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CSPAN
Jan 24, 2016 12:00pm EST
ended at the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china. the book is called tran 11 -- "one child." first i think it would be helpful to find for people what we are talking about. so what is china's one child policy? >> one child policy is really a misnomer. it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and illustrations that china has placed to regulate the population. theoretically you could more likely call it 1.5 child for a long time and of course the two child policy. in reality with regulations. >> not one not particularly, but a basket of these. when did it happen? when did it begin? >> 1979, 1980 when the communist party supposedly took members saying we are raising everybody to move to one child family. it was really telling. >> people sometimes imagine the policy that would've gone into effect under chairman mao, but it went to affect under xiaoping. what was going on at the time it was so important people imagine they needed the safety of a policy level? >> now had passed away. china had come off the cultural revolution. people are poor and als
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 9:54pm EST
, mei fong joins us on afterward to talk about her book, "one child: the story of china's most radical experiment" about the one child policy in china and its impact on the country. this is about one hour. >> mei fong, welcome to "after words". you just published your first book. it's a remarkable book. i enjoyed it immensely. it's the subject of a lot of discussion. the book is called "one child: the story of china's most radical experiment". in a minute we will talk about why you chose this subject and how you went about answering the questions on your mind. first i think it would be helpful to define for people what it is we are actually talking about. what is china's one child policy? >> evan, the the one child policy is really a bit of in misnomer. it's a name we used to describe a set of rules that china has used to regulate the population. theoretically, you could lightly call at 1.5 child five child for a long time. now they have moved it to a two child policy, but it's laws and regulations. >> it's not one law, but a basket of policies. >> that's right. >> when did it happen?
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2016 10:00pm EST
first book it is the subject of long debate your book is called "one child" the story of china's most radical expeeriment" we will talk like you chose the subject tonight answer the questions but first it is helpful to define for people what we are talking about. what is the one child policy? >> it is a misnomer of we use to set up a set of rules are restrictions -- restrictions china placed. you could call it 1.five so with a lot of regulations stick like a basket of policies? when did that go into effect >> with a 1979 but i seek the 1980 with a communist party we are inviting everybody to move to though one child family. civics of people imagine this is the palaces -- policy now but it actually went under effect before. why did they think they needed this? that was a cultural revolution and. and the population was growing with a significant worry that the population wed overwhelm and therefore to do something spinach you compare though one child policy to a crash diet that was the gun for the reasons that have merit. was the rationale? what was the goal? >> for economic reasons chi
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 9:00pm EDT
: it's just beginning to converge with the nascent moment in china and now also beginning to converge in the automated transfer logistics and turn it so they are expanding to the free internet committee energy internet, the automated logistics contract created a super internet called the internet of things and these are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data so we have the sense is now conducting the resource flows feeding the data from the production lines, warehouses by distribution centers have the sensors on the smart roads that are conducting the grid. we have sensors connecting vehicles and offices. that data coming in across the economies of these internet communications, energy, internet and logistics internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. by 2030 perhaps 112 yen sensors and i know later on we will talk about the questions of privacy and data security so it is exhilarating and frightening at the same time. there's a lot of possibilities enabled of challenges that what is interes
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2014 11:01pm EDT
. her think it's an important book. is going to bring back this idea of the balanced budget. and china to show the balanced budget as a very, very powerful country which they held a preponderance of power and global affairs. it's timely and important. of smoke and no one there to be well about this. attend to the more hawkish on public spending and some of my other colleagues. this is definitely something which is being talked about. >> brothers speaking, growth verses austerity. is a very useful way? >> is slightly crazy way. the argument about growth which was a very new argument. only in the 60's, and it was lyndon johnson, j. f. k. to the end of his brief, tragic tenure, the service saying, mission now worry about balancing the budget. confronted deficit we would get more growth. it's kind of circular of me run a deficit more so looking dude more growth. a pair of the dead. it's a circular argument. he did not really hearing until the early 60's which is one i make in the book. it is associated with the name of cannes. but he himself realized that debt spending was an exceptional t
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2014 10:00pm EDT
can't be sure but she was a pioneer in her own right lou henry hoover. they wanted china for a couple of years and eventually hoover use london as his base during his mining career which took them up to world war i. he became successful and traveled all over the world and went to places like wermuth, china and australia and so forth and had a great success in that first career. >> we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point getting minerals out of the ground and growing the economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard. your child is the best-educated speaking of hoover in the area studied with masters at stanford and also hoover was it was that the best paid young man of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer at this time. he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2014 1:00am EDT
