Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20180120
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 290
KQEH (PBS) 257
WETA (PBS) 151
KQED (PBS) 91
WMPT (PBS) 77
WHYY (PBS) 23
DATE
2011 204
2010 188
2012 163
2013 102
2017 81
2009 80
2014 69
2015 2
2018 1
2016 0
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 890 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 11, 2014 12:00am PDT
friend, celebrating george duke reached number one on the billboard jazz charts. it pays a tribute to the wonderful artists. glad you joined us for the conversation with al jarreau. ♪ ♪ >>> from contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ >>> seven time grammy winner,al jarreau. "my old friend" celebrating duke with whom al shared so many wonderful moments. let's take a look at a cut from the cd called "summer breeze." it was originally on duke's love aware album. ♪ ♪ >> what i wouldn't have given just to be in that studio. >> it's all games in there. i call sally clark. i saw paul jackson on guitar. good lord. >> wonderful players. >> you have some friends. >> and people who came to help me do this wonderful record to celebrate the great george duke. >> george was quite an artist. take me back to the beginnings of your friendship. >> there's a record called "al jarreau and george duke live at the half note." my wife says b.c. b.c. don't forget that, al. we were there. >> right. >> people were doing other music than what we were doing. we were sw
PBS
Oct 8, 2009 12:00am EDT
significance. >> i s your point. beforeou go to george carl, i sawhim a few weeks go in to mples he and mor sahl togeth. >>nd? tavis: i laughed and laughed. i'venown dick for yea but never saw himin standup. he stopped doing ifor a while. but to see hi and mort together, it was funny,man. george carlin was your fourt one? >> george, i did, hen we lost george i went on davidetter mapp and we were talking and - letterman and we wer talking and i look -- took out this list, like 26 lbums. i'veone one album, een in the siness 2 -- 37 years. doing album likewriting a nol. e hardest thing inhe world if it's going be good. ani would say arguly 0 of them are mastereces. i remember when we did the mark twain tribute r george in washington and bakstage john tuer saider, -- oh,that's his 11th gretest bit. it's like some comics -- cosy had noah. guys are kwn for --well, georgeas known for 0 different things. i'd likeo share something i'veever said in pblic fore because rnell is here and i feel comforble -- george's daught kelly called me and said georgeanted his ashes spread in morningside heig
PBS
Apr 28, 2011 12:00pm EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. this evening, george soros. his organization helped democracy around the world and made him a leading voice on the world stage. despite all of the talk of a debt crisis, george soros believes the u.s. could absorb more debt if it made improvement in the struggling u.s. economy. we are glad you have joined us. our interview with george soros is coming up right now. james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: george soros is, of course, a very successful businessman and chairman of open society foundation, whic
PBS
Mar 24, 2017 6:00am PDT
you. this book gives us a new way of seeing george washington. tell me more. >> it does. it was my goal when i wrote this book to tell a story about the founding of the nation, but through the eyes of the enslaved. not through a typical founding fathers. so ona judge's life gives us the ability to do that. she moves throughout the new nation and gives us a portal into the south, the mid-atlantic, and the north. >> i wasn't whispering to you but saying to you when you came on the set. it was fascinating to me to see the extent to which george washington told on himself with the almanac, the copious notes he was taking every day about his life and his goings and comings. i thought about all the historians over the years who have pored over these same notes and didn't find what you found. tell me about ona judge. >> i'm glad that george washington left so many notes. it helped with this book. and it allowed me to sort of read between lines. i think all of us who do african-american history and women's history, we have to do that. the archives are not spaces in which we find ourselves
PBS
Oct 13, 2010 2:00pm PDT
, "george washington." following acclaimed books like alexander hamilton, his latest bestseller is called "washington: a life." and also tonight the remarkable story of liz in youry -- liz murray and her journey from being homeless to harvard. her story is the basis for the acclaimed new memoir "breaking night." we're glad you joined us. biographer ron chernow and liz murray. coming up right now. >> his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> james? >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference. >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports "tavis smiley" with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is helping to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: ron chernow is an acclaimed author and biographer whose houses include "house of morgan" and biographies of alexander hamilton and john
