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20090604
20170919
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2016 11
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
Bloomberg
Jan 24, 2016 9:00am EST
♪ francine: welcome to bloomberg's davos debate. i am francine lacqua. and we are talking china. over the next 75 minutes, we ask where is the chinese economy headed? with the new five year plan being presented in 2016, how can the world's second-largest economy shift gears without stalling its growth engine? and what does the market volitility tell us about the perception of china, and the task facing chinese regulators? well, we have, i am pleased to say, an a-star panel. thank you so much for coming on. jiang jianqing, chairman of the board of the industrial & commercial bank of china. christine lagarde, the managing director at the imf. fang xinghai, vice chairman of china's securities regulatory commission and director general at the intercontinental economic department. gary cohn, president at goldman sachs. zhang xin, chief executive officer and co-founder at soho china. and ray dalio, chairman and chief executive officer at -- chief investment officer at bridgewater associates. thank you so much for joining us. ray dalio, is there something that the west misunderstands a
Bloomberg
Jan 23, 2016 11:00am EST
headed -- and how can the economy shift gears without stalling? what is the perception of china, and the task facing regulators. say, an i am pleased to a-star panel. christine lagarde is the managing director of the imf and thank you so much for joining us. is there something that the west misunderstands about chinese markets and does that exacerbate volatility? >> i think there is a lot the west does not understand about chinese markets. the essence of what's going on in china is an adjustment. they have a debt restructuring challenge. they have an economic restructuring challenge and they have to come up with a new model. they have a capital markets challenge. to build in an efficient way that circulates capital through the system better. they have a balance of payments challenge. that will pressure on the currency. capital outflows -- those types of things. these are things that have happened repeatedly through the rest of the world. the united states has had three major debt crises. we couldn't pay our debts in 1971. in 1982, we had a debt crisis. we had the s&l crisis. we've re
Bloomberg
Jan 31, 2016 9:00am EST
about the perception of china, and the task facing chinese regulators? well, we have, i am pleased to say, an a-star panel. thank you so much for coming on. jiang jianqing, chairman of the board of the industrial & commercial bank of china. christine lagarde, the managing director at the imf. fang xinghai, vice chairman of china's securities regulatory commission and director general at the intercontinental economic department. gary cohn, president at goldman sachs. zhang xin, chief executive officer and co-founder at soho china. and ray dalio, chairman and chief executive officer at -- chief investment officer at bridgewater associates. thank you so much for joining us. ray dalio, is there something that the west misunderstands about chinese markets? and does that exacerbate the volatility we have seen the last few weeks? mr. dalio: i think there is a lot the west does not understand about chinese markets. i think the essence of what's going on in china is an adjustment. they have four major challenges. they have a debt restructuring challenge. they have an economic restructuring
Bloomberg
Jan 23, 2016 9:00am EST
going on in china is an adjustment. they have a debt restructuring challenge. they have an economic restructuring challenge and they have to come up with a new model. they have a capital markets challenge. they need to build in addition ways that circulates capital through the system better. they have a balance of payments challenge. that will pressure on the currency. that havethings happened repeatedly through the rest of the world. the united states has had three major debt crises. s&l crisis. we've reshaped our economy many times. we have gone into other areas. we have had another of talents of payments and currency issues. one of the things being misunderstood is what is a normal balance of payments and too much debt restructuring kind of recession? define recession is anything less than 3% growth. i think it's been confused with the longer-term feature. i think the reforms going on in china and the leadership in terms of where it's going will be fundamentally good. you're looking at something that is a short-term challenge. this is five years after the generation of new market
Bloomberg
Feb 14, 2016 9:00am EST
china. the underlying consumer demand is very strong in china. the internet companies there, their business is very good. it is strong. it is healthy. it is vibrant. and we have built our own business there over the course of the last 13, 14 years -- emily: quite a robust business. sir michael: a very robust business, run by some wonderful people. and it's no accident that seven of the 20 most valuable internet companies today are chinese. because over the next 20 years, there is going to be far more business done between the technology companies that get started in china and get started in the u.s. than there has been over the last 20 years. emily: what does silicon valley have to learn from china? sir michael: i'm always struck by how eager people running chinese companies are to learn about their american counterparts. how frequently they come to the united states, how jammed their schedules are when they come here. i wish that the ceo's and founders of silicon valley companies did the same thing in china. because i think we could learn a lot from them. and in mobile in particul
Bloomberg
Jan 30, 2016 9:00am EST
going on in china and the leadership in china in terms of where it is moving, it is going to be fundamentally good. you are looking at something that is a short-term challenge e will berom where will in five years. with vibrant, young entrepreneurs and economy beginning to flourish. >> why have we had so much volatility since the start of the year? >> the volatility has been a result of the world that we have an ease and monetary policy all around the world. there not going to have same effectiveness and the easing of monetary policy because at interest rate is zero, you cannot cut interest rates. the risk premiums have gone down. there is a big vulnerability. when china is dealing with the rest of the world, china is a negative on the margin for the rest of the world. the world is vulnerable because of a lack of monetary policy while as the prices are comparatively high. >> how do you explain volatility? is it something we need to learn to live with? are several things going on. one is that chinese are in the transporting -- transitioning to economic consumption. there are a lo
Bloomberg
Jan 31, 2016 6:00am EST
beginning of something more enduring? >> it feels like a correction to me. if i thought china was in freefall, i would be really concerned. i actually don't think that the consumer and the service economy is holding up pretty well in china. but there are parts that are way overdone, whether it is steel, coal, overbuilding of residential and in certain of the interior cities, and so if you just take one anecdote, you could get -- you could get really -- erik: you could get what you want, right? stephen: you could paint a really bad picture, in terms of the stock market and in terms of policy implantation. -- implementation. erik: if the selloff doesn't stop, what happens then? stephen: the markets become reality if they affect the behavior of regular people. at this point, i don't think that has happened. >> the markets are in turmoil. we worry about china, the fact that you may not have ammunition to deal with inflation. what do you think the markets are spooked by? >> well, overall my perspective is, if you really want to look and forecast the economy and look at the real economy, d
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)