Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171023
DATE
2017 11
2013 6
2012 3
2016 1
2014 0
2015 0
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Jun 13, 2013 6:30am PDT
peaceful life, and it was. i blamed george bush for what happened to my family that year. i blame when regime in iraq for what happened after. not stop thed iraqi militia. the militia would target muslims like my family and bomb the neighborhoods. 2004, the first reason for us to think about fleeing iraq. my father-in-law and brother-in- law were killed in one of those farms. >> they went to buy some sweets from the store, and when they went to the store, they killed. >> the second reason, i was a taxi driver. the street.ss on the iraqi militia put a check. all around gigantic, and at each checkpoint they demanded to see id. they were looking for a series -- for sunis. my cousin was 26 years old, and he was working as a minister of health, and one day when he finished his job and went home, there were sent. . we stopped and asked him about his id. when they notice, they shot him. >> they asked me, and i said, i forgot my id at my house, but because there was speaking like iraqi people, and i have an iraqi accent, they said, ok, but next time you cannot forget your id. you have to carry
LINKTV
Feb 28, 2013 9:00am PST
capra, gregory le cava, leo mccary, and george stevens. all got their training in the slapstick of the 1920's. and it was this new form combining high and low comedy, classy chatter and physical highjinks, that bore america's sweetheart: the screwball. and in 1934, "it happened one night," the first screwball comedy, ran away with 5 academy awards. aren't you going tgive me a little credit? what for? i've proved once and for all at the limb is mightier than the thumb. why didn't you take of l your clothes? you could have stopped forty cars. oh... i'll remember that when we need forty cars! screwball comedi, i think, have lasted so well because they're sophticated; they're very unsentimental; of all the genres produced in the 30's and 40's, they're the most modern cause they center on the idea of equality of the sexes. and how many drinks have you had? this will make six martinis. all right... will you bring me five more martinis? leo, line them right up here. what was interesting about 30's screwball romantic comedy was that it was the second full decade where women had the vote, where
LINKTV
Mar 13, 2013 7:30pm PDT
. george washington chops down the cherry tree, doesn't lie; abe lincoln walks a million miles to give back a penny - these kinds of things. we happen to be in the state of illinois - if you have been down to the springfield region, you know exactly what i'm talking about when we're speaking of civil religion, with the figure of lincoln. he's larger than life, he's more than just a human being or a past president - he's something that infuses public policy with an ideal. and we have to be very clear about that. civil religion supports the ideals over reality, and when we talk about the sacred texts that guide civil religious ideals in a country like america, we think about the declaration of independence - "that all people have inalienable rights." well, some folks have not gotten inalienable rights here, and we've had classes on native american spirituality, and we don't need to rehearse the whole negative scene with african american, native american, immigrants, people who didn't measure up to some kind of ideal, literally white-washed image of what the american mythos was. but we've
LINKTV
Feb 22, 2012 10:00am PST
restaurants in the united states. it dates back to 1826. rebecca: look, there's a portrait of george washington. and there's abraham lincoln. kevin: and there's betsy ross and the first american flag. hi. how many? four of us, please. four? four right over here. i'll take your coats. thank you. thank you. you're welcome. so, is everyone going to have oysters? are you? waitress: would you like an appetizer? yes, please. oysters-- a dozen. why don't you order another dozen for the table? okay, sure. by the way, this is my treat. oh, get out of here! this is our treat. i've never had oysters. i don't know if i'll like them. you'll love them. but they're raw. don't worry, they slide right down. sorry, folks. these are not for me. ( laughter ) thanks, anyway. it's an acquired taste. mm-hmm. we have some good news. it turns out dad had an insurance policy, and kevin and i are the beneficiaries. it's worth $50,000. i just called the insurance company today and they're going to send the check in a couple of months. well, that's a blessing. i guess firemen have to take out life insurance. how
LINKTV
Feb 13, 2013 4:30pm PST
-born mathematician named georg cantor to force the concept of infinity into mathematics once and for all. cantor's first work was in the subject of number theory, the area of mathematics that seeks to reveal truths about the natural numbers. he revealed a previously unimagined beauty and richness as well as paradox. with this he discovered a whole new world of mathematics. so now we'll be speaking with dr. jim tanton, the founding director of the st. mark's institute of mathematics. hi, jim. >> hi. >> let's talk about infinity. a big subject, isn't it? >> it is a big subject indeed. absolutely. >> all right, so cantor was really the first one to sort of take it on, right, mano-a-mano, try to figure it out? >> absolutely, grab it by the horns and understand what's going on here. but the interesting thing is he didn't start right away with that concept. he went to a more fundamental question: what is a number? for example, here are some cats and some dogs. if i'm trying to define "number" in the first time, and say, are these two sets -- the set of cats, set of dogs -- the same, i don'
BBC News
Jun 3, 2017 2:30am BST
group was joined by george roger, who was a nonconformist adventurer. i think they change photography in different ways. when you look at robert carper‘s wall pictures, he was more concerned with the pictures of suffering than any glory from the war. “— suffering than any glory from the war. —— robert capa. i remember another picture of the independence of indonesia. and robert capa's pictures from palestine... they didn't want to be told what to do. that was more important to them than having a nice fat salary. this was from a big magnum show. it was a cooperative at a family atmosphere. everybody was very affectionate. when robert capa and chim came in from paris, they brought perfume and elegant things. there was never any idea of you being the boss, or the secretary. a christmas parties, capa would come and dance with the bookkeeper. i don't know whether i was more enchanted with the personalities of the photographers than with the photographs. and magnum photos is still going strong today. that is it from witness for this month will stop next month, will be
