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BBC News
Jul 24, 2017 9:00am BST
ordinary, civilised human beings. we'll talk to peter tatchell and george montagu, convicted of gross indecency with a man in the 70s and describes himself as the oldest gay in the village and a woman who's only just in the village and a woman who's onlyjust come out, about how much as changed. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. throughout the programme the latest breaking news and developing stories...a little later we'll celebrate two amazing british sporting achievements. england's women beat india to the cricket world cup. absolutely amazing. i took my kids there. so many kids there, it was brilliant. a great atmosphere. and we'll be asking why this brit — chris frome, the 4 times tour de france winner — isn't receiving the love he deserves. is he britain's least popular greatest sportsman? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. the parents of charlie gard return to the court today as the court consider new evidence f
BBC News
Jun 29, 2017 9:00am BST
. police in australia have charged one of the most senior roman catholic cardinals, george pell, with sexually abusing children. cardinal pell is in charge of the vatican's finances and is considered to rank third in the hierarchy of the church. he is accused of multiple offences dating back to the 1970s— charges he's strenuously denied. iam i am looking forward finally to having my day in court. i am innocent of these charges. they are false. the whole idea of sexual abuse is abhorrent to me. talks over resuming power—sharing stormont have stalled with only eight hours to go until the deadline. northern ireland faces the prospect of direct rule from london ifan prospect of direct rule from london if an agreement cannot be reached. culture and media secretary karen bradley will make an announcement today about whether 20th century fox, owned by rupert murdoch, is allowed to take over sky. it would give mr murdoch total control of the broadcaster of which he already owns 39%. 0pponents say that any deal will give him too much power over the uk media. a mother has described the dist
BBC News
Feb 27, 2017 10:00am GMT
head of theresa may's policy board the tory mp george freeman. at issue is who in future should such receive benefits. benefits tribunals have ruled that ministers should extend the scope of the new personal independence payments to another 160,000 people at a cost of more than £3 billion. norman smith is in westminster. they are facing a backlash and it is not the first time this government got into difficulties and suffered grief over curbs to disability benefits. you think about the last budget of george osborne when he tried to push through cuts to personal independence payments and iain duncan smith resigned from the cabinet. it was almost the start of the unravelling of the cameron—osborne government. well, now there is another head of steam building up following this court ruling which in effect means many, many more people will be able to claim personal independence payments becausically, extending it to people who have mental health issues, people who suffer from dementia or who suffered a stroke or are suffering from schizophrenia and the government have reacted basicall
BBC News
Jun 8, 2017 9:00am BST
wyn is going to captain the side against the canterbury crusaders. sean 0'brien, conor murray, george north, they will all make their first appearances of the tour. the lions opponents have named eight all blacks in their team. saturday's match will be far more daunting, it isa match will be far more daunting, it is a big step up in quality because the crusaders have a perfect 14 wins from 14 so far this season. thank you very much. more from hugh throughout the morning. polling day, as you know, delighted to see one of the great register additions is continuing on this general election day, which is #dogsatpollingstations. we would very much like to end the programme today with pictures of your dog at the polling station. a picture of your dog, where you are at the uk, and obviously the name of your dog. we have this picture, u nfortu nately your dog. we have this picture, unfortunately richard hasn't given us unfortunately richard hasn't given us the name of this dog, which i'm guessing is a cockerpoo, but i might be wrong. not the most glamorous polling station, but certainly the m
BBC News
Apr 24, 2017 9:00am BST
given from jason at george's, you can see there is a lateral curvature of the spine which is what scoliosis is and the tether or the growth that you can see have been put on the long side of the spine or the right—hand side of the spine or the right—hand side of the spine or the right—hand side of the spine as you look at the images and what we're hoping to do is the child as they grow, they will actually grow on the left—hand side of the spine, thereby normalising the actual spine and straightening what you are seeing is three images. 0ne preoperatively with a sizeable curve . 0ne preoperatively with a sizeable curve. the middle image shows you post—operatively, you might look at it and think it hasn't changed much and you would be right in saying it hasn't changed much, but on the right—hand side, 12 months done the line, the curvature has reversed and we have had a cure of the actual scoliosis itself. that's the main aim. are patients not getting that in this country or are they? the most important thing to say is we are cautious in this country like everybody shoul
BBC News
Sep 4, 2017 9:00am BST
after at kensington palace. pretty severe morning sickness again, just like with george and charlotte. that is the little girl's name, charlotte? yeah. william and kate having another baby. hooray! everybody is very happy. kensington palace and the queen, members of both families are also really delighted. coming up: a model who sparked a row after saying that all white people benefit from racism. she is here to talk about her comments and to talk about the horrific online abuse, including death threats, that she has received over the last week. we will speak live with her before 11am. united states says it is ready to use united states says it is ready to use its nuclear capabilities to defend itself and its allies against threats from north korea. the white house issued the statement following a phone conversation between president trump and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe. it was made in response to north korea's sixth, and most powerful, nuclear test. this is what we know about the test so far. we are going to speak with our war correspondent, about the news that
BBC News
Jan 27, 2017 9:00am GMT
