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CNBC 154
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 154 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNBC
Nov 20, 2012 9:00pm EST
more counterfeiting going on in china now than we've ever seen anywhere. >> name an american brand. any brand. any kind of product. just name it, and we'll tell you something about it. it's probably being counterfeited in china as we speak. >> this is the most profitable criminal venture, as far as i know, on earth. >> counterfeiting. >> counterfeiting and your partners don't kill you. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this edition, we look at the multibillion dollar business of international crime. first, we report on the theft of an eye-popping fortune stolen from the iraq treasury. then we take a look at shoplifting gangs from south america. and finally we go undercover in china to expose rampant product counterfeiting. we begin in iraq with the theft that's been called one of the largest of its time, the mother of all heists. and it happened right under the noses of u.s. advisers. as iraqi investigators told us in october of 2006, more than half a billion dollars had disappeared from the defense ministry-- money that was supposed to equip the iraqi military. inve
CNBC
Aug 4, 2013 8:00pm EDT
the china investment corporation. how much do you have to invest? >> we have $200 billion. >> $200 billion? >> $200 billion. >> this is the fund's president, gao xiqing. he has poured billions into investment houses on wall street, causing some concern here in the u.s. >> "we think, based on your historical behavior, china, that you're gonna do mischief in our economy." [ticking] >> hey, how you doing? >> oh, i'm doing well. how are you doing, sir? >> how you doing, scott? >> good to see you. >> is davos the most important meeting on earth? >> well, the top of the alps is a long way to come for the rich and powerful, but you'll run into billionaire george soros; eric schmidt, the guy who runs google; nobel prize winners; captains of industry; kings; and even a queen. >> lot of the work is done just sitting in the cafeteria in the congress hall and just seeing people pass by and discussing things. >> the queen hangs out in the cafeteria? >> i enjoy hanging out in the cafeteria. i'm gonna do it this afternoon, actually. it's fun. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in
CNBC
Dec 21, 2014 9:00pm EST
tai shen kuo, a spy for the people's republic of china. bergersen knew a secret that the chinese desperately wanted to know, and neither man knows that what they're about to do is being recorded by two cameras the fbi has concealed in their car. >> let you have the money. >> oh, oh. are you sure that that's okay? >> yeah, it's fine. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. in this edition, we turn our attention to some foreign intrigue. first, a story about a mysterious computer virus that struck an iranian nuclear plant. later, the report of how american agents hunted a notorious arms dealer. and finally, an account of a chinese-american spy trying to steal u.s. military secrets for china. we begin with the story of stuxnet, a computer virus considered to be the world's first destructive cyberweapon. it was launched several years ago against an iranian nuclear facility, almost certainly with some u.s. involvement. but as steve kroft reported in march of 2012, the implications and possible consequences of this new kind of warfare are now being studied intensely. >> i do b
CNBC
Mar 20, 2012 9:00pm EDT
and to create new jobs here in america, not overseas, not in china, not in europe. >> dan dimicco is the c.e.o. of nucor, the biggest steelmaker in the united states, with 18 plants all across the country, including this one outside blytheville, arkansas, along the mississippi river. plant manager doug jellison told us nucor has revolutionized the way steel is made. so what is this stuff? >> it could be old barges. it could be from, you know, old buildings. this stuff is, like, you know, old barrels, or you'll see some wheels. >> instead of using expensive iron ore to make steel, nucor uses mostly scrap, anything with steel, like crushed cars or old washing machines. >> we are the largest recycler in north america. >> over the last five years, this plant, like the u.s. steel industry as a whole, saw its profits soar. by mid-2008, nucor had hit an all-time high. but then things changed overnight. just what? >> just off a cliff. >> you went from feast to famine like that? >> when the credit crisis hit, the water shut off. the flow of money shut off. it was like dominoes, boom boom boom
CNBC
Feb 18, 2013 8:00am EST
china. >> he found one already? where, where, where? where? he found one? oh, my god. oh, smell that. in the beautiful italian province of perugia, truffle hunters roam the frosty hills with their trained dogs, who sniff out these lumpy mushrooms when they're ripe, one at a time, as they have for centuries. wow. truffles grow wild, underground, usually at the base of an oak tree. [pig snorts] they used to use pigs, but they ate the truffles. >> very rich american people, they only see truffles on the table of a very elegant restaurant. they don't see this. now you know why they are expensive, right? >> olga urbani may be the only person in the world who goes truffle hunting in a full-length fur coat and a caribbean tan. but in the truffle business, she can pretty much do what she wants. olga. >> yeah. >> her company, urbani, controls 70% of the world's truffle trade. >> when you find the truffles, it's like to have a miracle. >> another one. other countries, including the u.s., have tried cultivating truffles with only limited success. oh, another one? it's the combination of europea
