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CSPAN
Aug 19, 2016 8:00pm EDT
teefor . . . i think it would be helpful to define what we are walking about. what is china's one-child policy? >> guest: the one-child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it is a name we use to describe a set of rules, restrictions, that china has placed to regulate family population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child and ten it moved to a two-child policy. >> host: it is not one law but a basket of policies. >> guest: that is right. >> host: when did it happen? when did it go into effect? >> guest: i say 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter to the members saying we are adviceing everyone to move to a one-child family. -- advise. >> host: you are saying this went under effect under ping. what was going on in china that was so important that people imagined they needed an idea of the policy like this? >> mao had just passed away and the population was growing. there was a worry that china's population was going to overwhelm the showers and there wouldn't be enough to go around and they really need today do something. >> host: you writ
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2016 12:00am EDT
it immensely. it is the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china analyst. the book is called one child, the story of china's most radical experiment. an amendment we will talk about why you chose the subject and how you went about answering the question that were on your mind. first i think would be helpful to define for people what it is we're actually talking about. what is china's one child policy question. >> guest: the one child policy is a bit of an it misnomer. it was used to describe a set of rules and restrictions that china has placed to regulate the population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child for a long time. now they they have moved it to a two child policy. it just means regulations. >> host: it is not one law and particularly but a basket of policies? when did did it happen and going to a effect? >> guest: 1980 when the communist party sent out an letter saying we are advising everybody to move to a one child family. it was advised but it was really telling. >> host: people think this is the same kind of policy that wa
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2016 10:00pm EST
first book it is the subject of long debate your book is called "one child" the story of china's most radical expeeriment" we will talk like you chose the subject tonight answer the questions but first it is helpful to define for people what we are talking about. what is the one child policy? >> it is a misnomer of we use to set up a set of rules are restrictions -- restrictions china placed. you could call it 1.five so with a lot of regulations stick like a basket of policies? when did that go into effect >> with a 1979 but i seek the 1980 with a communist party we are inviting everybody to move to though one child family. civics of people imagine this is the palaces -- policy now but it actually went under effect before. why did they think they needed this? that was a cultural revolution and. and the population was growing with a significant worry that the population wed overwhelm and therefore to do something spinach you compare though one child policy to a crash diet that was the gun for the reasons that have merit. was the rationale? what was the goal? >> for economic reasons chi
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 9:00pm EST
the country. she talks about the book one child of the story of china's most medical experiment. >> welcome to "after words." you published your first book, remarkable and terrific achievement. i enjoyed it immensely and it is the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts as you know. the book is called "one child the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first i think it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about. so what is the one child policy? >> the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions to regulate. you could call it 1.5 for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy but in reality, it needs more regulation. >> host: so it is a basket of policies. when did it happen and go into affect? >> 1979 and some people collect 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter because they think we are advising everybody to move to a
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 10:50pm EST
personal level, many families in china are making decisions. >> i can't let you to go without talking a little bit about what's on everybody's mind which is the chinese economy. you were a wall street journal for a long time. when you look at what's happening in china, do you see a country that is on the prefaces of an economic transformation, a hard landing or do you see a place that is doing something else? >> i see china in a much more challenge economically. in the past it was all low hanging fruit. there were all the things they did that was all easy to do. the gains for very quick and rapid. now this is the hard part, the things they have to do to keep growth. they're going to have to do a lot more with a lot less people. you have to increase productivity. chinese university are pretty bad. that's why we see such a huge flood of graduate students in the american institution. the reason we have smart graduates is not because of the universities, it's because of natural talent. >> i don't see a very hopeful people picture going ahead. i don't know that green societies mixed with vib
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the markets and to mao and his cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned the election of the polish pope pope john paul ii in his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and and the election of margaret thatcher and the tom alt over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of written after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming back to that a number five of course the one probably the most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. wow that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there has just been huge outpourings of tributes to thatcher on the occasion of her death. magazine covers revisited. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: well i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place. there have been a lot of revisionis
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 10:45am EDT
