he would be able to get such a waiver. before they pass it donald trump takes office or after, we will have to wait and see. typically, the candidate gets a november. on generate 20th, they are up on the third floor changing the sign. they have a nameplate, and a crew goes up. after an hour or so of being sworn in, the name is up on the door. mcintyre with us now. let's get your phone calls. for democrats. 202-748-8001 for republicans. independentse for . you can also send us an in mail email oret -- an treat. caller: i believe he is the right man for the call. i appreciate what all of you are doing. got bless. -- god bless. giving wonderful thanks and new year. host: i believe general petraeus was also mentioned. guest: he did say that he would work with president-elect donald trump if asked. he does not seem to be under active considera
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2015 9:33am EDT
distinguished guest this evening, mr. george meany, secretary treasurer of the american federation of labor. the opinions expressed aren't necessarily those of the speakers. >> many of our viewers of course, members of the american federation of labor and they together with the rest of us, i'm sure would like to hear some of your opinions tonight on the political situation. first, sir, the american federation of labor has just broken the precedent of 28 or 30 years by endorsing a presidential candidate. now, sir, first of all, why did the afl see fit this year to endorse the candidacy of governor stevenson? >> of course the american federation of labor has been interested in the political scene for many years because of the fact that to a large extent, the conditions under which we work can be determined by legislation. >> what's the difference between 1952 and 1948, for instance? why was this particular year? >> because of the passage of the taft hartley act followed by the establishment of a official political arm of the american federation of labor that year. and then entry into the poli
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2015 12:00pm EDT
, mr. obama, are continuing the policies of george w. bush. seriously, if you want to poison the relationship, that would be the way to do it. >> i want to ask mr. mulcair to respond to that, because it goes right to the heart of his policies regarding the islamic state and the international coalition. so please. >> and our relations with the united states. >> exactly. >> it's interesting to hear the prime minister cite our allies only when it suits his purpose. it's not based on a question of values. with the islamic state, he says, we have to do the same as the americans, the british, the french, because they're involved in the combat mission. when it comes to the deal that france, the united states, great britain, helped ensure that iran's nuclear ambitions were peeled back, mr. harper attacks that as being wrong headed. it's not a question that some of our allies agree and some don't. we just said the same thing, mr. harper, that when it's not in canada's interests, we'll stand up with canada's needs. i know that canada can get back to being a voice for reason. i want to put
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2016 9:00am EDT
colorado and john lynn of ohio, former presidential nominee george mcgovern and reverend jesse jackson. for the complete american history tv weekend schedule go to cspan.org. >>> next a discussion about foreign aid programs hosted by the brookings institution and the american enterprise institute with usaid administrator gayle smith. the event begins with remarks from senators david perdue and jeanne shaheen, members of the foreign relations committee. this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> again, ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon and welcome. two items of housekeeping. again, per senate rules, protesting is prohibited, and we would ask you to please ensure that your cell phones have been shut off. it's my honor to welcome from aei danny plecco. [ applause ] >> thank you, everybody, for not protesting and for clapping instead. ladies and gentlemen members of the diplomatic corps it's really a great pleasure to welcome you to this joint american enterprise institute, brookings event with the new agency for international development administrator, gayle smith. we've titled this event "u.s
CSPAN
Apr 1, 2016 5:00pm EDT
between ronald reagan and george h.w. bush and also a 1984 democratic primary debate. >>> i am a history buff. i do enjoy seeing the fabric of our country and how things -- just how they work and how they're made. >> i love american history tv. presidency. >> american artifacts, they're fantastic shows. >> i had no idea they did history. that's probably something i'd really enjoy. >> with american history tv, it gives you that perspective. >> i'm a c-span fan. >>> former house intelligence committee chairman mike rodgers now a radio talk show host spoke about cyber attacks from china, russia's intervention in ukraine and the iranian nuclear program. from the heritage foundation, just over an hour. >> let's try to set the stage for our discussion and if you could, paint a broad picture for us regarding how the president gets intelligence information. obviously he doesn't just turn on the news and watch it. but since you served president bush let's focus on your time in the white house and president george w. bush's routine. what was his intelligence routine? the daily routine that
CSPAN
Apr 8, 2016 5:30pm EDT