CNBC
May 21, 2012 8:00pm EDT
ingredients from china was counterfeit. how many people were affected by this? >> in this country, a little over 80 people actually died from contaminated heparin. >> baxter says the number of deaths is closer to four or five, but everyone agrees it's difficult to know the exact number. nurse colleen hubley says, at at her dialysis center in toledo, ohio, she saw one patient have cardiac arrest and others with strange symptoms after receiving heparin. >> having hypotension, diarrhea, vomiting. i even had another patient that stated to me, "you know, what is going on around here?" >> had you ever seen anything like this? >> mm-mm. no. >> and then she says she saw the same symptoms in her own family. she says her husband, randy, and her mother-in-law, both regular users of heparin due to chronic kidney disease, had bad reactions and died within a few days. baxter, which is being sued by coleen hubley and others, disputes that and says the serious underlying medical conditions of her family and patient quote, "much more likely caused their deaths." you lost one of your patients, your mo
CNBC
May 25, 2014 9:00pm EDT
china, there are 200 million. worldwide, nicholas negroponte says, the potential number of kids who could get his laptop is over a billion, a fact that has not gone unnoticed by intel and other high tech companies. intel gave every student in this class in mexico a classmate, which negroponte believes is part of an effort to kill him off. >> it's predatory. >> at a lecture at mit, he accused intel of dumping, of going to the same governments he's trying to sell to and offering the classmate below cost. >> intel should be ashamed of itself. it's just--it's just shameless. >> craig barrett is intel's chairman of the board. >> negroponte believes that you're trying to drive him out. >> we're not trying to drive him out of business. we're trying to bring capability to young people. and it's more than just intel. it's gonna take the whole industry to do this. >> barrett flies around the world bringing computers to schools and places like malinalco, mexico. >> do you like the computers? >> ¿les gustan las computadoras? >> all: si. >> he says that like negroponte, intel just wants to help
CNBC
Mar 14, 2012 12:00am EDT
, shark's fin soup. [gong reverberates] in china, it's been an expensive status symbol for millennia. chefs in the emperor's court were once beheaded if they prepared it incorrectly. but these days, with china booming, more and more people can pay $100 for a bowl. finning sharks is a billion-dollar business, and it's not a pretty sight. that's because as soon as a shark is caught, his fins are cut off and he's thrown overboard, alive, to sink to the bottom and drown. in south africa and a few other countries, it's a crime to do that. but given the high price of soup, it's a very common crime. what's a fin worth? a large one can cost thousands of dollars. and the black market in fins is tough to police, because most of the sharks are caught in international waters, where there's no law against finning. but on land, laws can be enforced. in cape town recently, authorities raided several processing plants owned by hong kong chinese. seven tons of fins were confiscated. this is only a small fraction of the whole. and after you've seen those fins laid out, have another look, as we did, at
CNBC
Aug 11, 2013 8:00pm EDT
just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. just by talking to a helmet. it grabbed the patient's record before we even picked him up. it found out the doctor we needed was at st. anne's. wiggle your toes. [ driver ] and it got his okay on treatment from miles away. it even pulled strings with the stoplights. my ambulance talks with smoke alarms and pilots and stadiums. but, of course, it's a good listener too. [ female announcer ] today cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everything works like never before. [ female announcer ] today cisco is connecting the internet of everything. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. these are the hands a pediatrician. these are pioneering advances in heart surge
CNBC
Jan 31, 2012 9:00pm EST
you know the guys from china are in the office... [ speaking chinese ] [ male announcer ] stay a step ahead with the 4g lte galaxy s ii skyrocket. only from at&t. ♪ of how a shipping giant can befriend a forest may seem like the stuff of fairy tales. but if you take away the faces on the trees... take away the pixie dust. take away the singing animals, and the storybook narrator... [ man ] you're left with more electric trucks. more recycled shipping materials... and a growing number of lower emissions planes... which still makes for a pretty enchanted tale. ♪ la la la [ man ] whoops, forgot one... [ male announcer ] sustainable solutions. fedex. solutions that matter. >> the massive oil sands of fort mcmurray may be the next big oil boom. and as bob simon reported in 2006, it may also give canada a lot more leverage in its dealings with the united states. >> most of those lumbering trucks are on their way to the gas tanks of america. a million barrels a day are now coming out of the oil sands, and oil production is expected to triple within a decade. it wouldn't replace middle ea