between carl froch and george groves which said the current post—war record of 80,000, bringing in more than £20 million. when you meet someday like anthonyjoshua, if you go to its fight, you realise how lucky is by boxing fans, sports fans in general. he acknowledges the whole crowd, and that 27, to bring in 90,000 with a huge career head of him, fora in 90,000 with a huge career head of him, for a heavyweight, astonishing stuff. great, thank you very much, see you later. a new dawn is breaking — prime minister theresa may's verdict on the change in the white house as donald trump ends his first week in charge as president. today mrs may will meet him — the first foreign leader to do so. the two could not be more different. one of them is a vicar‘s daughter, the other a billionaire star of reality tv. there are frequent and regular meetings between british prime ministers and american presidents, but few will be as significant as the visit to washington today. the prime minister will be hoping to prepare the ground for a trade deal after brexit. speaking last night to a gro
BBC News
Apr 5, 2017 9:00am BST
off as a result of george 0sborne's cuts, yet two thirds, well over half will go back into work within 18 months. you do not need to whip them. but the ones who are not ready to go back to work and who will be hurt, they are to matt crooks, those with young children who are badly distressed, having nightmares, bedwetting, not wanting to go to school, and the mother feels she needs to be around to attend to them. to avoid mental health issues later, you need to give them extra care. and the government is saying you cannot have it. if it is so important to you as a labour peer, why did your own leader not bother to turn up to vote against this in march? jeremy corbyn? yes. i don't know. you must have an opinion about that?” corbyn? yes. i don't know. you must have an opinion about that? i don't know what he was doing. i cannot be accountable to him. but you are his labour colleagues. i am responsible for policy development in the lords, and in the lords, we have been putting in some of these delays and changes. the crucial thing is how that we now get mitigation and changes, and
BBC News
Aug 9, 2017 9:00am BST
would never respond. they thought george bush would not respond and he responded. donald trump seems like a chap who responds and if i were in kim jong—un's shoes i would be smart to listen to what the president says. and stop trying to develop nuclear capability? i would stop. if you listen to secretary of state rex tillerson. his language is more diplomatic. even though we would like to bring them into the community of nations. tell them economically. generally in the past thatis economically. generally in the past that is what the nuclear programme has been used for. they would threaten and get more wheat and close down the programme and bring it up several years later. nobody wants to see the country suffering. if you do a programme like this, you will face consequences. hopefully china will have seen this audio and know there is some serious stuff going on. thank you very much. earlier this year paralympian athlete anne wafula—strike came on this programme to talk about the moment she was "was completely robbed of her dignity." she had been forced to urinate on herself on a
BBC News
Apr 10, 2017 9:00am BST
would receive pardons. george montague was convicted in 1974 of gross indecency with a manment the conviction was repealed in may 2004ment the 93—year—old who has fought for an apology has received one from the home office. actually, understand that we offer this full apology, their treatment was entirely unfair. what happened to these men is a matter of the greatest regret and it should be so to all of us, it really made my day. i was over the moon and the wording is so wonderful and so explicit. abject apology. from the government. more on that on the world at one programme on radio 4. unprecedented coral bleaching in consecutive years has damaged two—thirds of australia's great barrier reef, aerial surveys have shown. the bleaching, or loss of algae, affects a 900 mile area of the reef. so why does it matter? we can speak to drjames kerry from the national coral bleaching taskforce in australia. hopefully we will talk to the owner ofa hopefully we will talk to the owner of a marine and diving business. good morning from us. hi there. explain to our british audience what co
BBC News
Jun 13, 2017 9:00am BST
, remember i resigned over a year ago because i disagreed with george osborne's direction of tral and i have asked us to re—think whole areas of where we are. the length of time that we are asking public serva nts time that we are asking public servants and others to put up with reduced flattened salaries has been an issue for me and many other people and we would like to see that revisited. this isn'tjust an issue to do with the dup. what the election told us the election was too early and we should have had time to resolve those issues, but, on one side, there is a genuine discussion about that and i think there are key issues around education and stuff that we need to resolve. on the side of the brexit side, actually the dup are very clear that they support theresa may's original position which is no, thet want control of the bofrders, money and laws. there will be no entry into the single market and they're keen not to be in the customs union. but they are opposed to her mantra of no deal is better than a bad deal. they're not actually opposed that. i promise you that this will be
BBC News
May 2, 2017 9:00am BST
performed cpr on the children at the scene, who were taken to hospital and are said to be doing well. george osborne starts his newjob as editor of the london newspaper the evening standard today the former chancellor's appointment drew criticism from opposition mps who called on him to quit politics. mr 0sbourne stepped down as conservative mp for tatton in cheshire last month, a seat which is due to be abolished at the next election. he'll edit the paper four days a week. new parents cheryl and liam payne have reportedly named their baby boy — five weeks after his arrival. some of this morning's newspapers are reporting that the couple have named their son bear. they apparently spent a week with the baby before deciding on the name. actresses kate wi nslet and alicia silverstone also both have sons named bear. a host of celebrities turned out in their finest for what's been described as "the party of the year" — the met gala. the annual charity ball is held at new york's metropolitan museum of art to raise money for the museum's fashion department. it's an exclusive event, with tickets
BBC News
Mar 17, 2017 9:00am GMT