the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: tell us about china. where is china in all of this? described as america's banker. you talk about some of the rhetoric from republicans politician, mitt romney talking about naming, sort of shaming china on day one of his presidency, which never happened. he talked about economic nationalism. >> guest: economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat began to talk of this on the fringes of the debate in many ways, but if you look at the 19th century america was the great protectionist country. that's a who struggle fact. we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing. the fact is that someone described to me the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that's just what happened. the argument on the right is very much, has been about, or shared and as you said economic nationalism. and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. if i'm exporting cars to china i would probably have a 15% tariff to get my goods into chi
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:00pm EDT
information internet is just now beginning to converge with the energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge their fledgling automated transport and logistics. the information internet company energy in her neck, the automated transport and logistics internet creating the internet of things and they are placing centers across the economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data from production line, warehouses, distribution centers. we have sensors on martin, sensors connect to the electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing them in a moment. sensors connecting vehicles and offices and stores it that big data coming in across the economy to these three internet, communication, energy, internet which is its internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now in ibm says in 202,050,000,000,000 sensors connecting everything with everyone. it's exhilarating and challenges. what's interesting fr
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2014 12:00am EDT
agreed by both side, both the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: we talk about china. where is china in all this? described as sort of america's banker, and i interested in -- you talked about the rhetoric from republican politics, mitt romney talking about naming -- shaming china as the currency manipulator on day one -- >> guest: never happened. >> host: talked about the economic nationalism -- >> guest: that's right. economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this, been on the fringes of the debate it if you look at the 19th century, america was the great protectionist country. that's historical. the fact is, as someone described to me, the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that is just what happened. the argument on the right is very much -- has been about -- or shaded into the, as you say, x actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting cars into china, i have 15% tariff to get my goods into china, whereas if i'm a chinese
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2014 12:02am EDT
a level playing field. so if i am exporting into china i probably have a 15% tariff to get my goods into china whereas if i can expor am asked porter a 15% subsidy so the trade is about equalizing the trading. again these things are always more complicated. ronald reagan is per trade as a great betrayer but he was a [inaudible] people remember all of these flooding america and harley-davidson was going bust and he just slapped a tie here on these japanese motorbikes and so the domestic industry. >> host: if china had been named and shamed in that way would that have just been basic domestic populism? >> guest: the problem is that there is still a massive demand for these chinese goods and you cannot legislate against them. the naming and shaming, you could. this is a greenspan argument. if we imposed here is, we own china and malaysia and the southeast asian industrial base if you like what provide those goods anyway and it wouldn't help the u.s. many factors. that was his argument. but if you look at where china started its run and we mentioned this earlier. in the 1980s it was one
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2014 2:39am EDT
converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everything or anyone. later on we will t
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2014 9:06pm EDT
they balance the budget and that is what is in the case on china government and it is agreed by both sides the liberals as it was and the conservatives. >> host: you talk about china earlier. where is china and i was interested in the section you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come and if romney in 2012, talking about naming and shaming china as a currency manipulator on the number one. and you talk about the economic nationalism. >> guest: the economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the country that is a fact we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing the fact is as someone described it to me the american industrial basis was built on the high tariff war. that is just what happens. and so they put the argument on the right that very much has been about the economic nationalism. and it's not just about economic nationalism but it is about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting the cars into china
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2016 12:00pm EST
think the workers look and they say, entrepreneurs have moved to california and outsourced to china and engineers that remain behind are designing products more mexican and off-shore workers and i'm waiting for entrepreneurs to put me back to work and so 40 million born adults, that's a lot of people looking for innovation and super vision and entrepreneurialism to put them back to work and without that, if you dilute resources, slow growth relative to the west of the economy. >> we are facing high inequality, slow wage growth, it seems like it's a natural thick to do is use the tax code to redistribute. that's not what you want to do. >> well, i certainly recognize that as a possibility and maybe useful in some places. if you're a 50-year-old worker who spent your whole life working in one endeavor and trained in that endeavor and you lose your job it'll be awfully hard to get a job so there's cost and we need to be thoughtful about that. and that talent is working inside of institutions like google, like silicon valley which greatly amplify their productivity. those institutions were
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2014 8:00pm EDT
