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CSPAN
Jun 6, 2009 11:00pm EDT
founding of the people's republic of china represents a great opportunity to the -- to review the events of june 4 no, 1989. today, it is a global economic power poised to become a superpower. it is my hope that the chinese leaders have the courage and farsightedness to embrace more truly egalitarian issues and a policy of greater accommodation and tolerance. a policy of openness and realism can lead to greater trust and harmony within china and enhance its international standing as a truly great nation. the dollar llama, june 4, 2009. -- dalai lama, june 4, 2009. [applause] >> thank you very much. as a key to his holiness, the dalai lama. i am pleased to call to the podium the congresswoman from the state of florida. she is very passionate in the cause of human rights, and we forgive her for not bringing some florida sunshine for us this morning. >> thank you so much, dr. lee, representatives of human rights organizations, ladies and gentlemen. at the turn of the last century, those who were yearning to breathe free turned their gaze to a towering lady who lifted a bright torch high abo
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2009 2:30am EDT
. we have to try something else. not violence but may be a more confrontational approach with china. what is his answer to that and is it an answer that is satisfactory to the young and restless tibetan diaspora? >> his answer first is anything you do confrontational is going to be more suffering to tibetans and tibet and the chinese in tibet. you may not feel the consequences of your cousins will feel them worse. second he is the one tibetan exiles who knows china inside and out. he spent a year in beijing in 1954. so he knows china historically has never been very receptive to the outside and it's a prideful country and distinct full country and he says to these people if you read a gandhi march to the border to you think is going to cause the beijing leadership to say we made a mistake we will give you to that? piece is fine, do it but what do you think it will achieve? nothing. he's a realist and knows the chinese are realists and the have no motivation for easing up on tibet and a big difference between his situation and gandhi's is the one advantage gandhi had against the brit
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2009 3:00pm EDT
much like the revolutions of 1989. the sixth general secretary of the communist party of china was famous for supporting ideas like political reform and capitalism. not much different from lech walesa of poland or havel of czechoslovakia. when he died on april 151989, thousands of chinese students began a peaceful protest in tennessee square in his honor and call support for -- in tiananmen square. protesters called for nothing more than a dialogue with their government and party leaders on how to combat corruption and how to accelerate economic and political reforms like freedom of expression and democracy. more than a million people would eventually gather in tiananmen square in the shadow of the forbidden city and the monument in front of chairman mao's mausoleum. that 1 million people that congregated, that was just in bay which i think. protests spread -- in beijing. protests spread across city after city, community after community. on the night of june 3, 1989, 15,000 soldiers with armored tanks storm tiananmen square. on june 4 the chinese red army fired upon the protesters
CSPAN
Apr 2, 2010 6:00pm EDT
increasingly understood is the amount of negative investment is going to hurt china. our problems are not with china per se. if china revalued the r&d this afternoon. china is losing manufacturing competitiveness to others like vietnam. the first order of question to the u.s. is we need to stop doing the bad things that we do to our own manufacturing. that list to me would include the corporate tax that people have talked about, but also the tort system, also regulatory burdens. there's much we can do ourselves before turning to china. but you are absolutely right. china's policy is a merkantilist policy. the question is more when china wakes up and decides they are making a mistake and i think that will be soon. >> could i get my slides back up -- is that possible? if i hit the -- i had data on the rest of the world. i'm hitting it, but -- there, we are. the dark blue line is the rest of the world. just as you said, the rest of the world is below. that's the world average. individuals that are down -- yeah. that's right. >> just to press on that a little bit. china, you must do t
CSPAN
Jun 27, 2009 1:00pm EDT
vice president gore and all the people has been all the people has been tremendous. china has about more co2 than any other nation in the world. they have said that they reject any finding of such emissions and claim their rights to continue to release greenhouse gases. at the same time, we have tried to pass this legislation. the united states stands to lose many jobs to these countries that will profit from this bill today. some say we should make unilateral reductions, unilateral disarmament. i find it hard to believe that china and india will reduce their economic growth because they are willing to adopt the cat and trade. the cabin trade is flawed. -- cap and trade is flawed. clean coal technology is important. advanced nuclear power generation is also important. the rapid development of widespread deployment of such technology is paramount in any reasonable effective effort to address co2 reductions. the mass new regulatory burdens proposed by this cap and trade scheme will cut the growth and innovation in this country and lose jobs in this country. let us not pass this bill.
