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20090604
20171124
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KNTV (NBC) 29
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2017 13
2016 10
2015 6
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
NBC
Dec 25, 2016 5:30am PST
think about? >> china town is always changing. >> do you think the community appreciates it's own history? >> no. one reason is because a whole new population of people that do not know that we're part of that earlier history. >> how difficult is it to be able to show it? >> because of the exclusion, one thing is no one wants to talk about history for so long, it was complicated and there was shame involved. nowadays we appreciate how important it is to all america. >> museu -- what happened with all of this labor and california china became a threat to other parts of the world, to the irish for instance, there was backlash to china. there was act that barred immigration from laborers. >> chinese exclusion act is coming up next. ♪ come on, wake up!!! come on, why ya sleepin'? come on! what time is it? it's go time. come on. let's go, let's go, let's go. woooo hoooo!! yeah!! i feel like i went to bed an hour ago. i'll make the cocoa. get a great offer on the car of your grown-up dreams at the mercedes-benz winter event. it's the look on their faces that make it all worthwhile. th
NBC
Dec 27, 2015 5:30am PST
, they had to go to somewhere to look for workers, they went to china first. >> reporter: the greatest influx of chinese arrived as contractor laborers. they were a cheap labor force. they created a society to provide a support. the social hall temple in cook was built in chinatown. and it also provided aid, friendship and funeral benefits bon death. it was vital and am capitol hill mating thousands to their new home in maui. >> then the japanese came, and finally the filipinos came. >> when you ask somebody about their heritage, it's very common for them to say my grandmother and grandfather came here to work on the sugar plantations, came here to work on the pineapple plantations. >> reporter: these immigrants became the first immigration working for low wages in the sugar and pineapple fields. a sense of community, a sense of pride and prom nancy emerged. bride marriages were arranged so as to perpetuate the families. thousands of women bravely crossed the ocean to meet husbands they had never met. >> my uncle is a farmer. his grandfather was from japan, worked in a plantat
NBC
Sep 13, 2015 5:30am PDT
mid autumn festival is the second largest festival in east asia celebrated by the people of china, vietnam, korea and japan. in the springtime people celebrate with exploding fire crackers and bright flowers to symbolize the release of live energy into nature so in the fall thyme when nature energy is going back and rest noog the ground people celebrate with moon cake, people have festivals at nighttime, children travel to neighborhoods holding lanterns representing the wishes and dreams for the future and families gather togetherdbú and reminisce the harvest of the season. >> we're going to feel a bit of that energy in the studio. we have to let them know that they are going to occupy a small space compared to what they're used to, right? but the children's discovery museum of san jose will present the lantern festival played by the light of the moon september 26 starting at 5:30 at the museum on 181 wass way, mark your calendars now. you can get more information on nbcbayarea.com and you can find out more about all our guests and their iechbts on our website asi"asian pacific a
NBC
Mar 12, 2017 5:30am PDT
human remains back to china. >> for alba where are you right now in terms are you still growing, are you still looking to grow? what's the perspective now? >> we're always looking to grow. what we do is train students as filmmakers we take them from once again zero knowledge up until a really high degree of professionalism in the course of a class and then after that they sort of are in our bull pen and when good projects come our way then we constitute a crew and put a story out there. we try and make two, three movies per year, but we think we could probably do as many as four. >> you're going to join us a little later on to talk about another film. >> that's true i am. >> one of the films from albr handmade textiles and what it reveals about culture and the human experience. that's next. it reveals about cue human experience. that's next. reveals about cultu human experience. that's next. it reveals about cue human experience. that's next. handmade textiles a reveals about culture and the human experience. that's next. (burke) at farmers, we've seen almost everything, so we know h
NBC
Nov 27, 2016 5:30am PST