, george w. bush when he w was elected, went by what historians call the abc policy. the anything but clinton policy. anything the clinton d the administration needed to move quickly away from. even against wishes of some of the other members of the administration like condy rice. there was also now a growing to play down the threat posed by terrorism. when it's coming from clinton administration officials were unheeded or cast aside. they had other priorities. by contrast a more effective strategy, need look no further than the bush family. george h.w. bush announced a pause in u.s.-soviet relations and believed it was necessary to take a step back and reflect on the tactics and the policies between the u.s. and soviet union, but the assumptions towards the soviet union and whether they could trust in the leader and whether or not the strategy and so forth and so on. many historians look back on this as a wise decision that helped calibrate the priorities moving forward. gave them great confidence to not involve themselves in the revolutions that swept across in 1989 and let them rea
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2016 2:38pm EDT
know how many confederate soldiers actually surrendered here at appomattox. general george sharp was put in charge of this process, and the men printing those passes worked on printers similar to this, and they kept those passes going. they would have to ink the printers and strike off paroles that would look like this. they would actually have to be hung and dried, and then they were cut into individual parole passes. these were sent over to the confederate army where the officer and their command would fill in the soldier's name and sign the parole. and that was giving -- made into a master list of paroles that was turned over to the united states forces and that's how we know what confederate soldiers were paroled here. each soldier would take this pass and on the way home, grant afforded them to receive rations from united states forces should they encounter. they could use them for transportation on ships and railways. we've even seen occasions where soldiers are being issued shoes and clothing on their way home. so it was a very valuable piece of paper to have. and it was one t
CSPAN
Jul 20, 2016 1:30pm EDT
presidents, there was a thirst to know what presidents look like. iconic presidents like george washington especially, andrew jackson or lesser known ones, john quincy adams would have an oil painting done because it was customary with the royalty and you would have a democratic portrait in a democratic country. then there would be lith graphs and prints and drawings of varying quality. as you move down the food chain the quality becomes not pretty artistic. so there was this thirst to find imagery which photography satisfies. you have lincoln for the first time here 1846 becoming visible. again, he has worked his way up. he is a lawyer, becoming a lawyer, establishing himself. he has gone through this process of auto didacting, self teaching of where all of the cliches are true where he does walk five miles to return five cents. he does learn to cipher by using wooden logs. there is primitivism which only adds to the mystery that in the beginning of this modern country that the united states is becoming that lincoln is coming out of the west. he is coming into prominence and fa
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2016 12:15pm EDT
-hosted by george washington university and the conference also featured a panel of intelligence officials and experts discussing a number of issues including challenges presented by russia and its president vladimir putin. >> i have the great honor of being the director of the central intelligence agency. it's an absolute pleasure to be here and to kick off this day of discussion and examination of the ethos and profession of intelligence. thank you for being here and supporting this important endeavor. i want to first thank the president, b.j. penn and the hospitality. thank you to all of the staff and support here at gw university. george washington is a true center of excellence, particularly in the realm of cyber security and studies. i'm thrilled to have so many individuals with ties to gw who are involved in today's proceedings. i'm confident it will be a fascinating day of panels and debate. having gw serve as our setting made a lot of sense for several reasons of the for starters it's nice to return to one's roots. i'm not talking to myself as much as i would enjoy being
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2016 12:00am EST
presidential transition teams of bill clinton, george w. bush, and barack obama share some of the lessons learned from their experience and offer advice to the incoming administration. this was part of the forum cohosted by the brookings institution and miller center. it is 55 minutes. to brookings. >> welcome to brookings. we are very proud to covers this atnt with the miller center the university of just josh virginia -- virginia. the first year has not begun yet for the donald trump administration. have some already flavor of what life could be like in the first year. there is nothing like a trip down memory lane to try and understand the kinds of challenges any administration has in its first year that the trump administration in particular will face come january 20 when president trump is sworn in. we have an action-packed program that will deal -- today that will deal with the various aspects of presidential leadership in the first year, from domestic to foreign policy to bureaucratic and organizational challenges. i am happy to have the opportunity to partner both with daryl, schol
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2016 11:00am EDT