partnership, tahira crow, the mum of 15—year—old george who has a rare genetic syndrome and is autistic. she is receiving some social care but says it‘s not enough. for her disabled daughter. she didn‘t have any.supp9;t........... .. . for about eight years, has some now, but says it‘s not enough. tell us about your daughter‘s care needs and the pressure it puts on you. holly has multiple illnesses, cerebral- epilepsy, chronic cerebral palsy, epilepsy, chronic lung disease, jackie austin the gastronomy dependent, she highly skilled medically requires highly skilled medically people to care for her. 2a trained people to care for her. 2a hours a day seven days a week, which myself and my husband do, to keep her alive. holly‘s prognosis is she is life limited. each day brings a different challenge for us. you and your husband are full—time carers and you do a very highly skilled job in caring for holly. tells what to do. yes. we have to be specially trained to react to everything that holly does. we do the job of an intensive care team at home. holly... i house is set
BBC News
May 9, 2017 9:00am BST
and steve who has used the foodbank in the past. hi, steve. we've got rachel george who is a mum and carerfor we've got rachel george who is a mum and carer for her disabled we've got rachel george who is a mum and carerfor her disabled son we've got rachel george who is a mum and carer for her disabled son who is ten. hi rachel. we've got laura allen who is a single parent and working mum. good morning. welcome to our working mum. good morning. welcome to oui’ programme. working mum. good morning. welcome to our programme. general question, do you feel exercised by this election, do you feel engaged, do you feel passionate? election, do you feel engaged, do you feel passionate ?|j election, do you feel engaged, do you feel passionate? i feel a bit passionate. i'm still undecided, but i'm taking a lot more interest in it. so you're happy with the conservatives in power, are you?” feel a lot more confident with this government now than the old government. do you? yeah. 0k. what about yourself, rachel? not particularly. not particularly engaged? i feel strongly that any candidate t
BBC News
Jan 10, 2017 9:00am GMT
shoes and dance the blues.# # and ziggy played guitar.# so, george, you knew david since you were kids? what are you thinking?” what are you thinking? i still can't really get used to it. it is a tough one because he was a big part of my life. you met at age nine... yes, enrolling for the cubs. 0k. kyoto treaties what nine—year—old david bowie was like? -- can you tell us what nine—year—old david bowie was like? he was enthusiastic. the first thing we started talking about was music and the music that was of the time in1956, music and the music that was of the time in 1956, you know, there was everything. music was starting to change drastically. we were in a good place. we wanted to get a group together straightaway even though we we re together straightaway even though we were only nine years old! but we did, while we were in the cubs we did, while we were in the cubs we did go around the cap fire singing a few songs. probably david's first public performance. maybe. maybe. you cemented that friendship, i think, through your teenage years and obviously he's grog up and then
BBC News
Jul 6, 2017 9:00am BST
and our diplomats because of that very close relationship he built up with george bush. you may remember that the inquiry uncovered that note sent from tony blair to george bush after they had met at president bush's ranch in crawford in texas, saying we will be with you whatever. that was sent nine months before we went to war. sirjohn says how shocked he was when he read that, because it was when he read that, because it was pretty much just giving was when he read that, because it was pretty muchjust giving george bush a green light. you are left with the sense that sirjohn believes that tony blair was, is and a lwa ys believes that tony blair was, is and always will be a lawyer, an advocate making the case, seeking to persuade rather than necessarily the statesman taking a cold, hard—headed look at the facts. does anything change as a result of him giving this interview? we waited a long time for that report, which came out a year ago. does anything change now? there are couple of things which point us forward. one is sir john's conviction that the have changed, that they
BBC News
Jun 21, 2017 9:00am BST
if they's performance? elliot daly, perhaps, the wasps winger, might push george north outboard warren gatland said it will be the toughest selection meeting he's ever had. other positions in the field, up for grabs, some conjecture over the fly half position, owen farrell, will he be fit? even if he is, will he be able to usurp jonny be fit? even if he is, will he be able to usueronny sexton? and the captaincy, sam warburton, captain of this tour, but peter o'mahony who did so brilliantly against the maoris, he's expected to get the nod for the first test. cannot wait, all will be revealed later. thank you very much, ollie, see you later. later, the queen will head from buckingham palace to westminster for the pomp and ceremony of parliament's official opening. a little bit less of the pomp, though. in normal times after an election, she would spell out the winning party's agenda for the year ahead, turning their manifesto commitments into government bills. but theresa may's conservatives didn't get enough mps to be certain of getting their policies through, so this year's quee
BBC News
Feb 10, 2017 9:00am GMT
70,000. drjess brittain—george has justjoined a hospital where assaults are declining, but she's witnessed several elsewhere. i think you'll find most nhs staff can say at some point or another they've been attacked or felt unsafe at work. it's a running joke in the staff room, what's happened to me today or i've been hit again, something like that. everyone's on alert. everyone's looking out for the patients they think are going to kick off. alan, not his real name, works for nhs protect. he claims it's deliberately avoided public discussion about ending its role in protecting staff. i think it's an absolute disgrace that we're turning our back on staff in the nhs. they are there to protect the public and we are there to protect them. it will have a material effect, in my view. i think assaults will go through the roof. nhs protect said it was consulting staff on proposals, under which our organisation would not be tasked with security management work. it added, it should be noted that keeping health service staff safe and secure has always been a responsibility of local nhs emp
BBC News
Feb 23, 2017 9:00am GMT
poignant moment, chris martin from coldplay‘s george michael tribute. no wickham you are the only one to stop my tears, i'm so scared... lizo mzimba, bbc news. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. letter on the programme, about half past ten, we talk to dame helen mirren. only one of hollywood's, one of britain's's finest actors, most successful as well, she has won pretty much every award going and she is giving a talk to the princes trust, the young people at the princes trust, about the times in her life when she has experienced low self—esteem. we will talk to her later about that and other things of course. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now with hugh woozencroft. hugh — news this morning about wayne rooney and his possible move to china? his agent is flying out there, it might happen? we were talking about wayne rooney and that prospective move to china, and that prospective move to china, a huge £1 million per we