CNBC
Dec 2, 2012 11:00pm EST
, china. inside, his hotels are fantasy lands for well-heeled adults. he brought gourmet restaurants and high-end shopping to the strip. his hotels may be extravagant, but his business strategy is conservative. his company is not highly leveraged and has over $1 billion in cash to help ride out the recession. i want to understand a bit about the casino business. >> so do i. [laughter] [babbles] >> the only way to win in a casino... >> is to own one. >> own one. >> unless you're very lucky. >> and, he says, even when people are lucky, they usually gamble away their winnings. you have never known, in your entire life, a gambler who comes here and wins big and quits. >> walks away. never. >> you know nobody, hardly, that, over the stretch of time, is ahead? >> nope. >> the customer's loss is steve wynn's gain. he's a billionaire. but he isn't all that interested in gambling. his passion is creating the resorts. >> are you satisfied with the way the light is hitting our flowers? >> he works closely with his design team and signs off on nearly every detail. >> i love this restaurant, roger. >
CNBC
Sep 17, 2013 12:00am EDT
china deal and didn't have the price low enough for the cell phone. so it makes total sense that it pulls back. okay? it's just natural. i promise right here on "mad money," i'm jim cramer. i will see you tomorrow. >> looking at the googleplex, it's hard to imagine that just a few years ago the company basically consisted of the russian-born brin and cofounder larry page working in a converted garage. >> our boardroom table was also our ping-pong table, so it had the net and everything. >> he's been called the toddler ceo, the boy wonder who created facebook. you're not a harvard alum. >> that's true. we don't have a setting for dropout, so... >> what's the difference in $5 billion and $100 billion? i know it's $95 billion. >> a lot of cheeseburgers. let me tell you. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm lesley stahl. the information technology revolution changes our world on a daily basis, but one thing that doesn't change is our fascination with the so-called nerds who not only transformed society but became billionaires in the process. this edition features a trio of these tech t
CNBC
Feb 7, 2012 1:00am EST
fin soup. in china, it's been an expensive status symbol for millennium. chefs were at one time beheaded if they cooked it incorrectly. people will pay $100 for a bowl. feeding sharks is a billion dollar business and it is not a pretty shark. as soon as a shark is caught his fins are caught cut off and he is thrown overboard, alive to sink to the bottom and drown. in south africa and a few other countries it's a crime to do that. given the high price of soup it is a common crime. what's a fin worth? a large one can cost thousands of dollars. and the black market in fins is tough to police because most of the sharks are caught in international waters where there's no law against finning. on hand, laws can be enforced in capetown recently authorities raided several processing plants owned by hong kong chinese, seven tons of fins were confiscated. this is only a small fraction of the haul. and after you have seen those fins laid out, have another look, as we did, at sharks doing what sharks do. a shark weaving through an underwater forest. at the perfect gee yom tri and grace of a
CNBC
Sep 3, 2012 10:00am EDT
have justified such a big increase. >> did china and india suddenly have gigantic needs for new oil products in a single day? no--everybody agrees supply-demand could not drive the price up $25, which was a record increase in the price of oil. the price of oil went from somewhere in the $60s to $147 in less than a year. and we were being told on that run-up, "it's supply-demand, supply-demand, supply-demand." >> a report out of mit analyzing world oil production and consumption also concluded that the basic fundamentals of supply and demand could not have been responsible for the 2008 run-up in oil prices. and michael masters says the u.s. department of energy's own statistics show that if the markets had been working properly, the price of oil should have been going down, not up. >> from quarter four of '07 until the second quarter of '08, the e.i.a.--the energy information administration-- said that supply went up. worldwide supply went up, and worldwide demand went down. so you have supply going up and demand going down, which generally means that price is going down. >> and this
CNBC
Feb 28, 2012 10:00pm EST