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2009 10:30pm EDT
condemning north korea's actions. you haven't seen china and russia respond as forcefully in the past on these issues because i think there's an indication that they recognize how destabilizing north korea's actions have been. my preference is always to use a diplomatic approach, but diplomacy has to involve the other side engaging in a serious way and trying to solve problems. and we have not seen that kind of reaction from north korea. so we will continue to consult with our allies. we'll continue to consult with all the parties who previously have been involved in the six-party talks. but we are going to take a very hard look at how we move forward on these issues. and i don't think that there should be an assumption that we will simply continue down a path in which north korea is constantly destabilizing the region and we just react in the same way, by after they've done these things for a while, then we reward them. now, with respect to iran, i've made very clear that we are not taking the same position. i'm curious that you would suggest we're taking the same approach when i'm spen
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2009 5:30am EDT
is china. could you comment on the status of pakistan-china relations. is there a difference between the military relations and the civilian government? any thoughts? >> we have had a long relationship with china. it's been a military relationship in the sense that we have procured equipment from china in the past and we have a joint production of fighter aircraft and battle tanks with chinese collaboration in pakistan. we have, on the civilian side, and has been offering incentives and encouraged to comment on the economic side in pakistan. right now they have not come in strongly, but somewhat in the telecommunications sector. they have a big telecommunications company operating there. they have come in on infrastructure. some mining and other projects as well. the civilian government and military both have been pushing for greater collaborations with china. to the effort on the civil side has been to bring china more and more into the economic sphere. we have not really had a problem with china. minor issues may be like one group operating somewhere in the border areas was taken s
CSPAN
Jun 26, 2009 8:00am EDT
personal spending and consumer sentiment. china national radio says the state planning agency is likely to reject a chinese company's bid to acquire bankrupt general motors hummer unit. -- hummer unit, saying it conflicts with goals. u.s. district judge sam can't turn over a letter of resignation to a senate official serving a subpoena at the prison where he is serving a 33-month sentence. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> conservation and the beginning of 20th-century, there were two sides -- just like now. >> teddy roosevelt and his leading role in the early days of the conservation movement. >> he was not what we would call by modern terms a kind of holistic -- he believed in hunting, but he did not believe in hunting so you would make a species extinct. so, yes, he cared about snail darter, butterflies, wild flowers. he wanted to make sure we had a place for that in modern society. >> sunday, part two with douglas brinkley on "the wilderness warrior." federer roosevelt and the crusade for america. sunday night at 8:00 p.m., or listen on satellite radi
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2009 9:30am EDT
cars. >> has the world tried to emulate the u.s.? >> it's at a crossroads, china, india and, brazil, russia, most of asia, are all following us. affluence has made more me build which is wonderful and the way it has been sold to them has been, you know, gm going to china, and saying, buy cars. so, we are at that crossroads where it could be conventional or really could be different. and that is a lot of what the book is about. >> you say there is about 1 billion motor vehicles on the world's roads today. >> right. >> the titled of your new book, coauthored by daniel spurling says "two billion cars." >> over the last 100 years we have invented the car, and fueled it with oil and we have risen now to a billion. in the next 15 years, we expect to double that to two billion. and that is the road we're on and it issen creditably fast. >> why? >> for the sake of affluence, and mobility and right now, the only technology we have for mobility is a motor vehicle. >> where is the growth, though. >> the growth is in china, number one, india, number 2, brazil and russia, also, indonesia, really
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2009 8:30am EDT
the region with india, china, afghanistan and the countries around, we need to build that up. we need to dismantle the hurdles that stand in the way of cooperation in the region. global zero aims to provide the opportunity and the impetus for us to achieve that regional harmony. >> on your first question about the relationship between a country wanting to take advantage of the civilian or commercial opportunities offered by nuclear power and why they should focus or care about u.s./russian arms reductions, i am going to ask ambassador pickering, who has dealt with this issue on several occasions. >> north korea is a special, difficult, important case for all of us. all i can tell you is in the past, north korea has agreed and has taken steps to moved back away from its military nuclear posture. that can still be achieved with the negotiating process, with the unity in the six party talks that has been demonstrated in the past, that north korea has in the past indicated a willingness, if you can say it, to pay attention to the concerted interests of others in the region. fascinating th
CSPAN
Jun 26, 2009 2:30pm EDT
fairness factor here. china adds about more co-2 to the atmosphere each year than any other nation in the world. however, they have consistently said they reject any binding international cap on such emissions and claim the right to continue to increase thes release of greenhouse gases. at the same time we're going to attempt to pass this legislation. without equivalent efforts by china and india, to limit greenhouse gas emissions, the united states stands to lose many hundreds of thousands of jobs to these countries that will profit from this bill today. the proponents of the legislation say we should make unilateral reductions. unilateral disarmament. which in turn will impose moral pressure on other countries. i find it hard to believe that china and india will reduce their economic growth and idle their people because they're willing to adopt a cap and trade. the cap and trade is flawed. china and india are not going to go forward. any meaningful effort to achieve long-term, sustainable reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions depend on the development and deployment of techn
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2009 9:00am EDT
referencing with respect to china, what do these statistics say about our ability to isolate north korea economically and what affect have sanctions really had on the country? well, i think first of all, senator, it's important to note those are percentage increases off very low base levels. now i haven't personally analyzed the data sufficiently to be able to tell you exactly what it means. i think one thing that it probably reflects particularly on the import side is a very high price for oil over the last -- most of 2008 and i think that probably has inflated the figures. i would say that in all likelihood as we go forward and particularly as the new u.n. security council resolution comes into force as we continue our efforts to coordinate with china in particular about other countries in the region. that i would be surprised to see those rates of increase continue in 2009 and beyond. but it is true, nonetheless that north korea has an economy which in many ways is only barely above the level of subsistence. so that makes it difficult to change its behavior through the use of ec