conservatives. >> talk about china earlier to describe america's banker? and you talk about the rhetoric from politicians and mitt romney in shaming from china that never happened also economic nationalism. >> guest: it has always been of seem like pat buchanan talk about this. but look at the 19th century as a protectionist country you can argue if it is the right thing or the wrong thing but for someone to describe to me the american industrial base was built in that was what happened so the argument on the right has been the economic nationalism. and it is not just about economic nationalism but a level playing field if i could china and have to pay 15% to get my goods into china but to export you get a 50 percent subsidy so that trade argument is about equalizing. again it is always more complicated the way he is portrayed by he saved hall the davidson in the early '80s people would remember. and harley-davidson was going bust. he slashed the tires from the japanese motorbikes and saved the industry. >> what is the effect. >> the problem is the demand for the chinese goods you could stop
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2016 8:00pm EDT
teefor . . . i think it would be helpful to define what we are walking about. what is china's one-child policy? >> guest: the one-child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it is a name we use to describe a set of rules, restrictions, that china has placed to regulate family population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child and ten it moved to a two-child policy. >> host: it is not one law but a basket of policies. >> guest: that is right. >> host: when did it happen? when did it go into effect? >> guest: i say 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter to the members saying we are adviceing everyone to move to a one-child family. -- advise. >> host: you are saying this went under effect under ping. what was going on in china that was so important that people imagined they needed an idea of the policy like this? >> mao had just passed away and the population was growing. there was a worry that china's population was going to overwhelm the showers and there wouldn't be enough to go around and they really need today do something. >> host: you writ
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2016 12:00am EDT
it immensely. it is the subject of a lot of discussion these days among china analyst. the book is called one child, the story of china's most radical experiment. an amendment we will talk about why you chose the subject and how you went about answering the question that were on your mind. first i think would be helpful to define for people what it is we're actually talking about. what is china's one child policy question. >> guest: the one child policy is a bit of an it misnomer. it was used to describe a set of rules and restrictions that china has placed to regulate the population and the size of the family. theoretically you could call it 1.5 child for a long time. now they they have moved it to a two child policy. it just means regulations. >> host: it is not one law and particularly but a basket of policies? when did did it happen and going to a effect? >> guest: 1980 when the communist party sent out an letter saying we are advising everybody to move to a one child family. it was advised but it was really telling. >> host: people think this is the same kind of policy that wa
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2016 12:00am EST
discontinued one china policy and its impact on the country and talks about her book the story of china's most radical experiment with ethanol snowe's office of the national book award-winning age of ambition. >> mei fong, welcome to "after words." you published your first book and i end joyed immensely. it's the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts. the book is one child at the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and how you went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about so what is china's one child policy? >> guest: the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer. it's just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions china has placed to regulate the population and the size of the family. theoretically you could collect 1.5 child for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy. but it's a lot of regulations. >> so it's not one law but a sort of basket of policies. when did it happen and
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 6:00pm EST
president of china russia, the united states are powerful people. but they are more constrained in what they can do and therefore i started looking at that and it also coincided with a period. i had been the editor of the foreign-policy as you said. so i was trying to distill what did i learn, what are the important trends that came into my mind as i was trying to summarize the experience. >> host: why don't we stop for a moment and tell me a bit about how you define power because the definition of ual in the book is central to your thesis of how it is declining and it is different from how we talk about power conversationally today. >> guest: right. as you know, power has been discussed in the memorial as many definitions and it can get complex and developed that idea and it has become very but he did. for the buck and conversation is to say that power is the ability of one actor to make all of the others do or stop doing something. and influencing and in powering the influence also is interrelated and influencing the book i used the influence use the influence as the ability to c
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 11:51pm EDT