BBC News
Jul 25, 2017 9:00am BST
. also professor rob george, medical director at st christopher's hospice in south london and a professor of palliative care at king's college london. and emma nottingham, a lecturer in child law at the university of winchester and a member of the institute of medical ethics‘ research committee. welcome all of you. catherine, what have the parents said to you? what have the parents said to you? what have you said to the parents? well, as you can imagine they are just devastated at the loss of their son. they have been given information that had he received treatment several months ago then he might have had a chance, but that in these intervening months his muscle tissue has got to the point where this cutting edge treatment can do no good. it would be ineffective apparently. and so, and so we do know that they're doing everything they can for their son. spending the last precious moments with them, but they're heartbroken.” last precious moments with them, but they're heartbroken. i wonder emma and professor rob george what your view is of the parents‘ belief that had thi
BBC News
Aug 30, 2017 9:00am BST
repeat the mistakes of george bush, when hurricane katrina hit. in houston, the mayor has introduced a night—time curfew, amid fears of looting. to the west of this vast city, two huge reservoirs are overflowing. harvey's path is slow—moving and erratic. this force of nature may not be spent yet. keith doyle, bbc news. kezia dugdale has resigned as leader of scottish labour, after less than two years in the post. the lothians msp insists she is leaving the party in a much better state than when she found it. she's also rejected the idea her departure has anything to do with her previous criticism ofjeremy corbyn. most political leaders quit at a moment of crisis, something terrible's happened. i've decided that i think the labour party is very much on its uppers. it's made tremendous progress from the state that i found it in two, 2.5 years ago, when it was literally on its knees. i've taken the party forward. it's in a much better state than i found it. now it's time to pass that baton onto the next person. we've had five national elections in 2.5 years. now it's time to move on
BBC News
Apr 4, 2017 9:00am BST
george's and my parents received great support and care." still to come, government support for widowed parents is being cut later this week. we'll be finding out what this means for people who receive the allowance. david moyes says he regrets talking about "slapping" a female reporter. is his apology enough? zblud should that be the end of the matter? joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the man suspected of killing 11 people by bombing a st petersburg train, is a native of kyrgyzstan who obtained russian citizenship, according to security services. 49 people were injured in the explosion between two underground stations yesterday afternoon. three days of mourning have begun. a group of mps has accused the government of making "unsubsta ntiated claims" about the potential impact of failing to reach a brexit deal with the eu. the exiting the eu committee report criticised the prime minister's position that no deal was better than a bad deal, and called on the government to carry out an urgent impact assessment. but six pro—brexit mps on
BBC News
Jul 17, 2017 9:00am BST
bbc to slur men. this role was created as a male character and should have remained so. george says brilliant to have jodie whittaker and being from yorkshire, she'll be the best yet. thank you for those. keep them coming in. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. a terminally ill man will protest to overturn the laws so a doctor is allowed to help him die when his health deteriorates. under the current law, any doctor that helped him would face up to 14 years in prison. 0pponents say the change would put vulnerable people at risk. the rise in the number of acid attacks will be discussed in parliament today. latest figures suggest there were more than 400 assaults involving corrosive su bsta nces assaults involving corrosive substances in england and wales in the since months to april. the debate comes as the government begins a review into the issue which could see sentences for the offence increased. the brexit secretary david davis has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning as the next round of negotiating takes place in brussels. mr
BBC News
May 10, 2017 9:00am BST
during george w. bush's time as president. she's head of the us and the americas programme at chatham house. gordon, many people are asking what was james comey on to, what had he found out? i think that is the problem the donald trump, that is exactly the question, despite the idea that this was to do with hillary clinton's e—mails, and his announcements during that. i think very few people will buy that line from the white house. i think almost eve ryo ne from the white house. i think almost everyone will think this was to do with the russia enquiry, and that in some way james comey with the russia enquiry, and that in some wayjames comey was not with the russia enquiry, and that in some way james comey was not playing ball, always pushing too hard was doing something. that will be the assumption in washington, which people are already working on. i think itjust doesn't make sense for this to have been about hillary clinton, because donald trump praised his the surgeon to announce an enquiry into hillary clinton and to the reopening of itjust before the election. so thatjust doesn
BBC News
Feb 8, 2017 9:00am GMT
writer for george w bush and democrat who isa for george w bush and democrat who is a pollster and strategist. argue for talking to our audience. what sort of pressure is president trump under over all of this? he is under a lot of pressure, especially after the women's march showed there were a lot of people willing to travel to the capital to oppose his policies. the executive order prompted protests at airports, including dallas, washington, and people were protesting very joyfully and dallas, washington, and people were protesting veryjoyfully and happily and the spirit was good, but it has prompted a lot of resistance and opposition from just your average person. does it matter about that pressure? in the end it will be down to the cause and it may go to the highest court in the land eventually. it does matter for the executive order to come about in the way this one did to stop thejustice department was not consulted. the homeland security agency was not given a chance to weigh in on the implications of this and for it to come out it has been disorganised and it was stopped.