was actually agreed by both sides. >> host: we talked about china earlier. where is this and it's interesting you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come in mitt romney talked about naming and shaming and trying on day number one. he talked about some economic nationalism. >> guest: are people like pat buchanan that talk about this that have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the 19th century america was the great country and that is a historical fact. we could argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing to the fact is as someone described to me the american industrial base was built at the height ^-caret war. that is just what happened and so the argument on the right is very much as you said the economic nationalism and actually it's not just about economic nationalism but it's about having a level playing field. so i probably have a 15%. where you get a 15% subsidy and so a lot of the trade argument is about equalizing that playing field. he's portrayed as a betrayer but i think it was a 30% tariff people remember
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2016 10:00pm EDT
and hong kong and old china vs. new china. so it probably isn't of a tax rate so overtime with those capabilities that is why it is a mistake to see what would happen to bill gates? that is and really relevant what about silicon valley to slow the gradual accumulation with those capabilities show me where the tax rate is high. >> kovach to the '50s television has created enormous mass markets turning back with two decades of the great depression me have fallen behind. there were numerous reasons a lot of agriculture into manufacturing. >> but nobody pays 90 percent. but corporate taxes were lower than. that was very circumstantial. going back because of the capital-intensive the large corporations general motors and kodak are very capital intensive. they plan to transfer through you have more restaurants we happen to be in the information intensive area. with more of investment phillip said the large corporation has a difficult time innovating in succeeding for such a large pool. >> but we could come to another era where retry to use stop global warming and it all could change with a
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2016 8:32pm EDT
public, but i am not sure by itself it is enough to sell the public. people know that china is investing. but it is remote to say we want to be number one. my thought is, and what i am saying in this book is want to see to the people who are elected leaders. i feel many of us could be leaders if we are holding office or not. i am trying to be a thought leader. what i am trying to say is we need a vision about mobility. mobility is so essential. you talk about transportation as a circulartory system of the nation. we have to be able to move goods, ourselves, good where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically to talk about catching up or getting into the lead as we compete with other countries. but we have to continue to be the land of opportunity. i say we have gone from the land of opportunity to being the state of malaise. we have to get that back. this is all about building the middle class, restoring the middle class and reducing inequality. one of the things that keep people poor is they cannot get to jobs. we have to make things affordable and
CSPAN
Jun 22, 2015 12:00am EDT
different as china, turkey, afghanistan, the united states, the middle east and north africa going through various instances of saying enough and when i mentioned china i think they were detained and five remain in detention because of the feminist protest. in afghanistan she is lynched for her views even though according to the traditions they say to the men most importantly no weatherman will touch her in reference to a woman that is raped and murdered and here in the united states in response to the police brutality we saw three women who after the murder of trayvon martin started the hash tag #blacklivesmatter. be they women of the middle east or the u.s. commanded the example women in india and hundreds and thousands protested. and there's the issue of women of color speaking out because i think that is historically in silence to the combination of things don't talk about these because it's going to make us look bad or because they give ammunition to the races to use against men so we have a double burden to bear and that is for the middle east and everywhere but these are the reasons
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2016 11:32pm EDT
public. people know that china is investing a great deal and that japan had already invested and it's part of their rebuilding after world war ii. but it is a little remote just to say that we want to be number one on rankings and indicators of it does not translate to things and improve people's lives. some i thought is that what i'm saying in this book and want to say to the people who are elected leaders, i feel many of us can be leaders whether we are holding office at the moment or not. i'm trying to be a thought leader here. what i'm trying to say to them in "move" is that we need mobility. mobility is so essential a new talk about transportation as a circulatory system, we have to be able to move goods, we have to be able to move ourselves so we have to get where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically to talk about catching up for getting into the lead as we compete with other countries. but we also have to continue to be the land of opportunity. i say we have gone from the land of opportunity to the state of delays. but we have to get th
CSPAN
May 24, 2015 9:00pm EDT
future to recite imagination entreprenuers are dreaming up but you mentioned both china and in japan now china is one belts of one road initiative where they try to bring up to date the old silk road that is all about trade in to participate in the global economy. but i was recently in japan i was on the bullet train with the 50th anniversary. now they'll look at a advanced technology. that is the future. >> guest: in that sense that we can learn from them. but i have been in japan to ride those trains i landed and i had of a colleague of was unsure how we would get there but as i would exit from security we were on the train faster than you could get any city in the united states to downtown. and seamlessly it is impressive when i found out the bullet train only an average deviated from schedule 32 seconds. tell anybody who takes amtrak gone the northeast corridor. >> host: i know. and the president knows this to get it going again and your good friend is very interested. >> guest: i know they are trying but i tell a great story about amtrak getting the government regulators to be littl