crisis. think of china, late 1970s. india, 1991. think of asia, 1997. and after that, the countries in regions enacted large structural reforms. as for russia, the man looking into the abyss is vladimir putin and russia is not going to change until he is gone. thank you. [applause] >> okay. the bar will be open after the session is over with. either that or coffee will be offered. thank you for your presentations. we have a few minutes left for questions for the panel. i would -- we have ay here with a microphone. if you could wait or two the microphone so everybody can hear you. if you could just raise your hand, identify yourself briefly, and in the interest of time, if you please ask a question and if possible keep it as short and to the point as possible. so, anyone would like to start? down here. >> sherry from voice of america. dr. wilson said we shouldn't worry too much about china's stock market crash. i'm just wondering, the other experts, do you hold similar view on that? >> i think you do have to worry about it but it's probably for something that my colleague would agree
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2016 9:00pm EST
the country. she talks about the book one child of the story of china's most medical experiment. >> welcome to "after words." you published your first book, remarkable and terrific achievement. i enjoyed it immensely and it is the subject of a lot of discussion among the analysts as you know. the book is called "one child the story of china's most radical experiment and in a minute we will talk about why you chose the subject and went about answering some of the questions on your mind but first i think it would be helpful to define what it is we are talking about. so what is the one child policy? >> the one child policy is a bit of a misnomer it is just a name that we use to describe a set of rules and restrictions to regulate. you could call it 1.5 for a long time and now of course they moved it to a two child policy but in reality, it needs more regulation. >> host: so it is a basket of policies. when did it happen and go into affect? >> 1979 and some people collect 1980 when the communist party sent out an open letter because they think we are advising everybody to move to a
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2016 1:36am EST
an economist is that a bad thing for the united states? >> guest: i don't think it is bad china holds them but i think it would be bad if the rest of the world keeps accumulating treasuries at a rapid pace because it means the united states is accumulating the debt at a rapid pace. one of the big author earth shaking things you don't hear about is china is running down its pile of foreign reserves. that is a sharp break with what happened over the last 15 years. we are getting in some sense what we wanted. the u.s. government with the share of gdp and accumulating debt at a rapid pace and the united states isn't by as many tryin treasuries and then the price of treasuries will be lower and that is the thing with higher interest rates. so many offsets going on at the same time. but if emerging market countries, including china and oil exporters, tend to accumulate further treasuries that will put pressure on the interest rates. and interest rates have been unnaturally low. >> the title of the book is lost decades. what happened in 2008 that empoup -- empowered that ripple. >> gue
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2015 10:54pm EDT
. it's e3 secbaclly timely to have this discussion today because of what's hg bpew ng in china, and of course impth the u.s. stock market. the problems that are causing the meltdown of china's stock market are not limited to china alone, many of the same economic faile mes that h urnt china afft the rest of the worlds. huge debts, corruption, lack of e span3 saren ge, lack ocare the rare ce of law and general lack of economic freedom. as you will lea on from teathas difanusn many mistakes china and others make are always also be in debt by the s led miw stration. we should not be surprised that that our economy is in trouble to and we have lost the particular ability to lead the world out of trouble. which culm se me all of oe m rcrticipants, particularly grat will be talking about. to get us startei hapant impll deliver sdiie rema, he wears many hats and has a wide range of experience in e spade and econdiiic policy and the law. 2001 to 2005, roughly the same thousand fivsome rou3 huly the same time i was at the state department, grant was secretary ocare comiliaerce of national t. a
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 10:45am EDT
the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: tell us about china. where is china in all of this? described as america's banker. you talk about some of the rhetoric from republicans politician, mitt romney talking about naming, sort of shaming china on day one of his presidency, which never happened. he talked about economic nationalism. >> guest: economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat began to talk of this on the fringes of the debate in many ways, but if you look at the 19th century america was the great protectionist country. that's a who struggle fact. we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing. the fact is that someone described to me the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that's just what happened. the argument on the right is very much, has been about, or shared and as you said economic nationalism. and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. if i'm exporting cars to china i would probably have a 15% tariff to get my goods into chi
CSPAN
Jun 15, 2014 12:00pm EDT
information internet is just now beginning to converge with the energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge their fledgling automated transport and logistics. the information internet company energy in her neck, the automated transport and logistics internet creating the internet of things and they are placing centers across the economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data from production line, warehouses, distribution centers. we have sensors on martin, sensors connect to the electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing them in a moment. sensors connecting vehicles and offices and stores it that big data coming in across the economy to these three internet, communication, energy, internet which is its internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now in ibm says in 202,050,000,000,000 sensors connecting everything with everyone. it's exhilarating and challenges. what's interesting fr
