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CSPAN
Apr 18, 2015 9:45pm EDT
elizabeth and then betty. she liked betty. her father was george cyrus thorpe. he was a captain in the marines who served with distinction. her mother was cora wells thorpe, the daughter of senator harry wells. she was an educated woman. and she did not mix well with the rest of minneapolis society, which she may have sometimes felt she was above them. she studied at columbia and the sorbonne and the university of munich. she was often referred to by little betty as cold and aloof. in fact, it was difficult for laura to display affection to her family. when i picture her now, i picture a cross between margaret dumont from the marx brothers films and the dowager countess from "downton abbey." a little less friendly, perhaps. [laughter] it is 1910. george is stationed in maine. he is commanding the naval base and portsmouth. amy has a brother george born in 1914. betty's childhood is interesting. she liked being outside. she liked to run through the maine woods. she says she often felt as though she was built around aloneness. but that was most comfortable for her. she would hide amo
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2015 8:45pm EST
president george washington in 1791. this is about one hour. >> i don't have any visuals and i could claim that is because i do not know how to do it, but the truth is i never know what i am going to say and how i am going to say it until i get here. at so, i hope you will forgive me for the lap of visuals. my title -- for the lacking of visuals -- for the lack of visuals. my title -- i will start with earlier than 1783. i will start with the european expirations, the early part of the 17th century, so it is going to be almost a 200-year dream but it will go fast as i concentrate on what happened once the dream was realized. in 1607, john smith entered the seven-mile wide mouth of the potomac river and headed north. whether he got this far north, we are actually not certain, but people living here, algonquin peoples called the place -- it translates to something like the place where something is brought, a training place, a place to which tribute is brought. it was a beautiful area in which the tidewater from the ocean stopped. the river stopped and as you know, north of georgetown,
CSPAN
Jun 21, 2014 11:15am EDT
-- including editors at another newspaper. infuriated by the sentiments, george bent, son of a borderlands trade tycoon named william bent, his cheyenne wife, weighed in on the history of sand creek. george bent shown here with magpie his wife was a victim and survivor of the ordeal. wounded at sand creek, he fought for years after to keep memories of the massacre alive. around the turn of the 20th century, frederick jackson turner speaking in chicago at the worlds fair fretted over the closing of the frontier. conservationists warned of the impending extinction of the bison and the native peoples who depended on those animals for survival and readers consumed piles of novels about cowboys and indians. culture and popular public policy stood at the center of debate about the future of united states and george bent worried that native americans had no voice and these conversations. he began relating tribal history to george bird grinnell, a founder of professional anthropology and james mooney. george hyde, relatively obscure hysteria and -- historian. in 1906, george bent and g
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2014 10:00pm EDT
george meade in command. this is an army that has a lot of casualties in the 1863. several were either badly wounded or killed outright. you have the likes of william french, the only aggressive he made in his life was on a bottle of whiskey. [laughter] commanding the third core. john newton, a solid soldier but not as spectacular. not a guy who is well-suited to core command. hancock, badly wounded. governor warren. we have to restructure the army. the first and third corps were merge. then you have john newton being transferred to the western theater. hancock comes back to duty. the entire structure of the command has been moved around. we have a bigger problem. while 1863 was a decisive year and the development of the union calvary, the problem is that everything fell apart at the end of the year. it begins with the death of john buford on december 18, 1863. you have the debacle of the kilpatrick raid. he was relieved of command in the third division and sent to sherman. what does that tell you? ultimately, offered pleasanton had one real supporter in the army. george gordon meade.