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2010 7:30am EDT
responsibilities and missions than let's say a nation like china or like russia or other nations in the world. and to protect ourselves, to protect our sea lanes to respond to humanitarian crises, to have a nuclear deterrent to have a nuclear weapons and the list goes on and on, it requires an annual budget of roughly 4% of our gdp. right now we're at about 3.8% of gdp. and total federal spending is over time been approximately 20% of the gdp. so we're saying that the defense budget ought to be about 20% of the total gdp. there's a lot of percentages there. i apologize for taking that course. but i think sometimes we say, gosh, we're spending so much more than any other nation in the world. why should we be spending any more in the military. 'cause they spend far less than we do. but actually as you go behind their numbers and you find they don't report all of their military spending. and their costs, for instance, of standing up an army where they have conscription, not a paid volunteer army their costs are much, much lower. when you look at a comparable basis china is spending not at
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2009 2:00am EDT
. you haven't seen china and russia respond as forcefully in the past on these issues because i think there's an indication that they recognize how destabilizing north korea's actions have been. my preference is always to use a diplomatic approach, but diplomacy has to involve the other side engaging in a serious way and trying to solve problems. and we have not seen that kind of reaction from north korea. so we will continue to consult with our allies. we'll continue to consult with all the parties who previously have been involved in the six-party talks. but we are going to take a very hard look at how we move forward on these issues. and i don't think that there should be an assumption that we will simply continue down a path in which north korea is constantly destabilizing the region and we just react in the same way, by after they've done these things for a while, then we reward them. now, with respect to iran, i've made very clear that we are not taking the same position. i'm curious that you would suggest we're taking the same approach when i'm spending an awful lot of ti
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2009 2:00am EDT
time in history. and the final part of this process for me was very soon after china opened tibet to the world i quickly went to a loss of course and i think many of you in this room have been there and you know that it is almost impossible not to be moved just by the intensity of the elements, the sharp shafts of sunlight coming in on the chapels where the monks in the corners reciting their citrus. it's hard not to be moved by the warm and hospitality by the people who've never seen foreigners and history and were very excited to see the handful of us traveling there in those days, and also hard not to be moved by the resilience of the fortitude with which they were trying to sustain their country in very difficult circumstances. and the one final thing i will say before i leave the subject to myself and turn to the dalai lama is all the time that i was going to visit him and traveling back-and-forth to tibet i was also as i still am, and as you heard in the introductions, a full-fledged journalist. i've been writing for "time" magazine for 27 years now. so as with eric, i spent a
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2009 9:30am EDT
of china. that is the real security risk to the united states of america. and i don't know any other way to stop it, guaranteed it might not work, then through a negotiating process. >> i won't cede my time but i would say specifically, professor, of course, we want negotiations. the whole point we're trying to make is the north koreans have deliberately walked away from it. have shot missiles across japan and done a nuclear test. of course, you want negotiation. but until we really do something as an international community, i don't see much movement in that respect. thank you. >> thank you, senator lugar. senator corker? >> thank you, mr. chairman, for this most timely hearing and for all of y'all being here. i obviously sense, mr. sigal -- that you, professor sigal, that the outlie that mr. cha has put forth is counterproductive -- >> i didn't say that -- >> so you think the broadness of sort of keeping proliferation from occurring is that's too broad and we ought to focus only on plutonium; is that what you're saying? >> what i'm saying you have to do both. we need to be ab
CSPAN
Apr 1, 2010 8:30pm EDT
and to do it in china time. and let me put this in context. go back to 1910. i can barely remember it. but in 1910, we started down the road to provide universal access to electricity in america. and we did it. and the price of our electricity has been flat in real terms for 50 years. that scale. particularly in a world where 1.6 billion people have no access to electricity today and we did it for the prices are lower than other developed countries around the world. and it's allowed huge gains in the development of our country. when we started down that road in 1910, we couldn't envision what we would enable. for a hospital, x-rays, m.r.i.'s, laser surgery, just the ability to do things in the medical world. we couldn't envision that as a result of providing electricity to every home and business, it would lead to productivity gains of how we develop steel in this country with electrotechnology, which means our steel industry has the lowest carbon footprint of any steel industry in the world. we couldn't envision computers, the internet. it all came as a consequence of providing un
CSPAN
Jun 28, 2009 7:00pm EDT
with china and is there a national policy on transportation in china that you think the u.s. could perhaps withdraw from? >> china actually adopted fuel economy standard a couple of years ago and they are more stringent than america which tells you something. because we have our standards from the first oil crisis and then they sat at the very low levels of date set at 27 and a half miles per cars for 25 years and then they just have been raised after the price of oil spike. so already china is jumping and i think with its feetfirst. and interestingly, china and i think indian both jumped in ahead of america on this. they don't have indigenous oil either. like us they have a lot of coil and not oil. do you have the u.s., china and india, the three largest transportation oil consumers and then the two will consumers, china and india are they'll have the oil that is going to fuel the fleets that they are matching they will have. i think that will create either tremendous political turmoil on the downside or on the upside tremendous innovation. and the hope is that america will be the
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2010 2:00am EDT
russians but to some extent with the chinese. china decided to come to the nuclear summit. if the could offset tight a correlation between the victory in health care and that but the fact that he is coming here bolsters that image that this is a president that is looking more successful. how successful they are going to be with the sanctions on iran, i did not think anybody in the obama administration is under the illusion that would avert sanctions are leveled on the iranians are going to solve the problems. we're going to have to wait and see. >> could you follow up just a bit? what are we likely to see? will there be developments in the coming week on sanctions in iran and how would that become evident? >> in a lot of ways, we are in the same place we have always been on sanctions with iran. over the past few years, we have tried to target sanctions so that they did not effect the iranian people as a whole all the while knowing that the kinds of things which would relate get their attention are the kinds of things that hurt -- restrictions on refined petroleum products into iran. the