CSPAN
Jun 28, 2014 10:00pm EDT
conservatives. >> host: tell us about china. where is china in all this? described as america's banker and you talked about some of the rhetoric from republican politicians and talking about naming and shaming china on day one of his presidency. and you talked with some of the economic nationalism. >> guest: economic nationalism has eyes been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan talk about this and are on the fringes of the debate in many ways. america was the great protectionist country. that's a historical fact and we can argue whether was the right thing or the wrong thing but the fact is that someone described to me the american industrial base was built behind the wall. that's just what happened. the argument on the right very much has been about shaded into as you say economic nationalism. and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's about having a level playing field. if i'm exporting cars into china i'm probably going to have a 15% tariff to get my goods into china for as if i am a chinese exporter you get a 15% subsidy. the loss of trade are about
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2016 10:50pm EST
personal level, many families in china are making decisions. >> i can't let you to go without talking a little bit about what's on everybody's mind which is the chinese economy. you were a wall street journal for a long time. when you look at what's happening in china, do you see a country that is on the prefaces of an economic transformation, a hard landing or do you see a place that is doing something else? >> i see china in a much more challenge economically. in the past it was all low hanging fruit. there were all the things they did that was all easy to do. the gains for very quick and rapid. now this is the hard part, the things they have to do to keep growth. they're going to have to do a lot more with a lot less people. you have to increase productivity. chinese university are pretty bad. that's why we see such a huge flood of graduate students in the american institution. the reason we have smart graduates is not because of the universities, it's because of natural talent. >> i don't see a very hopeful people picture going ahead. i don't know that green societies mixed with vib
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2014 9:00pm EST
criticize them for things we don't china or saudi arabia for. russia is a european country, they are a member of the counsel of europe, and signed on to conventions of agreements where they are supposed to adhere to the norms and china and saudi arabia haven't done that. it is true the u.s. has not been consistent for criticizing russia and not their neighbors and i go into this in the book because they are important partners for the united states at least in the war on terror. i think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. the reset, when it worked, and it hasn't in the last year or two, worked with russia on common interest like iran, missile defense and afghanistan and saying it was a two-track policy and separated from what what the was happening domestically in russia. this has changed in the last year, well the last couple years, since putin has thrown out other u.s. ngo's and we had the acts that banned the adoption of russian children. the u.s. congress, if you look at the entire, again 23-year period that i am look at, hasn't been a sour
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2015 12:00am EST
deal with this? >> what i tried to do is put the issue of china in the narrative of our relations on the presidential election debate agenda for 2016. china wasn't much of an issue in 2012. that romney has a chapter on china in his book, no apology and he brings up we need to be more competitive with china. but there isn't much of a debate. and what i would like to see in 2016 is our media to dominate the issues. if everybody
CSPAN
May 23, 2015 10:02pm EDT
know china has invested a great deal. but it is a little remote to say we want to be number one my thought what i want to say to the people who are elected leaders, many of us can be leaders. i'm trying to be a thought leader. we need a vision about mobility. mobility is so essential. you talk about transportation is a circulatory system. we have to be able to move goods move ourselves to get where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically we also have to continue to be the land of opportunity. we have gone from the land of opportunity to being the state of delay. we have to get that back. this is all about building a middle-class command reducing inequality. one of the things that keeps people poorer is they can't get to jobs. we have to make things affordable and accessible. if we wrap mobility and competitiveness together we have a shot. we should all be starting the conversation and figuring out a way to talk about it. they were never actually called the national defense highway act that everyone the frigid in that way. the space race by its
CSPAN
Apr 6, 2014 9:00pm EDT
an import from china it's hard to know exactly that about $10 million a year into those devices alone after the trade deficit with china because they are made in factories in southern china so they get made in a factory and put on a container ship on long beach and they get assigned a hotel which is $220 it is a $220 import or $250 import from china, but is it really? is anything that we now use really made in any one country? whether it is a t-shirt where cotton comes from one country and the pattern comes from another and thus watches come and then they are assembled, it is assembled in a factory. it isn't clear that $220 or $250 comes from the united states to china because if you break down that phone which a lot of economists have done. there are parts from taiwan and somewhere else and above all intellectual property from the u.s.. but in the world of trade numbers that assume the object has a final substance transformation in one country with no way of breaking any of that down. >> host: i think the retail value when they first came out it was $499. nobody ever paid that
