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CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 7:00am EDT
west including whether -- including editors at another newspaper. infuriated by the sentiments, george bent, son of a borderlands trade tycoon named william bent, his cheyenne wife, weighed in on the history of sand creek. george bent shown here with magpie his wife was a victim and survivor of the ordeal. wounded at sand creek, he fought for years after to keep memories of the massacre alive. around the turn of the 20th century, frederick jackson turner speaking in chicago at the worlds fair fretted over the closing of the frontier. conservationists warned of the impending extinction of the bison and the native peoples who depended on those animals for survival and readers consumed piles of novels about cowboys and indians. culture and popular public policy stood at the center of debate about the future of united states and george bent worried that native americans had no voice and these conversations. he began relating tribal history to george bird grinnell, a founder of professional anthropology and james mooney. george hyde, relatively obscure hysteria and -- historian. in 1906, ge
CSPAN
Apr 4, 2015 6:49am EDT
creation including story of the plan presented to president george washington in 1791. this session from the smithsonian associates and historical society of washington, d.c. is about an hour. >>> i don't have any visuals and i can claim that that is because i don't know how to do it but the truth is i never know what i'm going to say and how i'm going to say it until i get here. so i hope you will forgive me for the lack of visuals. my title is dreams nightmares and neglect. and i'm going to start earlier than 1783. i'm going to start with the beginning of european exploration, the early part of the 17th century. so it's going to be an almost 200-year dream. and but it will go fast because i'm going to concentrate on what happened once the dream was realized. in 1607 john smith entered the seven-mile wide mouth of the potomac river and headed north. whether he got this far north we are actually not certain but the people living here called the place petomek. it translates as a place to which something is brought, a trading place, a place to which tribute is brought. it was a beauti
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2014 10:00pm EDT
to fight with the confederacy and a cheyenne warrior, a man of george bent, had served as the south's agent in the run-up to sand creek o figh promising colorado's native american peoples that quote with the great father at washington having all he could do to fight the children of the south the indians could regain their country. end quote. in this way john shivington ene made the victims at sand creek enemies not just of white oodshe settlers id n colorado, but of the ju union morest broadly. the bloodshed then game a triumph not just in the indian wars but also of the civil war. finally, in 1883 nearing the end of his life, he spoke publicly for the last time about sand creek. he t addressed a colorado heritage. organization at its annual banquet. he remained very popular in colorado until he died. with he addressed this heritage organization and concluded the remarks, i believe the last nd words he said on the subject of sand creek quote i stand by sand creek. a man of captain silas sole did not. prior to h arriving in colorado four years before the massacre, sole lived in bleedin
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2014 3:30am EDT
like entering empty cities was the fantasy of george mcclellan beforehand. militarily, virginia poses a major problem. it also poses a major problem politically. it is the focus of 19th-century media, because of the proximity of richmond and washington. people pay attention to what happens in virginia in a way they do not pay attention to what happens in tennessee, mississippi, or any other state west of the appalachian mountains. 1862,m lincoln notices in how can we win in the west and be so hurt by a week in the east? why do people pay such attention to the east? to this day, we are still eastern-centric. story about confederate military generalship is a story in the east. no one is seriously going to make the argument that braxton bragg and joe johnson, earl van others, were the cream of the confederate leadership crop. if you go into town, you will not find a cup with a bragg picture on it. [laughter] so you rearview camera can back up like joe johnson into a parking space. but when we talk about confederate superior generalship, we are talking about the eastern theater. --
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 10:00am EST
to super peace man like george mcclellan will take the presidency, it's into the we willcy, and what have is then a divided nation. it will be predicated on what lincoln does early in 1864, and that will be appointing ulysses s. grant as commander of all union forces come all 20 plus , departments,army and divisions to enter the field. lincoln will give them a mandate. he is going to try to apply pressure all across the board, by applying the pressure that 1851eld scott called in the anaconda plan, we can completely and i leave the south. the idea with grant and lincoln is going to be to try to apply pressure at various points. now grant and robert e lee have been intertwined since 1864. grant has been known as a butcher to some people are he has been known as a dry since his army days. but ulysses s grant is a fantastic general, not a typical one that will smash his head up against a wall. he is a soldier that will follow orders, and he is going to do it very well. when granted appointed in march of 1864 to lieutenant general c, first one since george washington, he has this mandate
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2014 10:00pm EST