CSPAN
Apr 1, 2010 5:00pm EDT
with others. gym has raised in china a number of different times, and i had a great time over 14 years that i was there. bp spent $5 million it was great fun. there are some real strengths that china has. i wouldn't advocate that we take their system, but they have some real strengths. and one of them is china time and the other is china costs. there's an enormous opportunity for us to cooperate with them. there is a place in the north-central part of china and the future of the world energy system is playing out their right now. and the reason that i say it is playing at the right now is partly for the reason that jim has mentioned. the chinese are able to connect rnd with commercialization, and they are really good at doing big demonstration projects. they pick a national champion. they give them the money. they tell them go away and find out what it is we have to do. they built the first thousand line doing exactly that. the world's largest carbon capture and storage projects are going to have it. they will be done by their company and they will be done because that's what the
CSPAN
Jun 25, 2009 3:30pm EDT
, but suffice it to say, he's wrong about china. i just came back from a week in china, where i met with their leaders. i went out to see what they're doing in wind power. i went to see their energy conservation efforts. they're ahead of us in some respects with respect to those efforts. they have a higher standard of automobile emissions reduction that they're porting in place -- sooner than we are. they are tripling their level of wind power that they're trying to target. they have a 20% energy-intensity reduction level that they're now exceeding in several sectors of their economy, which they didn't think they'd be able to do. china, in two or three years, we're going to be chasing china if we don't recognize what's happened and do this. so, the senator from california, the chairperson of the environment and public works committee, completely understands, as do many others here -- this can be done without great cost to our electric production facilities, without our companies losing business, losing jobs. on the contrary, the jobs are of the future are going to be in alternative
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2009 2:30pm EDT
. president bush obviously reached out, tried to engage north korea, began the six-party talks, made china a part of that process, and yet at every stage when it comes to weaponizing uranium, plutonium, moving forward, north korea has refused to respond in good faith. and when they do make an attempt to good faith, it's a deploy and they renege after any concession is made by the united states or any of our allies. mr. speaker, i think it's important that we send a message to the north korean government. now, let's be clear about this. when talking about the north korean government, we're really talking about an organized crime family mass crading as a state. i mean, kim jong il defies every standard of decency that is built up in the community of nations. i think it's important to realize that, especially when north korea is contrast with the republic of korea, which has become a modeled democracy and such a strong and staunch ally of the united states. so as we go forward, mr. speaker, i think it's important for the president and the secretary of state to know that congress will stand behi
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2009 1:00am EDT
efforts to chlorinate with china in particular but others in the region, that i would be surprised to see those rates of increase continue and 2009 and beyond. .. to want to engage again, and any kind of discussions or negotiations? >> i think that at the moment there is no evidence that they are prepared to do that now. i am however, as i indicated earlier of the belief that the eventually will come back to the table. then i think the challenge is to impart on us to insure that we engage with them in a realistic fashion, and that we begin considering negotiating measures, which will in fact be much more irreversible than some of the measures that have been negotiated with them in the past. now i don't underestimate the difficulty in doing that. it is going to be very difficult indeed, but we need a greater sense of the irreversibility and a greater sense that things that they agree to know they are not going to fall away from in the future. as some of us have indicated, we have no desire nor willingness to pay twice for things that north korea is willing to do. >> so, how do we enfor
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2009 7:00am EDT
deal follows through, fiat will be exploring china and closing factories. steve is next. good morning. caller: we have to look at this carefully. i remember, general motors lost only $1 billion when they tried to d-o a deal with fiat -- tried to do a deal with fiat before. the devil is in the details. we have got to look at this carefully and not just do all this big splash stuff. host: this cover story, "the wise latina." sonia sotomayor's confirmation hearings are scheduled to start in the middle of july. the issue of climate change in "the national journal." tom, north carolina. good morning. caller: my concern is about general motors and what is happening with its situation within the car industry. no one seems to be pointing out the fact that there are six general motors factories in china and that they are talking about expanding, plans to build more. there are no problems with the ones in korea. to me this is just a way that they are trying to break the backs of the union's in america, take the jobs away. once the unions are broken and benefits are down, they beat manufacturing
CSPAN
Jun 14, 2009 7:30pm EDT
ability to cope with china and russia. i appreciate what secretary gates is trying to do. it is impossible to defend this country and to maintain homeland security on the current budget. and we frankly need more retired military people talking out and telling the truth about the decay of our navy, the decarry of our -- decay of our air force and decay of our long-term capabilities in the current budget constraints. . >> i do not want to turn over the first generation to have failed to done its job of fixing the country so our children and grandchildren are better off, not worse off. [applause] without a strong economy and without scientific leadership, we cannot sustain our military capabilities. the economy and education our national security issues. competing with -- i commend all of you, which shows you vividly two indian haskell students, two attorneys high-school students, and at the end of the movie, you realize we are a country preparing for the 1956 olympics. we will win no gold medals at that level. to meet that challenge, we have to reform litigation, regulation, taxat
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2009 6:30pm EDT
so on. india thinks that china and so on -- it becomes a tried- elective process. even that is being discussed. there is work going on on changing the situation from such an active, ongoing thing to a more restrained thing. as far as pakistan is concerned, the nuclear issue was in response to the 1974 nuclear tests by india. our hand was forced. we tested. we tested. let me put it like that. pakistan is working on a strategy with india, and admittedly right now because of the mumbai, there's enormous momentum for resumption of dialogue. and some point in time in terms of restraint and so on. as far as fmct, and other thing concerned, i think it legitimately this starts getting negotiated and as pakistan would have no objection. already very strongly conforming. maybe they connect them to the grid later. [laughter] >> do you have a question there? >> sir, thank you for your time. i am with the department of defense but my comments are my own. you actually printed one of my questions when you spoke about the future of the fatah and the conversation that needed to be had regarding that.