CSPAN
May 14, 2016 6:00pm EDT
since gettysburg. i am not going to get rid of him know, george, you mead is a good soldier per can you imagine how difficult it would be to have the boss sitting over your shoulder? once a campaign started, neither staff could stand each other. you know. the difference of course was that grant had to exercise the ghost of the 12th. he. would do that, eventually. nevertheless, a good soldier. basically reduced into a glorified chief of staff to grant, right? then for reasons that are hard to understand, grant proposed william b .lin. he had been enamored with franklin since their west point is because franklin graduated first in his class and sam grant thought he was simply brilliant. well, to lincoln, eastbound of mcclelland and anybody smelling of mcclelland would not be commander of the army, so they left it at that. grant said, i'm appointing a 33-year-old irishman and i don't know whether it was age or the fact that he was irish but believe hehard to was going to be phil sheridan, but it was phil sheridan because grant wanted somebody finally to take over the army in the valley
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2016 1:00pm EST
and go in opposite directions. but he did not completely leave hood alone. he sent george thomas to nashville to gather a force to deal with hood. but that will take time, and time becomes a factor. if hood can cross the river, that could cause some real trouble. grant and sherman express a good deal of concern about what is going on. sherman also detaches two corps from his army. they end up in pulaski, tennessee. the birthplace of the ku klux klan after the war. that is where hood strikes across the river to drive off schofield. he has this reputation of being a guy, john bell hood is not tactically innovative. there is only one frontal attack that john bell hood ever orders as an army commander -- franklin. most of his moves are trying to do flanking maneuvers. schofield gets wind of it. there is a race to columbia, tennessee, and schofield gets in town just ahead of hood. hood will then flank columbia, trying to hit the little town of spring hill, tennessee. hood, his army gets there and all he needs to do is pull the trigger, but something happens. this gives a little bit more
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2014 10:00am EST
metal tennessee -- middle tennessee, rather than following sherman, george h thomason in nashville, who was amassing separated troops and also reinforced by thousands of sherman's veterans from the atlantic campaign, would defend against the rebel defensive. -- rebel offensive. in mid-november, sherman began the march for which he will ever be remembered. while hood and the army of tennessee, a set of pursuing -- instead of pursuing sherman, prepared to cross the tennessee river and drive northward toward nashville. the resulting campaign in central tennessee highlighted by events at springhill, franklin, and nashville, and characterized by mystery and misery, anger and turmoil, suffering, slaughter, tragedy, soon became and ever -after has remained, a subject of endless controversy. the springhill affair was an intriguing in the pneumatic episode -- in the medic episode, and has been the focus of much attention. the bloody clash at franklin has attracted even more attention. but the two-day battle of nashville has a highly significant feature which neither springhill nor franklin
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2014 9:00pm EDT
fantasy as george mcclellan beforehand. militarily virginia poses a major problem. it also poses a major problem la politically. it is thelle focus of a 19th century media.medi because the proximity of the two capitals, richmond and washington. people pay attention to what p i happens in virginia, in a way they do not pay attention to what happens in tennessee or mississippi or any other state west of the appalachian in mountains. abraham lincoln notices in 1862t how can we win all these in seven days? why do people pay attention to l what's going on in the east? to this day we're eastern concentric. in terms of generalship, it has to be a story of confederate generalship in the east.br no one is seriously going to make the argument that braxton bragg and joe johnson, earl van dorn and others were the cream of the confederate leadership n crop. when you talk --fi you go into town, you will not find a cup ae with a brag picture on it maybe a rearview camera so you can back up to joe johnson in a parking space.erior we talk about confederate superior generalship, we're talking about
CSPAN
Jun 21, 2014 7:00pm EDT
war in -- warren and some other people. just like entering empty cities was the fantasy of george mcclellan beforehand. militarily, virginia poses a major problem. it also poses a major problem politically. it is the focus of 19th-century media, because of the proximity of richmond and washington. people pay attention to what happens in virginia in a way they do not pay attention to what happens in tennessee, mississippi, or any other state west of the appalachian mountains. 1862,m lincoln notices in how can we win in the west and be so hurt by a week in the east? why do people pay such attention to the east? to this day, we are still eastern-centric. story about confederate military generalship is a story in the east. no one is seriously going to make the argument that braxton bragg and joe johnson, earl van others, were the cream of the confederate leadership crop. if you go into town, you will not find a cup with a bragg picture on it. [laughter] so you rearview camera can back up like joe johnson into a parking space. but when we talk about confederate superior generalship, we
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2015 10:00am EDT