move west and north into metal tennessee rather than following sherman, george h thomason in nashville, who was amassing separated troops and also reinforced by thousands of sherman's veterans from the atlantic campaign, would defend against the rebel defensive. in mid-november, sherman began the march for which he will ever be remembered. while hood and the army of tennessee, instead of pursuing sherman, prepared to cross the tennessee river and drive northward toward nashville. the resulting campaign in central tennessee highlighted by events at springhill, franklin, and nashville, and characterized by mystery and misery, anger and turmoil, suffering, slaughter, and tragedy, soon became and ever after remained a subject of endless controversy. the springhill affair was an intriguing enigmatic episode, and has been the focus of much attention. franklin has attracted even more attention. the two-day battle of nashville has a highly significant feature which neither springhill nor franklin can claim. i refer to the participation of african-americans. several thousand strong in
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2014 6:00pm EST
. nashville,le of general george h tomas harbored doubts about the combat prowess of african-americans. available,troops thomason decided to use them. on both days of the battle, the united states colored troops make a diversionary tactic against the confederate right flank. the african-american infantry were serving in a division commanded by james stephen composed of two black regiments and one white regiment, and numbered approximately 7500 men. ,hrough no fault of the blacks as the fortunes of war dealt with them harshly, the diversionary tactic resulted in heavy casualties. the situation was even worse on december 16 when cork member -- corps commander john thi launchd an assault in hope of carrying the formidable rebel right flank. it was a blunder. affair thatnceived cost the new troops clearly. both white and black. exacted proximately one third of the total union casualties for the two days fighting at nashville. suffering the greatest loss of ct,regiment, the 13th u.s. a regiment raised in nashville, which lost approximately 40% of its men. once more, as so often in the civil
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2016 1:25pm EDT
. dan also has a huge man crush . -- on george custer. [laughter] [applause] next to dan, stuart henderson. stuart is a ranger here at the national military park. he has worked his way up to bigger and better things. he is now one of the leading experts on united states colored troops. he told the story of the 23rd u.s. ct at president obama's inauguration parade. he is passionate about sharing spotsylvania's most unknown but important stories. and gentlemen, stuart henderson. [applause] lifemate, author and co-author of 11 books on the civil war. he has worked on the andsylvania courthouse works that have appeared all the major civil war magazines. he has spoken in excess of 250 roundtables. he has been involved as a reenactor. warrant -- for a short term he served at gettysburg. ladies and gentlemen, chris mackowski. [applause] emerging civil war's chief historian billerica way down with mr. white. -- i am going to start with mr. white. i will ask our panelists to speak and then open things up so you in the audience can also ask questions. what is the greatest attack? >> howeve
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2015 8:00am EDT
mobile bay. so farragut was born in campbell station, tennessee. he is also, his father, george farragut -- george farragut is actually from mallorca. he becomes a sea captain and then when the revolution takes place he becomes a lieutenant in the south carolina navy, then a lieutenant in the continental navy. following service he gets the sinecure of running a ferry in tennessee. george farragut would actually moved to new orleans, where he becomes a collector of the u.s. customs in new orleans. he would move there in 1804. i have to tell you, david glasgow farragut, his real name is james glasgow farragut. what would happen is when george farragut is in new orleans, his wife sarah will actually tend to his friend's father, who is suffering from yellow fever. his friend is david porter, the famous naval officer, whose father is head of the naval station at new orleans. david porter also. what happens is david porter comes down with yellow fever. mrs. farragut treats him and tries to tend for him. he dies, she contracts yellow fever, she dies. they have 11 children, so what is g
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 10:00am EST
-runners. the charleston blockade-running company, andjacora importing and exporting company. george williams, very important individual who was on city council and helped run relief programs in charleston during the war was a big backer of these companies. alwaysought in what i felt was needed to sustain the confederacy, brought in enough munitions that the troops always had uniforms, head shoes, had weapons, had powder to meet the federal adversaries, gave them a chance for victory. they also brought in items for the commercial market, anything handkerchiefs, china. if you had the money, you could order anything from great britain. it was suggested that they run in a glass greenhouse complete with a british gardener just to show what a mockery this blockade was. occurred atack battery wagner and the north seizes morris island, they could set up batteries to fire over the channel. they could put ships into the main channel, so this blockade-running companies shipped over to wilmington for a year, there is no blockade-running business in charleston. the last year of the war, they sta
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2016 6:00pm EST