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2016 6:00am EST
have moved to california and outsourced to china and engineers that remain behind are designing products more mexican and off-shore workers and i'm waiting for entrepreneurs to put me back to work and so 40 million born adults, that's a lot of people looking for innovation and super vision and entrepreneurialism to put them back to work and without that, if you dilute resources, slow growth relative to the west of the economy. >> we are facing high inequality, slow wage growth, it seems like it's a natural thick to do is use the tax code to redistribute. that's not what you want to do. >> well, i certainly recognize that as a possibility and maybe useful in some places. if you're a 50-year-old worker who spent your whole life working in one endeavor and trained in that endeavor and you lose your job it'll be awfully hard to get a job so there's cost and we need to be thoughtful about that. and that talent is working inside of institutions like google, like silicon valley which greatly amplify their productivity. those institutions were built very slowly over time through success
CSPAN
Jun 30, 2014 12:02am EDT
a level playing field. so if i am exporting into china i probably have a 15% tariff to get my goods into china whereas if i can expor am asked porter a 15% subsidy so the trade is about equalizing the trading. again these things are always more complicated. ronald reagan is per trade as a great betrayer but he was a [inaudible] people remember all of these flooding america and harley-davidson was going bust and he just slapped a tie here on these japanese motorbikes and so the domestic industry. >> host: if china had been named and shamed in that way would that have just been basic domestic populism? >> guest: the problem is that there is still a massive demand for these chinese goods and you cannot legislate against them. the naming and shaming, you could. this is a greenspan argument. if we imposed here is, we own china and malaysia and the southeast asian industrial base if you like what provide those goods anyway and it wouldn't help the u.s. many factors. that was his argument. but if you look at where china started its run and we mentioned this earlier. in the 1980s it was one
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
just now beginning to converge with the nascent energy internet in europe and now in china and also beginning to converge with a fledgling automated logistics internet so the internet is expanding to three internets read the information internet the automated transport and logistics internet and creating one super and in the net called the internet of things. these three internets are then placing sensors across the entire economic system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting resource flows. we have sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses and distribution centers. we have centers on smart groves connecting electricity grid so we know what the appliances are doing at any moment. we have sensors connectinconnectin connecting vehicles in offices and stores. that big data coming in across the economy to these free internet communication energy internet and the distance internet is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. we now have 14 billion sensors out there now and ibm says in 2020, 50 billion senso
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
1979, china, the rise of deng xiaoping and the beginning of a turn towards the markets and to mao and his cultural revolution. poland as you mentioned the election of the polish pope pope john paul ii in his return to his homeland and the precursor of the solidarity movement. great britain and and the election of margaret thatcher and the tom alt over the british economy that has been really lost as part of the historical narrative of written after thatcher. i'm looking forward to coming back to that a number five of course the one probably the most people think of first when they think of 1979, the iranian revolution the toppling of the shah and the hostage crisis. wow that's an awful lot of ground to cover. let's start with thatcher. there has just been huge outpourings of tributes to thatcher on the occasion of her death. magazine covers revisited. your book takes apart some of the myths of margaret thatcher. >> guest: well i tried to do that. it's always a challenge because you want to show why somebody is worth knowing about in the first place. there have been a lot of revisionis
CSPAN
Jun 29, 2014 9:06pm EDT
they balance the budget and that is what is in the case on china government and it is agreed by both sides the liberals as it was and the conservatives. >> host: you talk about china earlier. where is china and i was interested in the section you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come and if romney in 2012, talking about naming and shaming china as a currency manipulator on the number one. and you talk about the economic nationalism. >> guest: the economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the country that is a fact we can argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing the fact is as someone described it to me the american industrial basis was built on the high tariff war. that is just what happens. and so they put the argument on the right that very much has been about the economic nationalism. and it's not just about economic nationalism but it is about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting the cars into china
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2014 10:00pm EST
criticize russia for doing things that we don't criticize china for. the russians have of course said that russia is a european country. there are a number -- member of the consulate of your been signed off on conventions do agreements where they are supposed to adhere to these norms which of course china hasn't done and saudi arabia hasn't done but it is true that i think the u.s. has in the past not been consistent in the way that it has criticized russia for something should happen to drastically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors in azerbaijan and kazakhstan. you think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. when at work and it hasn't worked so well in the last two years differentiated between working with rush on these common interests like arms control, like iran like missile defense, like afghanistan and saying it was it to track policy in the woods separate what was happening domestically and russia. it has been fairly quiet and reserved in what is happening domestically. this has changed a little bit in the last year since, or