especially true during the two world wars, in great britain, prime minister david lloyd george and churchill venerated lincoln. both tried to learn from lincoln about how to act as a statesman during wartime. so the specific forms that that lincoln has tainaken had ferried across time and space. and the three statues that i mentioned provide some great examples of that. and the first one was in edinburgh. the story begins in 1890. the widow of a man who was scottish but had fought for the union in the civil war visited the u.s. consulate in edinburgh. looking for help in securing a pension for his union war service. the consul were taken by this woman's story and disturbed upon hearing that the man had been buried in an unmarked grave. so they decided that they wanted to build some monument and then it expanded out to include scottish-american soldiers in general who fought for the union during the civil war. wallace bruce, the consul, took this on as a personal project . the next time he returned to the u.s. as a visit he started to raise money. somewhere along the way he decided, not sure
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2014 6:00pm EST
here tonight. these officers include such prominent northern commanders as george g meade, winfield scott hancock, and david and greg, and such senior southern sword -- soldiers as richard s you will and ap health. -- prelude,ayer you siege summarize the before we assess it. petersburg, virginia, situated on the right bank of the appomattox river 20 miles due south of richmond, was militarily important in its own right as the 10th largest city of the confederacy. the head of navigation on the appomattox, as the site of the confederate states led works, which manufacture of bullets for lee. the strategic significance of petersburg lay in logistics. how fitting isn't that the u.s. army's center is now situated at and ourst of petersburg new director colonel hardy kate -- came to us from the logistics center at fort lee? throughout the civil war, petersburg functioned as the rail center for richmond. from northeast, southeast, south and west, railroads ran to the city. railroade, a single continued north to the confederate capital. ff from southside virginia, armaments from the ports a
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2014 8:52am EST
captured they often were mistreated or even murdered. at the battle of nashville general george h. thomas, like many of his peers, harbored doubts about the combat prowess of african-americans. but with black troops available thomas decided to use them. on both days of the battle the united states colored troops made a diversionary attack against the confederate right flank. the african-american infantry were serving in a division commanded by james b. steedman. it was composed of two black regiments and one white regiment, and numbered approximately 7,500 men. through no fault of the blacks, as the fortunes of war dealt with them harshly the diversionary attack on december 15 resulted in heavy casualties. the situation was even worse on december 16 when corps commander thomas j. wood decided instead of a demonstration, to launch an assault in hope of carrying the formidable rebel right flank. it was a blunder a hastily conceived affair that cost the union troops dearly, both white and black. in fact the attack exacted approximately one-third of the total union casualties for the
CSPAN
Mar 1, 2015 1:35am EST
some historians to characterize his george to the sea as the birth of modern total war. but hard war was not total war. while the march destroyed property and infrastructure and visited suffering and fear on the civilian population it lacked the wholesale destruction of human life that characterized world war ii. sherman's primary targets food stuffs and industrial government and military property, were carefully chosen to create the desired effect and never included mass killing of civilians, especially those law-abiding noncombatants who did not resist what sherman described as the national authority. indeed, sherman always claimed that his war on property was more humane than traditional methods of conflict between armies. he even told one south carolina woman that he was ransacking her plantation so that her soldier husband would come home and general grant would not have to kill him in the trenches at petersburg. he was fighting to bring rebels back in to the union, not to annihilate them. at the end of the march, when the people of savannah surrendered virtually without a f
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2014 2:00pm EST
overall union commander there was george b mcclellan. the first major battle of consequence was the battle of rich mountain. that is near beverly west virginia. or move, that's where you -- it was to be a pincher move, that's where you approach the opposing army from both sides. he would go up the mountain and make a flank attack. the aim was to strike that in me from the front. the cleland didn't do his part, didn't participate in the battle. rosecrans did, and he won. the beneficiary of this immediately was george b mcclellan. he is called to washington to head the armies of the potomac in the wake of the union defeat at manassas, first bull run. so george b mcclellan gets command of the union army of the potomac without having actually participated in combat in the civil war. rosecrans now becomes the union commander in that department of the war. he fights another battle in september 1861 in central west virginia. small battle, but important. then later in the fall he faces none other than robert e lee, in lee's first military engagement of the war. no big battle. the armies were facin
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 4:59pm EDT
than george mcclellan and the democratic ticket. if you are a republican, in 1864, you're going to do everything you can to deflect the emphasis on race. you cannot win the election defined in terms of racial equality. you must win the election if you're going to win at all, defining the issue in terms of union. so what the republicans are going to stress above all is the disloyalty of the democratic party. they're going to link the democratic party with the south. they're going to emphasize the democratic party's support for a ceasefire, at least according to its platform. and so you have other images. again i'm going to skip over. there are other images about miscegenation here. here's one particular republican car too that shows the democratic party in 1832 and 1864. this should resinate to some degree. 1832 is the midst of what's called the nullification process, stanch advocate of the union, forcing the south ultimately to submit to federal authority. but in 1864, what does the democratic party look like? you have a union general, not thundering the union must be preserved cringi