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2016 10:18pm EST
influences. if this is a new case where china and china slow down precipitates a greater slowdown in the east asian industry and that translates to the united states that would be effective. >> host: has the legislation of 2008 important for stabilization of the economy? >> guest: so i think there are many aspects of the legislative response. the first one, the first big wan was the araa, the american recovery and reinvestment act implemented in 2009. that was a big counter cycle move. i would say that is one thing that pushed the economy in the right direction. that was early on and most affects of that have petered out. but i think that mitigated a lot of the pain and suffering that could have occurred. the other legislation that was passed, i think, have more long-lasting implications and that includes the dodd-frank legislation regarding the bank of legislation. so that is important over the longer term in so far as it really -- it reduces the incentives for banks to over over-leverage. that is borrow up lots amounts and only putting in shareholders money and borrowing up with the sh
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2014 9:11pm EDT
how we can do just that. >> host: the trade gap with china has resulted in cheaper consumer products for everybody and i guess that's a good thing but it certainly hasn't helped the american manufacturing. you almost never hear anybody complain about that. why? >> guest: well because most people have lost their jobs or are getting lower paying jobs. a small percentage, relatively small percentage of americans are participating in manufacturing. certainly substantially less than it was before so if you are a professional or someone who works in the service industry and you are looking at getting something for a substantially lower price because it's been manufactured overseas you are happy to go to walmart but as you know tucker walmart is now very focused on the ad campaign for the last year almost talking about how they are trained to moving back to america to try to encourage manufacturing here in this country. i think even those who have benefited like walmart from this globalization and having these products made overseas, see the benefits of having these products made h
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2014 12:00am EDT
economy in the world that we have been since the 1870s. we are going to lose it soon because china -- >> host: china is a mess though, too. >> guest: but they are growing at six to 7%. how much are we growing? >> host: two to three, right. >> guest: they aren't going to pass us up however i don't think they are going to become the same kind -- look at the bang in the system. >> host: there's a lot of problems they are going to face. >> guest: however, here's the issue. they are already talking about it. russia is talking and some other nations about creating the basket or in the instance of the u.s. dollar being the basis it would be a hodgepodge of things. what would you do to s.? is what rob us or deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the kind of debt that we have? stop and think about that for a moment. >> host: with the ask about risk. you took my political correctness in here. and i look a got the last 30 yed i think when i grow up we have more honeshadmore honest discuse 70s out race and we do today. we are actually a
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2014 10:43pm EDT
context of missing control. over china all of a sudden the spacecraft starts spinning. the first day he thinks, well, that's his gyro. one choice. so then they started fighting this. they immediately suspected it was the regina and fall. and so anyway, getting greater and greater. got to the point where there were almost 400 revolutions a minute and all ready to pass out . plant to make the decision to get off of that when there were going to pass out. and they did. he made it. order to get enough rocket power to get off of that he had to fire the a section of his return rocket. to return sections. then the body. so he fired the eight banks, got it under control and un document. as soon as the hon gotten everything they thought well , that's it. they start spending again. then he realized it was joined by eight. they kept turning off. they got down, found the culprit. some mistakes in my mind. so anyway kidded under control. bleated so that next opporunity. the next engine and the is way out in the middle of the pacific. for under miles off of okinawa. had to come and over china. so you
CSPAN
May 11, 2014 12:00pm EDT
some bad affects in china, no doubt about that. really complicated issues. as you can probably tell, the way i am rambling around, it's one i have not thought about enough. thank you. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. [applause] >> you can purchase books, and we will have a signing here. [inaudible conversations] >> well, thank you. [inaudible conversations] >> should be handled differently , but i have a general philosophy. its starts with the basic premise that i approach everything with, which is economic freedom. here is my guiding principle. come to buy from that comes four factors. one, does the commission had authority to act on a particular issue? what has congress given us and statute? is it harmful to consumers? should -- is the solution tailored in a particular problem that we are addressing and not regulate by analogy? fourth, even with all those three elements, the benefits of regulation outweigh the costs? hell i am approaching each issue individually. but you tend to take each issue as they come before you. >> new fcc commissioner michael o'reilly monday o
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2016 11:00am EDT
: good question. >> guest: why not buick making cars in china? buick. why not h1b workers question mark these are taking white-collar jobs, these are taking kids jobs. it's not just taking your nanny job anymore. how about a little time on that? >> host: one of the reasons perhaps because trump continues the conversation and respond to every question posed to him. eventually he turns the conversation back to himself and your hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign based on what you believe or what you might do, you want to run a campaign that's a referendum on doldrums character so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> guest: what you mean? >> host: why would you help hillary clinton by talking about yourself? >> guest: why isn't he talking about her correction? >> host: if i'm elected, this is what america will look like. that's not the point. the point is if elected, everyone else says this is what we hear. >> guest: not exactly right. the close that we buy in america are made of america, it's like three percent on i belie