PBS
Jan 25, 2012 12:00am PST
, "red tails, "about the tuskegee airmen. it was produced by george lucas, who has worked on bringing this project to the big screen for over 20 years. a conversation with actor terence howard, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it is the cornerstone we all know. it is not just a street, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make everyday better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: pleased to welcome terence howard back to this program. the oscar nominee heads "red tails," which tells the story of the tuskegee airmen. the film is playing in theaters around the country. here now, a scene. >> your combat record, which to th point -- >> we have done all of that. >> to this point -- >> i do not believe your boys have scored a single aerial strike. >> you have not assigned as a single foreign mission. >> it is hard to shoot down the enemy 100 miles behind th
WHUT
Sep 4, 2009 7:00pm EDT
former heavy weight champion, turned entrepreneur, george foreman. this is his 40th debut, following his performance at the 1968 summer olympics. his book is called knockout entrepreneur. and journalist fred kaplan on the 50th anniversary of the events o 1959. in his critically acclaimed new book, kaplan argues that many changes in american society that we shoshiate with the 60's and beyond began to take place in fact in 1959. heavy weight champion, george foreman and fred kaplan coming up. >> wal-mart is looking forward to building stronger communities and relationships. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance. working to improve financially literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: george foreman is a two-time heavy weight champion who has been a successful entrepreneur. his latest is called knock-out entrepreneur. he joins us from new york. nice to have you on the program. >> i'm happy to be with yo
WHUT
Feb 8, 2013 8:00am EST
." i love george, i don't want to call him old. you are a longtime friend, george do. -- and george duke. >> this was my first solo record. the record company was like, we should move on and try this and that. it has been awhile since we worked together. probably look 1987, that was the last time we did a record together. doing this kind of project, i would not want anyone else but george. i know that george is just an incredible producer, a musician. he is kinda scary because he has perfect pitch. he is scary to beround. but musically, i knew that if i had george there, all i had to do was just walking in and sing, and he would surround my voice with just incredible music. it was wonderful to get back together with george. i have been talking about doing this record for years. when you sign with companies, most of them said they want original tunes. now i am at the. in a career where it is starting to wind down a little bit, so i can do what i want to now. tavis: i talked to a number of artists on this program who have had great success doing the standards. rod stewart, glenn frye,
PBS
Oct 1, 2014 11:30pm EDT
winner, jazz master, george benson. he's recorded with every one from frank sinatra to stevie wonder and written down] those experiences in a new memoir titled "benson the autobiography." a conversation with the great george benson coming up right now. ♪ >>> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you, thank you. ♪ >>> ten-time grammy winner george benson began his career at the tender age of 8 playing in nightclubs in his native town of pittsburgh and making some $40 a week and we'll find out how he got away with that in just a minute. played with some of the greats including miles davis and frank sinatra and jazz master. he's chronicled his life, finally, in a memoir titled "benson the autobiography." we'll look at the artery from his nat king cole project.g ♪ if you ever plan to move travel my way it's the highway that's the best ♪ ♪ get your kicks on route 66 ♪ well, now you go to st. louis joplin, missouri and oklahoma city looks mighty pretty ♪ ♪ you'll see amarillo and gallop, new mexico. flagstaff, arizona ♪ ♪ kingsmen >> you sound so go
PBS
Nov 10, 2010 12:00pm EST
winning george dohrmann and his expose on youth basketball. he pulls back the curtain on the often troubling way we treat young athletes with an acclaimed new book called "play their hearts out." we're glad you've joined us. >>>> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economical empowerment that comes with it. >> nation is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: andrew young is the former u.s. ambassador to the united nations and an atlanta mayor who was a legendary figure in the civil right movement, led by his abiding friend, dr. king. his book is called "walk in my shoes." he joins us tonight from atlanta. mr. ambassador, an honor, sir, to have you back on the program. >> it's always good to be with you. tavi