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 5:01pm EST
here in the united states. >>> abraham lincoln won re-election over union general george mcclellan in 1864 with more than 70% of the soldier vote. some historians have argued that lincoln's strong support from soldiers indicated that the troops also agreed with lincoln's greater mission of emancipation. next, author and professor jonathan white argues that was not necessarily the case. professor white says changes in the military command structure and the weeding of mcclellan backers helped engender such overwhelming numbers on the part of lincoln. this hour long discussion was part of the symposium on the 1864 election hosted by the lincoln group of d.c. >>> well, you're in for a treat. jonathan white, assistant professor of american studies at christopher newport university has written several books and several articles, and i've heard him talk on the treason in the civil war about merriman. in fact, last night i watched him on c-span going over with his class this topic. it was really fun. it was neat to see how he interacted with the students and brought out in them a different op
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2014 7:05pm EDT
18 succeed for election between a president abraham lincoln and general george mcclellan. she explains that lincoln was so unsure about his chances that he had his cabinet sign at what was known as the blind memorandum, which pledged cooperation in hi -- with his unknown challenger if he lost. they also expand how important the soldier vote was. this 50 minute talk was a part of a symposium hosted by the emerging civil war. adjust theng to not microphone because we spent time adjusting it for meg. so i will bend over, and i apologize if i look like i am hunched over. [laughter] i hate to stereotype, but i am sure that meg looks like a mild-mannered middle school math teacher. that is exactly what she has. [laughter] -- what she is. [laughter] educated by day, by night she has been working on her degree in military history. she is just about to wrap up her masters degree. in one of the most courageous acts i have seen from anybody, she is reinventing herself. it has been a great adventure for her to discover the american civil war from the perspective serious scholar, but also
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 10:10pm EST
:00, george washington and benedict around and sunday afternoon at 4:00, between 1914 and 1930 from henry ford's film collection. find the schedule at c-span.org and let us know about the programs you are watching. e-mail us at comments.c-span.org or tweet us. join the c-span conversation. like us on facebook and follow us on twitter. >>> now, we continue the look at the 1864 presidential election between abeham lincoln and george mcclellan. it was marked by casualties and the end goal of emancipation. many believed lincoln would fail re-election. jennifer webber examines the political climate in the summer of 1864 and explains how lincoln won by a landslide. this is hosted by the lincoln group of d.c. it's about 50 minutes. >>> good morning. i'm pleased to be here this morning and honored to be able to introduce our next speaker, jennifer webber. jennifer is an associate professor of history at the university of kansas where her specialty, no surprise, is the civil war. her first book was "copperheads" for those of you who may not have a copy at home. this, of course, is about the
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2016 8:00am EDT
go on to some other man. when he received a first corps division -- where is george pickett? after gettysburg, he was shipped down to petersburg. part of his division is shattered. while he is there, george decides to ask robert e. lee if he can get married. robert e. lee refuses. george doesn't care and he goes off to petersburg to get married. unfortunately for him, there is nothing going on in petersburg. robert e. lee reason a lot of newspaper so he reads about his insubordinate general. take it goes to north carolina -- pickett goes to north carolina, making his way to virginia, but he is going to miss this battle. the outbreak of the 1864 campaign is an army that is similar to what you would have seen a gettysburg. the first corps has longstreet, a veteran commander. he is also going to be that sounding board. very important, a sounding board for robert e. lee. they are going to work well together. when stonewall jackson was alive, robert e. lee cap his headquarters with longstreet. one of the reasons why is i think because jackson and his staff were sticks in the mud but lon
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2014 11:47pm EDT
victory for george h. thomas and the greatest defeat for john bell hood. as you may be aware, the army with which george thomas fox battle of nashville was composed of several contingents. you might even say, cobbled together almost on the field of battle there. thomas was sent back with the fourth corps of his army of the cumberland back into tennessee to gather forces there and other reinforcements that would be sent to him and put them together into an army that would stop john bell hood's late fall incursion into the state of tennessee. the fourth corps that tomas had commanded throughout the atlanta campaign earlier that year, there was the 23rd quarter under -- 23rd core under schofield, which had also served under sherman alongside, sproul army of the cumberland in the atlantic campaign. there was a large cavalry contingent under james h wilson, as brian just mentioned. and there is a division of united states colored troops under major general james steve mann. there were three divisions of the army of the tennessee under general andrew jackson smith. these are the people i wil