, mark zuckerberg runs a vast global empire with the world's largest population after china and india. i first met him in 2008 at facebook's old graffitied building in downtown palo alto. the company has since decamped to giant hangars nearby to accommodate their explosive growth. the graffiti is largely gone, except for one word you just can't miss. i see "hack" everywhere. >> mm-hmm. >> hack. it has a negative connotation, doesn't it? >> when we say "hacker," there's this whole definition that engineers have for themselves, where it's very much a compliment when you call someone a hacker, where "to hack something" means to build something very quickly, right? in one night, you can sit down and you could churn out a lot of code, and at the end, you have a product. >> which is what he expects from his 500 engineers. as we walked through, we got a sense of high-level competition, whether it's writing code into the night or taking breaks to play speed chess. it's a constant game of one-upsmanship. you have hack-athons. >> yeah, and hack-athons are these things where just all of the face
CNBC
Oct 13, 2013 11:00pm EDT
states and some other industrial countries. that savings has come from china and east asia. it's come from oil producers. and it has--hundreds of billions of dollars has come into our financial system. and, you know, that would be great if we took that money and invested it wisely and got a high return. but instead, our financial system didn't do a good job. we had a regulatory system that was like a sand castle on the beach. when you had little small waves just lapping up against the sand castle, everything looked good, but when you had a big breaker come in, suddenly the system wasn't strong enough to deal with it. >> does the federal reserve bear any responsibility for missing what was happening to the banks as it was happening? >> well, like other regulators, we probably could have done more. we've already done a lot of-- put a lot of effort into reviewing our practices, into reviewing the banks' practices. we are trying to strengthen our regulation at every point that we can. so i don't want to deny that we certainly could have done a better job and others could have done a bette
CNBC
Apr 4, 2012 1:00am EDT
? >> bosnia, el salvador, liberia, niger, sierra leone, iraq, china, indonesia, pakistan, haiti. did i say nepal? >> how do you keep it running? >> on a prayer. [laughs] [ticking] >> coming up, the personal cost of caring. >> how often do you run into people who say, "look, those kids are from overseas, and we'd rather donate our money to kids here in the united states"? >> often. >> it's a big problem for you? >> i've gotten hate mail. >> oh, hate mail? >> yeah. >> that's ahead when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. the chevy cruze eco also offers 42 mpg on the highway. actually, it's cruze e-co, not ec-o. just like e-ither. or ei-ther. or e-conomical. [ chuckling ] or ec-onomical. pa-tato, po-tato, huh? actually, it's to-mato, ta-mato. oh, that's right. [ laughs ] [ car door shuts ] [ male announcer ] visit your local chevy dealer today. now very well qualified lessees can get a 2012 chevy cruze ls for around $159 per month. e.p.a. estimated 36 miles per gallon highway. two of the most important are energy security and economic growth. north america actually has one of the largest oil reserves
CNBC
Jun 11, 2013 9:00pm EDT
is it. glacial runoff provides water for 1 1/2 billion people, mostly in south america, china, and india. >> in the medium term-- let's say, depending on the size of the glacier, 30 years, just a few decades-- the glacier will start to waste away in such a degree that you will see the runoff, the glacial melt coming from that glacier starting to decline. >> and these cities around the world will be starved for water. >> exactly, so that's a major issue. and we see now the first impacts. >> we wanted to see the evidence of warming nearer the bottom of the world, so we set sail ast city south, ushuaia, argentina, on a two-day voyage to antarctica. it's more than 1,000 miles from glacier o'higgins in patagonia and across the drake passage to the antarctic peninsula. here, we found there's green where the white used to be. on the coast in summer, there's grass where the scientists used to ski. this is paradise cove. it's home to fur seals, lazy elephant seals, and the chinstrap penguin. there's the chin strap right there, right under the eye. american biologists sue and wayne trivelpie
CNBC
May 8, 2012 9:00pm EDT
that china and india now put more carbon in the air than we do, and the chinese are opening coal-fired plants at a rate of one a week. none captures its carbon. now rogers has broken ground on his two new coal-fired plants despite warnings from top scientists like nasa's jim hansen. so when jim hansen says that to save the planet, we should stop building coal-fired power plants today, you say what? >> i say, "mr. hansen, can't get done, won't get done. we've got to keep our economy going. we've got to make the transition. and i'm gonna do everything i can with the greatest sense of urgency to make the transition. but to do what you ask me to do now is just not doable." >> in his 2011 state of the union address, president obama called for 80% of the energy used in this country to come from clean technology, including clean coal, within 25 years. meanwhile, jim rogers announced plans to merge his duke energy with progress energy, forming the nation's largest power company. that's this edition of 60 minutes on cnbc.