. but he did not completely leave hood alone. he sent george thomas to nashville to gather a force to deal with hood. but that will take time, and time becomes a factor. if hood can cross the river, that could cause some real trouble. grant and sherman express a good deal of concern about what is going on. hoursn also detaches two o corps fromy -- tw his army. they end up in lasky, tennessee. the birthplace of the ku klux klan after the war. strikeswhere hood across the river and -- to drive off schofield. he has his reputation of being a john bell hood is not tactically innovative. -- there is only one frontal attack that john bell hood ever orders as an army commander -- franklin. most of his moves are trying to do flanking maneuvers. of it.ld gets wind there is a race to columbia, tennessee, and schofield gets in town just ahead of hood. columbia,then flank trying to hit the little town of spring hill, tennessee. hood, his army gets there and all he needs to do is pull the trigger, but something happens. this gives a little bit more clarification. one of the people at fault is gene
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2014 10:00pm EST
and exporting company. george williams, very important individual on the city council, helping to run relief programs in charleston during the war, was a big backer of these blockade running companies. they brought in what i felt was needed to sustain the confederacy. enough munitions that the troops always had uniforms, shoes, accoutrements, weapons, powder to meet the federal adversaries. gave them a chance for victory. they also brought in items for the commercial market. anything from corsets to handkerchiefs, china. if you have the money, you could order anything from great britain. his partner suggested that they run in a glass greenhouse, complete with a british gardener. [laughter] just to show what a mockery this blockade was. his home was ashley hall at the time. when the attack occurred at battery wagner and the north seizes morris island, they could set up batteries to fire over the channel and put ships into the main channel. so the blockade running companies shift to wilmington. and for about a year there is no blockade running business in charleston. then the last year
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2015 6:00pm EST
dramatic departure from earlier methods, and has prompted some historians to characterize his george to the sea as the birth of modern total war. but hard war was not total war. while the march destroyed property and infrastructure and visited suffering and fear on the civilian population, it lacked the wholesale destruction of human life that characterized world war ii. sherman's primary targets, food stuffs, and industrial government and military property, were carefully chosen to create the desired effect and never included mass killing of civilians, especially those law-abiding noncombatants who did not resist what sherman described as the national authority. indeed, sherman always claimed that his war on property was more humane than traditional methods of conflict between armies. he even told one south carolina woman that he was ransacking her plantation so that her soldier husband would come home and general grant would not have to kill him in the trenches at petersburg. he was fighting to bring rebels back in to the union, not to annihilate them. at the end of the march, when th
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2014 6:00pm EDT
time, was the first significant campaign of the war. the overall union commander there was george b mcclellan. the first major battle of consequence was the battle of rich mountain. that is near beverly west virginia. it was to be a pins or move, that's where you approach the opposing army from both sides. he would go up the mountain and make a flank attack. the aim was to strike that in me from the front. the cleland didn't do his part, didn't participate in the battle. rosecrans did, and he won. the beneficiary of this immediately was george b mcclellan. he is called to washington to head the armies of the potomac in the wake of the union defeat at manassas, first bull run. so george b mcclellan gets command of the union army of the having actually participated in combat in the civil war. rosecrans now becomes the union commander in that department of the war. he fights another battle in september 1861 in central west virginia. small battle, but important. then later in the fall he faces none other than robert e lee, in beijingrst military in -- engagement of the war. they faced e
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2016 6:00pm EST
union right, small unit , namely george s. greene and how that leadership made a dramatic difference in the outcome there. works, ilove when it would like to speak about july 3 dawn on, how leadership in the struggle played out for culp's hill. derailedof the potomac lee was not served by subordinates. , judgment made by both sides, some fog of war and man lead to costly maneuvers, yet the courage and determination when you look at these fellows speaks maryam's -- volumes of the type of men who fought at gettysburg. on july 3, the battle will last for seven straight hours. today, this morning, i would like to use some images from how then and some quotes, they would put it. i feel the battle is best heard from their perspectives. not my theory. tomorrow, we will be taking a walk and seeing it through your eyes, because what you'll find is the battle of culp's hill -- wrong way. , everytle of culp's hill nuance of ground man-made or natural will affect the outcome of this battle. tacticians don't like to bring things in particular, fighting at night, and fighting in the woods. they will
CSPAN
May 30, 2015 6:00pm EDT