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2014 10:00am EDT
able to watch the show one friday, when the today show focused on virginia. and in it, george c. scott gave a camera view, a tour of washington and lee university. speaking from a text that he himself had written! afterwards, the university got so many requests for it that it requested from scott permission to print. i happened to be teaching at dunwoody and was able to watch the show one friday, when the today show focused on virginia. and in it, george c. scott gave a camera view, a tour of washington and lee university. speaking from a text that he himself had written! afterwards, the university got so many requests for it that it requested from scott permission to print. and i quote from what scott told the nation over the camera. this is bicentennial america. this is the election year america. this is 20th century thermonuclear liberated oligarchy, in order to get mine, i've got to grind you, america. what are you and i supposed to learn from or feel about the world in the character of a man like r. e. lee? he's cold. we're cool. he's passe. we're avant. he's out of it. we'
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 11:00pm EST
postponed until the end of august 1864. as we already heard, they nominated george mcclellan for president and george h. pendleton for vice president. mcclellan had been very popular among the soldiers at the beginning of the war. he was the commander of the army in 1862 and the soldiers loved him. he was pro slavery, but he was also pro war. and so the democrats saw him as sort of a moderate pro war candidate. and they wanted to balance their ticket, so they picked george pendleton for vice president. and pendleton, as we've heard, was a copperhead from ohio, he was stridently anti-war. what the democrats thought they were doing was balancing their ticket. we're going to have a pro-war candidate for president, we're going to have a pro anti-war vice president, we're going to have a balance, a broad appeal. then as we also heard, they made one very fateful error in their platform. they called the war a failure. and this decidedly anti-war term would come back to haunt them, because as we've also heard already, the very next day after they adjourned, sherman captured atlanta, and
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2014 8:15pm EDT
, a discussion about british admiral george coburn and how he used washington, d.c.'s waterways to seize the city. all here, on c-span3. >>> next, sherman's 1864 atlanta campaign. including the union siege of the city, and the march to the sea. with university of west georgia professor keith bohannon. this is part of the summer conference. it's about an hour. >> before we get started, the map you see up here is a campaign map on the left side. the inserts there, or the smaller maps indicate the main battles. i know it's probably difficult for those of you in the back of the room to see the small details, and maybe read the print, and so what we did -- or actually, what pete's staff did is include this in your maps and handouts books. so hopefully most of you have this. if you turn to page 9, you'll see this map in there. you might want to refer to this, this is probably a little easier to read. but we'll be making frequent -- or i'll be making frequent reference to this campaign map, which will help us understand the course of the campaign. as general and chief of all union militar
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2015 6:00pm EST
up in this philadelphia independent militia is george stevens. george stevens when the war began, stevens writes to the governor and tells the governor, i'm the commander of a regiment of philadelphia collards -- coloreds, and we are ready to do whatever is necessary. whatever is necessary in this conflict, we are willing to do it. this organization would prove very valuable to harrisburg and pennsylvania and the nation. in south carolina you have men who have been organized. this south carolina regiment that was organized, it was organized independent of the u.s. government completely at first with prince rivers. they are running rage in the sea islands. they chase a lot of the planters inland because of the fear of rates. -- raids. prince rivers -- when you see these red trousers, after they've done this work and general david hunter is down there, he does organize them as butgiment in may of 1862, it's illegal. they can't requisition any uniforms from the quartermaster department. their uniforms are donated to them. within the loyal league, within this -- within this african-a
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2014 2:37am EDT
, confederate quartermaster george w. cunningham, who would seen feel as if he personally had a target painted on his chest. because at that time, cunningham was working for the new confederate government in atlanta. concluding on march 20, two days ago, in the burnett house hotel in cincinnati, where the conversations had moved, including being continued on the rail line between nashville and louisville, and then on to cincinnati, these full conversations set the strategy for the coming campaign season. two weeks later, grant, the principal in those full conversations, having relocated to the east, would reiterate the substance of those discussions as a general directive. in a letter to sherman, dated washington april 4, 1864, and marked private and confidential. grant would write, it is my design if the enemy keep quiet and allow me to take the offensive in the spring campaign to work all parts of the army together and somewhat towards a common center. for your information, i now write you my program as to present -- or as at present determined. he outlines briefly what richard had o
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 1:00pm EST