part of the record and with that mrs. -- ms. george -- sorry, we'll go in order i guess. different from my sheet. but dr. lacker, you'll go first and you're recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. good morning, chairman why zinga and i'm honored to speak about the governance structure of the regional banks to understand the fed's struck it's essential to understand the fed's purpose. the banking system was often unable to adjust the supply of monetary assets flexibly enough in response of the changing needs of commerce. the fed was founded to furnish an elastic currency in the words of the preamble to the federal reserve act. clearinghouses, bank owned cooperatives in larger cities played an important role in how periodic crises were resolved before the fed including the issuance of currency substitutes. but clearinghouses were widely viewed as favoring the interest of large money center banks. reserve banks were modeled after clearinghouse, but with universal eligibility, the aim being to improve upon the clearinghouses in way to serve broader public interests. the plan for the cent
CSPAN
Apr 4, 2016 11:00am EDT
from happening. >> george osborne presents his eighth budget but is forced into a rethink after a dramatic resignation. labor says the process is in chaos. >> he hasn't been very successful at producing a balanced budget in the interests of everyone in this country, particularly those with disabilities! >> and the lourdes put pressure on the government, voting against a string of bills on disability, child migration and party funding. >> i do not wish to be party to a move that would seriously disadvantage one of the great parties of this country. >> but first, to the referendum on britain's membership of the european union. david cameron promised in his manifesto that he'd renegotiate britain's relationship with the eu and put the results of that deal to a vote. the prime minister wanted restrictions on migrants' inward benefits. he wanted child benefit for the children of eu migrants living overseas to be scrapped, a promise that the eu commitments to ever closer union wouldn't apply to britain and safeguards to protect the city of london. after weeks of toing and froing, the pr
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2016 1:00pm EDT
occurring inside catholic circles led by arch neo-con michael novak who in conjunction with george weigle and others were arguing the global war on terror or whatever they call it now caused the rules of warfare to change. there's two categories of rules of war. one is the rules that governor how a nation goes to war and when it can disbi to ecide to g. the other, rules of governing conduct of warfare. rules governing conduct of warfare are easier to implement than when a nation is allowed to go to war. i will talk about in the few minutes that remain. my first paper at annapolis naval law class was about the apparent disconnect i saw in the operation of the naval academy and navy in general between the law and morality. it soon became clear in conjunction with, i suppose, my awakening religious point of view that i've talked a little about that there's something fundamentally wrong. if you're going to throw something, give me a chance to duck with the classic liberal ♪ notion of the state. the idea the civil law, aka positive law, written law, has no connection to the moral law.
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2016 3:12pm EDT
contractor in the world bank, watching the actions of the george h.w. bush administration -- i'd like to ask professor koh about whether he believes that the actions of the george h.w. bush administration post-9/11 -- >> george w. bush. >> george w. bush. sorry. whether the actions were legal or el legillegal. thank withdryou very much. >> first of all, there were several digfferent questions. the u.s. government is important in terms of the geneva conventions. i do not believe the u.s. military would obey an order from a civilian commander to torture somebody in violation of the geneva conventions because they have internalized those rules. i think you heard some of that which actually forced one of the president fshl candidaial candi recant his position and fall back to saying he would do whatever was lawful or something like that although every time he goes on tv, he recants the recantation. the second point makes the pint very graphically. let me put it this way. if i'm on my computer in washington and i'm monitoring what's going on in a computer abroad, nathat's cyber monitori. migh
CSPAN
Apr 14, 2016 4:00pm EDT
our ability to replace them is very questionable. >> okay. inspector george, we always value your work. i gather that you all have looked at this issue as well and you largely agree with what the commissioner has said. that these were justifiable hires, that these are exceptionally well qualified individuals. and that this was something that really worked. is that true? >> it is true. and it was actually even under-budget this is one of the programs implemented by the irs that we have to say was very successful and justified. >> i'm going to repeat that for my colleagues. so here we have something that's been an essential tool, we're not going to have it any longer, absent congress getting serious on a bipartisan basis to renew it. and inspector george, whose views we have long admired on both sides of the aisle said the program came in under budget. and i appreciate you're doing that, inspector, because if that isn't a wake-up call to the congress, i don't know what is. there's something that works and if we're going to beat the crooks, we ought to have it. now commissioner koskanen,