CSPAN
Jun 26, 2009 10:00pm EDT
district can count on losing thousands of jobs to countries like india and china if this legislation is enacted. mr. speaker, i oppose this bill and urge my colleagues to do the same. i yield back. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentlelady yields back the action on climate change is a policy and indeed moral imperative. prompt action is a vital part of our legacy to the nation. as we act, we can and must use these intensive industries and make sure they are not placed at a -- at a disadvantage. after discussants between the energy and commerce and ways and means committee, and the administration, we involve provisions that involve the president and congress in taking action, no more than necessary to ensure that this important legislation is trade mitchell for energy intensive industries. we want to see a meaningful international agreement. if we are unable to do so, through international agreement. this legislation will avoid carbon leakage in the trade sensitive industries. there are some critics, and we may hear from them today, who claim that these changes make th
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2009 3:00pm EDT
talk more about safety. when i was a young man, my generation was affected by the china syndrome. it was a motion picture that may or may not have had any scientific basis in fact. it was followed by three mile island. then there was chernobyl. a member of our panel was just murmuring "chernobyl" under his breath. i think we need to get that out there. talk about what can be done to make the american public feel good about the safety issue. if you can, be specific about the nuclear waste. i hear what you are saying, doctor rock wwell. let's suppose in a worst-case scenario, we have nuclear waste behind the reactor in a green building. what if some nefarious person gets in there and gets hold of this nuclear waste, what damage could he do to the country and the population? if you could comment about that, i would appreciate it. >> i will take a crack at it. >> the big advantage of nuclear power as a source of energy is that the waste problem is trivial. we have managed to turn this around to where we are willing to not build plants that then become cold-fired -- coal-fired plants.
CSPAN
Jun 23, 2009 2:00am EDT
generation was affected by the china syndrome. it was a motion picture that may or may not have had any scientific basis in fact. it was followed by three mile island. then there was chernobyl. a member of our panel was just murmuring "chernobyl" under his breath. i think we need to get that out there. talk about what can be done to make the american public feel good about the safety issue. if you can, be specific about the nuclear waste. i hear what you are saying, doctor rock wwell. let's suppose in a worst-case scenario, we have nuclear waste behind the reactor in a green building. what if some nefarious person gets in there and gets hold of this nuclear waste, what damage could he do to the country and the population? if you could comment about that, i would appreciate it. >> i will take a crack at it. >> the big advantage of nuclear power as a source of energy is that the waste problem is trivial. we have managed to turn this around to where we are willing to not build plants that then become cold-fired -- coal-fired plants. that is real irony. they say that nuclear waste stays tox
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2009 10:00pm EDT
china and russia. i appreciate what secretary gates is trying to do. it is impossible to defend this country and to maintain homeland security on the current budget. and we frankly need more retired military people talking out and telling the truth about the decay of our navy, the decarry of our -- decay of our air force and decay of our long-term capabilities in the current budget constraints. . >> i do not want to turn over the first generation to have failed to done its job of fixing the country so our children and grandchildren are better off, not worse off. [applause] without a strong economy and without scientific leadership, we cannot sustain our military capabilities. the economy and education our national security issues. competing with -- i commend all of you, which shows you vividly two indian haskell students, two attorneys high-school students, and at the end of the movie, you realize we are a country preparing for the 1956 olympics. we will win no gold medals at that level. to meet that challenge, we have to reform litigation, regulation, taxation, education, health, en
CSPAN
Apr 5, 2010 2:00am EDT
threats from wherever they may emerge. for russia, that would create great problems with china because china is against any type of bat defense. they would not participate in any of that. for russia, china is not only a great partner but a great concern. russia would not like to enter into ballistic missile defense and make a mistake like iran. a large part of the russian political elite would be strongly against that. after successful reeducation of the treaty -- successful ratification of the treaty, it would be possible to start to approach this on a step-by-step basis. the first thing that would be very important and not very difficult to implement is to revive the joint data center. , which was agreed to 10 years ago and has still not become operational. having a link and early-warning systems and collect on launches would be important in order to contribute to each others' knowledge about what is happening with ballistic missile tests and launch it. does important also to avoid miscalculation and avoid some concerns about the tests of the other side. it would be possible to use i
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2009 1:30am EDT