PBS
Oct 14, 2010 12:00pm EDT
, prince georges county, two of the largest jurisdictions that maryland has in our area. so i want to ask each of you to tell us one thing that you would do as governor over the next four years that would specifically benefit montgomery county, and then separate one thing that would specifically benefit prince georges county residents. governor o'malley, please begin. >> only one, huh? >> only one. just something you prompt to do that would really help montgomery county residents and something that will help prince georges county. >> i can't talk about protecting record investments and public education and record investments. >> reporter: that's right. you can't. >> you can if you want. >> if i have to choose only one, and i can't pick those things for making college more affordable, i would say moving forward with a better balance and manassas moving forward with the purple line which will benefit both montgomery county and prince georges and prince georges county specifically is finding and forging the partnership that allows us to create a world-class hospital at prince georges county
WHUT
Jan 27, 2011 5:30am EST
administration, george w. bush, they come out of this history not looking at all good, particularly in the preamble to 9-11. they were preoccupied by iraq, by anti-ballistic missile defense which does nothing to stop terrorists and received a lot of warning about al qaeda as a threat. george w. bush took the longest parfittal vacation in three decades during the summer of 2001 despite all this information in the system that something was going to happen. condoleezza rice claimed that the administration was a battle station during this period but there's almost nothing to substantiate that. and they were enormously surprised on 9-11. they overreacted in many ways. some of the more egregious overreactions were corrected over time whether it was the coercive interrogation of detainees. the biggest overreaction of course was the invasion of iraq which would deserve a whole other discussion because it's such a large issue. and then president obama, i think, has -- there's a lot of -- there's a great deal of continuity between the second bush term and president obama's term. in office. whether i
WHUT
Nov 30, 2009 8:30am EST
when you think of the historical significance. >> i see your point. before you go to george carlin, i saw him a few week ago in town mples he and mort sahl together. >> and? tavis: i laughed and laughed. i've known dick for years but never saw him in standup. he stopped doing it for a while. but to see him and mort together, it was funny, man. george carlin was your fourth one? >> george, i did, when we lost george i went on david letter mapp and we were talking and -- letterman and we were talking and i look -- took out this list, like 26 albums. i've done one album, been in the business 2 -- 37 years. doing an album is like writing a novel. the hardest thing in the world if it's going to be good. and i would say arguably 0 of them are masterpieces. i remember when we did the mark twain tribute for george in washington and backstage john turner saider, -- oh, that's his 11th greatest bit. it's like some comics -- cosby had noah. guys are known for -- well, george was known for 50 different things. i'd like to share something i've never said in public before because cornell is here
PBS
Nov 29, 2014 12:00am PST
given just to have been in that studio. i saw stanleystanley. george was quite an artist. take me back to the beginnings of your friendship. >> there's a george called al jarreau and george duke live at the half note. 1965. my wife would say bc, bc. don't forget to add that. we were there in the hate ashburry. people were doing other music than what we were doing. find an audience for this little stuff we were doing. testing the waters and maybing the decisions to go forward with this kind of jazzy approach to the music. so we did and had this marvelous career. such a broad career that help hip hop to bee-bop. that was george. covered it all and the romantic side of things. i wanted to do this record. when john berk, sat down with me and said what do you think of doing this, scared me to death. i think i told you that. scared the stew out of me. >> what were you scared of? >> oh, man. who can do george? who can cover that breadth of material. >> al jarreau did. >> no. there's a lot that i did so those are the places that george and i crossed paths and enjoyed a similar love of music th
PBS
Aug 16, 2017 6:30am PDT