somewhere to look for workers, and they went to china first. narrator: the greatest influx of chinese arrived as contract laborers. they were a plentiful and cheap labor force. the chinese plantation workers created societies to provide support. the wo hing social hall, temple, and cookhouse was built in chinatown in historic lahaina. it also provided mutual aid, friendship, and funeral benefits upon death. it was vital in acclimating thousands of chinese to their new homes in maui. alan: then the japanese came, the koreans, okinawans, and finally the filipinos came. darren strand: when you ask somebody about their heritage, it's very common for them to say, "oh, my grandma and grandpa came here to work on the sugar plantation," "came here to work on the pineapple plantation." narrator: these issei immigrants became the first generation working for low wages in the sugar and pineapple fields. even in the midst of poverty, a sense of community, a sense of pride, and permanency emerged. picture-bride marriages were arranged so as to perpetuate the traditional japanese family. thousands
NBC
Sep 20, 2015 5:30am PDT
that. and they choose chinese -- china is a major economic superpower. it's only going to get bigger. it's the largest country in the world. it's a natural choice for a lot of families. >> yes. and in fact, it is a choice at least, right? we were talking about how there were required languages. of course, that also makes you resistant to learning. and it shows that global perspective, right? they understand that oh, well, it's not that you need it now. you will need it later. >> right. and the thing i would say to parents is when you're looking at an immersion program -- and smanish immersion is the most chon in the united states. there's probably over 1,000 spanish immersion schools. mandarin, we're up to 200. it's not that i -- you know, i've got two daughters. they both speak chin these. we don't speak chinese at home. it's not that i expect them to become stock brokers in shanghai or work in biotech in singapore. but as parents, it's just about giving them options. >> and familiarity. >> exactly. >> you wrote a book. tell me a little bit about when you write a book like that, wha
NBC
Jan 1, 2017 5:30am PST
first. >> it starts off with where we came from. we came from china and the symbol of china is the dragon. you have the great wall. the people, the men, are the men of province or can tan where most chinese came from. they were farmers, they were laborers. >> that brings us to? >> the second is where you have the man hearing about the lur of gold mountain. and contemplating that he would be leaving his family behind, wife, child, children, who knew when he would see them again. >> searching for a better life? >> yes, so he left. >> so what are we talking on? >> we're walking on railroads. my grandfather came from chinese to work on the railroad. my family always said we have foot in america by working on the railroad. it's an american story how chinese-american society began which is the narrative that i have been focusing on. it's how americans dealt wit immigrants coming to america. this is part of that struggle. the chinese who were excluded and how they became a part of the america. >> it's called painful persist stance. a lot of people think the chinese wanted to be here. >> n
NBC
Jan 29, 2017 5:30am PST
special, we examined san francisco's china town and the evolution of the chinese comunltd. it was based on an exhibit that was about to open. it is now open. in the spirit of the lunar new year, that is the centerpiece of our show today. we start with a look at the exhibit and we'll talk about the significant events that help shape the community, both the exclusion of chinese as well as how the community was able to be included in society. >> and as part of our tribute and the new year spirit, we present a performance from one of our favorite groups, the firebird youth chinese orchestra. young musicians playing traditional chinese instruments. >> when people talk tod me abou our recent special on the chinese commute, they usually bring about one of our special guides around the town. joining me is that guide, sue lee, who also recently took us on a tour of the new exhibit at their museum. >> this is a depiction of a creation of the men's barracks in the detention center, and here in the bay area, we would say it would be the refliction of angel island. you can see the male immigrants' b
NBC
Jul 9, 2017 5:30am PDT
. so we come from china, and the great symbol of china is the dragon. so you've got the dragon, and you have the great wall. and then the people, the men in this frame, are the men of guangdong province, or canton, where most chinese who came in-- 160 years ago came from. and the work that they did there was very difficult. they were farmers. they were laborers. robert: and that brings us to-- sue: the second frame is where you have the man looking or hearing about the lure of gold mountain of america, of california particularly, and contemplating probably that he would be leaving his family behind: his wife, his child, his children. and who knew when he would see them again? and yet, he did leave, because he needed to make a living and make sure that his family would be in good economic--in a good economic situation, and searching for a better life, so he left. robert: historian connie young yu's family was one of those pioneering families. robert: so what are we walking on? connie young yu: we're walking on railroad ties, and i think it's very symbolic, because my great-grandfathe