BBC News
Jun 12, 2017 9:00am BST
cabinet colleague george osborne said she's a ‘dead woman walking.‘ it's colleague george osborne said she‘s a ‘dead woman walking.‘ it‘s safe to say, for one reason or another, the campaign has been a bit of a ‘mare, for mrs may. just a quick warning if you‘re photosensitive — this video has bright flashes in it. i have just chaired a meeting of the cabinet, where we agreed that the government should call a general election, to be held on the 8th ofjune. i‘ve called an election because of brexit. you've called a general election for the good of the conservative party, and it's going to backfire on you. unless the exit poll is incredibly wrong, the prime minister has failed to achieve her principal objective. theresa may... theresa may. can we agree, to start with, that the one thing that voters deserve, in what you yourself have said is going to be a very, very important election, is no sound bites? strong and stable leadership. a strong and stable government. and there‘s a reason for talking about strong and stable leadership. strong, strong, strong and stable leade
BBC News
Apr 26, 2017 9:00am BST
it up, are they? lying? they are acting on behalf of the us. george kirby is a man with strong us connections. what would be the motivation for making all that up? —— judge kirby. to demonise the dprk, to turn the west against it. when you hear it from defectors, what do you think, they are making it up as well? yes. i have chaired hearings in the house of lords which has been addressed by escapees. they would leave you in tears, when you are about the things that has happened to them. a catalogue of executions, torture, rape. massive violations of human rights occur in north korea. it must change. anyone who loves the people of north korea would be working for change. instead, we are on the brink of a war. the sarajevo moment, if it were to occur, the law unintended consequences, we to occur, the law unintended consequences, we could see another one the korean peninsular. last time, 3 million people died on a war in the korean peninsula including 1000 british servicemen. more than in the falklands, afghanistan and iraq combined. that is the danger the world faces at the momen
BBC News
Jun 23, 2017 9:00am BST
saint georges park, as will be fa, the national centre of footballing excellence where all the young players go through. signs that the development of young players is working at the fantastic site in burton upon trent. what's key is the often point to some of the failings that senior players have had, certainly in the latter stages of tournaments. what is key here is that big tournament experience for younger players at each age group, playing in big games at the latter stages of tournaments will serve them well when they potentially make them well when they potentially make the move up to the senior team. big tournament experience counts and at the moment these young players certainly have it. we will catch up withjohn again in around half an hour. so, exactly a year to the day since britain voted to leave the european union, theresa may has given more details on the rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. any eu citizen who's been here for five years or more will be allowed to stay. they'll have a new immigration status. that will give them access to education, health
BBC News
May 11, 2017 9:00am BST
her mouth. another thing that caught my eye, george osborne is standing down now as an mp to go and edit the london evening standard. a week ago, when he started the job, he looks pretty sharp and perky. he looks ok. he is getting on with life, looks quite refreshed. this was mr osborne after a week in the job. sorry, i've got the picture. can you see it? that is his first day in the job, and that is two weeks in. if he thought it was going to be easy to edit a newspaper, he is not looking like it now. i think he is finding it harder than he thought to be a humble hack. still to come, aid agencies in somalia are battling a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions. we will get the latest from a special conference in london aimed at trying to help. and we will talk to the men that have been left unable to have sex following treatment for prostate cancer because they cannot get the corrective surgery they need on the nhs. now time for the latest news headlines. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has described the leak of labour‘s draft manifesto as "very disappointing". due to be
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 9:00am BST
george osborne's commitment of balancing the books by the end of this parliament and has not given us a fresh trade for balancing those books. lastly, of course, age. one of the most contentious areas, david cameron, a very high—profile policy commitment to ensuring that suroor .7% of our total earnings close towards overseas aid. they lot of conservatives are unhappy about that. mrs may when pressed about that. mrs may when pressed about that refused to confirm she would give that so the signs are certain key planks of the cameron agenda could be dropped by theresa may. the other interesting thing is that we expect these manifestos to be a lots of the previous ones. we now mrs may thought david cameron's manifesto was far too bulky. so she wants to slimming down. as for the other parties, they are in a rush. they're having to write their manifestos. well, joining me now in the studio are two people who can tell us what to look out for. sam tarry used to be a spokesman forjeremy corbyn and is in regular contact with the labour leader. and mark wallace is executive editor of the infl
BBC News
Jul 12, 2017 9:00am BST
, arrangement. even george clinton, one of the most sampled artists in the world, who has influenced loads of people, including bruno mars, i'm sure, and mark ronson, he even said about the case that he couldn't see it, because he said you can't copyright a vibe. well, in their depositions, they were talking about it is just they were talking about it is just the feeling, the vibe and that was enough of the us jurors. the feeling, the vibe and that was enough of the usjurors. yes, i think it is sad this case has come around, particularly when motown, which marvin gaye came up through, all those artists shared a lot of influences and sounds, and the feel and the vibe of the songs. they are still amazing songs, they can still coexist together, but now all of a sudden this litigious nature that eve ryo ne sudden this litigious nature that everyone is kind of suing each other, and it is a bit of a shame really. you are right, you say it is the arrangement, the production and so the arrangement, the production and so on, but chi gave the example where it was quite similar so the new lot h
BBC News
Aug 1, 2017 9:00am BST