, russia and the and china have begun to say we have to have a reserve currency which has been the reserve currency of the world. what does that mean cracks the more of these that you print the price of oil is going up the price of gold, nickel, copper, iron, lu mber, you name it. it has all gone up. there are so many dollars chasing these items. it will go way up o one dozen eggs will cost more, a loaf of bread all the way up and down the line. how do i protect myself? you can go someplace in the channel islands but in all seriousness as far as investment strategy i think investing in hard assets investing gold, silver, a crude oil, commodities, i think that is where it will be. and in terms of currency come at least up to recently these things have gotten too high by eight recommended 45 putting money into the currency and we picked up 1 million or so dollars going from the united states currency into australian dollars and canadian dollars because their economy is based on natural resources. had is the average person protect themselves? i don't know. backed it was crazy then it
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2009 9:00am EDT
, russia, china thing. i am a young american. i am 36 years old. i do not know who is listening to these phone calls. it puts everybody at odds to know that two main countries, china and russia, we have a treaty with. how can we allow someone like china and russia to provide arms to people that we are trying to bring to the table, calm down a region. they're providing arms. these people are in our treaty. how do you deal with other superpowers? how do you deal with other nations that are s fas strong ad have not extended themselves throughout the world. how do you defend your country when you are spread so thin? and then you have people in europe treaty who are actually backing it? where is our government going? i know our people want us to do the right thing and be an honorable superpower. we have countries that talk about the united states. most of their families are here in the united states. for instance, the pictures you to show developed of united states leaving the middle east. even the soldiers are jumping up and acting crazy. it seems that they do not have any training on
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2009 9:00pm EDT
stop. china continues to buy our debt. we just sent the secretary of the treasury over to china to encourage them to keep buying america, buy our debt, because we cannot control ourselves. imagine a parent going into a bank and saying, i need a loan because i can't control my spending. you see my little children over there, i even got some grandchildren. i'm going to pledge to you that someday, i can't pay it back, but they will. they would take the children away and yet we sent our secretary of treasury to buying our debt because we can't control our spending. we've done things in the last weeks like $25 million we voted for in this chamber to buy land in foreign countries for rare dogs and cats. china has some. we'll borrow that money from chivene china to buy dogs and cats. and we are paying for that with interest while we run up our debt even higher. it makes no sense at all. you know, i went back and did some looking. i remember pretty good, having been a history major, i loved to follow things as they occurred, because we're told those who fail to learn from history are desti
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2009 7:00am EDT
, possibly with china's help. north korean sea and air shipments suspected of carrying weapons or nuclear technology. the administration also said it was examining whether there was a legal basis to reverse former president george bush's decision last year to remove it from the list of states sponsoring terrorism. >> if we do not take significant and effective action against the north koreans know we will spark an arms race in northeast asia. no one wants to see that. we are sharing with other countries our calculus of the risks and dangers that lie ahead if we do not take very strong action. >> there was a letter saying that north korea should go back on the list. would you do that? >> we will look at it. there is a process for it. we want to see recent evidence of their support for terrorism. we're just beginning to look at it. >> the senator says that they never stop with these actions. >> we take very seriously. there were obviously been taken off the list for reasons and that is now being courted by their actions. host: and for your calls concerning this matter. independent l
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2010 6:00pm EDT
difference in the amount of healthcare in the fanl time this is morning, china hints at currency, provided a visit this month by the chinese leader goes smoothly. christian, china holds a lot of the u.s. debt. they are adjusting of their currency stharks going to have an effect on our debt? implet over time, it will have an affect. we have to be real is tick. this eventually will come to an end. eventually in the long run, we'll see the interest rates. we have to contend with the unwillingness of the over seas lenders whether japan, china, switzerland and germany. foreigners no longer want to hold dollars i think the chinese announcements will make more explicit than when we know anyway. it's another piece of the puzzle that puts pressure on the administration and the congress to address the deficit in the long run. host: assuming this comes up between president obama and the chinese president, what would you suggest the president say? guest: we are in a tough position with china they said in the past, american presidents have talked forcefully to the chinese about human rights.