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2014 12:00pm EDT
out of contact with mission control at the mayor over china on the other side of earth and all the sadness spacecraft starts spinning and he brings it to neil's attention. first he thinks that is his side, so he checked his and his were showing them in a day. so they started fighting this. so immediately suspect they would not follow. so anyway, the speech kept getting greater and greater and it got to the point they were almost like 400 revolutions a minute and they were all about ready to pass out. so neil had to make that vision to get off of that at jena where they are going to pass out and they are dead. so he made it and in order to get enough rocket power to get off of that spinning at jena, he had to fire the a section of his return rockets. he had two sections of return rockets for reentry. they had ebay. so he fired a big, got it under control and i'm not private. as soon as day on talk, they thought that did. they started spinning again. so then he realized he was gemini eight i'm a cat turning off and they got down upon the culprit. and i think it sticks in my mind. it
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 10:00pm EDT
you talk about the close relationship to china telecommunications industry and the government i think it's worth noting years ago when news came about the warrantless wiretapping under the bush administration many groups sued but down the government had given immunity to the telecoms. i think that will be changing. we we are going to take a break. i'm really interested when we come back, you talk about things like whether in addition to health and education, important fields where you pause more information that the future will benefit all of us. we will take a short break and we will be right back. >> host: patrick you write in your book in many ways we are moving backward on the issue of climate change. can you talk about back? >> guest: so in many ways climate research is a real bright spot in the area of analysis but as we learn more about the climate and the information that comes -- becomes more more vulnerable to political vagal reese to political forces that change the way we feel about climate change. case in point the interim pencil on climate change. this is an enormo
CSPAN
Mar 9, 2014 9:00pm EDT
control and finish. have a last sentence. >> guest: i was just going to say that china right now is a very good example of a country described by china scholars as, you know, strong sense of superiority with massive dose of -- we have been humiliated by the west, so that's a nice boil for us, and we'll see what happens. >> host: amy chua, jed rubenfeld, thank you for joining us to talk about "the triple package. >> guest: thank you so much. >> that was "after words," booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, legislators and others familiar with their material. after words with air as every weekend on booktv at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on "after words" in the booktv series and top you cans list on the upper -- topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> here is a look at some books that are being published this week: got to talk about the update of the addition of their book the new digital age in which
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 10:00pm EDT
19th century and china and india are leaving right now. leaving the extended family to take care of him worked only by enslaving the young. young women supervise the care and on top of that his sons. imagine reaching they are waiting to inherit your lab. the economic progress of the world occurs because it gives people freedom. they can work where they want and live where they want to marry whom they want. they live to the cities i'm often take different lines of work. they often leave elders behind and we didn't have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. the india china and korea don't either and what we have decided medicine will take care of it. >> host: just turned over to health care and they will fix and take care of entry. >> guest: my dad was having trouble with memory or he is fought -- having falls in the home. let's taken to the doctor and what happens quickly take them to the doctor and say we like fixing problems. we have a procedure we can do for that, therapy we can offer. sometimes we can't make them go away and we throw up our hands. and we
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2015 9:00pm EDT
-backed securities in china thinking they would start learning about this. >> host: it's one of the downsides of this global connected system that we have a further central bank of china to be worried about fannie and freddie don't have enough capital. we want to make sure that the securities are protected. so this makes the security seemed safer than having the requirement to pay the dividend with money they may not have. >> host: you mentioned they were showing signs that they were starting to get better again. we know the government said the reason they did it. what do you think was the reason? >> guest: you know, this is the subject of the lawsuit, and there could be things that come out on both sides that are interesting and i almost hope it goes to trial as i think it will be a fascinating insight into the workings of the government. as well as fannie and freddie. but it is hard to see that the government didn't understand the two companies were about to become profitable. they had investors and they were tallying them and and there have been interesting stuff that had come ou
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 11:00am EST
19 century. it's what your pet in 19 century. it's what china, korea and india are leaving right now, and why. the breakup of the extende extem taking their selection is occurring because that works only by enslaving the young. young women to provide the care, and then on top of it isn't something imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit your land. having the economic future still dependent on your data. the economic progress of the world occurs because you give young people from they can work with you, live what they want and marry whom they want to be moved to the city for often they take different lines of work. the often leave the elderly, the elders behind. we didn't have a plan in the 19 century for what happens to people left behind india, china, korea don't either. and what we have decided medicine will take care of it. host lecture turned over to the health care and they will fix and take care of and treat. >> guest: my grandfather, my dad is having trouble with memory or he's having falls in the home. let's take them to the doctor and the doctor will fix that. we