lloyd george and churchill tried to learn from lincoln about how to act as a statesman during wartime. so the specific bonds that lincoln has taken and the three statues that i mentioned provide some great examples of that. and the first one was in edinborough. the widow of a man who was scottish but fell to the union in the civil war visited the u.s. consular and her husband died and looking for helping in securing a pension for his union war service. the consul were taken by this woman's story and disturbed upon hearing that the man had been buried in an unmarked grave. so they decided that they wanted to build some monument and then it expanded out to include scottish-american soldiers in general who fought for the union during the civil war. he took it on as a personal project the next time he returned to the u.s. as a visit he continued to raise money. he decided, i think it was his decision but i'm not sure why, he decided the statue, instead of representing the soldiers themselves, the statue should be of abraham lincoln. lincoln even by then, in the 1890's was the recognizable
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 7:00pm EST
cspan 3, saturday night, just before 9:00, george washington and benedict arnold and sunday afternoon at 4:00, a glimpse of american life between 1914 to 1930 from henry ford's film collection. find our complete schedule at cspan.org or call us. e-mail us or send us a tweet. like us op facebook. follow us on twitter. next, authors and historians discuss the impact and significance of the 1864 presidential election that took place in the midst of the civil war. lincoln, who ran on a platform of emancipation and preservation of the union defeated his opponent, george mcclellan, winning 212 electoral college votes. the hour long discussion was part of a discussion hosted by the lincoln group of d.c. >>> normal way to start off the panel is to let each of the panelists have an opportunity to comment on what they've heard each other say. does anybody want to comment on anybody else's talk? >> well, it's, i think, pretty clear from john's talk that john and i have a little bit of a different take on a couple of things. but here is one of the things that i will argue. >> sure. >> i don't thi
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2016 9:38pm EST
course, there's÷ú geor. but -- george after gettisburg was shipped out to petersburg. he goes down to÷ídivision, part of his division is shattered, while he's down there, george decides to ask robert e. lee if he can take a leafzv and get married to his la salle, lee refuses to allow him to do this. george doesn't -- and goes off and gets married in september of 1863. unfortunately for george, there's nothing going on in peterburg at this time that was on the front page of the paper and robert e. lee and general going off and getting married. he goes off to north carolina, goes down to new burn and he's eventually going to make his way back to the army of northern virginia. he's going to miss this battle. now, the army of northern virginia, and it's an armyzv -- and first field and second core of eric -- commander and he's also going to be that soundingboard that he always had, very important soundingboard. you don't alwayssagree, obviously, you heard earlier, but they are going to work well together for the most part. ì9=i511e jackson was alive, lee with james longstreet not wi
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 1:03pm EDT
supporting anyone other than george mclelland and the democratic ticket. if you are a republican, in 1864, you're going to do everything you can to deflect the emphasis on race. you cannot win the election defined in terms of racial equality. you must win the election if you're going to win at all, defining the issue in terms of union. so what the republicans are going to stress above all is the disloyalty of the democratic party. they're going to link the democratic party with the south. they're going to emphasize the democratic party's support for a ceasefire, at least according to its platform. and so you have other images. again i'm going to skip over. there are other images about mesogenation here. here's one particular republican car too that shows the democratic party in 1832 and 1864. this should resinate to some degree. 1832 is the midst of what's called the nullcasi if icasion process -- nullinicatoin process, stanch advocate of the union, forcing the south ultimately to submit to federal authority. but in 1864, what does the democratic party look like? you have a union gen
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2016 6:00pm EDT
confederacy. two breakthrough like a bazooka. have george gordon means in fredericksburg. 8000 using soldiers attacking prospect hill. they found a weak point. a 600 yard cap in the line. because they are too lazy to fill that gap. then there is the big swamp there. let's go through the swamp, you know? that opens up an opportunity lost to the union forces under franklin and burnside on that end of the field. we do not remember fredericksburg for that. it could be the great attack -- but they all tried to achieve that same thing, that victory, that how you achieve that victory. oftent him greatly good shows grant the way we can creep through. which we will talk about tomorrow. might bring you on the precipice of victory in a might bring you victory but it comes at a high cost. would agree in regards to the fact that one of the greatest attacks does not equal scale or size of the assault. tomorrow, we are going to hear about the july 2 salt of the .nion army -- july 2 assault one of the greatest attacks in gettysburg is by two brigades that are going to be attacking this unimaginable
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2014 3:30am EDT
complex was the quartermaster clothing depot, run by that tennessee now confederate quartermaster george washington cunningham. which had been sherman headquarters in nashville in late 1863, and early 1864. cunningham operated a facility in atlanta that was capable of producing 130,000 complete suits of uniforms in a 12-month time period. and the -- he did this mostly by piecework. he had male tailors and other staff cutting out fabric in warehouses in atlanta, and then all of the pieces of a given garment, like a jacket or a pair of trousers would be bundled together, along with the necessary thread to sew them together, and the buttons and other bits of trim, and then women would come in and check out these bundles of unfinished garments, take them home, sew them together, and then bring them back in and receive pay for them once they were inspected and found to meet standards. by the spring of 1863, this operation in atlanta employed 3,000 women a month. sewing uniform items together. and if we do not discount the sundays, just crude mathematics means that on a daily basis, about 100