week, william made it clear that he wanted george and charlotte to know they had another grandmother and she existed. this is a clear message that people should acknowledge. history cannot and should not be rewritten. more on this at 10.30am. the royal national lifeboat institution or rnli, says last year saw a rise in the number of coastal deaths in august. they're warning of the shock that can come with falling into cold water as we enter the deadliest month for accidents in the sea. radio 1 newsbeat‘s rick kelsey has been in cornwall with the rnli as a new national campaign tells people how to deal with the shock of falling in cold water. tens of thousands of people will go into the water off the uk this month. one of the most popular places is here in newquay. so how would you describe today's conditions? a good day for surfing or not? yes, it's pretty good, it's pretty solid out there. it's nice and clean which makes a change. josie has the job of watching hundreds of surfers and swimmers here on fistral beach. i've lived pretty much on this beach all my life. i've done the su
BBC News
May 3, 2017 9:00am BST
england defender, his old team—mate, phil neville likened him to pele or george best. he was in imperious form to help real madrid ta ke imperious form to help real madrid take a step towards the champions league final. they beat their city rivals atletico madrid thanks to ronaldo's 11th hat—trick for the club. they have the chance to become the first back—to—back winners of the first back—to—back winners of the champions league as well and that would be a third title in four yea rs that would be a third title in four years in the competition for them. a huge achievement even for a club with so much success. they are 11—time winners and their recent history, all of that success would be underpinned by cristiano ronaldo himself. describe how good he is. well, for ronaldo the record books continue to be rewritten. if you talk about footballing records, he just about has all of them to his namement if you want to talk about what his footballing legacy will be, he has taken the game to a new level. aside from his personal accolades, his time at manchester united and real
BBC News
Feb 22, 2017 9:00am GMT
george north has recovered from a bruised thigh to start for wales in saturday's six nations match against scotland at murrayfield. ryan sidebottom will end his 20—year professional cricket career at the end of this coming season. the yorkshire fast bowler has won the county championship five times, and won the t20 world cup with england in 2010. the director—general of the bbc has announced that a new tv channel is to created in scotland to begin broadcasting in autumn 2018. the channel will have a budget of £30 million, equivalent to the amount spent on bbc four. the plans for the channel include a scottish news hour at 9pm. let's get more from our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. we can also speak to snp mp john nicolson, he sits on the culture, media and sport select committee and is a former scottish television presenter. right, lorna, give us the details. this news has taken everybody by surprise. it has been very, a very well kept secret. there will be a new channel on the digital spectrum that will broadcast scottish content. it'll have a budget of about £30 milli
BBC News
May 30, 2017 9:00am BST
migration figures, these targets are bonkers which is why george osborne disagreed so profoundly with weak and wobbly theresa may. thank you very much, nicola sturgeon will be live on the news channel launching her election ma nifesto, news channel launching her election manifesto, the snp leader, you can see that at 11am on the bbc news channel. next this morning — a dishevelled tiger woods, bleary—eyed and unshaven — a picture that will no doubt haunt him for years to come. it was taken after his arrest for driving under the influence. tiger woods was one of the world's most successful golfers — he totally dominated the sport winning 14 championships and was the number one for eight of the years he played. but that all collapsed in 2009 when he revealed he had had multiple extra marital affairs and issued this public apology the following year. the issue involved here was my repeated irresponsible behaviour. i was unfaithful. i had a fair ‘s, i cheated. what i did is not acceptable. and i am the only person to blame. i stopped living by the co re to blame. i stopped l
BBC News
Mar 8, 2017 9:00am GMT
different economic model, so we can no longer afford public service the way we could, and even george osborne said the house of commons the comment has chosen not to make the economy the priority. if i was philip hammond against a structural weakness in the economy, pressure on finances, and brexit, and would be very worried. is the reason public services do not get money because of fears of what brexit means? no, we have protected spending on the health service and schools in real terms, so we are investing for the future. i am very pleased the chancellor is cautious and the public want a finance minister who is cautious and careful with their money. thanks very much. iam with their money. thanks very much. i am seriously concerned for the well—being of the white rabbit because it looks like this is the first budget in a long time when we don't see any! thank you very much. the royal college of midwives is calling for more midwives to be trained to specialise in bereavement as, at the moment, there is no mandatory training for maternity staff to deal with the issue and no nationalj
BBC News
Sep 13, 2017 9:00am BST
, george, she's a traveller and we do not mix with that sort". so it was parents at school stopping their children from being yourfriend. and we wouldn't obviously know, but when that happened, he called me "pikey" and i asked mummy and she said "it's basically not him, it's what he's hearing at home". do you think there's any truth in some of it? i do, yeah, but there's good and bad in all communities. you can't paint them all with one brush. they should educate schools about us. so because there isn't that education, you had a hard time, so you left, didn't you? yeah, i left school in year six. how old were you? i was about 11 when i left. and now being 28 and thinking back that you left school at 11... i would have loved to go to high school. definitely. i know i'm not too clever, but i would have tried my best and done something with my life. but the fact is that other travellers go to school and they're fighting racism and discrimination all the time from teachers, pupils and parents. and they're suffering. they're not getting an education. they're not getting to learn. you nee
BBC News
Sep 7, 2017 9:00am BST