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2010 8:00am EDT
healthcare in the fanl time this is morning, china hints at currency, provided a visit this month by the chinese leader goes smoothly. christian, china holds a lot of the u.s. debt. they are adjusting of their currency stharks going to have an effect on our debt? implet over time, it will have an affect. we have to be real is tick. this eventually will come to an end. eventually in the long run, we'll see the interest rates. we have to contend with the unwillingness of the over seas lenders whether japan, china, switzerland and germany. foreigners no longer want to hold dollars i think the chinese announcements will make more explicit than when we know anyway. it's another piece of the puzzle that puts pressure on the administration and the congress to address the deficit in the long run. host: assuming this comes up between president obama and the chinese president, what would you suggest the president say? guest: we are in a tough position with china they said in the past, american presidents have talked forcefully to the chinese about human rights. today, president obama is talkin
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2009 8:30am EDT
of weeks we have not heard this from china because the dollar has gone back up. so all the sudden interest are different. but it is a valid issue that as china becomes a bigger player in the world economy, why should they always land and other people's currencies? i would not be surprised if someday, not immediately, the chinese say if you want to borrow money from us, you repay it and -- so we have no exchange-rate risk. host: did the europeans ever had that aspiration for the euro? guest: some have suggested that. the euro has been very strong against the dollar in the last decade or so, but it has not become widely used enough to justify that, nor the yen. there was wild speculation but it never grew into an asset the people want to hold. host: north carolina. caller: i have a question and comment. i noticed during the bush administration, he pushed free- trade very hard -- any talk about new world order. is this the new world order he was pushing for back then? and i got clinton threw bipartisanship to sign off. -- and they got clinton threw bipartisanship to sign off on it. g
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2009 4:00pm EDT
china, russia, the e.u., nato, malaysia, india, the united states, australia, canada, greece, turkey would all be working together, that's a pretty, pretty interesting mix of countries. but that's what we're doing because there is a common concern that we all have, and i think we are making some good progress there. but it's also an international effort. for example, we created a task force, task force 151, to be a coordinating element for piracy, and right now that task force is being commanded by a turkish admiral on a united states ship. >> other questions? >> why don't we -- i'll call, i'll spot here. okay, there you go. >> got it? hi. >> hi, john, how are you? >> john donnelly, congressional quarterly, good morning. there's been some talk lately about getting rid of, basically, the idea or the goal of being able to fight two major conventional wars at about the same time in different theaters. the chief staff of the army, the joint chiefs have each basically said it's time to revisit this idea. wondering what your take is on that, and shouldn't we retain the capability -- we, th
CSPAN
Jun 23, 2009 9:30am EDT
. i guess when i was a young man, my generation was affected by the china syndrome, motion picture, which may or may not have had any scientific basis in fact. and then follow along three mile island. and then there was chernobyl, and a member of our panel was just murmuring chernobyl under his breath. i think we need to get that out there. so talk about what can be done to make the american public feel good about the safety issue. and then if you can be specific about the nuclear waste. i hear what you're saying, doctor rockwell, but let's suppose worst-case scenario. we get nuclear waste back behind the reactor in a green building. and what if some various person get dinner, breaks through all the security that we would have and gets hold of this nuclear waste. what damage could he do to the country, to the population? so if each one of you or even one wants to comment about that, i would appreciate it. >> well, i'll take a crack at it. that they did manage of nuclear power as a source of energy is that the waste problem is trivial. and we managed to turn this around to where we
CSPAN
Apr 4, 2010 11:00am EDT
. his experience showed. i do say in the book because again i tried to be fair, the china business i think was not good. i know people made a lot out of the does and it was more going on to the chinese leadership. at tiananmen square was a horrible thing. >> host: because that was as you say the realism which is if you are an idealist in tiananmen square happens you act and you push back on scheppach if your a villas you say that's internally there's. >> i have tended to been critical of democrat and republican presidents both on china. i don't think the case can be made that when we cooperate with china it's getting better. i think if you look the tally of the sheet, i don't think that case can be made. i was one of the only people in my organization, jack kemp, rumsfeld, all signed on to permanent normal trade relations. i didn't. i think they should be tougher and i think they should be tougher now. and i think we're way too easy now. >> host: why? >> guest: because what they're doing is bad. their policies are bad. they kill growth. i really think that is a terrible terrible thin
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2010 10:30am EDT
top it with technologies that will shape the next century. we cannot afford to lose to china or india or anyone else. all of the things that we're doing will help us cut dependence on foreign oil. but no single energy source is enough. oil, gas, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, they all need to be on the table. today we are announcing how we will responsibly expand oil and gas exploration and development on the outer continental shelf. our strategy calls for expanded delavan and production in areas such as the eastern gulf of mexico where we can develop more than 125 miles off the florida coast. we're also moving forward with the significant oil and gas exploration in frontier areas, such as areas in the arctic and the atlantic where we fuss -- we first must determine where oil and gas reserves exist and, secondly, if we handled them appropriately. we're protecting areas off our coast like alaska's's bristol bay where soup -- that are simply too important for us to develop. bristol bay has one of the largest sockeye salmon runs in the world. people come from across the world to see its wil
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2009 7:30pm EST
towards india and china and developing countries of africa. in the rate of growth for china has come out very strongly. so has india to a point. and this is where the incremental divide is going to come from, not from the united states or western europe. and this recovery continues, we think we should be able to sell as much oil as we are selling now. and if it is a bonus and a growth in europe and north studl amounts, then there may be room for some more incremented in the quantity of oil that we put back. at the moment, i don't see that as such a likelihood, but what i said was in the event of the international market calling for oil in order to keep prices within reasonable level and we are ready to put more out. [inaudible]
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2009 9:30am EDT