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2014 2:50am EST
captured they often were mistreated or even murdered. at the battle of nashville general george h. thomas, like many of his peers, harbored doubts about the combat prowess of african-americans. but with black troops available thomas decided to use them. on both days of the battle the united states colored troops made a diversionary attack against the confederate right flank. the african-american infantry were serving in a division commanded by james b. steedman. it was composed of two black regiments and one white regiment, and numbered approximately 7,500 men. through no fault of the blacks, as the fortunes of war dealt with them harshly the diversionary attack on december 15 resulted in heavy casualties. the situation was even worse on december 16 when corps commander thomas j. wood decided instead of a demonstration, to launch an assault in hope of carrying the formidable rebel right flank. it was a blunder a hastily conceived affair that cost the union troops dearly, both white and black. in fact the attack exacted approximately one-third of the total union casualties for the
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 11:05am EDT
the 1864 election between president abraham lincoln and general george mcclellan. he claims that lincoln was so unsure about his reflection chances that he had his cabinet member sign what is known as the blind memorandum. this pledge for cooperation was link one's -- lincoln's then unknown challenge if he lost. also spring how important a soldier vote was. president lincoln won by the 1864 election by 212-21. this 50 minute talk was part of a symposium hosted by the emerging civil war blog. >> all right, i am not going to adjust the microphone, because we spent some time getting it adjusted for meg. i apologize if i look like i am hunched over. [laughter] i hate to stereotype, but i am sure that meg looks like a mild-mannered middle school math teacher. ironically, that is exactly what she is. [laughter] as she has educated by day, by night she has been working on her degree in military history. she is just about to wrap up her masters degree. in one of the most courageous acts i have seen from anybody, basically she is reinventing herself. it has been a great adventure for her
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 4:10pm EST
george mcclellan. the summer of 1864 was marked by heavy union casualties, and dwindling support for lincoln's end goal of emancipation. many believe that lincoln would fail to win re-election. university of kansas professor jennifer weber examines the political climate in the summer of 1864 and explains how lincoln won by a landslide. this is a portion of a symposium hosted by the lincoln group of d.c. it's about 50 minutes. >> good morning. i'm pleased to be here this morning, and i'm honored to be able to introduce our next speaker, jennifer weber. jennifer is an associate professor of history at the university of kansas. where her specialty, no surprise, is the civil war. her first book was "copperheads" for those of you who may not have a copy at home or have read it. and this, of course, is about the anti-war movement in the north. this was published by oxford university press in 2006, and actually has a forward by jennifer's mentor, james m. macpherson. so you can tell she comes from a quality line. her second book is actually geared for children, and this fact has won her
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2015 10:00am EDT
. headed by george shriver, was actually away fighting in the union army. he is not in the battle of gettysburg. and so, left behind is his wife and their two daughters. they are ages eight and five. and so the mother, the husband not being there, gradeschool aged daughters, what is she to do? the big question that falls upon her. she determines that the safest place to go is to get out of town. unfortunately, she goes to the south of town and the battle essentially follows them. they go from one bad spot to an even worse spot. when the shrivers come home, their house is ransacked and has been trashed by the confederates. two confederate snipers were killed in their attic and they are never truly able to rebuild their lives. things get worse later that year when the husband, while away in the union army, is captured by confederate and is taken to a rather unpleasant place called andersonville, the most infamous southern camp. and he will die of disease and never to see his family members again. this speaks of the larger picture of how this war is shaping these communities in very dra
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2015 10:00am EDT
park service, has done a wonderful job with george washington's birthplace, where he was an interpreter for several years, but most recently, he has decided to go into alligator land and has bowed down at the everglades, where he has been for just a month or so. he is taking time to talk to us about a subject that eric introduced us to just moments ago, the the foundational document of the lost cause. phill is going to talk to us about where that goes and how that legacy remains with us today. ladies and gentlemen, phill greenwalt. [applause] phillip: good morning. >> good morning. phillip: the good thing about the lost cause or remembering southern confederate history is that has not been in the public eye at all for the last few weeks, months. [laughter] i think i had to turn off my own social media account because i had to rewrite my introduction and conclusion 15, 20 times -- since yesterday. [laughter] but no, for me, the lost cause is an amazing cultural phenomenon that shaped our collective memory of one of the big turning points in american military, political, econo