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2014 7:00pm EST
u.s. pursues double standards that we criticize russia for doing things we don't criticize china for saudi arabia. the russians have of course said that rush is a european country. they are a member of the council of europe. they have signed onto conventions into agreements where they are supposed to adhere to the atlantic norms which of course china hasn't done in saudi arabia hasn't done that it is true that i think the u.s. has in the past not been consistent in the way that it has criticize russia for some things that happened domestically and not criticize some of russia's neighbors. i go into this in the book azerbaijan because they are strategic partners for the united states released in the war on terror. i think the obama administration has been pretty skilled at dealing with these issues. the reset when it worked and it hasn't worked so well and the last year or two explicitly differentiated between working with russia on these common interests like arms control them like i ran like missile defense like afghanistan and saying it was a two track policy and it was separated f
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2016 9:00pm EST
i think that the workers say they've moved to california and outsourced to china meanwhile the engineers are designing products and intellectual workers and i'm waiting for them to put me back to work but so are the adults and adult children that a lot of people are looking for innovation and supervision and entrepreneurialism. i think those things can increase wages but they might slow the growth relative to the rest of the economy. >> host: with the slow wage growth it seems like a natural thing to do to redistribute more and give more to the people at the bottom of the economic ladder that's not what you want to do. >> guest: i recognize that as a possibility because i think if you are a 50-year-ol were a 50-r that spent your life working and you've are trained in your endeavor to get a job at the same level you were at we need to be thoughtful about that. but one of my chief concerns is the upside of inequality is the combination of the pool of highly trained, highly motivated talent taking the risks that grow the economy and the talent is working inside of institutions lik
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 8:56pm EST
, what china, china, korea, and india are leaving right now. the breakup of the extended family is occurring because that worked only by enslaving the young young women to provide the care and on top of it his sons imagine reaching your 80s still waiting to inherit your land? having your economic future still dependent upon your dad. the economic the economic progress occurs because you give your people freedom. they moved to the cities, often take different lines of work, leave the elders behind and we did not have a plan in the 19th century for what happens to people left behind. what we have decided medicine we will take care of it. >> turn it over to the healthcare field and they will fix and take care of and treat. it. >> my dad is having trouble with memory or falls in the home. we like fixing problems. but some problems you can't fix. you can make them go away. you can say, well, you can you can try xyz or go see another specialist. and that is the failure of our understanding. there are things to fight for besides just living longer. >> when we go through school it seems li
CSPAN
May 31, 2015 10:02am EDT
public jobs but i'm not sure by itself it is enough to sell the public. people now china is investing a great deal that it was part of their rebuilding after world war ii. it's a little remote to say we want to be number one on rankings and indicators. so my thought what i'm saying in this book and want to say to the people elected leaders, many of us can be leaders whether we are holding off for not. i'm trying to be a thought leader here. we need a vision about mobility is so essential. you talk about transportation of the circulatory system of the nation. we have to get where we want to go. about catching up and getting them as we compete with other countries. we have to continue to be the land of opportunity. it is the state but we have to get that back. this is about building the class, restoring the middle class. it is all about reducing inequality bee of the things that keeps people poor if they can't get to jobs. we have to make things affordable for people, accessible for people. if we wrapped mobility and competitiveness together, they have a shot and we should all be starting
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2016 9:00pm EDT
agenda because now that china and india have gone to war the cia is ready to replace the pakistan knees and they were right. they began to support the tibetan resistance and no flight started to come out of india to the chinese. also flights that would only come out of pakistan in 1963 and 64 there would come out secretly firebases in india and it was one of those flights that discovered the chinese are in the final stages to test their first nuclear weapons and to give the united states a crucial intelligence china was on the verge of becoming a nuclear weapon state. >> alleges like to say and ambassador at -- a word about the ambassador john galbraith was a tall man 6-foot 6 inches board ontario canada and a graduate of the ontario school of agriculture and moved to the united states did dkb economist and wrote several books and the star of harvard university. in dkb advisor to kennedy. and he kept the diary in he later published that diary is is a memoir. that whether or not. to say at least we know you actually said that. the diary is a fascinating piece politically unaware and unkn
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 10:47pm EST
