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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
slavery in the territories. we'll start with maryland's acting deputy state archivist and george washington law school professor christopher bracey. >> all persons having business before the honorable the supreme court of the united states, give their attention. >> landmark cases. c-span's special history series produced in cooperation with the national constitution center, exploring the human story and constitutional drama behind 12 historic supreme court decisions. >> number 759, ernest hernandez, petitioner, versus arizona. >> we will hear arguments on number 8, rowe against wade. >> quite often in some of our most famous decisions are ones that the court took a quite unpopular -- >> let's go through a few cases that ill straight very dramatically and visually what it means to live in a society of 310 million different people who stick together because they believe in the rule of law. >> c-span and the national constitution center welcome you to landmark cases, our 12-part history series exploring the people and the stories bebehind some of the supreme court's most famous deci
to missouri compromise. george curtis, the daughter, a brother of a sitting jurist argues before the court. i think there would be a conflict of interest. host: was he paid? guest: he was not paid and by the s curtis, but, time we are approaching the u.s. supreme court, these are men taking this case because their reputation called for it. and they would be a mistake because they were hired guns, which is to say, though, there is a great deal of pressage of arguing these cases. blair never meets the family. he takes the case in washington. scots are in sluse. they are in the custody of the sheriff and their daughters are in hiding. host: and taste important, i want to ask one question from twitter which plays into this well. one of our callers when we talk about roger taney, would you talk about his role as a catholic on the court? guest: taney does not come out of the religious communities that we would associate with the concrete eek of slavery and doesn't come out of that tradition. e doesn't have a growing cry teek. but remember, that baltimore is he arch guyo sees of the cat
validity of the missouri compromise. ms. swain: and who is benjamin curtis? and. bracey: george curtis, -- ms. swain: the brother of a jurist argued before the court. prof. bracey: i think there were be a conflict of interest today. ms. swain: was he paid? prof. jones: he was not pay, and neither is curtis. but, by the time we are approaching the u.s. supreme court, these are men who are taking this case because the reputation called for it. i think it would be a mistake to characterize them as hired gun. guns. there is a great deal of press each, he takes a case in washington and argues that there. was it dred scott in the courtroom when this was argued? prof. jones: the scots are in st. louis, in the formal custody of the court, the sheriff, and they are hired out and laboring, and their daughters are in hiding. this case is important, i want to ask one question from twitter, which plays into this as well. one of our college, when we were talking about roger taney, would you talk about his role as a catholic on the court, when that was unheard of in politics? taney does not come out
archivist and george washington university law school professor christopher bracey. >> all persons having business before the honorable, the supreme court of the united states manage to draw near and give their attention. >> landmark cases, c-span's special history series produced in cooperation with the national constitution center, exploring the human stories be behind 12 supreme court discussions. >> 759, ernest hernandez, petitioner versus arizona. >> we hear arguments, number 18, the rowe against wade. >> quite often in many of our famous decisions were ones that the court took a quite unpopular. >> let's go through a few cases that illustrate very dramatically and visually what it means to live in a society of 310 million different people who help stick together because they believe. >> c-span and the national constitution center welcome you to landmark cases, our 12-part history series exploring the people and the stories behind some of the supreme court's most famous decisions. tonight you're going to be learning more about the dred scott case of 1857. let me introduce you
about the history and the impact of this case. chris is at george washington university law school, where he's a professor there. also the co-editor of a book called "the dred scott case, historical and contemporary perfectives." >> thank you for having me. >> martha jones is a history professor. also chair of the african studies program and race, law and history program at the law school. glad to have you. in 1857, the supreme court rules that blacks whether free or slave were not citizens of the united states. they also declared unconstitutional the missouri compromise, which limited the spread of slavery to new territories. saying congress didn't have the authority to prohibit slavery in territories. i'll ask you to set the table for us in the mid 1850s united states. what was the background that gave rise to the case? what was the country in the state of at the moment? >> there are a few things important for dred scott. not the least of which is the fugitive slave act. 1850 really marks a turning point in the nation's thinking about slavery. a re-thinking of slavery. what do i
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)