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2014 7:15pm EDT
the greatest victory for george h thomas and the greatest defeat bell hood. as you may be aware, the army with which george thomas fox battle of nashville was composed of several contingents. you might even say, cobbled together almost on the field of battle there. thomas was sent back with the theth corps of his army of cumberland back into tennessee to gather forces there and other reinforcements that would be sent to him and put them together into an army that would stop john bell hood's late fall incursion into the state of tennessee. the fourth core that tom's had commanded throughout the atlanta campaign earlier that year, there was the 23rd quarter under schofield, which had also served under sherman alongside thomas his army of the cumberland in the atlantic campaign. there was a large cavalry contingent under james h wilson, as brian just mentioned. and there is a division of united states colored troops under major general james steve mann. there were three divisions of undermy of the tennessee general andrew jackson smith. these are the people i will talk about briefly now
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2016 2:55pm EST
grant is launching will bring george pickett's division down from richmond to southerland station. the horses have no food available so they are bringing in the calvary into action here in late march. lee will have to take troops along the earthworks constructed and transfer them down to the road which meet the threat posed by the federal fifth corps. they are maneuvering at this point based on the evening of march 29 and early into march 30. the problem is what place many, the weather does not always cooperate. it rained very heavily. unfortunately for phil sheridan, who is shaking like a leaf, he wants to get going. unfortunately, it is not cooperating. he will at least maneuver further into position. in doing so, warren will have one of his divisions left exposed. this is what i hope everyone takes away from the petersburg campaign is the confederates never stay behind the fortification. they never just sit there and wait for the next assault and abandon the supply line. what does robert e. lee and the fortifications run richmond of 1852, what is his intention? a springboard. a
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 11:00am EST
history. >>> abraham lincoln won reelection over union general george mclellan in 1864 with more than 70% of the soldier vote. some historians have argued that lincoln's strong support from soldiers indicated that the troops also agreed with lincoln's greater mission of emancipation. next, author and professor jonathan white argues that was not necessarily the case. professor white says changes in the military command structure and the weeding of mcclellan backers helped engender such overwhelming numbers on the part of lincoln. this was hosted by the lincoln group of dc. >>> well, you're in for a treat. jonathan white, assistant professor of american studies at christopher newport college has written several books and several articles, and i've heard him talk on the treason in the civil war about merriman. in fact, last night i watched him on c-span going over with his class this topic. it was really fun. it was neat to see how he interacted with the students and brought out in them a different opinion of what they had when they first came in, how they learned something from the
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2016 9:06pm EDT
the united states, weeping by the grave, and what this artist is saying, a vote for george mcclellan is a vote to clasp hands with the southern traitors who have wreaked such untold suffering on our land. final image, and this is my favorite run from 1864 election. this is a republican lampooning this kind of ludicrous combination of commitments in the democratic party. so you have mcclellan, the war democrat, riding a war horse waving a sword while simultaneous smoking a peace pipe and wearing a bonnet, right? which is supposed to be saying a little something about his masculinity, and he is accompanied, of course, by the peace democrat riding a donkey. the whole idea is to say this is a ludicrous, ludicrous combination. in the end nothing matters more than the fall of atlanta. nothing matters more than the belief that the war is again being won, and the result in the end was abraham lincoln's very comfortable electoral victor. you will see here he takes 91% of the electoral vote, but the one thing i'd want to stress is that his opponent takes 45% of the popular vote. 45% of norther
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 6:00pm EST
commander, george kaplan in virginia, under a flag of truce. the purpose of the meeting was to discuss whether he was surrender or not. the meeting was set at for 11:30 the morning, or at noon, the truce would end at noon. he shows up at 11:30. he says what are you doing here? mosby said i'm not going to surrender. what's the matter with you? he said i want to have a 10 day true so i can prepare myself and talk to my commanders. chapman said there is no commander to talk to. the war is over. mosby said i need to confirm that. i'm not going to take the word from you. i have to find on my own. they reset the timetable. he says i will give you two days . see you back on the 20th. mosby went back on the 20th and basically said i'm not surrendering. there was an incident that happened that day or one of his men, and mosby brought 15 officers, close to 20. they sat in this room in there was a young man named hern, referred to as an idiot, whose job it was guard the horses. some troops said let's see what you can do on the horse. he said let's take some bets. they ran up and down the street.