listen to this. # one—day... and a new george michael single has been released today 8 months after his death. we'll play you some of it and get reviews from some of his fans. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. throughout the morning the latest breaking news and developing stories and, as always, really keen to hear from you. a little later in the programme we'll be talking about the school which has introduced a gender neutral uniform. it's been introduced over concern about skirt lengths at the school and to accommodate some transgender pupils. it means effectively that girls have got to wear trousers and they cannot wear skirts. this comes after the announcement from do john lewis wear skirts. this comes after the announcement from dojohn lewis that they would sell gender neutral children's clothing. they would sell gender neutral child ren's clothing. one they would sell gender neutral children's clothing. one mother says that her daughter is a girl and she wa nts to that her daughter is a girl and she wants to wear a skirt and that is her gender. ple
BBC News
Jan 17, 2017 9:00am GMT
single market, but there is an awful lot theresa may ain't going to tell us. plus george michael's childhood friend tells this programme he believes a cocktail of drugs and anti—depressants were responsible for the singer's death on christmas day. hard drugs had been back in his life, it was not heroin. are you talking about cocaine? cocaine, crack was one of his favourite drugs. we'll bring you the full exclusive interview with andros georgiou — who was so close to george michael they described themselves as cousins — at 9:15am. and we'll meet one of britain's most prolific organ donors who's already donated a kidney, 16 eggs and 80 pints of blood to people she's never met — and plans to do much, much more. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11am. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. we will bring you the latest news and stories throughout the day. what do you want to hear theresa may say in her big brexit speech which is due at around 1145, you will see that on bbc news. if you have donated a
BBC News
Jan 20, 2017 9:00am GMT
magazine, and also a former speech writer for george magazine, and also a former speech writerfor george w bush. we have got so much analysis throughout the programme today, we will be talking to insiders, people going on protests in washington on any alteration day. do let us know your thoughts about the man who little bit later today is going to be president. let's catch up with the rest of the news with annita mcveigh in the newsroom. thank you, joanna. good morning. a group of british doctors say they've transformed the treatment and diagnosis of prostate cancer. they've used mri scans, which nearly double the number of aggressive tumours that are caught. prostate cancer — the most common type of cancer in men in the uk — is normally confirmed with an invasive biopsy. elaine dunkley reports. winning the world cup for gb, that was definitely my finest hour... fred is a former olympian who represented great britain in the long jump in the 1980s. two years ago, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. you know where you're at, as opposed to ignoring the problem, and then one day you hav
BBC News
Mar 1, 2017 9:00am GMT
patient ever to undergo — and survive — major abdominal surgery anywhere in the world. st george's hospital in london operated on a premature baby who was born atjust 23 weeks and was just six days old. patient abiageal peters weighed only 1.3 lbs — or0.5 kilograms — that's the weight of this bag of sugar — when doctors realised she needed emergency surgery. her intestine had ruptured in three places because of a severe condition of the gut called necrotizing enterocolitis. we can speak to her mum louise peters. and the surgeon who carried out the operation is mr zahid mukhtar at st george's hospital in london. hi both of you. good morning. hi louise, how are you? very well. how are you? i'm very well, thank you. tell us about the birth of abigail. well, it certainly didn't go how we expected it to. i was over half—way through my pregnancy and i was at home on a monday and my waters broke andi home on a monday and my waters broke and i kind of wasn't really sure what was happening to be honest and was in denial hoping that wasn't what it was. so i had to get an ambulance to
BBC News
Feb 13, 2017 9:00am GMT
grammys overnight — for an amazing george michael cover....but it didn't go without a hitch. i know it's live tv, i'm sorry, i need to start again, i can't do it again like last year. i'm sorry for swearing and i'm sorry for starting again. can we please start again? hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. i'm chloe tilley and throughout the morning we'll bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories. a little later in the programme we'll hearfrom children of addicted parents — as a new report from the nspcc says they receive a call every single hour from adults worried about drugs and alcohol being around children. we'll talk about the impact it has on those young children. if you've got you own experience, do get in touch — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. widespread drug use, door alarms that didn't work and a hole in a perimeterfence — just some of the discoveries made by a bbc undercover reporter at a prison in the north—east of england. panorama discovered evi
BBC News
Jul 18, 2017 9:00am BST
cambridge — along with prince george and princess charlotte — are continuing their tour of poland. today they'll visit the stutthof concentration camp in gdansk. last night, prince william delivered a speech in warsaw in which he praised the country's courage, fortitude and bravery. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. we are going to talk tojohanna konta later. now the sport. it was a great day for britain at the world paraathletics yesterday. yes, another great day. good morning. three more golds, that is 11 in total. 20 medal overall so far, they only started on friday. two of those 11 golds so far, have come from hannah cockroft. she got the second of those last night in the t 3a 800 metres. she could win a third later in the week as well. cockroft is amazing. nine world titles to go with her five pa ralympic amazing. nine world titles to go with herfive paralympic gold medals. she could complete a treble treble while not feeling great. she is short of breath. she says she feels like she is smoking 100 cigarettes a day! that treble treble could be sealed later. s
BBC News
Aug 15, 2017 9:00am BST
june cox has died. 79—year—old bernard kenny was awarded the george medalfor his bravery bernard kenny was awarded the george medal for his bravery after he intervenes when a right—wing extremist attack the mp in the run—up to last your‘s eu referendum. mr kenny was seriously injured in the attack but because of his death not believed to be related to the incident. rail passengers will learn this morning how much more they'll be paying for some of theirjourneys from january next year. regulated fares which account for almost half ticket will go up by the rate of inflation, the exact figure will be published this morning. it is expected to be around three and a half percent, well above average pay rises. a girl has died after a man drove a car into a pizza restaurant near paris yesterday evening. twelve other people were injured in the attack, four of them seriously. police said they're treating the incident as deliberate, but not related to terror. the driver of the car, a 32—year—old man, has been arrested. the fat but fit the theory that overweight people can still be healt
