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CSPAN
Jan 18, 2016 12:00am EST
discontinued one china policy and its impact on the country and talks about her book the story of china's most radical experiment with ethanol snowe's office of the national book award-winning age of ambition. >> mei fong, welcome to "after words." you published your first book and i end joyed immensely. it's the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts. the book is one child at the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and how you went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about so what is china's one child policy? >> guest: the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it's just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions china has placed to regulate the population and the size of the family. theoretically you could collect 1.5 child for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy. but it's a lot of regulations. >> so it's not one law but a sort of basket of policies. when did it happen and
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 10:54pm EDT
. it's e3 secbaclly timely to have this discussion today because of what's hg bpew ng in china, and of course impth the u.s. stock market. the problems that are causing the meltdown of china's stock market are not limited to china alone, many of the same economic faile mes that h urnt china afft the rest of the worlds. huge debts, corruption, lack of e span3 saren ge, lack ocare the rare ce of law and general lack of economic freedom. as you will lea on from teathas difanusn many mistakes china and others make are always also be in debt by the s led miw stration. we should not be surprised that that our economy is in trouble to and we have lost the particular ability to lead the world out of trouble. which culm se me all of oe m rcrticipants, particularly grat will be talking about. to get us startei hapant impll deliver sdiie rema, he wears many hats and has a wide range of experience in e spade and econdiiic policy and the law. 2001 to 2005, roughly the same thousand fivsome rou3 huly the same time i was at the state department, grant was secretary ocare comiliaerce of national t. a
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2014 1:00am EDT
conservatives. >> talk about china earlier to describe america's banker? and you talk about the rhetoric from politicians and mitt romney in shaming from china that never happened also economic nationalism. >> guest: it has always been of seem like pat buchanan talk about this. but look at the 19th century as a protectionist country you can argue if it is the right thing or the wrong thing but for someone to describe to me the american industrial base was built in that was what happened so the argument on the right has been the economic nationalism. and it is not just about economic nationalism but a level playing field if i could china and have to pay 15% to get my goods into china but to export you get a 50 percent subsidy so that trade argument is about equalizing. again it is always more complicated the way he is portrayed by he saved hall the davidson in the early '80s people would remember. and harley-davidson was going bust. he slashed the tires from the japanese motorbikes and saved the industry. >> what is the effect. >> the problem is the demand for the chinese goods you could stop
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2014 11:00am EDT
sides, both the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: tell us about china. where is china in all this? described as america's banker and you talked about some of the rhetoric from republican politicians and talking about naming and shaming china on day one of his presidency. and you talked with some of the economic nationalism. >> guest: economic nationalism has eyes been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan talk about this and are on the fringes of the debate in many ways. america was the great protectionist country. that's a historical fact and we can argue whether was the right thing or the wrong thing but the fact is that someone described to me the american industrial base was built behind the wall. that's just what happened. the argument on the right very much has been about shaded into as you say economic nationalism. and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's about having a level playing field. if i'm exporting cars into china i'm probably going to have a 15% tariff to get my goods into china for as if i am a chinese exporter you get a 15% subsidy. the
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2014 4:00pm EDT
about china earlier. where is china in all of this? i will describe america's banker and it's interesting in this section you talk about some of the rhetoric from republican politicians, in 2012 talking about naming and shaming china as a currency from day one of his presidency which never happened and nationalism. let's. >> guest: economic national and has eyes been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan talked about this and they were on the fringes of the debate in many ways but if you look at the 19th century america was the great protectionist country. that's a historical fact. we can argue about whether was the right thing or the wrong thing but the fact is as someone described to me the american industrial base was built, that's just what happened. so the argument on the right is very much, has been about or shaded into as you say economic nationalism and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's about having a level playing field so if i'm exporting to china i probably have a 15% tariff to get into china whereas if i make chinese exporter to get a 1
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2014 12:00am EDT
world to different places like irma china australia and so forth and had a great success with that first career. >> host: we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point, getting minerals out of the ground. a growing economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard and your child is the best city kid -- educated in that area studied with masters at stanford and also the most -- the best paid young men of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer of his time and he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was a lot of money in those pre-income tax days but he did to stop there. by the time he was 40 he was a modest millionaire. i'm not a midas or a rockefeller or mellow perhaps that he wanted to do more with his life and having done well in his profession he wanted to do somethi
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2014 9:19pm EDT