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2014 10:01am EST
of us here tonight. these officers include such prominent northern commanders as george g meade, winfield scott hancock, and david m greg, and such senior southern soldiers as with that prelude, let us summarize the siege before we assess it. petersburg, virginia, situated on the right bank of the appomattox river 20 miles due south of richmond, was militarily important in its own right as the 10th largest city of the confederacy. as the head of navigation on the appomattox, as the site of the confederate states led works, which manufacture of bullets for lee. the strategic significance of petersburg lay in logistics. how fitting isn't that the u.s. army's center is now situated at fort lee, just east of petersburg and our new director colonel hardy came to us from the logistics center at fort lee? throughout the civil war, petersburg functioned as the rail center for richmond. from northeast, southeast, south and west, railroads ran to the city. from there, a single railroad continued north to the confederate capital. food stuff from southside virginia, armaments from the ports
CSPAN
Apr 1, 2016 2:32am EDT
there are black congressmen all the way down to 1901, george henry white of north carolina is the last to walk away, his district is gerrymandered, he gives up and stays in washington. the question of does reconstruction fail. if you're talking about shop keeper in chicago, it doesn't because now thanks to the 15th amendment you have voting rights that never go away the way they do in parts of the south. there's places in the south where black local political involvement actually rises after 1877. what democrats are trying to do is carry those states' electoral college. they don't care if there's a black assemblyman in this one district in louisiana. so for me, reconstruction, a, doesn't fail, it's killed. where it does stop, it's murdered. and it doesn't stop every place. so for blacks in my new york, it is in fact a story of success. does that mean all of america's racial problems are solved? not a bit. not anywhere. but those voting rights are not going to go away. those integrated schools are not going to go away. >> the question i have for you is, i understand where you're coming
CSPAN
Jul 16, 2016 6:00pm EDT
anybody in the eye. but she was the only can she knew. she did get married to george armstrong shortly after the war, 1866. they settled in houston. she lived, her mother and eorge armstrong, and she sure. i'm going to repeat the question. he asked did mary find her family and then what happened next? where did she go afterwards? yes. what happened is she -- she finds her mothor and she is the ornl mother -- her mother was sold away when she was about four years old and her master actually legally sold her mother her mods moer was actually on loan. and he sort of got extra pocket money by taking her down to louisiana. so she was determined to find her but she was the only kin that she knew. she did get married to george armstrong shortly after the war 1866 and they moved settled in houston. she lived -- her mother and george armstrong. and she actually becomes a nurse and is very active and award for special elping with the yellow fever epidemic later in the century. you can see her posing here. she is very much -- you can see that she is proud of her story and proud of her experience.