LINKTV
Mar 5, 2012 8:00pm PST
, alert image of their patron saint, saint george, by donatello-- roman art transformed into a vision of christian courage. the bankers guild paid for ghiberti's expensive bronze statue of saint matthew, the patron saint of moneychangers. these reliefs are the two front-runners for the most famous of all florentine competitions, held in 1401 to decide the commission for the baptistery's new bronze doors. the subject is the prophet abraham, about to sacrifice his son isaac, and this entry by the young brunelleschi emphasizes the violence of the act. abraham holds isaac by the throat to plunge the knife in. the angel seizes abraham's wrist in a dramatic, last-minute intervention. but lorenzo ghiberti won the competition with this relief, immediately acknowledged as an exhibition of unrivaled craftsmanship. the nude figure of isaac is based on classical models. this is a triumph of a goldsmith's craft, embodying lessons learned from antique statuary and combining that with a gothic grace learned from the art of northern europe. florence is still a thriving center for the goldsmith's art. th
LINKTV
May 14, 2012 8:00pm PDT
. picasso moved into this kind of painting with georges braque as his ally. the mandolin, painted by braque in 1910, shows just how subtle cubist art can be. it's very different from les demoiselles, quieter, much more difficult to decipher. the eye oscillates between hints of a mandolin and a jug-- dislocated by multiple perspective-- and a structure of glinting shards, or planes, scattered right across the picture's surface. many people--british critic roger fry, for instance-- thought pictures like this totally abstract. they only saw the structures of planes. certainly, it can seem, in a figure painting like this by picasso, that the geometric structure of planes is antagonistic to any normal perception of the subject and that, eventually, it must completely cloak the subject, @@ take over. but, actually, picasso's and braque's cubism never broke with representation. what such pictures said was that painting is not a mirror held up to the world, but a language, a language of mark and shape-making, of structuring on a flat surface, whose means are infinitely variable, but which ha
LINKTV
May 2, 2013 9:00am PDT
, well... you know, george lucas or steven spielberg. schrader: my theory is that the reason orson welles scared hollywood to death is because he inserted his personality in the most... elephantine, multi-talented way into cinema and it was just terrifying to see that much personality. the directors who had a style worked in certain channels-- the hitchcock style, the sturges style the ford style, the lubitsch style. there was a way they did it but they were working in the corporate conglomerate way. uh, orson welles was saying, "screw all of this. i'm going to reinvent movies." and, well, they got rid of him. and then, you know, with the nouvelle vague and then with bertolucci finally... this has now taken root in hollywood which is why hollywood is so anxious and confused at the moment because they know they have to give money to spike lee and to quentin tarantino and they don't like that fact. eventually they can co-opt them, hopefully. or make money off of them and hold their nose while they do it. uh, now the question i'm trying to ask is are these guys really mavericks or has hollyw
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2016 11:53pm EDT
well there's one part of that they differ, reagan wanted to play george give, the one part in hollywood he was desperate to get. and he went after it and he got this part. that is where the gipper comes in he nearly didn't get it. >> pat o'brien got it for him. >> you know the story better than i do. >> i'm a notre dame man, we have to. >> i watched a lot of old movies and there's a line in that movie that nobody focuses on. they focus on that speech which is mythological by the way, never happened. it's a good myth. but but the line in that movie which is kind of true about what george was really like, i don't like like people to get close to me. and i thought, that is the line that really resonates with reagan, that's when which reagan was like that character. >> you should know that when hesburgh would visit the white house reagan would show -- >> the last question will do quickly. >> could you follow up please only, that was made during the introduction to the effect that i thank you might think that reagan was the second most influential president in the 20th century, sin
are in the same position. not quite sure where they're going. i do not expect george gorsuch to be a robotic vote. he is an intellectual curiosity and honesty that will take him across the ideological spectrum. in conclusion i would say, were not looking for the best imitation or facsimile or justice scalia, were looking for someone who can be in intellectual on the court in his own right. that person, in my view, is indeed milk or such who might eclipse the iconic predecessor. he will bring something new. in the end what i can say about a2's destination is that, i suppose they have this in common, he'll go where his conscious takes in. but he will follow his conscious. i cannot say what the final will be but it will be exciting to w watch. therefore it's my honor to recommend the confirmation of the honorable judge neil gorsuch for the united states supreme court. >> jimmy grassley, thank you for the opportunity to testify on behalf of the sierra club and 2.8 million members and supporters nationwide. court the supreme court justice hope hours over the laws of the air we breathe in