internet is just now beginning to converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everyt
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2014 12:03pm EST
russia for doing things we don't criticize china for, saudi arabia. the russians have of course that russia is a european country. their member of the council of era. they signed up to agreements where they are supposed to adhere to these alien tick marks, which of course china hasn't done to my saudi arabia hasn't done. but the u.s. in the past has not been consistent in the way it is criticize for some things that happened domestically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors. i go into this in the book because there's strategic partners for the united states at least in the war on terror. the obama administration has been pretty scaled at dealing with these issues. the reset when it worked and how that works so well in the last year or two explicitly differentiated between working with russia on common interests like arms control, like her rant, like missile defense, like afghanistan and he was separated from what was happening domestically and russia. it's been fairly quiet and reserved in what it has said about what is happening domestically. this has changed a little b
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2014 9:00pm EDT
an import from china it's hard to know exactly that about $10 million a year into those devices alone after the trade deficit with china because they are made in factories in southern china so they get made in a factory and put on a container ship on long beach and they get assigned a hotel which is $220 it is a $220 import or $250 import from china, but is it really? is anything that we now use really made in any one country? whether it is a t-shirt where cotton comes from one country and the pattern comes from another and thus watches come and then they are assembled, it is assembled in a factory. it isn't clear that $220 or $250 comes from the united states to china because if you break down that phone which a lot of economists have done. there are parts from taiwan and somewhere else and above all intellectual property from the u.s.. but in the world of trade numbers that assume the object has a final substance transformation in one country with no way of breaking any of that down. >> host: i think the retail value when they first came out it was $499. nobody ever paid that
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2016 6:00am EST
have moved to california and outsourced to china and engineers that remain behind are designing products more mexican and off-shore workers and i'm waiting for entrepreneurs to put me back to work and so 40 million born adults, that's a lot of people looking for innovation and super vision and entrepreneurialism to put them back to work and without that, if you dilute resources, slow growth relative to the west of the economy. >> we are facing high inequality, slow wage growth, it seems like it's a natural thick to do is use the tax code to redistribute. that's not what you want to do. >> well, i certainly recognize that as a possibility and maybe useful in some places. if you're a 50-year-old worker who spent your whole life working in one endeavor and trained in that endeavor and you lose your job it'll be awfully hard to get a job so there's cost and we need to be thoughtful about that. and that talent is working inside of institutions like google, like silicon valley which greatly amplify their productivity. those institutions were built very slowly over time through success
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 8:56pm EST
, what china, china, korea, and india are leaving right now. the breakup of the extended family is occurring because that worked only by enslaving the young young women to provide the care and on top of it his sons imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit your land? having your economic future still dependent upon your dad. the economic the economic progress occurs because you give your people freedom. they moved to the cities, often take different lines of work, leave the elders behind and we did not have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. what we have decided medicine we will take care of it. >> turn it over to the healthcare field and they will fix and take care of and treat. it. >> my dad is having trouble with memory or falls in the home. we like fixing problems. but some problems you can't fix. you can make them go away. you can say, well, you can you can try xyz or go see another specialist. and that is the failure of our understanding. there are things to fight for besides just living longer. >> when we go through school it seems li
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2016 9:00pm EDT
agenda because now that china and india have gone to war the cia is ready to replace the pakistan knees and they were right. they began to support the tibetan resistance and no flight started to come out of india to the chinese. also flights that would only come out of pakistan in 1963 and 64 there would come out secretly firebases in india and it was one of those flights that discovered the chinese are in the final stages to test their first nuclear weapons and to give the united states a crucial intelligence china was on the verge of becoming a nuclear weapon state. >> alleges like to say and ambassador at -- a word about the ambassador john galbraith was a tall man 6-foot 6 inches board ontario canada and a graduate of the ontario school of agriculture and moved to the united states did dkb economist and wrote several books and the star of harvard university. in dkb advisor to kennedy. and he kept the diary in he later published that diary is is a memoir. that whether or not. to say at least we know you actually said that. the diary is a fascinating piece politically unaware and unkn
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 10:47pm EST
the world, explosive economic growth in asia and the rise of china economic rise strategic desire for a larger and more modern military force. my conclusions are overwhelmingly optimistic, and icon to both optimistic conclusions conclusions informed by my experience as prime minister impossible for our nation, nation, australia, to improve its relationship with us and china at the same time. you could only improve the relationship with one at the cost of the relationship with the other. i set out to prove that that was not right. during my time we took a step forward with an alliance with the us and now trained us marines in our northern territory. pres. president obama said he wanted a harsh environment for them to train. i said boy, boy have i got a harsh environment for you. [laughter] they train in 100-degree heat and 90 percent humidity i'm probably not on their list of most liked people, like people, but we took a big step forward in the alliance at the same time we took a big step forward with china one of the few nations on earth to be able to strike such a compact. it is