NBC
Mar 5, 2017 5:30am PST
the great star theater in china town and, of course, we hope dorothy will there. we hope she'll be at the showing too at the new parkway theater when this airs on march 17th. >> maybe she'll dance for us. >> maybe too. >> i'm getting choked up about it all right. rick, thanks for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> rick dancing through life will be screened center stage shorts march 18th at 3:10:00 p.m. at the new parkway theater on four 70 four 24th street in local land. go to nbcbayarea.com for more details. next up dancer la nora lee. stay with us. >> welcome back. one of the highlights of caamfest is expected to be a film "light". joining us is la nora lee who's been a dancer, chore og graph if i for almost 20 years in san francisco, los angeles, and new york. she was an artist fellow at museum, nyu, and currently at dance mission theater. she is known for pushing the envelope of large-scale dance performances. it's great to have you here. >> great to be here. >> tell us a little bit about this film and how does your dance experience sort of play into it? >> sure. this file
NBC
Feb 28, 2016 5:30am PST
years later he resurfaced with these amazing intry candidate models of san francisco china town. what is the name? >> it's a work in progress. we don't have a name right now. the artist's name is frank wong. it's not finished yet but you commit to a forum for him. >> there are so many untold stories. there are so many people who have dynamic stories that people don't know about. it's our mission to make sure that the stories are heard. we're excited to have a work in progre progress. >> would you say the scene is improving? >> i think it's two steps forward, you know, one step back. if you look at the academy awards, you can kind of see there's a lot of backlash because we feel like there's not a lot of communities being represented. i love seeing a lot of communities coming together. the african-american, latino, asian-american and not just ethic communities but lgbt and female film makers coming together and saying that's not right. i love seeing that kind of activism and passion. i hope we move forward with a better media landscape. >> thank you very much. make sure you let us know
NBC
May 14, 2017 5:30am PDT
antique and modern roses, many of which are from china. and we continue our tradition of showcasing artistic and cultural performances with a rising young star from the philippines, who's making a name for herself in the us. mika gorospe sings her new single for us today. well, if there is one topic or issue that is important to every community group, it's water and our precious water resources. and the santa clara valley water district is certainly aware of that. with me right now is nai hsueh, the district five representative on the water district board of directors, a registered civil engineer who was elected to the board after more than three decades with the water district, rising from junior engineer to chief of the capital programs division, and she is known for her passion for the water district services. welcome to the show. nai hsueh: thank you for having me. robert: and quite a success story of your own. nai: thank you very much. robert: give us an idea here, you're having this asian community day. what are some of the things that you want to address to the community? nai
NBC
Aug 30, 2015 5:30am PDT
china town, when the first two china towns burned down, he hired a well known architect who had designed city hall at the time and specified it be made of brick to try to prevent the fires. and the second gentleman, jb james benjamin peckham, who helped immigrant families purchase real estate when it was against the law to do so. he would purchase property in his name, when the oldest child turned 21, he would transfer title back to that family. what i found interesting looking in our paperwork was not many of us would probably trust our 21-year-old with the family property. so at the moment he transferred title to the 21-year-old, he would then have a master lease agreement with parents so that the parents had control. >> he knew what he was doing. >> he did. >> give me an idea in terms of the 125th anniversary, we talked many times on the show about japantown, survival, trying to maintain them. only a few left. give us an idea how to fits in with what they want to do during the celebration time. >> i think to make people aware of japantown and historical buildings that we need
NBC
Dec 4, 2016 5:30am PST