CSPAN
Jun 1, 2016 3:25pm EDT
nomination for president of the united states. >> and incumbent president george h.w. bush accepts his party's nomination in houston. >> and i am proud to receive and i'm honored to accept your nomination for president of the united states. >> at 4:45, architectural historian barry lewis on the creation and evolution of new york's greenwich vision. >> when the "l" opened it gave us what we understood. west of 6th avenue was the lower west side. nobody ever crossed that line. now, the people from west of 6th avenue might cross the line to work as a servant in washington square, but believe me the people in washington square never went on the other side of 6th avenue. >> and at 8:00 p.m. "on the presidency" -- >> every time i look at washington, unanimous, unanimously president in chief, unanimously president of the united states, unanimously re-elected president of the united states, unanimously appointed as the lieutenant general and commander in chief of all the armies raised or to be raised for service of the united states. what a record. >> george washington >> george washington sch
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2016 9:00pm EST
the cuban missile price -- missile crisis. here is ted kennedy with george w. bush watching a film about his brother in the oval office and the cabinet room coming to terms with the cuban missile crisis. the bush library, which i had the post -- pleasure for visiting for the first time last week. they have a hand written thank you note from ted kennedy to bush, thinking him for bringing him and his family down to the white house to see 13 days. he said, i hope i will have many opportunities to come down to the white house and watch you signed some policies that we can agree on. including education and health care. a part from that, that outreach and that ringing together to people from across the aisle. which ted kennedy had done on many occasions. and president bush had done in texas. grew the no child left behind policy. there can be issues about whether that was the best policy for education. outpoint was about reaching to the other side, and the other side accepting the outreach and moving on from there. after the tax cuts, the top priority and that principal priority was the n
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2016 3:00pm EST
these days. but that happened then. george shultz called me. the president called. he was totally honest. about how he had thought the speech had not worked or had not done what he hoped to do. but before that he told me, he said, how did you know i knew that poem? i said, oh, mr. president, i didn't know that you knew the poem. i took a chance, i hoped you knew it. he said i did know it. you want to know how? indeed the poem "high flight" had been written on a plaque outside his daughter patty's grade school, and when he had dropped her off in the morning on the way to work, he would stop sometimes and read the plaque. so, that poem was very well known to him and really had meaning for him. and so really worked. then he very honestly told me he had not originally thought the speech had succeeded in doing whatever should be done but came to believe by this morning that it had. and i said, well, mr. president, what made you think that it worked. and there were a number of things that made him feel that it worked, but the most striking one was he said, well, you know, frank sinatra
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2016 12:00am EST
questions live. mitchell her george was a special envoy for middle east these. -- middle east peace. written a book on israeli-palestinian negotiations. he is interviewed by the president and ceo of the woodrow wilson center. they have accepted israel's existence and opted for peaceful negotiation to achieve the state. >> go to book tv.org for the complete schedule. >> the united nations will have a new secretary-general in january when former prime minister of portugal takes office. president obama welcomed the secretary general designate to the oval office. mr. obama: it is a great pleasure to be able to welcome the secretary-general designate to the oval office. he will be assuming a post that obviously has enormous influence and impact around the world. the good news is that he has an extraordinary reputation as multilateralas led organizations at the highest level and has done so in ways that everybody recognizes has been extraordinary effective. most recently, his work with the human commission on refugees -- the u.n. omission on refugees. and his ability to concretely help pe
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2018 12:16am EST
reagan and george bush and george bush, they increased the national debt so that president clinton who leftved it, and when he promised the entire national debt would have been paid down by 2009. we were in the black. then we got the george w. bush tax cuts that put us further in the whole. that is what barack obama inherited. -- tax cuts that put us further in the wholhole. that is what barack obama inherited and had us steadily working our way out of there, but it dragged on the economy. therefore, you needed a solution both globally so we could compete with foreign countries, and we wanted to make sure we were advantage in american companies, and there was wide agreement on this. obama himself proposed lowering the corporate rate from 35% to 28 percent, and then 25% for manufacturers, knowing that manufacturing, as we do in this state, has a better cash for the individual, meaning that for every manufacturing job, that creates for service sector jobs. that was the starting point for president obama. we felt going into this engagement that that at least should be a starting point