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:55pm EST
much his verdict on the cultural revolution. a lot of the china scholars at the time still bought into maoism and these ideas. this is one of the reasons why it was so hard for them to understand the reforms going on in china. if you go back to the accounts of the time, a lot of the established china scholars didn't quite get the story. they didn't understand what they were seeing. a lot of them were still wedded to these old images now as china and in some cases they were quite bewildered. >> host: it's an argument for on the ground journalism and observation. one of the people you relied on was a smart raiders diplomat who went out there and beat the pavement as if you were a journalist and in fact interviewed people and wrote down what he saw. >> roger garside who i am happy to say still alive. an absolutely magnificent book that has stood the test of time. some journalists wrote that looks at the time but i would say his is the one that's hard to be precisely because as you say he went out and he was on the ground and he got the story. he saw things very pragmatically without an id
CSPAN
Apr 13, 2014 12:00pm EDT
registered as an import from china. why? 6 billion, 750 at the ipad were probably about $10 billion a year in those devices alone, i pulled -- apple devices add to the trade deficit because they're made in factories in southern china. they get made in a factory and get put on a ship and a shove on long beach and they get a wholesale price which is the price that apple puts on a. isn't really? is anything that we now use really made any one country, whether the t-shirt wear cotton comes from one country, and the pattern comes from another and the swatches, and they are a symbol. it is clear the iphone is assembled in a factory in china. it is not clear that $220 or $250 goes from the united states to chime every time one is bought because if you break down the iphone which a bunch of economists have done and what your position for economic operation and development have done, you find that are parts from germany and parts from create an parts from taiwan and plastic from somewhere else and parts from america, and above all, intellectual property from the u.s. in a world of trade numbers tha
CSPAN
May 25, 2015 12:00am EDT
public i mean. people know that china has invested a great deal and that japan had already invested. it was part of their rebuilding after world war ii but it's a little bit more -- remote just to say we want to be number one on making 10 indicators but if it doesn't translate to things that improve people's lives. so my thought is and what i've been saying in this book and want to say to the people who are elected leaders, i feel many of us could be leaders whether we are holding office or not. i'm trying to be a thought leader here. what i'm trying to say to them in "move" is we need a vision about mobility. mobility is so essential you've talked about transportation is a signatory system of the nation. mobility, we have to be able to move goods. we have to be able to move ourselves and we have to be able to get where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically to talk about catching up or getting into the lead as we compete with other countries but we also have to continue to be the land of opportunity. i say we have gone from a land of opportunity
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 9:00pm EDT
who are left behind. china does 90 there. that medicine will take care of. turnover to health care. >> guest: my dad is having trouble with memory or falls but then take him to the doctor. they say we have a procedure. but there's some problems we cannot fix, and they throw up our hands. or we can go see another specialist. there are things to fight for besides living longer or to repair and repairable problems. >> host: when we go through school, medical school it attracts good people the type of high-school student that once to be a nurse is a remarkable person. and those from medical school but then they come out in a dilemma it is a confusion, preparedness, a sense this is out of my league? then they have such great people going into the profession then they deal with the problem that is out of their league? >> a few things happened. i have a geriatric office by bill my clinic and for years i never knew what they did. 97% of medical school does not teach geriatrics and i said let me hang out with you for one day and he would recognize the most life-threatening things for patien
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2014 9:00pm EDT
talk about how we can do just that. >> so with china it has resulted as you put it out in the super consumer products and that's a good thing for everybody but certainly it hasn't helped american manufacturing. you almost never hear anybody complain about that. why? >> guest: because most people are not -- most people haven't lost your jobs or are getting lower paid jobs. a very small percentage of -- relatively small percentage of americans are actually participating in a manufacturing. certainly substantially less than it was before. and so if you are a professional or someone that works in the service industry in your looking at getting something for substantially lower price because it's been manufactured overseas, you're happy to go to wal-mart. as you notice how wal-mart is now very focused. we have an ad campaign for the last year almost talking about how they are trying to move things back to america to encourage manufacturing here in this country. so i ca think even those who've benefited greatly like wal-mart from this globalization and having these products made overseas
CSPAN
Jun 23, 2014 12:00am EDT
can do that. >> the trade game with china has resulted in cheaper consumer products for everybody and that's i guess a good thing. certainly has not upped american manufacturing. you almost never hear anybody complain about that. why? >> well, because most people aren't in manufacturing. most people have lost their jobs are getting lower paying jobs, relatively small percentage of americans are actually participating in manufacturing, substantially less than it was before. and so if you're the -- a professional or someone who works in service industry and you're looking at getting something for a substantially lower price because it's been manufactured overseas, you're happy to go to wal-mart, but as you know, tucker, wal-mart is now very focused -- running an ad campaign talking about how they're trying to move things back here to america and try to encourage manufacturing here in this country. i think even those who have benefited greatly, like wal-mart, from this globalization, and having the products made overseas, see the benefits of having these products made here. i think t