BBC News
Feb 3, 2017 9:00am GMT
before they do it? this is the argument... i wanted to put to you what george osborne said as chancellor, he outlined the plan is backin chancellor, he outlined the plan is back in 2015... he has chancellor, he outlined the plan is back in 2015. .. he has probably changed his mind now! he said then that the system as it has been created perverse incentives preventing disabled people returning to work and at that point he said the number of people claiming out of what disability benefits had fallen by 90,000 since 2010. the committee is not against change, not against change for new claimants, although we have heard that there is a recycling of claimants as they lose jobs. the committee's case is very clear, if the government is really so clear, if the government is really so confident that it is going to be that easy for this large group of people, disabled people, to move into work, why won't they concede, as the conservative members on the committee have demanded, notjust labour members, to say that they should have the support measures in place, the safety net in place, for
BBC News
Jan 26, 2017 9:00am GMT
the international space station. dambuster hero george johnnyjohnson is the last surviving brit of the bouncing bomb raids on hitlers dams. we speak to carol vorderman about why she's spearheading a petition to get him a knighthood. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. let's begin with president trump. the us president donald trump has said he believes that torture can work to get information out of suspected terrorists. but he said he would seek further advice before deciding whether to bring back techniques such as water—boarding. speaking to the american abc network, in his first televised interview since becoming president, he also repeated his pledge to make mexico pay for a wall along its border with the united states. it comes as theresa may travels to the us to become the first world leader to meet the new president. the government will publish a bill today to enable it to invoke article 50 and trigger the process of the uk leaving the european union. the brexit secretary david davis says the bill will be straightforward, althoug
BBC News
Feb 28, 2017 9:00am GMT
around pips instead. george freeman, a tory mp and head of the number ten policy unit, caused outrage by saying the reason the changes were being made was to make sure benefit payments went to "really disabled people" rather than those "who suffer from anxiety". looking truth on the disability budget is we spend £50 billion a year on disability benefits and what we're trying to make sure is we get them to the right people who are most in need. you didn't mention the twea ks a re most in need. you didn't mention the tweaks are actually to do with rolling back some bizarre decision through the tribunals that mean benefits are being given to people who take pills at home. who suffer from anxiety. we want to make sure we get the money to really disabled people. the people who need it. let's talk now to labour mp and shadow work and pensions secretary debbie abrahams. and 27 year—old james downs who receives pip for severe anxiety, ocd and an eating disorder. he's also a student at cambridge university. alexandra got in touch. she receives pip for depression and personality diso
BBC News
Feb 21, 2017 9:00am GMT
george's people's budget, they said the house of lords should be amended or entered. for 100 years, governments have tried to reform the house of lords and failed. 0ne reform the house of lords and failed. one way or another, it will probably end up in the sand. why have so many governments failed? partly because the house of commons does not want to see a reformed house of lords that is elected, because it is the most damning thing you can say about the house of lords, these unelected, and representative people. if they were elected then there would be two elected then there would be two elected houses, which one has power over the other? that is one of the things that successful governments have struggled with. tony blair, to his credit, got rid of most of the hereditary peers, because that was complete nonsense, and there have been the reforms in the past when they invented life peers, which brought a really new life into the house of lords. the house of lords is quite a nice place in a lot of ways, it is amazingly civilised, even get nursery food, bread—and—butter pudding.
BBC News
Feb 6, 2017 9:00am GMT
weekend of rugby union's six nations. 33—7 it finished in rome. george north with his side's third try. wales making a winning start but missed out on scoring a fourth try which would have earned them a bonus point victory. that is all the sport for now. victoria, back to you. welcome back. this morning we're talking about the state of the nhs with you, and with an audience of 80 nhs workers and patients. for the next 15 mins or so we're going to talk about social care and the impact that stretched resources there have on the nhs. health care is provided by the nhs in doctors' surgeries and hospitals. social care is provided in the community to help people who need support due to illness, disability or old age. and because so many more people are living longer, it's really putting pressure on the social care budget, which in 2016 stood atjust under £20 billion in england. the social care system is designed to provide care in the community for the elderly, sick and disabled. it encompasses anything from help in the home with washing and dressing to care homes, and has remained more
BBC News
Mar 9, 2017 9:00am GMT
credits, when george osborne announced the changes to tax credits, huge rumpus on the tory backbenches, in part because it was seen as an attack on people who we re was seen as an attack on people who were working hard, maybe not earning much, but going out and doing a decent day's work and they risked losing tax credits. what happened? george osborne had to beat a retreat. could the same happen? we know there is almost certainly going to bea know there is almost certainly going to be a vote on it. labour will try to be a vote on it. labour will try to force a vote and it may be, i don't know that there has to be legislation to bring about the changes anyway. it looks like a parliamentary showdown on this is unavoidable. thank you. keep your thoughts coming in. all of the usual ways of getting in touch. still to come... a man in australia is charged with over 900 child sex offences after allegedly posing online as popstarjustin bieber. we're live in brisbane with the latest. cancer experts have issued a warning that children in the uk could be missing out on potentially life—saving d
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