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2016 1:00pm EDT
you president george? you're on the board? >> your question is an important one for federal reserve. as i listen to the discussing, i remain convinced, a question of accountability not structure of federal reserve. in the case of western states i have a few of those in my region, wyoming, colorado, new mexico. we are intentional in picking up information. in fact, today you will see coming out of the beige book, which is released by the federal reserve, a sense of each region which directly includes those kinds of -- >> i guess the question i'm asking is i know you are convinced it's working. the reason i mentioned house of representatives being closest to people is every single one of us are talking to our people. we're talking to our bankers. they share those concerns also. again, i know you feel as if it's representative but i'm trying to look for different ideas where that thought, they may feel like they are being more represented. yes? >> the important thing to keep in mind, although the federal reserve we've described as deeply engageded in understanding the entire country, w
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2016 11:37pm EST
view him unfavorably. george w. bush was elected under controversial circumstances, he got the benefit of the doubt from a number of democrats. donald trump did not get the benefit as he did. all levers of the government, especially once a new supreme court justice joined the court, he will have the ability to put in his agenda at the very beginning. over the first 100 days, six months, and first year -- a lot of presidents get a honeymoon period where they are popular. donald trump does not go into that. -- does not go in with that. significantnter resistance. >> the debate over the last nine weeks from election morning until this monday in december -- one iowa republican quoted that it was all one fantasy. we also posedd: this question to everyday voters in a poll that we conducted over the weekend. we did not find a large appetite even among democrats for actually trying to disrupt the elect oral college vote and overturn the results. that is one thing that has been interesting. we talk about shedding light on the process. americans still narrowly believe we should elect our
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 10:48am EDT
the several story lines connected to this southern mansion, from george washington and the revolutionary war, to robert e. lee and the civil war, and they learn about the enslaved people who lived their lives on the 1100 acre estate and whose legacies live on in their descendants. comi coming up first, we'll hear several presidents talk about the national park, and later, we'll hear from the director of the national park service, jonathan jarvis. first, president obama at yosemite national park. >> the foresight and the faith in the future to do what it takes to protect our parks and to protect this planet for generations to come. and that's especially true for our leaders in washington. what lincoln did when he set aside
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2016 1:00pm EDT
various aspects of -- [ no audio ] -- viadvisor to president georg w. bush from 2005 to 2009. he also from 2001 to 2005 served as deputy national security advisor to president george w. bush. we want to get your perspective. i'm not going to go into steve's long and distinguished career and resume but you can certainly read it online. we want to get right to the program. number one, thank you for coming to heritage. it is always a pleasure to have you. let's try to set the stage for our discussion. if you could, paint a broad picture for us regardng how the president gets intelligence information. obviously he doesn't just turn on the news and watch it, though i assume presidents watch the news. but since you served president bush, let's focus on your time in the white house and president george w. bush's routine. what was his intelligence routine, the daily routine that he had with respect to receiving intelligence briefings? what was your role in that? >> so, my sense is that it varies president to president. the presidents i know well are george h.w. bush and george w. bush, and ce
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2016 9:05pm EST
location of the prince george's equestrian center which sloekt eis located southeast. animals here will be vetted, fed, and assessed for their ability to remain calm in a crowded parade environment. to the other side of the city across the potomac river, we have the pentagon north parking lot. this will play host to the largest number o servicemen and cordon, and they will present their salute to the outgoing commander in chief as they move down pennsylvania avenue and make their way to the capitol. from the capitol, they will move through the building and then be announced on to the platform to begin the inaugural swearing in program. of course this culminates the oath of office which takes place right before 12 noon and immediately following that is the inaugural address. and at the conclusion of that ceremony, the outgoing commander in chief will department through the capitol. at the same time, the new president will be escorted into the hall into the capitol for a congressional luncheon. the time line continues then after the lunch. the president, vice president and their spouses will
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