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2016 12:00am EST
parallels with the growing immigration to put american workers in competition with others like china or mexico are directly of the united states and that with the dust to believe more competition would have a downward pressure of wages bearishness some research in trained immigration one. >> that we would be less to believe of what is going on. . . and why this would continue to go on for the next few years. it's like the experiment i just described. immigrants do not land randomly in different cities. any rational human being would rather live in a high wage city. they are coming here to work and want to make a -- they want to have a high wage level so they will settle in the city's have high wages. but look at what that means. it creates a coalition between immigration and wages. it makes it very hard to detect the impact on the potential negative impact immigrants could be having on the market because you've already got the date of isaiah sinisaiah sing it in a ws to be in high wage places it's not actually one difficulty that's been very difficult to get around. the second difficult
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2014 9:53pm EDT
have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. india, china don't either. and what we have decided, madison will take care of it . >> host: turn it over to the medical field and it will fix and treat. >> guest: trouble with memory or falls in the home. taken to the doctor and a fix that. you take them to the doctor and say, we have a procedure that we can do, therapy we can offer. sometimes you can't fix. some of these, you cannot make them go away. well, i can try extra like ozzie argosy and other specialists that is the failure of our understandings. living longer are trying to repair unrepairable problems . >> host: when we go through school, it seems like medical school attracts good people. the type of high school student that wants to be a nurse is a remarkable person and this sort of person of interviews for medical school is a remarkable person. they come out in this dilemma. is this confusion or preparedness, a sense of this is out of my lead. better things go wrong when you have such great people going to their profession. faced with dealing with a pr
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2014 5:32am EDT
that is not your problem. your competitor is china. and god bless him for trying. don't cut out africa, i have been there. there are billionaires in africa and there are entrepreneurs there. and we leave early. and we just want to chill. india wants her stuff, africa wants her stuff. everybody wants her stuff. and here is a miracle. and 7 million people on the planet, these are the numbers. more than 3 million people in america and this should make you excited. 27 million companies, creating one job or more. out of 6 million, creating one job or more. 974 and bank of america will, google, others, help me out, hp and apple and dell. and time warner. instagram, not yet. [laughter] you get my drift. and so this is employing 1000 to 10,000. the 100 employees. 70% of all those employed, 500 or less. and this is at least 20 people. and are you here, as they say in my neighborhood. and about the restaurants he went to. fifty, 70, 80, 100, 500 maximum employees driving the largest economy and looking for all the wrong places and digging in all the wrong holes. and we tell our kids go to school
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2015 12:02pm EDT
china? is that what these people are latching? china is getting our e-mails without help from anybody. i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of personal. i think she's got to open herself a. i did that in the senate race and to think missourians got more full picture of william, the good, the bad, and the ugly. >> host: i think that is sort of an interesting lesson our case study that applies outside of the route of politics because there so few women in these positions, because they attract so much criticism, that bunker mentality i think is probably easy for corporate executives to be in a similar position. it's easy for any woman facing back. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you've given to navigating the family and politics in a way that i certainly have never in any of the sort of male senator's memoirs. your daughter maddie was going to push you to endorse barack obama. you talk a lot about in the book didn't even at a young age is a wonderful anecdote what you're asking early in your career, your public career and
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2015 12:00am EDT
, all this e-mail stuff. exactly what was her motive? is she on the payroll for china is? that what people are alleging? china is getting our e-mail without any help from anybody. i don't really think she should spend so much time being protective of herself. she has to open herself up. i did that in the senate race and i think missourians got a fuller picture of who i am, the good, the squad the ugly. >> host: that it is an interesting lesson or okayed study that a -- case study that replies outside of the realm of politics because there are so few women in these positions, attract so much criticism, the bunker mentality is probably easy for a corporate executive to be in a similar position. it's easy for any woman facing that. let's go back to the very interesting and i think unusual role that you have given to navigating the family and politics in a way that i certainly never read in any of the sort of male senators' memoirs. your daughter, mady, was the one who pushed and prodded you in 2008 to endorse barack obama. you talk about in the book them even at a young age -- there's
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2014 12:00pm EDT
