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CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 9:00am EDT
a difference. .. after that doris kearns goodwin and >> i was an exchange student studying in china in 1989, so i'm very, very excited to be able to introduce our next speaker. i think most of us here may not recognize her, but we certainly recognize her voice. t i'm here to introduce louisa lim to talk about her book, "the people's republic of amnesia." she is the voice, as i said, from china for national public radio or has been, and appreciate that she work -- prior to that she worked for bbc. that she worked for bbc. over a decade of reporting she has earned many prestigious prizes and broadcasting awards for her work. during the previous academic year 2013 to 2014 louisa was a mic wallace fellow at the university of michigan and i just learned for the next academic year she will be teaching at the university of michigan in journalism school. for me reading her book brought back to me a flood of memories from my year in china and especially the events that surrounded tiananmen. having been in china around that time i found a reason quote in "the wall street journal" about her bo
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 10:00pm EDT
with china and successfully negotiated the paris peace accord that accomplished the withdraw of american forces from vietnam for which he won the nobel peace prize in 1973 and parenthetically the gratitude of this young attendant in the united states army. thank you mr. secretary. there are countless other honors including the presidential medal of freedom, the medal of liberty and the national book award for history for the first volume of his memoirs, the white house years. his new book, world order is a shrewd and comprehensive analysis of the challenges of building international order in a world of differing perspectives, violent conflict, burgeoning technology and ideological extremism. and if you will learn about the westphalian peace and you will be led on a fascinating exploration of european balance of power from charlemagne to the present time, islam and the middle east, the u.s. and iran, the multiplicity of asia and the continuing development of u.s. policy. in my business the questions are often more important than the answers and secondary kissinger has some brilli
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2014 1:30pm EDT
the big says germany china france you k you can see that this group in 1970 was clustered private debt so is a global phenomenon. how do we prevent and how do we prepare? to prevent we monitor that aggregate if you are convinced of the theory it is easy to see it. i was in the banking industry for a long time and i know regulators have a broad array or arsenal of ways to influence the behavior to increase capital requirements to jawbone are any number of things in recalled of behavior of 2005 for your 2007 were not ordinary behavior's people made loans to people who had no in, or no job and a regulator could have intervened. we think by monitoring of that aggregate regulators could see improvement to a crisis. but that leaves the more important issue of where we are today to repair the crisis. rehab accumulated a lot of private debt to drag down the growth today. the way to a lot stronger economic growth is to reduce the ratio or private equity. a lot easier said than done. that paying that takes money of the economy to contract gdp and that is what happened. it has a contractive
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
concerned today? china. where after you can see private debt levels through the mid 2000 it has been on the tear. 18 percent is a threshold china is almost 60 percent. that is the source but we also read about over capacity you all read about the coast city symmetry of the state has been built beyond the need of the country there are entire cities that are empty with tens of thousands of empty residences. and the absolute level we have a new number it looks like over 200%. run away lending again yielded over capacity. real-estate, land, excess manufacturing, empty shopping malls. what is the future of china? we think the crisis is possible but they have something that was not true with united states but they own the banks so it is unlikely china allows for that type of crisis. in addition it has lowe's central government debt and ample net worth probably $3 trillion of foreign currency reserves of the books. it has the capacity to deal preemptively but even so it has a significant and increasing level of overcapacity. people rejoiced recently when china reaffirmed the gross level was
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 5:20pm EST
everyone involved -- if you have a rising middle class like in brazil or turkey or in china, a lot of those people are going to want accountable government because they've got property, the government can take it away and that's right the condition under which democracy has spread in many parts of the world. so it's -- it's a big effort to build political institutions that can actually do those demands for participation. ... why it health or disappears is a problem. >> aristotle said this more than two oh thousand years ago, democracy works best in a society if a a broad middle class. the middle class people are educated. they aware of what the government is doing, and they have property, and if the government can take it away through taxation or confiscation, they won't be happen about that. so everywhere the middle class that when support for democracy. that's why in china, for exple, the is why i think in china, for example, the regime is going to have a big problem because right now there may be 30400 trainees that can be classified as middle class. they're the ones text each othe
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2014 8:57pm EST
nixon for? china. the let me list some th things he did very quickly in h first rm. the end t vietm war, bug t troops ho. netied degraded strategic arms agreement. rescued israel from the home cook for four, pulled egypt in the we ended the draft. 82 yr-d n right to vo. desegregatedheou. 10% when johnson left than 70 percent whenixon left he started e a d osha and nedour justices the supreme court including to chief justis. including wiiam rehnquist who wonhe 49state landslid unlievable "the ggest loser" ofll times when he putogher a polic coalition d at dominated the next4 years. had not been through waterge so those are the ideas from theoss and the d n. thk u very much. [alause] . . can reice what richard nixon did in creating the w jority and a 49 stecalition t reagan re-ead in 19 when he won 49 states 14gainst jimmy rt. don't know thatou can cause thetth is we ae another couny ghnow. we have chgeddramatically demographically. we a dferent country than we re today you can look 1stes includg for he ma-ates lirn, newyork ilnois and pennlvania gone democratic x raight times. can gt the
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 10:08pm EST