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 12:30am EDT
lose it soon. >> china is the mass. >> but how much are we growing? so they will not pass this up but i don't believe but however they already talk about it about creating a basket currency. so with u.s. dollar as the basis it is a hodgepodge. that will deplete us from the ability to print money. >> but me ask you. but there were more issues is the '70s but we are afraid of something happens or tax the president to say we will have a real conversation very soon? we don't. there is some fear. do you believe sense of. >> but i do think that people are very much influenced by their perception. for instance a somebody told you cousins but somebody is always looking for racism. no matter what you say to them. >> have you experienced it? >> i am sure there has been some but it rarely has not been a big factor for me. i have more important things to do. in choice. >> i don't think it has hurt me or benefit me. particularly in the profession and spent my whole life in, i fully recognize early in my career , i would come into the room. >> bay you entered of field that it is the perfect pla
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2016 10:00pm EDT
. >> why not buick making cars in china now, buick, why not h1v workers. these are taken white-collar jobs, they're taking your kid's jobs. why not time on that? >> trump continues the conversation and responds to every question posed to him and turns the conversation back to himself. if you're a hillary clinton and you don't want to run a campaign on what you believe or who you're taking money from, you want to run a campaign that's referendum on donald trump's character and so if you're donald trump, why would you continue to keep that conversation alive? >> what do you mean? >> why wouldn't you turn the issue -- exactly right. or about what he believes, if i'm elected, this is what this is way it will be. >> that's exactly right. you know what percentage of clothe that is we buy in america are made in america? 3%. >> i believe it. he wants to change it so that your ties will be made here. >> you follow the stuff as close as anybody and you're clearly, you have emotional skin in the game and if you watch trump go off meanl, do you call him, do you call people on his campaign. >> no,
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 8:57pm EDT
great wall of china beyond which options couldn't move. as long as the republicans have the house, senate, or governor from 1994 until 2009 there is no tax increase in american history. it was the longest time in american history with no tax increase. it was when when they are all democrats in 1993 on that in 2009 when they passed a tax increase, all democratic votes. that period was the longest. without the tax increase, as soon as republicans got control the house no tax increase again. the reason why say no tax increases is to force a discussion about spending reform and government reform. if tax increases are an option government never reforms itself. all the things we have been doing, some smart some stupid, we just keep doing those. it's like a ship that just keeps it cumulative barnacles. there's never an effort to decide whether some of the stuff doesn't work anymore. the pledge is what force the sequester and the spending cap that we live under for the next ten years. because because of that, people who care deeply about national defense art talking about calvert's legisl
CSPAN
May 4, 2014 9:00pm EDT
we cannot be expected to compete with the japanese. we hear this about china. they are poor and selectiveness and don't have our standard of living. now tokyo has much higher standards of detroit did or has. and we want to say the wave of the future is wind mills and green energy but the market isn't moving that way so we need whitehouse, congress, and department of energy to push capital in the right direction. talk to me about wind mills and whatever the new trends in green energy are. and i say this as someone who admires green energy. there is an oil refinery in texas that runs on wind. no people lots of wind. western pennsylvania, the gas wells pumping the gas from the fracked wells run on solar. talk about ilan musk as well. >> guest: the last section is written about the people seeking the subsidies. with world war one and two we learned the wrong lesson. the budget declined by 50%. in world war down from 73% to 25% cut. so it wasn't a state directed recovery. it was a private directed recovery. we come out with the wrong lessons. and in the '70s, we had an energy crisis.
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2014 9:00pm EST
depended on hacker culture and that meant whether it is china, india, europe, the middle east developed a system whereby the small comprising 5% of the population took away the surplus of the produce grown by the peasants and kept them at a subsistence level in the poverty and degradation and used the wealth that they have taken to fund their civilization project. this could only have been done by force. they somehow had to be subdued as did 90% of the population. for 5,000 years they were kept in distress and anger. now historians tell us that without this terrible system we probably wouldn't have developed beyond the primitive level as a species because the system supported the class with the people that had a measure to explore the arts and sciences on which the civilization depended. plus, when you are economy is based on a culture, the only way that you can increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and presence. consequentially it became essential to the economy and it was the only way for the economy to grow and plunder and it was essential to supporting the ari
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2016 10:00pm EST