china, taiwan and mongolian affairs and is a long time serving member on the u.s.-china economic and security commission. since we only have about an hour, i've asked our panelists to speak for about eight minutes, which should leave us plenty of time for follow-up questions and discussion. but again, as danny said when we do turn to questions, please identify yourself and try to make it a question. so if that is an introduction, susan, you're up. >> good morning. i'm pleased to be here with a distinguished panel and certainly with the american enterprise institute, a private sector perspective on defense and security cooperation. having just returned from india this past weekend i can attest to the growing importance of u.s.-india discussions with respect to indian industry and an indian industry both including the public sector undertakings the psus as well as the enterprise to deal with the multidimensional threats associated with the security of india as well as the u.s. security. lockheed martin has been in india for many years, most notably focused on defense recapitalizati
CSPAN
Jun 12, 2009 4:00pm EDT
with china, russia, japan, south korea, britain, and france, and then, ultimately, others in the canceled her to put forth a very robust regime, both on the inspections front and with respect to the financial sanctions, the additional companies and entities that will be subject to assets' freezes, and we're comfortable with the outcome. i do not think it is particularly productive to talk about what others gave up and what was the substance of the give and take. i think what is important is that from the united states' point of view, we got all of the critical countries involved to stand behind a very tough resolution, to speak unanimously in the council today in support of it, and we are all committed to its effective implementation. >> the north has already said that they would consider any further sanctions as an act of war be how would you respond to that with this regime in place? >> i think i did just respond to that question, because we have said very clearly that we are going to respond not to every provocative north korean statement or potential action. there is reason t
CSPAN
Jun 13, 2009 7:30am EDT
outcome wasn't what i would have desired. it reminutes me a lot of the anniversary with china and the democratic movement attempted there in 1989, i'm old enough to remember that personally. i've been to iran. my family is from iran. the outcome is very important to me with talk of possible invasion of iran and that type of thing. i agree with the caller from tehran university. i don't believe this in any way that ahmadinejad would lighten his stance. i believe the reporter from iran is correct. he is who he is and that's the stancele take because he's a media hound. that gets him on the map. i really do believe that there is a desire for change. the youth, the kids are just as western as any other country. my cousins all know the latest rp music and are up on fashion. you don't see this through most of the publications you see here in the united states. it's very much underground but it is there. host: question for you. we had a caller saying the average american may not be interested in this issue. caller: i totally disagree with that statement. that's really sad. this does affect o
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2009 1:30am EDT
trillion dollars for the creditors, 500 billion held in china were paid off whole. how? u.s. government taxpayer gave them 400 billion and the clock is still ticking and we could eventually pay $1 trillion program makes no sense all of the bill strip out -- bailouts, wall street and auto six cetera and they are not punishing the shareholders but also the debt investors it is not fair. >> that is my second question i read about the debates about why the banks were nationalized and by the bondholders were protected. what in your opinion is the reason for that? why did that happen? >> in a complex world it is an easy answer. because they lobby our government. they lobbied your government when they had market valuations of 100 or $200 billion. for a while when citibank stock without water $2 they had a market cap of 10 billion i thought that would take muscle away but they were not stupid and the money they took from a government they did not cut back on the lobbying efforts of a continued to lobby strongly in washington and that is a simple explanation why they are getting away
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2009 8:30am EDT
going to come from china now to the united states at a cheaper price? host: plant-closing is, of the cars coming from china at a cheaper price? guest: the chinese are obviously trying to enter the market. but with a restructuring of the industry, i think you will see wider options and different models. general motors will focus on four core brands. ford introduced a new taurus and others. all international brands are providing credible value for their vehicles. the chinese have yet to officially enter the market, but hummer, sold by general motors, is going to, if approved, by a chinese firm, but that is not where most people see the value in the long term. host: what do you know about the chinese from? guest: not much other event it is in the session one province and it is a big manufacturer. they are entering the market from the upper end as opposed to those coming from smaller vehicles. there will be out placement of some vehicles. fiat, providing smaller, more efficient vehicles from the european side. so i think you will see a lot of different, small, fuel-efficient vehicles
CSPAN
Jun 5, 2009 9:00am EDT
michigan first. caller: i am a first-time collar. i am very worried that china is getting all of the business now. they are all going to china and mexico. ge has opened up a plant to make wind turbines in china. i think they should do it here. i am too old to be working anymore myself. but i am worried about all of the children and our children's children here in the united states of america. i think the government should do something about this. that is all i have to say. thank you very much. host: now we will go to it lynn in california. caller: i have been unemployed since november. when i lost my job, a retired first from the major telephone company. i was a manager for a long time. then i decided to take a job with the cable company selling air time. my timing was not very good. i took the job last year. last summer, everything started to go down as far as businesses closing here in california. the unemployment where i am is quite high. i decided to change careers. i think that is what a lot of us have to do, especially those of us who have been in the workforce for a long time
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2009 11:30am EDT
china. i'm sorry. no, no. i know your name. i got the order on the list from. on my immediate right is from the russian federation. this is ambassador from india. another ambassador, from pakistan. and the ambassador from japan. now, behind me, we have a general from the russian federation. tony lake from the united states. next a gas from the united kingdom. -- next a guest from the union -- from the united kingdom. our next guest from the people's republic of china. i think that completes our list. we do have someone on the phone with us, from moscow. he is the chairman of the management board of the institute of contemporary development and enjoys close ties with the presidential administration in russia. i will give you briefly the main results of our deliberations to date. i would just make one introductory. . i think there is a general consensus amongst the commission that whatever impact , positive impact nuclear weapons may have had in terms of enforcing deterrence and stability during the cold war, at any residual benefits of these weapons have been more than overshadowed in r
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