moment for george mcclellan where to his credit he says, no. we are not going to do that. and he keeps the high leadership under him from doing that. >> but he came close to issuing a statement denouncing the emancipation proclamation and arms were twisted and he backed down. but he did back down, to his credit. >> we have members of the lincoln group and other visitors. questions that you would like to ask the panel to address? >> those are the people who have access to democratic papers or they feel strongly. do you see a lot of correlation or influence from letters from home? >> is that directed to me or the panel? >> anybody. >> i will let other people talk. >> you would see certain savvy northern governors who positioned themself as the soldier's friend but also the friend of the soldier's wife. and had taken measures in pennsylvania to relieve the economic suffering of soldier's wives. this was -- curtain is an example of a middle of the road type who would run representing a people's party during the anti bell lum period. he's a union first type who embraces that designati
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 8:00am EST
the wide oak road. lee will bring george pickett's division from richmond sullivan station on the south side and brings the cavalry who has been for raging even the soldiers are hungry and horses have no food so they bring the cavalry into action in late march. in addition to having to bring pickett down and bringing fitz hugh lee into action lee will have to take troops along the earth works and transfer them down to the wide oak road to meet the threat posed by the federal fifth corps under warren. they are also maneuvering on late march 29 and early march 30 but the problem is what seems to plague many of the advances is the weather doesn't always cooperate. it rains very heavily and unfortunately for phil sheridan who is clarifying -- chafing like a hound on a leash sheridan wants to get going. unfortunately that rain doesn't captain. but the federals are able to at least maneuver further into position. in doing so, warren is going to have one of his divisions left exposed. this is what i hope everyone takes away tprfrom the petersburg gain campaign is the confederates never j
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2016 6:00pm EDT
? george is right that there is sort of a loss of feeling in political communities as a result of fighting the war and even before the war. do we lay it there and just race alone accounts for these differences? united now, race -- the states in that period, maybe throughout its entire history -- has tended to organize things in terms of race and it's interesting that nowadays we think of there being a caucasian race. ere was a time, though, when what we now think of as caucasian would have been sub divided into nordic, tutonic, mediterranean, this kind of a thing. and so the reason you can do this is because race is a social concept. it doesn't really exist. we invent it. we can uninvent it. well, what seems to have been going on during the civil war, something that i noticed and george has probably noticed it more than i did, which is that you -- when the confederates talk about how much they dislike the damn yankees or whatever, the language that ey use is a racialized language. an know, and i think in article i did some years ago i suggested if the civil war had gone on long en
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2016 8:45pm EST
sent george thomas to nashville to gather a force to deal with hood but that's going to take time and now time becomes a factor. if hood can get across the river and thomas can amass his forces that can cause real trouble. and expressing a good bit of concern about what's going on. and sends them to deal with hood and they end up at a place called palasky, tennessee. they end up there and that's where finally in mid november hood strikes across the river and again starts out as a campaign. it's a funny thing. hood has this reputation of being a guy. you read most general things. he's not innovative. all he ever wanted was launch frontal attacks. he tries to try, in fact, there's only one frontal attack ever as an army commander. he tries most of us moves are trying to do flanking maneuvers. well, there's race to columbia tennessee. and gets in town just ahead of hood. and this time moving at the little town of springhill tennessee. and never were and that's one of -- that would be springhill. and that gets set to go. and something doesn't happen. and it's called the mystery of springh
CSPAN
Jun 27, 2015 10:00pm EDT
george shriver, was actually away fighting in the union army. he is not in the battle of gettysburg. and so, left behind is his wife and their two daughters. they are ages eight and five. and so the mother, the husband not being there, gradeschool aged daughters, what is she to do? the big question that falls upon her. she determines that the safest place to go is to get out of town. unfortunately, she goes to the south of town and the battle essentially follows them. they go from one bad spot to an even worse spot. when the shriver's come home, their houses ransacked and have been trashed by the confederates. two confederate snipers were killed in their attic and they are never truly able to rebuild their lives. things get worse later that year when of the husband while away in the union army is captured by confederate and is taken to a rather unpleasant place called andersonville and he will die of disease and never to see his family members again. the larger picture of how this war is shaping these communities in very dramatic ways whether what talking about soldiers or civilians
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2015 10:02pm EDT