china and discovered his door was jammed and got a driver to help him jimmy the door. a passerby saw it, thought something was skew, and the police came and discovered it was professor gates home but there was talk and tension. professor gates was lured, if you believe that story, which i think he is telling the truth of course, on to his porch and then arrested. the president said this is my friends. and he said he acted stupidly and when he said that it caused an entire week of controversy. professor gates and the arresting officer were brought to the white house with vice president joe biden and president obama for what was dubbed a beer summit to resolve the broader structural issues. that set the tone for the president's engagement with race. it is controlled and as rare as possible. >> host: that moment was a foreshadowing of things to come. he spoke the conversation of racial profiling and toward the end of the term we had treyvon martin could have been his son. talk about the relationship and that link through your book. you talk about martin and ferguson and talk about the i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2014 8:00pm EST
been. we are going to lose it soon. >> host: china? they are a mess, too. >> guest: but they are growing at 67%. how much are we growing? they will pass us up but i don't believe they will be the same force. look at their banking system. >> host: there is a lot of problems they will face. >> guest: russia is talking about it and other nations are talking about creating a basket currency so instead of the u.s. dollar being the bases it will be a hodgepodge. it will rob us or deplete us from the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have the debt we have? stop and think about that. >> host: let me ask you about race. you talk about political correctness and i look at the last 30 years and think when i grew up in the '70s we had more discussions about race. where we are afraid to have conversations now. something happens and attacked the president and we sigh say we are going to have a real conversation about race. do you believe there are people against the president because of the color of his skin? >> guest: i think some people but i don't think
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 9:00pm EST
are multiracial and china imagined what the post-segregated america could look like. so after the civil rights revolution begins to dismantle the walls that have mandated the segregation you still have to imagine what that the post-segregated future is going to look like so the spiral collective new york city that becomes the core group that launches protests in new york city in the 60s and the 70s to get into the halls of the institutions of the visibility. then we move into the 80s which becomes an era of the rise of the multiculturalism as an avant-garde independent backlash that we see coming from conservatives both i would say cultural conservatives both liberal cultural conservatives as well as conservative cultural conservatives. folks who are democrats and republicans in other words who are against the notion that there could be more than one way of understanding how to become an american and so how to radical they thought that america had always made up the multicultural and people could have all these different ways of living and being handed that in exchange is what mad
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2014 8:59pm EST
civilization, whether china, india, europe, the middle east developed a system whereby a small aristocracy comprising at most 5 percent of the population took away the progress grown by the presence and kept them at subsistence level and used his wealth that they had taken to fund their civilization projects. this could only only have been done by force. they had this peasantry subdued. subdued. some 90 percent of the population throughout 5,000 years were kept in distress and anger. now, as historians tell us, without this terrible system we would probably not have developed beyond a primitive level as a species because the system supported a privileged caste with the people had the leisure to explore the arts and sciences, plus when your a economy is based upon agriculture, the only way that you can, if you like, like, increase your gross national product is by acquiring more land and more peasants to farm it. consequently warfare became essential to the economy. plunder was also essential to supporting the aristocratic lifestyle. that, of course, because we are meaning seeking creatures
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2016 9:00pm EDT
security threat that the u.s. faces now don't competely packaged and, oh, it's russia or, it's china, or, oh, it's germany and you can tell they're coming because there are whole bunch of people wearing uniforms driving tanks. that increasingly we're facing these threats that cross borders, that may not have anything to do with the formal decisions made by states or their militaries. we have these loosely organized networks. we have cyberthreats and so forth, and they don't look like what we normally think of as crime because sometimes these are threats that can cause death or destruction on a scale that historically is associated with the use of military force by states. but they don't look like war, either. and if you decide that you're going to -- the problem is, one way to put it would be to say we have a world in which there are threats along the whole continuum, from the traditional state on state armed conflict at one end of the continuum. at the other other end we have stuff that looks like individual crime. a guy drives a truck through a crowded nice. so we have threats that are
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2014 9:55pm EDT
you believe that? china is en masse. >> guest: they are a mess but growing at 67%. how much are we growing? so they are going to pass us up however i don't believe they are going to become the same kind of force. look at their banking system. >> host: there were a lot of problems they are going to face? >> guest: however here's the issue. they are are you talking about in russia's started talking about it about creating a basket economy so instead of in the u.s. dollar will be hodgepodge of things. what will that do to us? it will rob us or to plead us of the ability to print money. what happens when you can't print money and you have that kind of debt that we have? stop and think about that for a moment. >> host: let me ask you about race. you talk about political correctness and i look at the last 30 years and i think when i grew up we had more honest discussions in the 70s about race than we do today. we are actually afraid to have a conversation. something happens, somebody attacks the president and we say we are going to have a real conversation about race and then we don't. l
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2015 10:52pm EDT