was what american in the 19 centric that's what your pet in the 1 19th century. that's what china, korea and india are leading right now, and why, the breakup of the extended of taking or someone like him is occurring because that works only by enslaving the young. young women to provide the care, and then on top of it his son, imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit the land. having the economic future still depend on your debt. the economic progress of the world occurs because you give young people freedom they can work with, live what they want who they want. a move to the cities. they take different lines of work. they often leave the elders behind, and we didn't have a plan in the 19 century for what happens to people left behind to india, china, korea don't either. and what we have decided, medicine will take care but. >> host: turn it over to the health care field and they'll fix and take care of and treat. >> guest: my dad is having trouble with memory, or he's having falls in the home. well, let's take into the dock and the doctor will fix the. what happens? he
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 12:00pm EST
come. i find amazing talking to friends in china, members of the chinese intelligentsia, the appetite i find this mainly low, just cannot believe how little importance they seem to attach to it. young people in china who you would have thought would be in the vanguard of wanting this thing, i i find there is a cultural difference. i think it is inevitable, and it we will come, like all revolution, circumstances of economic distress. as as soon as the bourgeoisie feel the pinch they will want greater political relief, but it is not happening yet. >> no comments. [applauding] >> thank you. [applauding] [inaudible conversations] >> every weekend book tv offers programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. keep watching from over here on teewun. watch any any of our past programs online. next on book tv afterwards. this week cheryl atkinson and her book stonewalled, my fight for truth against the forces of obstruction, intimidation, and harassment in obama's washington. and if the former cbs news investigative reporter presents her account of the opposition she says she encountered
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
competition with other workers, whether they're in china or mexico in terms of import's or in terms of immigration and certainly basic economics would lead toddes believe that more competition would have a downward pressure on wages, but there's been an awful lot of research and this is wart of what you calling length here -- both in trait grade immigration that makes a different argument that suggests that flights that, the effect wed would be led logically to believe are not in fact what is going on. why is this such an enormous fight within the immigration economic field? >> it has been over the last ten years or so that economists have begin to document the negative impact of trade on works the u.s.a. market. before the last ten years it was said to be very small and very sort of numerically relevant and now it's nobody -- showing that trade as an impact and some people, some americans have ends up behind by trade. this immigration is part of the trade. there's a couple of reasons wife it has so difficult and why it is -- why the debates still going on and -- for the next few years
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2014 9:02pm EDT
some detail is true of the vietnam, of the china. >> host: these meetings about watergate with his top aides, haldeman, or liquid, you to a certain extent. they are rambling. they are unfocused. >> guest: and i have tightened them. >> host: and there's no kind of let's march through this and let's make a decision. and he will just say something, almost at random. and then haldeman will say something. at one point -- >> guest: and 30 minutes later at the same conversation if not with the same person. >> host: nccic on traversing things. use of the metaphor can you say as a participant you and his counsel at the time, not in the inner circle but you say this was the devils merry-go-round. what did you mean by that? >> guest: that was actually a metaphor i picked up as i was writing but i thought about this but i thought about the circular nature of the watergate conversations. and how the same tune in the same circle repeated, sometimes slight difference but basically over and over but the man with the lever a city in their right in the middle is richard nixon, and he never pulls it.
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 9:00pm EST
are immigration put american workers in competition with other workers, whether they are in china or mexico or whether they are directly in the united states in terms of immigration. and certainly the economics would lead us to believe more competition would have a downward pressure on wages. but there's been an awful lot of research into this is what you challenge them to immigration to try to make a different argument that suggests that isn't true in the affect is that we would be led kind of logically to believe are not in fact what's going on. why is this such an enormous fight in the economic field? >> guest: i have to return to trade because you raised a point of trade. in the last ten years or so, economists have begun to document the negative impact of trade on the workers in the u.s. market. before it was thought to be very small and numerically relevant and now there is a new body of work schilling trade has an impact and some people have been left behind by trade. immigration is actually in part trade to measure the impact. there's a couple of reasons why it's so difficult
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2015 12:00am EDT
we have why we don't want the bank as china to be worried they don't have enough capital. we want to make sure they are safe and protected his mistakes that he see for sees her than the requirement for the dividend they may not have. >> host: you mentioned in 2012 the market is already showing signs that it's going to get better again. i guess what do you -- we know the government said of the reason they did it. what do you think is the reason they didn't? >> guest: this is a subject of the lawsuits and there could be things that come out on both sides are interesting and i hope this goes to trial because it will be fascinating to the inner workings of the government. but it's hard to see the government didn't understand the two companies were about to become profitable. there was interesting stuff that came out saying they knew we were about to become really profitable. i guess i am in the camp of if the government has a good reason for doing this i would like to know what it was and that makes me very nervous because i don't like feeling that we are being lied to and that there
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2015 9:00pm EST