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2015 10:24am EST
continue our look at the 1864 presidential election between abraham lincoln and general george mcclellan, lincoln's former commander of the army of the potomac. university professor veron examines the issue. >> i think this is a very important issue to address very on early in the symposium. professor varon has her bachelor's degree from fort smith college before coming to the university of virginia where she is a professor of american history. her first two books were from a woman's point of view about women's opinions and activities in the south and in antebellum, virginia. and a biography of elizabeth, a yankees spy in richmond. that her next book was on the unit, about the whole debate about the __ the discussion and strategizing of the possible breakup of the union, basically from 1789 onwards. and most recently, her book is on victory and defeats aand freedom at the end of the civil war. that has already won a number of prizes, including the library of virginia award. professor varon has also been speaking widely, including the civil war institute. and also on c_span "boo
CSPAN
Jun 27, 2015 6:57pm EDT
by the constitution, followed through by george washington. that is what northerners thought. keep the union whole. american exceptionalism was popular back then. i think we can look at the speeches of abraham lincoln for that. the point is that it was a country that was very well aware of that history and the importance of keeping the country together. john: not just the confederacy. i agree. the union is looking back at that as well, the common heritage. i would like to suggest that loyalty probably depends in many respects on your relationship to the coming war. border states, for example, who might be loyal to the union, but at the same time, feel that perhaps a war against slavery would not be particularly welcome. gary: let me interrupt. it is a misnomer to say there is a war between the north and south because three southern states remain loyal to the united states. missouri kentucky, maryland, delaware. john: absolutely. we even have northerners who are -- a few northerners who make statements to suggest that if they are entirely loyal to the nation. they are not necessaril
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2016 9:05pm EDT
politics. and the restauranteur, george downing, who ran a series of restaurants in rhode island. he made -- probably was one of the most prosperous black men at the time and then became the restauranteur for the house of representatives in washington which gave him kind of a real kind of inside view what was happening in the house and would talk to people like stevens about what should be done in congress. they are all there meeting in syracuse. they met for three days, issued their list of demands and of course, the most obvious simply was an amendment abolishing slavery. note the date. this is october of 1864. this is before congress gets around to even really considering seriously an amendment. they call for voting rights for black men in all states, new york, illinois, ohio, so again, this is not just about the south. this is about fixing the entire country. they called for equal pay for black soldiers. congress had finally just gotten around to doing that. and the right for black men to rise in the ranks and become commissioned officers and again, this reminds us how many of th
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2015 6:00pm EDT
his third year, he encountered a fellow student by the name of george turpin, who had a habit of bullying others and set his sights on young mosby. when mosby heard turpin was looking to eat him up raw mosby pick of a pistol in his defense. when turpin came after mosby, turbine charged, mosby shot him and in and nearly killed him. he asked the prosecutor for his law books, which he leant tom mosby, who spent his time in jail reading them. he received a pardon and later passed the bar becoming a lawyer. and he again learned never to back down from a fight. in 1855 at the age of 22, he opened a law practice in the town of bristol in southwestern virginia near the tennessee border near his girlfriend pauline, whom he married in 1857. the omens of war, however had begun to pervade talk in a small town of bristol as it had many of the small towns in the south. most of the favorite -- mosby favored state rights, but he was not in favor of secession. he noticed militia units were mobilizing for protection should it come to that, but he himself was not interested. focusing on building hi
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2016 8:00am EDT
war measures of the likes of generals george crook and nelson miles during the indian wars learned during their days fighting john s. mosby in virginia or bushwhackers in western virginia were effective in many ways in defeating the sioux and cheyenne in the 1870's and the apaches in the 1880's especially coupled with more lenient pacification measures afterward. surprise morning attacks, burning out food supplies and hunter strike forces that pursued the indian warriors day and night were all tactics they learned in the civil war and applied to their native opponents in the west. yet, the american public of the post-war period was not the northern public of the civil war era. in cries of hypocrisy and outrage emanated from the big city newspapers who said the policies of harshness and conciliation born of the die createdof the dichotomy during the war by lieber's famous code and still roughly followed in the west at that time allowed for far too much discretion on the part of the commander in the field and resulted too often in massacres of native americans. the shock to the white
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2015 10:45am EDT
his third year, he encountered a fellow student by the name of george turpin, who had a habit of bowling others, and set his sight on mosby. that turpin was looking to eat him up, he picked for histol defense. when he came looking for him, .us mosby shot him he was convicted of the shooting, but he asked a prosecutor for his law books, which he lent to mosby, who spent his time in jail studying them. mostly received a pardon after a few months, but had developed a love of the law, and later passed the bar, becoming a lawyer. he again learned to never back down from a fight. in 1855, at the age of 22, he opened a law practice in the town of bristol, near the tennessee border. he met his girlfriend, whom he married in 1857. begunferings of four had warading -- the rumor of had begun pervading. he was in favor of state rights, but not secession. he noticed that people were ,eginning to organize militias but he was not interested. focused on building his new law practice, to support his young a nearbyosby ran to the town town to deal with court cases. it was there that a friend from
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