the world, explosive economic growth in asia and the rise of china economic rise strategic desire for a larger and more modern military force. my conclusions are overwhelmingly optimistic, and icon to both optimistic conclusions conclusions informed by my experience as prime minister impossible for our nation, nation, australia, to improve its relationship with us and china at the same time. you could only improve the relationship with one at the cost of the relationship with the other. i set out to prove that that was not right. during my time we took a step forward with an alliance with the us and now trained us marines in our northern territory. pres. president obama said he wanted a harsh environment for them to train. i said boy, boy have i got a harsh environment for you. [laughter] they train in 100-degree heat and 90 percent humidity i'm probably not on their list of most liked people, like people, but we took a big step forward in the alliance at the same time we took a big step forward with china one of the few nations on earth to be able to strike such a compact. it is
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2014 12:00am EDT
agreed by both side, both the liberals and the conservatives. >> host: we talk about china. where is china in all this? described as sort of america's banker, and i interested in -- you talked about the rhetoric from republican politics, mitt romney talking about naming -- shaming china as the currency manipulator on day one -- >> guest: never happened. >> host: talked about the economic nationalism -- >> guest: that's right. economic nationalism has always been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan who talk about this, been on the fringes of the debate it if you look at the 19th century, america was the great protectionist country. that's historical. the fact is, as someone described to me, the american industrial base was built behind a high tariff wall. that is just what happened. the argument on the right is very much -- has been about -- or shaded into the, as you say, x actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's also about having a level playing field. so if i'm exporting cars into china, i have 15% tariff to get my goods into china, whereas if i'm a chinese
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2014 4:00pm EDT
about china earlier. where is china in all of this? i will describe america's banker and it's interesting in this section you talk about some of the rhetoric from republican politicians, in 2012 talking about naming and shaming china as a currency from day one of his presidency which never happened and nationalism. let's. >> guest: economic national and has eyes been a theme in america. people like pat buchanan talked about this and they were on the fringes of the debate in many ways but if you look at the 19th century america was the great protectionist country. that's a historical fact. we can argue about whether was the right thing or the wrong thing but the fact is as someone described to me the american industrial base was built, that's just what happened. so the argument on the right is very much, has been about or shaded into as you say economic nationalism and actually it's not just about economic nationalism. it's about having a level playing field so if i'm exporting to china i probably have a 15% tariff to get into china whereas if i make chinese exporter to get a 1
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2013 8:55pm EST
much his verdict on the cultural revolution. a lot of the china scholars at the time still bought into maoism and these ideas. this is one of the reasons why it was so hard for them to understand the reforms going on in china. if you go back to the accounts of the time, a lot of the established china scholars didn't quite get the story. they didn't understand what they were seeing. a lot of them were still wedded to these old images now as china and in some cases they were quite bewildered. >> host: it's an argument for on the ground journalism and observation. one of the people you relied on was a smart raiders diplomat who went out there and beat the pavement as if you were a journalist and in fact interviewed people and wrote down what he saw. >> roger garside who i am happy to say still alive. an absolutely magnificent book that has stood the test of time. some journalists wrote that looks at the time but i would say his is the one that's hard to be precisely because as you say he went out and he was on the ground and he got the story. he saw things very pragmatically without an id
CSPAN
May 25, 2015 12:00am EDT
public i mean. people know that china has invested a great deal and that japan had already invested. it was part of their rebuilding after world war ii but it's a little bit more -- remote just to say we want to be number one on making 10 indicators but if it doesn't translate to things that improve people's lives. so my thought is and what i've been saying in this book and want to say to the people who are elected leaders, i feel many of us could be leaders whether we are holding office or not. i'm trying to be a thought leader here. what i'm trying to say to them in "move" is we need a vision about mobility. mobility is so essential you've talked about transportation is a signatory system of the nation. mobility, we have to be able to move goods. we have to be able to move ourselves and we have to be able to get where we want to go. other countries are moving faster. we can use it metaphorically to talk about catching up or getting into the lead as we compete with other countries but we also have to continue to be the land of opportunity. i say we have gone from a land of opportunity
CSPAN
Apr 5, 2014 10:00pm EDT
registers as an import from china. >> host: williamson. deficit. >> guest: if you have a ipad probably $10 million a year and those devices along. apple devices add to the trade deficit because they are made in factories many of which are in ginsing many of which are in china so they are made in the factory and they show up in a port on long beach and they get a wholesale price which is the price that apple puts on it. it's a 250-dollar import from china but is it really? is anything that we now use really made in any one country where there's a t-shirt or coffee comes from one country in the pattern comes from another and the swatches, and then they are simple. it's clear that the iphone is assembled in a factory in ginsing. it is not clear that $220 or $250 goes from united states to china every time one is bought. if you break on the iphone which the asian development bank is done and the organization for economic cooperation and development have done you find there are parts in germany and parts in korea and parts in taiwan and plastics from somewhere else and parts from a
