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20090604
20171212
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
the va case, lewis redding, jack greenberg and george hayes and james nabrit. you talked about the impact of this social science experiment 6789. so we have a video with -- about kenneth and namey are clark who conducted this test, and we'll talk more about the impact on the justices deciding this case. let's watch. >> the doll test was integral to the brown v. board of education because it clearly demonstrated that separate was not equal. and separate was not good. in fact, separate was an injustice. what we're looking at here were the dolls that they used in their doll studies. the doll tests were a series of studies that mamey clark and kenneth did to try to determine racial awareness in young children. with the implication being that in a segregated society, if children are aware of race and the differences in race and the differences in how different racial groups are treated, that it would impact how they felt about themselves. what they did that actually became very well known in part of the brown case was they showed young children, black and white dolls, and they would ask
were equal. prince george's would be able to say a was able after looking at it was confusing to marshall, that is why he picked a school where there was no allegation of separate but equal facilities, he was stressing what linda brown said that as her tears froze up as she walked to school. she had to walk six blocks to school and then take a bus to the segregated elementary school. there was another school, sumner elementary which was seven blocks that she could have walked two. for her and her father, it was an in dignity and outrage. the arguments before the court, naacp was represented by greenbergter and jack and it was a three-judge panel. can you tell us anything about the opinion? >> i would say that although the judges rejected the application of two cases where the naacp had prevailed, it did include a finding of fact indicating that segregation of schools was which was incredible for the naacp editors precisely the issue that was so controversial before the supreme court. wasas a decision that adverse, but in terms of the finding affect, there is a nugget that was hel
the prince georges case had the gall to present them and say we are equal was confusing and that is why he picked a school where there was no allegation of separate but equal facilities. that brown and she said in freezingion, her tears up and she walked to school, the fact that she had to walk six blocks to a school bus and then take this bus ride when there was this other school which was seven blocks from her house which she could walk directly to , for her and her father was an indignity and outreach that was self-evident and did not rely on whether the facilities were equal or not. in 1951.was filed the argument for the court, the naacp was represented arguing because -- topeka school board. can you tell us anything about should know that we about for the story? >> the important aspect of that opinion i would say is that although the judges rejected the of the two cases revealed, itcp had did include an effect indicating that segregation of schools was harmful which was incredible. for the naacp it is the issue controversial before the supreme court. this is a decision that on
facilities whether equal. the fact that both sides in the prince george's case had the gall after seeing those photographs, actually to present them saying they were equal. was confusing according to marshall. that's why he picked a school where there was no allegation of separate but equal facilities. he was stressing the fact, that linda brown, as she said in the incredibly moving introduction, the her tears freezing up. the fact that she had to walk six blocks to a school bus and take a long bus ride to this segregated school. where there was another elementary school seven blocks from her house, in which she could have walked directly to. for her and for her father was an indignity and an outrage was self-evident and didn't rely on exactly whether the facilities were equal or not. >> it was filed in the u.s. district court, february 28, 1951. the arguments before the court naacp was represented by robert carter and jack greenberg. arguing for topeka school board, lester goodell and it was a three-judge panel, walter huxman, arthur mallet and dallas hill and judge walter huxman
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)