detail and provides a look at george washington's relationship to slavery. i'm delighted she did it and honored to have her. thank you, thank you, thank you. >> thank you. >> this book gives us a way of seeing george washington. tell me more. >> it does. with my goal when i wrote this book to tell a story not through typical founding fathers and ona jude's life gives us the ability to do that. she moves through the nation and gives us kind of portal into south. >> i was whit perring to you that i was -- it was fascinating for me to see the extent to which george washington told himself with the almanac or note, i thought about all the historians over the years who have poured over these same notes and didn't find what you found. so it's a great testament to you. tell me about ona. >> i'm glad that george washington left so many notes. we have to read between the lines. in someways we did that but ona gave us her voice. she left two interviews at the end of her life so i could use her interviews and the words of others to put together her life and she was representative of one of the
PBS
Oct 7, 2009 12:00pm EDT
. also, george benson is here. his new project covers a range of artists from james taylor on. we're glad you have joined us. announcer: there are so many things wal-mart is looking forward to doing, like helping people live better but mostly we're looking forward to hope -- helping people build stronger relationships. with your help the best is yet to come. >> tavis and nationwide insurance -- working to improve financial literacy and the empowerment that comes with it. >> nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow in chicago attorney general eric holder and education secretary arne duncan will meet with school officials to discuss the rash of school violence in the city over the past month. i'm glad to be joined by reverend jesse jackson, founder of the rainbow/push coalition. what is happening in chicago with regard to youth violence? what's happening there? >> you know, there was the tragedy of derrion albert being beaten to death last week and it became a big deal because it was caught on video and it
PBS
Feb 14, 2017 6:00am PST
after he learned that his tribute album to george duke, called my friend, had reached the top of the charts. we talked about his creative process and after a decades-long career he still believe that ♪ had the power to change the world. >> number one, you did it again, number one album. tell me about the decision -- and maybe it even wasn't a decision, but how did you process back in the '60s swimming upstream, as you won't it? cutting against the grain. >> i couldn't help it, that is what i said a moment ago, neither of us had any choice. i came up listening to sarah vaughn, billy epstein, nat cole, all of my brothers and sisters who were older than me back in milwaukee, number five of six kids and they were listening to jazzy kind of music, big band music. and the artists that i mentioned there. and so i listened to that in my living room and they were singing it. that's the main thing, they were singing it. they had quartets in my living room and i was looking up singing -- and didn't know i was not supposed to do that may -- that is what i mean by no choice. >> i'm laughing
PBS
Oct 7, 2009 1:00am EDT
are doing calm the violence i chiago. also, george benson is here his new projt covers a rnge artists fromjams taylor on. we're gl you have joined us. announr: there are so many things walart is looking forward to doing like helping peopleive betterbut motly we're lookg forward to hope helping people build stronger relationships. with your help theest is yet to come. >> tvis and natiwide insurance -- workingto improve financialiteracy and the empowerment that comes with . >> nationwide on your side. >> and b contributions tyour pbs station fro viewers like you. pbs station fro viewers like you. ank you. tavi tomorrow inchicago attorn general eric holder and educatiosecretary arne duncan will et with school officials to discuss the rash of school volence in th city overhe past moth. i'm glad t be joined by revere jesse jackson, founder of the rainbow/push coalition wh is happening in chcago wi regard to youth violence? wh's happening tre? you know, there wa the tragedy of derrion albert being been to deathast week and it became a big deal because it was caught on ideo andit was such a
PBS
Oct 11, 2013 12:00am PDT
season. she can also be seen in the independent film "mother of george," which is getting outstanding reviews. immigrantlight in the community in brooklyn. we are glad you joined us. a conversation with danai gurira coming up right now. ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. versus warrior in the hit series "the walking dead name muchnounces her more beautifully and lovely than i do. what is your name? >> danai gurira. as sheseems invincible battles throughout the apocalypse. in a new independent film entitled "mother of george," a nigerian immigrant struggling to have a baby. let's take a look at a clip from "mother of george." >> i went to the doctor today. >> what dr.? >> fertility specialist. this, her business? x she can help us. her, i not talking about am talking about us. the doctor can help us. everything, on me. and you. me. than likely it is onis: i am glad to have you the program. to "the walking dead" for all your fans. and there were a significant amount of times you turn down of the inauthentic way that african wome