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2016 10:00pm EDT
and hong kong and old china vs. new china. so it probably isn't of a tax rate so overtime with those capabilities that is why it is a mistake to see what would happen to bill gates? that is and really relevant what about silicon valley to slow the gradual accumulation with those capabilities show me where the tax rate is high. >> kovach to the '50s television has created enormous mass markets turning back with two decades of the great depression me have fallen behind. there were numerous reasons a lot of agriculture into manufacturing. >> but nobody pays 90 percent. but corporate taxes were lower than. that was very circumstantial. going back because of the capital-intensive the large corporations general motors and kodak are very capital intensive. they plan to transfer through you have more restaurants we happen to be in the information intensive area. with more of investment phillip said the large corporation has a difficult time innovating in succeeding for such a large pool. >> but we could come to another era where retry to use stop global warming and it all could change with a
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2014 8:00pm EDT
was actually agreed by both sides. >> host: we talked about china earlier. where is this and it's interesting you talk about some of the rhetoric from the republican politicians come in mitt romney talked about naming and shaming and trying on day number one. he talked about some economic nationalism. >> guest: are people like pat buchanan that talk about this that have been on the fringes of the debate but if you look at the 19th century america was the great country and that is a historical fact. we could argue about whether it was the right thing or the wrong thing to the fact is as someone described to me the american industrial base was built at the height ^-caret war. that is just what happened and so the argument on the right is very much as you said the economic nationalism and actually it's not just about economic nationalism but it's about having a level playing field. so i probably have a 15%. where you get a 15% subsidy and so a lot of the trade argument is about equalizing that playing field. he's portrayed as a betrayer but i think it was a 30% tariff people remember
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2014 12:00am EDT
world to different places like irma china australia and so forth and had a great success with that first career. >> host: we want to stop a minute and think about this. imagine you have a son or daughter and he goes to college and studies that thing that the world needs most at that point, getting minerals out of the ground. a growing economy needs minerals especially when the world is on the gold standard and your child is the best city kid -- educated in that area studied with masters at stanford and also the most -- the best paid young men of his generation and certainly one of the most successful. he wasn't just any success. >> guest: you are quite right. he became the outstanding mining engineer of his time and he was recognized for that. he was earning in 1908 to 1914 in excess of $100,000 a year which was a lot of money in those pre-income tax days but he did to stop there. by the time he was 40 he was a modest millionaire. i'm not a midas or a rockefeller or mellow perhaps that he wanted to do more with his life and having done well in his profession he wanted to do somethi
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2015 1:00am EDT
that china is investing your japan is reeve printing bed to bed of a does not translate or improve people's thoughts so what i say in this book is ideal and the fis could be leaders. i am trying to be a thought leader with the vision of mobility that is so in central to talked-about transportation as a circulatory system, you have to move and get to where we want to go. and choose talked-about to carry into is the lead to but the state that we have to you get that back but read to sing in a quality because the plan for people cannot get the job said we have to make things affordable for people. so this mobility and competitiveness together we have a shot we should start a conversation to figure at a good way to talk about it. the interstate highway, looking at the history there were national called the defense highway act but that is how they were referred to. everybody knew sputnik was about beating russia but the space race by itself was inspiring to astronauts. >> all of those discoveries of people landing on the moon. we don't arouse information about the future and this is suc
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2014 2:39am EDT
converge but the nation's energy internet in europe and now china. and also beginning to converge with a fledgling an automated logistics' the internet. it is expanding into three, information, energy, automated transport or logistics' and creating one super internet of the internet of things. and these three internet seven placing sensors across the system to monitor the flow of data. we have sensors now connecting three source close, sensors feeding data in from production lines, warehouses, distribution centers, sensors on smart roads, sensors that are connecting the electricity grid so that we know what the appliances are doing at any moment, since disconnecting vehicles and offices and stores. that big a data coming in across the economy to these three internets, communications, energy, and logistics' is providing a wealth of data about what goes on at any given moment across the economy. and what this is -- we now have 13 billion censors out there. ibm says in 2020 there will be 50 billion. and by 2013 perhaps 100 trillion sensors connecting everything or anyone. later on we will t
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