sacrifice to that and. if your second goal is to use an opening to china to put pressure on the soviets, then you may have to make compromises with the pakistani government. if you have no other concerns you might not make that. i think any judgment you make about foreign policy has to be done not on a case-by-case basis but in a strategic framework. it is the nature of statesmanship that you have to make choices in your free to make these choices. but there really that's the problem and the challenge of the statesman that there are sometimes no good options. there are just evils that you have to choose between. >> all that is persuasive but i wouldn't put that in the real policy camp. are you seeking stability for the sake of peace. were having to look the other way in pakistan or his joint decision for the bombing of cambodia. you do some of this in the book, his role in chile these sound like realpolitik to me and they are the reason he is so controversial himself. in january 1969, the question is does he remain an idealist? does he adhere to the principles that he set out as an inte
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 10:00pm EDT
what was the motive? where she on the payroll with china? is that what they are alleging? so i really don't think she should spend so much time being protected but they have a more full picture of who i am the good and the bad and the ugly. >> is an interesting case study with men and women in these positions to attract criticism said this is easy for corporate executives to be in a similar position. go back to the unusual roles to navigate of family and politics that they would push and prod to talk about even at a young age there is a wonderful anecdote to ask your the a in your career to come with you i am gathering that is not just a party. >> maybe he was seven or six or five i would say we're going to a party given in the car. so i told him to get ready. but then they don't realize how loud their whispering they said listen if she says if it is a party ask her if somebody will give a speech. if they give a speech it is not a party. [laughter] >> but if there was says of barrier but my guess is it enables you to keep integrating your family as so many women struggle with t
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2014 9:00pm EST
year. my slogan ibb china have a slogan of 100 harvard equipment. we need to build 100 berkeley's. we need to wear three of those in every state so we don't have every high school kid in america competing to get into one of 12 schools. >> host: some of them you can go for free if you get in. so you want greater access but you also want standards create a >> guest: that's why you don't want us to rely on them. the low income who doesn't get into harvard it's amazing it's like three or 4% of their student body are kids from the bottom quarter so we are not talking about a lot of kids. >> host: jiffy program for we have a program for an additional scholarship and mentor program so when they come they come they are mentored by the students that are there and alumni in the social etiquette and negotiating an environment that is different than the one they came. they are bright enough to do well but there are other cultural issues that are challenging and we need to provide for event. you want them to have a good and a positive experience that you have to provide a lot for them. and i think
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2016 12:00am EDT
important to work in haiti or china? i know mandarin. so they said no it is most important that we staffed the embassy in baghdad. so there was a lot of discussion but yet the evidence in the cable suggests that officers willingly and wholeheartedly energetically each to accomplish some impressive things while they were there even without their knowledge of arabic or wrote without the knowledge of the region but the tools that they had been given and being creative and improvising. i think it is one of public diplomacy's success stories. it is hard to use the word success in the same sentence because things are in the air but the cable suggest a trajectory of officers who answered the call, were loyal and did with the initiation asked asked, search, and accomplished. >> host: you mention the assistant secretary of state for educational cultural affairs at the time. . . and it was very striking, his mark on that period. >> it became the largest in the world and we had other programs as well. my colleagues put on theatrical performances and had standing room only crowds coming and in
CSPAN
Apr 12, 2015 9:00pm EDT
-- >> guest: there was an effort and pledge that became a great wall of china beyond which they could move which was from the presidency from 94 until 2009 there was no tax increase, the longest period with no tax increase its only when it's only when they were all democrats in 1993 and again in the 2009 when they passed the tax increase. that period as soon as they got control of the house increased again. the reason you say no tax increases is to force the discussion about spending reform and government reform and prioritizing. if the tax increases aren't an option, the government never reforms, just all the things we've been doing some smart, some stupid. it just keeps accumulating the articles and there's never an effort to decide whether some of this stuff doesn't work anymore. the pledge is what forced to the sequester and do u. live under for the next ten years. because of that the people that care about the national defense talk about the legislation to reduce the number of civilian and pleased at the pentagon at about 100000 say $85 million in five years, 170 billion in ten y
CSPAN
Jun 1, 2014 9:00pm EDT
hypothetical where they were at the china syndrome. they were just, you know, there was no understanding in the public mind was a nuclear accident involved. and so, on everybody's television screen again and again and again they use the word explosion and you have to admit they are pretty compelling individuals and so, all of a sudden now the public says holy smoke what about that reactor over there on the river as that could be my backyard. so the visuals worked to raise public awareness. they may not have understood what was going on or why there was the explosion but the reactor building with the roof blown off and the repeated broadcast of those and the photographs from around the plant. >> host: you go through in the book and pretty good detail what was happening on the ground to read what kind of impact do you think those have for the japanese who were trying -- >> guest: i can't imagine what the working conditions -- you ask if there were characters that stuck with me. i don't know a name, but those workers they didn't know if their families were alive or dead or if
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2015 12:00am EDT