war. my grandfather george weitzel. he was born in the united states in ohio. his parents were immigrants. his parents died at a young age when george was 18 months old. he was adopted, and the family name was changed. to quatman. i'm a blood weitzel. we have weitzel's in the confederate white house. we have some weitzels here today. probably more than in 150 years. welcome. this is major general godfrey weitzel. died at age 49 years old. he was born in germany, a small town on the french-german border. his family immigrated in 1837. like many german immigrants, they to cincinnati, ohio to a neighborhood the called over the rhine. it reminded them of the rhine river valley, full of steamships and steeples. today if you go there it looks you like it did 150 years ago. still preserved. the neighborhood is still home to german restaurants. you can picture what it looks like back in the day. his father's name was ludwig. the name was changed to a more american sounding name, lewis. lewis owned a grocery store in the over the rhine neighborhood. gottsfried, the german name, and the
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 10:00pm EDT
virginia. and in it, george c. scott gave a camera view, a tour of washington and lee university. speaking from a text that he himself had written! afterwards, the university got so many requests for it that it requested from scott permission to print. and i quote from what scott told the nation over the camera. this is bicentennial america. this is the election year america. this is 20th century thermonuclear liberated oligarchy, in order to get mine, i've got to grind you, america. what are you and i supposed to learn from or feel about the world in the character of a man like r. e. lee? he's cold. we're cool. he's passe. we're avant. he's out of it. we're up to here in it. well, scott continued, there are a few qualities this remarkable creature had, if we consider them. i've just colorized some of my favorites. patience, loyalty, love of animals, traveler, courtesy toward the conditional frailty of advanced age. and my personal favorite, ladies and gentlemen, gentleness and the aspiration to achieve gentlemanliness. head master. lee on leadership. but that can be said for a l
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 2:00pm EST
, rose in importance as an issue at the democrats no m nated general george mcclellan known for securing love and loyalty of troops pop there character traits high latlighte with coolness in the face of setback, resolve under fire by both radical republicans and democratic copperheads, a superior intellect, and according to one writer, a student of providence. a key to lincoln's success and the opinion of thare is his willingness to acknowledge the hand of god in events. moreover, he is a man without moral stain since his habits are as simple and pure today as they were in his early manhood, a man who never smoke, never uses intoxicating drinks, never utters a profane word or engages in a game of chance. is understand usual in the political world. the president's moral and pie us abouts protect him against the seductions of office or honor. they move to link them directly to his actions as president. a strong character formed on the western frontier, molded by a strict regimen offal self education, prepared lincoln the assume the mantel of leadership and the role of the father of his cou
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2015 7:15pm EDT
george washington. that is what northerners thought. american exceptionalism was popular back then. i think we can look at the speeches of abraham lincoln for that. the point is, it was a country that was well aware of that history and the importance of keeping the country together. >> not just the confederacy which harkens back to the meaning full revolution that appropriates a lot of the symbols for the state. the union is looking back to that as well. that is the common heritage. i would like to suggest loyalty probably depends in many respects on your relationship to the coming war. border states, for example, the maybe loyal to the union feel that perhaps a war against slavery would not be welcome. >> it is a misnomer to say there is a war between the north and south. three southern states remain loyal to the united states. >> absolutely. we even have northerners who are at least extraordinarily -- a few northerners at least who make statements to suggest that they are loyal to the nation. wayward sisters go in peace. so, loyalty itself although i think we are going to use it in
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2014 3:26am EDT
bewildered. from a letter of a member of the first united states sharp shooters, george a. martin, may 15th, 1864. people say it's monday. i never knew it was sunday yesterday, until about sunset. the days have got so mixed up, that i can't keep the run. some days have two nights. and some no night at all. the sun rises in the southwest. i am so mixed up at that. the toil and stress begot exhaustion and inexpressible sadness. chaplain francis perkins of the 10th massachusetts, may 15th, 1864. you have been expecting doubtless some accounts of the movements occurring during this campaign. but never did i feel so utterly adverse to writing. never did it seem so almost impossible to connect and express any thought as now. all my energies of thought and emotion are used up by the actual passing events. and to recall the past is positively painful. our brave fellows, they have melted away, like smoke. [ bagpipes playing ] ♪ ♪ ♪ >> all that had been wagered in this war treasure lives. there was no turning back. for the armies there were no turning points, just crossroads. literal
CSPAN
Apr 1, 2016 3:23am EDT
microphone. you talked about political community and george rable's book on "damn yankees" notes the hatred of southerners towards northerners. there's much more hatred today than we appreciate. with that in mind, what's going on? can we then conclude that race is the only or primary factor in all this? if george is right there is a loss of feeling in the political community as a result of fighting the war and even before the war, do we lay it there that race alone accounts for these differences? >> the race -- the united states in that period has tended to organize things in terms of race and racialization. what's interesting is that nowadays we think of there being a caucasian race. there was a time, though, when we would have -- what we now think of as caucasian would have been subdivided into nordic and mediterranean. the reason you can do this is because race doesn't exist. we invent it and we can uninvent it. what seems to be going on during the civil war is when confederates talk about how much they dislike the damn yankees r whatever, the language that they use is a racialized langu