me to this traditional art form was when i go to china oftentimes i see like the beauty of the nature, especially when i visit my hometown. i'm able to see the rice fields and able to see the grapes growing and the lotus inside the ponds and especially i really like it when i get to see like the fish like blow bubbles in the pond. it's really cool. so like when i see the beauty, i just really want to find a way to portray it and i feel like music is a great way to portray the city. that's why i chose to sing folk songs. >> especially the traditional songs, had you? >> yeah. >> how about the song you chose? does it have a connection to what you were talking about? >> it's about my hometown. it's from my hometown and it's chinese name is called -- w in english just means the waves of the lake, and it talks about the harvest of fish and lotus root which is something that we like to eat in our hometown. >> we're looking forward to hearing it. thank you for being here. all right. here she is. she's going to have a chinese folk song about the winter harvest. please enjoy it. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
NBC
Jan 22, 2017 5:30am PST
occasion landmarks like the empress of china chinatown is a culinary destination for cheap eats for tourists. that sent locals to the suburbs to satisfy their palates but chefs want to change the culinary scene including brandon ju with his first michelin star within six months of opening. he's setting a new table for chefs in chinatown serving a new vision on the plate. robert handa gets his take on the food scene. >> how do you view yourself in terms of being part of the renaissance and what you need to do to make chinatown become what it is that everybody is hoping it will be. >> i'm very dedicated to learning more about chinese food. but this is going to be a life long lesson for me. it's something i love about cooking. the learning is endless. for me, this is about getting the conversation started about what products we believe in here in the bay area that express the sense of place here. but also, you know, honor the traditions of my parents, my grandparents and even just, you know, chinese tradition. so it's something that i think just kind of came full circle once i had the
NBC
Mar 6, 2016 5:30am PST
south market, south park, parts of china town. for the 110th anniversary is where it's currently located in the western edition area. so a lot of people are asking why 110? it's an odd number. we did celebrate the centennial ten years, but what we wanted to do this year is because our second generation japanese-american, they're in their late 80s and early 90s. it may be the last significant milestone or celebration for them. we wanted to make it about them. we wouldn't be here without the first and second generation japanese-americans. so this is a special and sentimental one for us. they might not be here for the 115th or definitely not for the 125th. >> yeah. when we hear 110 years, you kind of forget there's are a lot of original businesses operating in japan town. >> definitely. >> so that feeling is definitely not just a historic but a person one, right? >> we were talking a bit about this musical play. some people heard about it. some haven't. the place to be. tell us about that and how it fits into the celebration. >> i can talk about this. >> okay. >> it's a place to be
NBC
Sep 6, 2015 5:30am PDT
by the political situation of china at the time. on the fifth day of the fifth month of the chinese winter calendar, he picked up a large rock, threw himself in the river and protest and to commit suicide. all the villagers raced out, beat the surface of the water with paddles to keep the fish and water spirits from his body and beat drums to scare away spirits as well. that re-enactment each year has given rise to the act of dragon boating. >> and talk about the food involved. >> there's food involved. because this was in the water, they threw rice in in hopes of them eating rice instead of the body. then the spirit said hey, like put it in silk, wrap the rise in silk so i can eat it, too. >> he was hungry. >> so then tradition had it where it evolved into wrapping in lotus leaves. now today we have it in all kinds of variation. we have meat and beans and other things. we all like to eat. >> we brought a couple here wrapped in lotus leaves now. i think everyone loves that this time of year eating these, even when not that festival time. >> best festival involves a lot of food. give
NBC
May 22, 2016 5:30am PDT
was 20 years old, she came from china. he went from southern province to hong kong. in that moment, my mom told me she had cancer, it changed my life forever. since i was little, i remember my mom comforting me when there were bad times. i wanted her to hug me, comfort me when i was little. but i soon realized that i was the one who was comforting her. >> i was not interested at all. i did not want to practice. i did not even want to go to class. one day, while browsing on the internet, i saw a video of a piano piece. i liked it so much, i started to read about the composer. >> well it, was great to have the winners here at the station. now, coming up, we profile a bay area icon, ben fong torres, former editor of "rolling stone magazine." stay with us. >>> i have known about ben fong torres for much of my life. haes been an influence odd moon he's a young music fan, especially in rock and roll, but also as a journalist, his articles and by line caught my eye and attention for many years. i had a chance to work with him as well when we did the tv broadcast of the san francisco chinese n