CNBC
Feb 29, 2012 12:00am EST
your jobs and we send them to hungary, poland, if not china. >> so there should be huge political support then to change it. >> um, there is not a huge political support to change it. >> why not? >> because it's seen as a sort of entitlement now. >> people see it as their right. >> exactly. >> "i'm only gonna work 35 hours a week and that's it." >> exactly. >> no, no, no! >> so no french politician would even dare to suggest fundamental reform, like trimming that guaranteed five weeks of vacation. and american melchior ray has been won over. she's talked herself into the idea that the french way of working, rather, not working, translates into good economic sense. >> people came back, and it was like everyone had had ten shots of espresso. they were just ready to go. they were like ever ready bunnies. everyone was going together, and there was a teamwork that was inspiring. >> how much vacation time do you take? >> i take my five weeks. absolutely. >> i bet that feels good. >> it feels great. it feels great. >> in 2010, workers at a ford motors plant in france agreed to give up si
CNBC
Mar 7, 2012 12:00am EST
iran, israel or china. okay? but that can happen. be careful. there's always a bull market somewhere. i promise to find it jus cocaine, and alcohol.jus dave smart was a meth addict for 20 years. he took peizer's treatment one time. the cravings? >> the cravings were gone. >> what do you mean? you mean overnight? >> i mean overnight. that's the way it worked for me. [jingly thai music] >> thailand: an exotic vacation land known for its buddhas, its beaches, its brothels. but how about going for hip surgery or a multiple bypass or a face-lift? a growing number of americans are doing just that, combining holidays with healthcare. this uninsured louisiana man had a complicated quintuple bypass. this woman from bend, oregon, a bit of an eye lift. >> it was just beyond my expectations. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this episode, we'll look at people who market medical procedures as business ventures, everything from anti-aging treatments to a protocol that claims to end addiction. we'll begin with doctors and pharmacists who are catering to the 78 million aging baby
CNBC
Jan 26, 2014 8:00pm EST
... >> mm-hmm? >> come from where? >> bosnia, el salvador, liberia, niger, sierra leone, iraq, china, indonesia, pakistan, haiti. did i say nepal? >> how do you keep it running? >> on a prayer. [laughs] [ticking] >> coming up, the personal cost of caring. >> how often do you run into people who say, "look, those kids are from overseas, and we'd rather donate our money to kids here in the united states"? >> often. >> it's a big problem for you? >> i've gotten hate mail. >> oh, hate mail? >> yeah. >> that's ahead when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. mine was earned in korea in 1953. afghanistan, in 2009. orbiting the moon in 1971. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection. and because usaa's commitment to serve current and former military members and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. if you wear a denture, take this simple test. press your tongue against it, like this. it moves! do you feel i
CNBC
Feb 7, 2012 9:00pm EST
? did you know the guys from china are in the office... [ speaking chinese ] [ male announcer ] stay a step ahead with the 4g lte galaxy s ii skyrocket. only from at&t. ♪ (watch ticking) >> safer: arlan galbraith, who called himself the pigeon king, convinced hundreds of american and canadian farmers there was good money to be made raising the birds for food. >> safer: how did you first hear about this whole pigeon business? >> i went to canada and met him. they had an open house up there. i mean, seemed--seemed like a nice guy. and everybody we talked to said this guy was--he was on the up and up. nobody had a bad word to say about him anywhere that we could find. >> safer: so aaron and joline humbert, ohio farmers, signed up. where were you gonna make money out of this? that's what i don't quite understand. >> we was kind of getting in on the ground floor of this, and all his plans was, you know, to raise pigeons for food consumption. >> they've had such tremendous demand for the live birds. >> safer: the pigeon king assured investors that pigeons would replace chickens in every po
CNBC
Oct 19, 2014 9:00pm EDT
from where? >> bosnia, el salvador, liberia, niger, sierra leone, iraq, china, indonesia, pakistan, haiti. did i say nepal? >> how do you keep it running? >> on a prayer. [laughs] [ticking] >> coming up, the personal cost of caring. >> how often do you run into people who say, "look, those kids are from overseas, and we'd rather donate our money to kids here in the united states"? >> often. >> it's a big problem for you? >> i've gotten hate mail. >> oh, hate mail? >> yeah. >> that's ahead when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good around ♪ ♪ turn around, barry ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ [ female announcer ] fiber one. (receptionist)und gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. aweso
CNBC
Feb 14, 2012 9:00pm EST
, we heard. wanna sign the card? did you know the guys from china are in the office... [ speaking chinese ] [ male announcer ] stay a step ahead with the 4g lte galaxy s ii skyrocket. only from at&t. ♪ [ male announcer ] ylord of the carry-on.. sovereign of the security line. you never take an upgrade for granted. and you rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i deserve this. [ male announcer ] you do, business pro. you do. go national. go like a pro. oh there's tons. french presses, espresso tampers, filters. it can get really complicated. not nearly as complicated as shipping it though. i mean shipping is a hassle. not with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits it ships, anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. that is easy. best news i've heard all day! i'm soooo amped! i mean not amped. excited. well, sort of amped. really kind of in between. have you ever thought about decaf? do you think that would help? yeah. priority m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 154 (some duplicates have been removed)