WHUT
Dec 26, 2011 8:30am EST
last refuge. george bird grinnell. coyote: by the 1890s few americans understood as keenly as george bird grinnell, the editor and owner of "forest and stream" magazine, how fearful the price had been for the nation's relentless expansion across the continent. raised on the estate of the famous painter and john james audubon at the north end of manhattan grinnell could remember spotting a bald eagle from his bedroom window and watching immense flocks of passenger pigeons darkening the sky from horizon to horizon as they passed overhead. traveling across kansas, he had once encountered a buffalo herd so vast that his train was forced to stop for 3 hours while the beasts crossed the tracks. he had hunted elk in nebraska when elk could still be found on the plains, ridden with the pawnees in areat buffalo chase as the indians brought down their prey with bows and arrows. now all that and so much more suddenly seemed gone or on the verge of disappearing. passenger pigeons had been so systematically killed that a bird once numbering in the hundreds of millions had been reduced to a handfu
PBS
Mar 4, 2010 12:00pm EST
a book, i wrote the speech that george bush should and could have given, ordering airplanes down, saying to the american people, this is why we need international law, this is why we need to collaborate with other countries. instead, what we heard from the beginning was, we will go after these people and kill them. the problem is these people were already dead. none of the people who committed those crimes were afghan spree they were egyptians and saudis. they trained in florida. none of them went to flight school in afghanistan. they went to flight school in minnesota. we went to war with the country across the world from us because we could, because it looked like justice, and it really was about vengeance. it was designed, i think, to lay the political basis for the war that would come later, and iraq. but it was not a war of necessity then, and it is certainly not a war of necessity now, especially since president obama promised, "i will end the war in iraq and expedite afghanistan." the problem is there is a huge contradiction between that promise, which he has kept, but the
PBS
Oct 5, 2017 6:00am PDT
. ali's family, his closest friends, managers. don king, larry holmes, george foreman, ali's ex-wives were open and helpful. they wanted to make sure that ali's story was told right, fairly. it's been told many times over the years by journalists, but nobody had stepped back and done the big-picture book. i had a lot of help. >> as a writer, that's gold. how did you feel when you had -- when you received that kind of access from the persons closest to him? that's -- it's gold but a lot of pressure to get the story right. >> it's a big responsibility. i feel a responsibility to ali who i met briefly before he passed away. i said, listen, i'm doing this book about you, and it's scary. you had, you know, life like few others, like no other in the 20th century. it's -- it's a frightening responsibility to have that life in my hands, that i'm going to tell your story. i said, is there anything you want to tell me? anything you want to make sure i get in and get it right? he couldn't speak at that point. he didn't answer me. i felt like i owed it to him to do my best, to be honest, and not
PBS
Oct 23, 2017 6:00am PDT
joy and all the collaborations you had with everybody from george harrison and bb king. i have been lucky to be at the right place and right time, i think. thumping and being introduced to george harrison in london and in the studio and he knew who i was which floored me. >> yes, i love to play and this is the beatles. it was unbelievable. i got to play with him there. and all these incredible players and then a couple of weeks later he called me back and said i am making my first solo record, would you come and play some accu accoustic with me and i said okay. >> uh-huh. >> i go down and i tracked about fiver or six of the songs with him. a and our producer, killer producer. [ laughter ] >> so it is just me and george sitting and in front of the glass over dubbing the whole album and in between and jamming. it does not get any better than that. >> i am glad you mention that they called him the fifth needle. billy does not get as much love as he deserves. i miss him. you are talking about a keyboard that's extraordinary he and clous and nikki all came to the first record. i went aro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 890 (some duplicates have been removed)