NBC
Dec 18, 2016 5:30am PST
that duller the cultural revolution in china and the 1960s. the chinese government suppressed that kind of a traditional culture. so -- and a lot of things have been lost. so shen yun wants to bring backseat the rich culture and telling stories of historical characters and what they stand for. for example, one year they had a general and then that stands for loyalty. and also there's a misallegiance and i'm not sure if you heard about the monkey king. and then goes -- these stories reflect braveness and courage and righteousness. so i think that the audience will understand the performance for the universal language of dance music. >> it's interesting because it's not a matter of enplightening audiences who aren't aware. a lot of chinese aren't aware of the aspect of their history and they get to see it in the show. >> we have a lot of chinese audience that in a lot of performance even in china, but in watching shen yun, this is something they've never seen before, it's so pure and free to express all kinds of ideologies, about that they wouldn't performly see in china because of the pr
NBC
Jul 2, 2017 5:30am PDT
. now, in china, the purity of the lotus blossom, you know, growing out of muddy waters, it became a symbol of the incorruptible politician, who remains pure in the middle of all of this muck and mess in politics. and so, it was a very--a favorite symbol of confucian officials in china. robert: so, what flower is next? dany: the next flower is the rose, and it's represented here by this grand mughal floral carpet and this intimate portrait of a mughal indian prince. robert: okay, so you have one big, grand display, and you have one small display. you prefer people to kind of look at the small display first, right? dany: yes, because if we're going to talk about flower power, this display is it. so, in the prince's left hand, he's carrying a rose. it's long been a symbol of love in persian culture, but in this context, it also symbolizes perfection, refinement, and elegance because, if you notice, his right hand is also holding a sword. and so, here we have, again, the flower and the sword. but in this context, it represents the ideal aspects of a ruler. he has both cultural sophistic
NBC
Feb 21, 2016 5:30am PST
francisco's china town that empowered generations of chinese-americans and their families through financial assistance, youth afterschool program, and so much more. we'll talk about their july cup gala. we'll talk about a program that achieved similar success in the community. emq family first started as a small agency in san jose and has grown to a statewide organization offering community-based programs to children in crisis ander that families. we'll show the big events coming up in the community calendar and the pacific exposition. the beauty and culture of the exotic flowers all on our show today. >>> the two agencies we are highlightings on today's show have rich histories of helping people in need. the cameron house carried the name of a woman who saved thousands of chinese girls from servitude and human trafficking. the program started in 1874, and continues to this day growing and expanding. joining me now is the executive director of the house. she's known as a passionate community builder with more than 25 years of experience in a variety of roles spanning the globe. bo
NBC
Dec 6, 2015 5:30am PST
? what do they want the audience to kind of come away with? >> you know, china has a history of 5,000 years, 26th dynasty. a lot of ethnic groups, has really blended culture. unfortunately the culture was lost during the culture revolution and a lot of the heritage, art forms, arts, were persecuted. so the mission of this group is trying to revooive that heritag through pages of history, present them on stage in a grand scale to really share with people of the world what china has to offer. >> in fact, it was interesting that you mentioned that they're actually based out of new york. >> correct. >> i figured they were a traveling troupe, but they are here. definitely they want to bring that culture and make sure it stays alive for the generations here, right? >> correct. >> give me an idea in terms of trying to keep it fresh. you mentioned trying to have something new every year. what do they do to make it different year to year? >> china really -- the long history and the diversity, you know, has so many things. just the classical novels. there are endless stories that you can presen
NBC
Sep 18, 2016 5:30am PDT