average high school democrat from immigrant from the place like china or india creates five jobs for the nativeborn americans. this is important. the guest worker program so they would stop being exploited coming to the united states and so on and so forth so we can make progress coming down the list going down the list and understanding that it takes a whole bunch. >> guest: this is a good way back from the personal journey and how that works in the book to the point where you talk about practical hope you and you referenced it just now. what is that does that for you, what does that mean? i had flashbacks to yes we can, keep hope alive, hope and change. we talked politicians and they talk a lot about hope that you gave a new emphasis for the gop. you talk about it in terms of being tactical hope. >> guest: hope as we come to understand as you mentioned from hope and change state from the 2008 obama campaign it was all about i hope the government will hopefully help me. you can hope all you want about events outside of your control. that's not the traditional understanding of hope i
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2015 12:00am EDT
. we've done three. colombia, panama, south korea. china has done 30 including a 30 billion-dollar deal with ukraine. including many of the people we would never deal with. so i think that it's a very dangerous precedent. i don't think we have nearly what we think we have. there's no shame that's one man's opinion. >> that was a great talk. very disturbing. it seems like there is so much to be done. but as we all leave this room what would you like us as individuals to take with us what can we do tax >> we have it. there is no more talented organism on the planet and we are. we are the descriptors. anybody that doesn't think we have descriptors, go to the silicon valley to the places in new york where they're thinking about new things. there are new businesses cropping up. a friend of mine in town has just discovered a clever place to be is in cyber. cybersecurity and so you listen to the officials and talk not to the coal mine manager but to the person that is facing the cold and one of the things i found is that cybersecurity is exploding. one of the biggest banks in the world he told
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2014 12:51am EDT
designation that generally goes to the largest economy of the world but we will lose that soon. china is growing 67% how much are we growing? so they will pass us however i don't believe they will become the force and get their banking system. however here is the issue they're already talking about creating a basket currency. so instead of the dollar being the basis it is a hodgepodge but that it will rob us or deplete us. what happens when you can not print money with the debt that we have? stopping and think about that. >> talk about political correctness, i looked at the last 30 years at a more honest discussion than we do today we are afraid is somebody attacks the president to say we will have a real conversation and we don't. there is some theory there. to believe it is some people is not but the color of their skin? >> guest: when you say some people. i do think people are very much influenced by their perception so if somebody told you and then you met me you would interpret everything they he is a nice guy and lowe's everybody. somebody is always looking for racism. the matter w
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2015 10:29pm EDT
guest about the affect china's economy has on the u.s. stock market and global economy. after that, senior science writer john markoff discusses the use of robotics in the u.s. manufacturing industry. his new book is machines of loving grace, the quest for common ground between humans and robots. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span and you can join the conversation on facebook and twitter. >> a signature feature of the tv is our all-day coverage of the fearsome book festivals and coverage. beginning this weekend we have the 15th annual national book festival from the nation's capital. near the end of september we are in new york or the brooklyn but festival celebrating its 10th year. in october we have the southern festival of books in nashville and the weekend after that we are live from austin for the texas book festival and near the end of the month we will be covering tube book festivals on the same weekend from our nation's heartland as the wisconsin book festival in madison. and then the boston book festival. at the start of november we will be in port
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 10:00pm EST
single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, middle east, developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most five percent of the population, took away the surplus of produce grown by the peasants and kept them at subsistence level in poverty and degradation and used this wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization or project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow had to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for five thousand years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species, because this system supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the less sure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, whether your economy is biased oning a actual tour, the only way you can, if you like, crease your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequencely, warfare was the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder was essent
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2014 12:00am EST
more information on both tvs visit from china to tennessee and the many other cities visited by her content vehicles, go to c-span.org/local content. up next on booktv, "after words" with the former senior researcher of columbia university. nicholas johnson in his book "negroes and the gun: the black tradition of arms." in it, the law school professor discusses the tradition of african americans using firearms to defend their families and communities. a tradition that dates back to reconstruction. he argues that the nonviolence of the civil rights help to bury this fact of black history. this program is about one hour. >> so this strikes me as an important intervention in three ways. one of the black freedom movement and over the years has been increasingly revising the way that we understand the role of violence related to nonviolence. the other intervention is cultural in terms of who we see or who we think of when we think of gun owners, and also how we think about black individuals. finally there is a public policy implication for the presentation of the black tradition of arms.