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2014 10:00pm EDT
we will send sherman through georgia and eventually the faneuil bank up the george river. what they are going to do is apply pressure all at once. when grant anders the wilderness in 1864 -- enters the wilderness in 1864 he is acting essentially as dwight eisenhower did during the invasion of normandy in 1844. he is going to seat all of these pieces. unlike ike, grant wants to be the alpha male. he wants to have his hand in the pot. in a few hours grant is already putting an impact on the army. rent is essentially writing behind meade, looking over his shoulder the entire time. it is a tough position to be in. i love -- grant is essentially writing -- riding behind me. meade is a fascinating character. he had one the battle of gettysburg, which was good enough for grant. meade is going to turn into a high-ranking staff officer. he will turn into grant george marshall, so grant is going to be a different kind of beast. mainly i want to focus you on the red and blue lines. grant realizes, as does lincoln and jefferson davis, the fastest way to get the confederate army to battle or a u
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2016 6:00pm EDT
bankruptcy and desolation. atlanta stood defiant. grant was no closer this summer than george mcclellan had been two years earlier. while northern republicans made excuses, northern democrats again searching for an 1864 presidential candidates. in midsummer, president lincoln admitted publicly that he expended -- expected to lose. offensen davis's of-defense of strategy was working. the union army was held back at every corner. if the two southern armies could hold their own until the november elections, northern public opinion would and the civil war and the confederate dream would be accomplished. high water mark of the war. , the timethree months it took for northern military might to effect a complete turnaround. headlinesot the first . a change of commanders in the confederate army in atlanta proved disastrous. soundly defeated in each engagements. grant, put a stranglehold on leave. grant kept widening the length of his lines. 'sis in turn stretched lee smaller defenses. grant'sortantly, strategy took away from the only effective weapon the southern journal had, mobility
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2016 9:20pm EDT
commanders, how four titans won the war in the west. 1941 to 1945 and later on saturday 7:00, george p. bush, jose mendez and phil collins talk b about the spanish mission, the alamo, at the 2016 texas tribune festival in auctionen. >> the memories i have, this group of people were going and they knew they were going to die. but they went. or they were there. there was something very noble and romantic. i've learned it wasn't quite black and white. that's one of the things i think would be good in day and age. we put it into context! then sunday evening at 6:00 on american artifacts. >> mcarthur is up front. not wear iing a weapon. he could lead attacks carrying nothing but that riding crop. you see in his left hand. the men looked at this and realized, hey, if the colonel can take it, well, i can take it, too. >> we visit the mcarthur memorial to learn about his e l early life, who commanded allied forces in the pacific during world war ii. and at 8:00 -- >> the great leaders also serve conscious with with the highest level of integrity. with their moral compass locked on true north
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2015 5:00am EDT
studied. she completed her dissertation on general george pickett which became a book which is a model biography, published by the university of north carolina. and the inspiration for all of this of course begins right here at the civil war institute in 1983. she was one of the high school scholarship recipients that came here. one of many who was gone on to have academic careers. as you all know we have a strong contingent of high school scholarship award winners this summer as well. she now teaches at the university of akron undergraduate as well as graduate students. for a very long time she was the editor of the journal of civil war history and i believe her tenure is coming to a close. she just published a book she has been working on for eight to 10 years or less. she is not the kind of person who strays away from archives. all you have to do is look at bibliographies and you will not see manuscripts cited. lesley goes right into the archival mines and things. the result -- digs. the result is an incredible book entitled "a broken regiment: the 16th civil war." i should add that
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2015 5:00pm EST
chiefght back to of staff, at that time major george strong. strong is making butler's case to say, you don't think the negroes will fight? you know more than general andrew jackson? general andrew jackson leather fathers into battle and he had a very high opinion of them. fathers into battle and he had a very high opinion of them. he says, haven't you been watching our army? we encourage insubordination to their former masters. anyway.oing to happen command, they captured louisiana. in december of 1860 three, butler is replaced by general daniel banks. is a former governor of massachusetts. in 1859 when the general assembly passed legislation that allowed men of african descent ofjoin the state militia massachusetts, banks had vetoed legislation. does not like having these african-american officers in his command. he comes after them. when yous very clear start looking at who gets discharged first, they tend to be the darker skinned officers. the lighter skinned officers stay around. feigned -- them had they once volunteered with the confederacy. their acts of sabotage when they'r
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