and then-candidate george w. bush called the soft big tri of low expectations. unfortunately, judge gorsuch bakes these very low expectations into his disability rights jurisprudence in spite of congress' bipartisan attempts to dismantle such prejudices. judge gorsuch's decisions on the education of our children with disabilities are troubling. not just were their devastating human koconsequences but also f their dismissiveness of the law as established by congress. the individuals with disabilities act, education act, or idea, requires public schools to end sure a free, appropriate public education for each student with a disability. in the luke p. case you heard about earlier, judge gorsuch read the i.d.e.a. to require only an education that is merely more than ddeminimus. judge gorsuch adopted this standard in spite of supreme court precedent requiring educational benefits to be meaningful. in spite of statutory text requiring appropriate educational programs and in spite of congress' repeated updates to the i.d.e.a. explicitly calling for high educational standards for children
president and then candidate george w. bush called the soft bigotry of low expectations. unfortunately, judge gorsuch bakes these low expectations into his disability rights jurisprudence in spite of bipartisan attempts to disen mantle such prejudices. troubling not just for devastating human consequences but for dismissiveness of the law as established by congress. individuals with disabilities act, education act requires public schools to ensure free appropriate public education for each student with a disability. in the luke case that you heard about earlier, judge gorsuch read to require only education that is merely more than diminimus. that context is nowhere. judge gorsuch adopted the standard inspite of statutatory text requiring appropriate educational programs and in spite of repeated updates calling for high educational standards for children with disabilities. yet in luke judge gorsuch substituted his opinion for that of three decision makers who found luke's school did not provide appropriate or meaningful education benefit nor did precedent require merely standard. a deci
public interest law, george washington u. pat gallagher is director of environmental law program, sierra club. karen harnen is executive director of the national federation of independent business, small business legal center and eve hill is partner with brown, goldstein,levy. previously served as deputy assistant attorney general for the civil rights division from 2011 to 2017. we'll start there and we'll go until we see how this vote goes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. ranking member feinstein, members of the committee, for the opportunity to speak to you about judge gorsuch. since clerking for justice o'connor in 1992, i've had the honor of arguing 23 cases before the u.s. supreme court. many of those as an assistant to the solicitor general first under seth waxman who was president clinton's solicitor general then later under ted olson who was president bush's. i've known neil gorsuch, neil, as i've always known him, as a colleague and friend for more than 20 years. my wife who's here today has known him even longer because she went to law school with him. i like to think i helped recr
time. it doesn't say that here that ii can say it, and his the public interest law george washington university, pat gallagher is thg director of the sierra club, karen is with the small business center and partnered with brown goldstein leading man served as the deputy assistant for the civil rights division from 2011 to 2017. we will start their and see how far the vote goes to be a >> thank you mr. chairman, ranking member feinstein, members of the committee cannot for the opportunity to speak about judge gorsuch. clerking for justice o'connor and o2, i had the honor of walking two case cases before te supreme court and many of those as an assistant to the general, first under mr. waxman waspporti president clinton . general and then president bush's. i have known neil gorsuch of the colleague and my wife is not an even longer because she went to law school with him. i like to think that i helped recruit him after the supreme courtship. i think i may have edited the first brief he ever wrote as a young lawyer. i understand he's improved substantially since then and i can tell he's
doesn't say that here, but i can say it. j.b. and maurice shapiro public interest law, george washington u. pat gallagher is director of vierm environmental law program, karen harnen the frederation of small business legal center. and eve hill with brown, gold stein, levy, served as the deputy -- from 2011-2017. we will start there and go until we see how this vote goes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. ranking member feinstein members of the committee. since working for judge gorsuch. i've had the opportunity to argue 23 cases before the court. first under less waxman, and later ted olson, president bush's. i've known neil gorsuch, neil as i've always known him as a colleague and friend 20 years. my wife has known him longer because she went to law school with him. i like to think i -- after his time at oxford. i think i may have edited the first brief he ever wrote as a young lawyer. i understand he has improved since then, and can tell senator sass he never used the word bigly in a brief. it was clear to all of us that he was not only smart, thoughtful and a great writer but he
maurice shapiro professor of public interest law, george washington university. pat gallagher is director of environmental law program, sierra club. karen harned is executive director of the national federation of independent business small business legal center. and eve hill is partner withre brown goldstein levy.. she proves he served as deputy l assistant attorney general for the civil rights division from 2011-2017. we will start there and we will go until we see how this vote goes. >> thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member feinstein, member of the committee for the opportunity to speak to you about judge gorsuch. since clerking for justice o'connor in 1992 i've had thebe honor of argument 23 cases before the u.s. supreme court. many of those as an assistant to the solicitor general first under waxman who was president clinton's solicitor general than later under ted olson who is president bush's i've known neip gorsuch as a colleague and different for more than 20 years. my wife was here today has known an even longer because she went to law school with him. i like to think
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)