idea, you grew up in china town. what do you think of this face lift and how much was it needed? >> i grew up in china town and at that time chinese recreation center was the only recreation center in the neighborhood. we loved it. we have been going not just there for the sports but other community events and everything else, and we all loved it, but obviously there were needed improvements. the gym, the plumbing, heating, things like that needs to be upgraded, needs to be improved. and the community and the rest of us were so happy to final finally -- the city passed that $21 million bond to improve. >> yeah. what are you able to offer now that you couldn't offer before? how much has it expanded not only services there but also opportunities in the community? >> well, i would say with the new rec model, we have expertise in providing programs such as petite bakers, zumba, senior ballroom dance, tai chi, ma jong. >> jimmy, are you going to be able to keep up with the demand? you know, you make a renovation, the population keeps growing. i was actually in china town recently and you g
NBC
Jul 24, 2016 5:30am PDT
development? >> yeah. i'm going to china to do actually -- actually, it's just really for fun. amendo bo is doing a short in china. that tells you how china has become so popular and fashionable as a set. so i will be working with him. he's a really interesting filmmaker. >> that's a good thing in a way. the international perspective, whether movie making or as a backdrop will open up opportunities at least for more asians and chinese americans. what is the future for joan chen as far as you see? what would you like to start maybe looking at, maybe branching into? is it the blog? >> i'm not really branching anything. i think film making is a big part of me. when angela goes to college, i might start looking at stories and go back into directing. and acting. film is what i do. finally, you know, when i'm as old as i am now, i can say that. you know, all along when i felt like in my 20s and 30s, i still had the leeway. i still say, well, you know, i'm going to do something else. because i never felt film is a viable career being a chinese woman living in america. there are simply not en
NBC
Jan 8, 2017 5:30am PST
experienced in china, how do they survive here, how do they thrive here? what are the things they have to adjust and learn about? >> well, keep up the good work. it's great to see you both doing it for the older generation and the younger generation. >> thank you. >>> next up, the chinatown community development center and how it helps enhance the quality of life for low-income residents in san francisco. (coughs) cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. community development center' does a lot of things for a lot of people... >>> the san francisco chinatown community development center does a lot of things for a lot of people, from finding people homes to community advocacy and leadership training for young people. to tell us about is executive director and deputy director. great to have you both here. >> great to be here. >> we're going to show a video about some of the service
NBC
Apr 30, 2017 5:30am PDT
heard the beijing olympics apply in 2001, bidding for beijing olympics, i say it's good for china if there is the international olympics so it changes. that's why i wanted to use my art. >> you did that eight-mile-long artwork. did you propose -- how did you propose that? what do you tell the people making the decision what you want to do and why it represents the show? >> this is a very long, long time for the idea and draw a sketch. then we go to the beijing olympic committee. present it to them, say this is what we want to do. so nobody believed it. it's hard to do on a mountain. you have 1,000 people, 8,000 people there. same time. just like a military. so it's hard. but you always go through difficultiys to make a great thing. >> how did you get so involved in the american art world? >> i came here to san francisco in 1988. so i had a different show, different museums, galleries. so when the asian art museum opening in 2003, the chairman offered asian art museum. they said we love something. so they wanted me to do something. >> so you wrapped it in canvas. >> yeah. the mayor sa
NBC
Oct 29, 2017 5:30am PDT
trump leaves on friday for a 12-day trip to asia. he's scheduled to visit japan, south korea, china, vietnam and the philippines. much of the focus, of course, will be on containing north korea and the president could meet with vladimir putin on the sidelines of an economic conference during the trip. >>> on wednesday the united states olympic committee will mark 100 days until the pyeongchang winter games in south korea with a game that starts. it's scheduled for february 9th. >> 2018. >> we'll both be there. >> looking forward to it. it's my first olympics. >> it's a blast. lindsey vonn, mckayla shiv front. >> thank you very much. thank you for spending part of your morning with us. we'll see you right back here next week take a live look outside -- bay bridge -- from embarcedaro sf >>> it's 7:00. that's the bay bridge from our cameras in san francisco. just a little bit of fog is at the top of the bridge there. thanks for waking up with us this sunday morning, i'm vicky nguyen with vianey arana. look at the microclimate forecast. things have taken a cooldown. >> they have, in a g
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)