part of the other countries particularly china. so i think you have to be very careful that you structure it as a level playing field and you do a consistent with the trade laws that are in place and the limitation of what those countries can do to favor manufacturing of one country over another. host: you don't it mention immigration in the book, if you persistently high on unemployment you have usually don't have a labor shorter, why would you import 1 million low-wage workers from other countries into our country every year? how does that help? guest: i do talk about the importance of having a trained labor force but you're right, certainly with illegal immigration, illegal immigration is anything that we would do in my opinion that would solve the problem of illegal immigration by bringing in any form of amnesty to these workers will flood label markets in this country with more low-wage workers. we have an immigration policy that is today fairly generous immigration policy and we need to in examine that policy and see how it impacts the american worker, where we are bringin
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2013 10:00pm EST
. >> host: all right. that begs to question, is he, like other democrats, was haunted by the who lost china? >> guest: yes. >> host: under his presidency, who lost laos? >> guest: yes. >> host: him being a cold warrior, strong missile defense, ran on the missile gap in 1960 even though there was no gap and eisenhower was not happy about it, committed the first ground troops into southeast asia, is that, you know, the what-ifs are that kennedy would not have gone into vietnam in the way that lbj did and nixon did, but although nixon then, you know, went through vietnam, withdrew forces, but would kennedy -- would you know about him as anti-communist and not one to lose in other countries to communism, would he have also gone and jumped in with both feet? >> guest: i examine the question at length. i have great interest in it. here's the conclusion. kennedy zephyrs some of the length for vietnam. you can't exonerate him. he put a lot of advisers and troops there under cover. >> host: what? 16,000? 17,000? >> guest: right. he started the trend. here's why i believe he never did what johnson di
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2016 9:00pm EDT
time discussing this? why not make cars in china now and each of the workers seeking white-collar jobs. >> one of the reasons perhaps he continues a conversation posed to him and he sees it turned back to himself. you don't want to run a campaign on what you can do or take the money from. you want to run a campaign that is a referendum on the character and so if you are donald trump y. but you continue to keep that conversation a life? why would you help hillary clinton by talking about your self -- >> guest: >> host: if i'm elected this is what america will look like. >> guest: the clothes that we buy in america made america are 3%. that's the whole point he wants to change it so that your ties will be made here. >> host: when you watch them on television and you think he goes off message and i'm sure you feel the way, do you call people on his campaign -- >> no, i tweet. >> host: do you think he listens? >> guest: sometimes a full-fledged clarification like after the visa debate, he absolutely listens and is a quick study. he is going in the direction we want to go. they kept at
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2016 10:30am EST
canadians would export it to china. it is not that big a deal. >> the greenhouse atmosphere will have any the way. >> less canada changes its policies, the same. >> thank you, i really enjoyed the conversation and congratulations on the book. >> c-span, where history unfolds daily. in 1979 c-span was created as a public service by america's cable television company that is brought to you today by your cable or satellite provider. >> a ton of things happening constantly that are affecting our politics and the ways things get changed in this country, there are many ways things get changed. my favorite example is in new york everybody is familiar with governor andrew cuomo and how hard andrew cuomo fought against raising the minimum wage up to the moment he decided he wanted to take credit for it. >> it wasn't his idea? >> it
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2015 12:00am EST
china to put pressure on the soviets, and for the sake of that you may have to make compromises with say the pakistani government, if you have no other concerns you might not make. i think any judgment you make about form policy has to be done, not on a case-by-case basis but in a strategic framework. in his his early writing and i do talk about in the book he says it is in the nature of statesmanship that you have to make choices and you are free to make these choices. their choices between evil and the challenges to decide what the lesser of two evils is. kissinger says this is their right from the very earliest writing. that is the problem, that is the choice that there is sometimes no good options. there there are just evils that you have to choose between. >> all that is persuasive but i would put that in a real policy camp in the sense of seeking stability for the sake of peace, or not annihilation. having to look the other way on the repression on pakistan or his decision and joint decision on the bombing of cambodia. or something you do engage some of this in the book, his ro
CSPAN
Oct 16, 2016 12:00pm EDT
haiti. i spoke four years learning mandarin, shouldn't i be worked in china? the administration said, no, it's most important, it is our priority that we fully staff the embassy in baghdad and there was a lot of discussion, some of it became public as i mentioned in the chapter and yet the evidence from the cables suggest that officers went willingly wholeheartedly, energyically and established impressive things even without knowledge of arabic, i have been without in-depth knowledge of the region but given the tools that they were given, improvising and being creative and getting out trying to relate to people and i think it's one of public diplomacies success stories and i understand it's hard to talk about the -- use the word success in iraq in the same sentence because things are still so very much up in the air, but the cables suggest a trajectory of officers who answer the call, were loyal, served and accomplished impressive things. >> you mentioned the assistant secretary of state for educational cultural affairs at the time and then you also mentioned embassador adam -- >> yes. >
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