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2014 12:00am EST
on agriculture. and that meant that a small -- in every single civilization, whether it's in china, india, europe, the middle east, developed an inequity system where a small aristocracy comprising five percent of the population took away the surplus of produce and kept the peasants in at subsis stance and used the wealth they'd taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they had this peasant somehow how to be subdued. so 90% of the population throughout -- for 5,000 years, were kept in distress and anger. now, -- so, as historians tell us, without terrible system we november heat developed beyond as a species because this supported a privilegedcast with the people who had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences on which civilization depended. plus, where we all economy is based on agriculture, the only way you can, if you like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently, warfare became essential to the economy. the only way for the economy to grow, and plunder, too, was also
CSPAN
Apr 3, 2016 11:00am EDT
today. there's some great research this is one of our economic power in china or india combined. i think people who look at the evidence-based case you want to get from here today. they are very pragmatic. you are not an ideological about things. they know it matters to our future. i think that's kind of an important point, given that's why your book is laid this out in such an important way. >> guest: i also think, right, the stakes could not be-or in this election. every remaining republican candidate for president has taken a very extreme position on women's health and women's rights. so it's not only that we're going backward, going forward and beat to death someone who really prioritizes and speeds this up. there's also a big danger of falling backward of what's at risk. voting rights for millions of african-american women. african-american women have the highest turnout of any group in the country now. latinas, the question with the supreme court allow obama's immigration orders to go through, or millions of women going to be deported? will women continue to have reproductive
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 9:00pm EDT
been since the 1870s. we are going to lose it soon because -- >> host: china is a mess though. >> guest: but they are growing at 6%. how much are we growing? postcode two to three. >> guest: i don't believe they are going to become the same kind. look at the banking system. however, here's the issue. they are already talking about it, about creating the affair so instead of the u.s. dollar being the basis it would be a hodgepodge of things. it would deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have. stop and think about that for a moment. >> host: you talk about political correctness and a look at the last 30 years and think when we grew up we have more honest discussions than we do today. something happens and we say we are going to have a conversation and we don't. there is some fear they are so let me start first with this. do you think there's some -- do you believe some people are against the president simply because of his skin? >> guest: i'm sure there are some people who are against. >> host: . >> guest
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2016 3:00am EDT
threats now don't connie lee packaged it is rush-hour or china or germany. that increasingly facing the threats that have nothing to do with those formal decisions to have a loosely organized network. they don't look like what we think of as crime to cause death or destruction on non scale with the use of military force by states. but if you decide, one way is to say we have a world of the whole continuum for the state conflict on one end it does look more like individual crime. how do we categorize that? we have a big area in between traditional war but we have legal system that does not allow for in between either picked one with this set or it is not in to get this set that are diametrically the opposite so if we decide and i don't know how, but what is an armed conflict? what is a war? is that track a weapon? the airplane? the box cover? they killed a lot of people. what is a combat and? somebody who doesn't belong to any military with planning and supporting with any plot that will eventually hurt people? do have any special level? we have no idea so we have an arbitrary decisi
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2015 8:57pm EDT
economy in the world which we have been since the 1870s, we, we are going to lose it soon. china is a mess too but they're growing at 67% how much are we going? >> two to three. >> so they are going to pass us up, however i don't believe they're going to become the same kind of force, look at the banking system. >> there's a lot of problems they will have. >> however, here's the issue, they're already talking about it and with other nations to create a basket so instead of the u.s. dollar it will be a hodgepodge of things. what what will that do to us? it will rob us, deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have? seventh? seventh think about that for a moment. >> i would ask about race. you talk about political correctness in here. i look at the last 30 years and i think when i grew up we had more honest discussions in the 70s about race that we do today. where were actually afraid to have conversations, something happen someone attacked here pres. and we say were to have a real conversation about race yet we
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2015 10:00pm EDT
current state of japan. it would also be true of china if it wasn't already whereby you have government of the special interests by the special interests for the special interests. i spent five chapters in the first part of the book justifying civil this obedience on grounds that a lot of these dynamics do not lend themselves to solutions. >> host: a couple of things. i still haven't given you a chance to say what you mean by civil disobedience. >> guest: let me give you the story that prompted this book without many details because i don't want to be identified but is a true story. my wife and i have a friend who is a small-business that employs latinos as certain kinds of businesses do. the difference between him and everybody else in this part of the country is he's documented. he spends 20 or 30 grand a year to do this but what happens is doing the right thing and documenting them he has made himself a visible target so he has been for lack of a harassed by a far different with her agency is not doesn't pay good wages are provided living conditions, he does but there are things that
CSPAN
May 26, 2014 6:00pm EDT
age of terror for some and the rise of china and the nuclear progr program. much with the wherewithal clinton cut the defense budget and when you cut spending and maintain a certain level of revenue are going to get a balanced budget surplus and that's what's happening in the states. i have a whole chapter on what's happening in the states. we have indiana, louisiana doing fantastic jobs in balancing budgets. i wish we could have that in the federal level. the federal government of course the word goes out at the end of the fiscal year if we haven't spent it all spend it all the budget might be cut at last to be covered in indiana they send a check with the remarkable thing. you wrote in the federalist papers and all the rest, but then you have to somehow explain to me well then how is it that you can say that the social security and medicare into these things that are around that that is a good thing and clearly you are a big fan of the defense spending and now guess what if the founding fathers were not about the international use of the military overseas. >> thomas jeff
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