portion. >> the united states will continue to pursue a constructive relationship with china. by virtue of its size and its remarkable growth, china will inevitably play a critical role future of the region. the question is, what kind of role will it play? i just came from beijing. as i said there, the united states welcomes the continuing rise of a china that is peaceful and prosperous and stable and plays a responsible role in world affairs. it is a remarkable achievement at thellions of people lifted out of poverty in china because the extraordinary growth rates they have experienced. that is a good thing that we should want and welcome that kind of development. ofchina is playing the role a responsible actor that is peaceful and prosperous and stable, it is good for the region, it is good for the world, and it is good for the united states. we will pursue cooperation with china where our interests overlap, and there are sick ethic and injuries -- there are significant areas of overlap. more training between the militaries to prevent misunderstandings. more travel and exchange
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 1:35pm EST
growth rate. >> host: what's another success story? south korea? china? >> guest: you know, south korea's a really interesting success story. it's a long process of transition of giving. it so happened that at first they gave a lot more economic freedom, the about for entrepreneurs to flourish and export to markets. and there was an example of a really successful south korean entrepreneur who founded what is now hyundai from, basically, started as a garage repair shop in 1945. today is, like, one of the most successful car companies, of course. and that's what drove a lot of the early success of south korea. and then at some point south koreans also made a lot of effort to get their democratic rights and demanded their political rights as well as their economic rights. that happened in the late '80s, and they were successful in getting a full democracy in place also. so south korea's now a flourishing, prosperous place where south koreans enjoy both political and economic freedom. >> host: china? >> guest: china's more complicated case and is very misunderstood. i think what we're
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2014 8:53pm EDT
existed in almost total isolation from china. there were millions of refugees in hong kong but no american and there was no trade. it was a listening post but not a very informative one. but the experience that he had their used to be typical of the experience that foreign service officers had. he was assigned to interview visa applicants. he learned rudimentary mandarin chinese and it was a undoubtedly a broadening experience for a graduate of exeter yale to suddenly find themselves interrogating an impoverished and desperate people. and it's an experience which washington think tanks have these days have and it produces i would think less certitude and more humanity than we see on the part of those who think that they are entitled to make foreign policy in washington. i was not close to john negroponte during that. math. we grew up in the same apartment building and we were very close childhood friends until about the age of 10. we went off in completely different directions. i did not see him for 50 years. i then saw him when my brother saw his mother's obituary in the newspape
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2014 8:15am EDT
one says, china. or watergate. those two things. let me just list some of the things he did very quickly. in his first term before watergate. the ended the vietnam war, brought our troops home, brought the p.o.w.'s home. opened up china to the world and west. negotiates the evidence greatest strategic arms agreement since the washington naval treaty of 1922. he rescued israel in the yom kippur war. he brought egypt out of the soviet bloc other into the west. ended the draft. gave 18-year-olds the right to vote. desegregatessed the south. only 10% desegregated when johnson left office. 70% when nixon left office. he created the epa, osha, and the cancer institute. he named four justices to the supreme court, including two chief justices. the lat e e'er one, william rhenquist. he then won a 49-state landslide, unbelievable. the biggest loser of all times, 49-state landslide, and he put together a political coalition that dominated presidential elections for 20 of the next 24 years. had it not been for watergate i think people would be talking about whether he is a near great or a g
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2014 10:00pm EDT
2002 when john and his son why it went to china to see who was making said cheap chest of drawers you wanted to eyeball the guy who was making it that would become the world's largest petition. so this is where i tell you how i found the story. i was driven initially by the question would have been to all those people from henry county who lost their jobs? half of the workforce almost 20,000 people and where did they go? the second question it was, was there another way it could have been done? and friend of mine who was visiting last week said your book is doing so great it is wonderful. you found this amazing story to go to china and back. it is like living history. [laughter] >> once in a reporter's career a person like john bassett becomes a long he is brash the good old boy from rural virginia larger than life rule breaker that stood almost single-handedly against the outflow of furniture jobs from america he is asshole. [laughter] >> i made sure it was okay to say that in church. [laughter] >> when they heard i was writing a book about globalization with him as a character aha d
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2014 12:46am EDT
now going back to its islamic concept. it isn't so much the case in relations with china, because china has no concept, no national concept of religion. it also has no national concept of pluralism but it is a different issue in china than it is in with respect to the muslim world or any border in which religion and the state are merged. >> let me see if we can get somebody all the way back, the very last row. yes. >> thank you very much. >> cost you $500 for derek jeter's has day. >> want to thank his excellency for all of the wonderful things the has had to say over his career on the importance of statesmanship, and statesmanship wasn't really mentioned tonight, and i wonder and ask the question that, where can we learn how to be better statesmen? where is statesmanship being taught, anyplace in our country, that you could single out as fulfilling that role that was developed in your own mind and in you're writing over the years, particularly reflected in this book. >> i think that is a very important question. because statesmanship consists of helping to lead your society from
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2014 2:13pm EDT
then he laughs at his own jokes. more details. we looked up, china and england at that time. his words were mostly written in a letter that was printed that was written to present -- president roosevelt printed, i think in the times. you can see how much work was put into it. you know, we have another where we use china as well and have jokes about drips of money where there are drips of tea. a lot of punning, an acquired taste for some of us. that part of the story, each one of these cases as like as seen from a play with a little joke at the end. sometimes it's a lame joke. now we turn to something serious. how do you depict iconic images from the new deal? this is, of course, perhaps the most important photograph of the time. michele hear about this. michele hear about this. this was a photograph by a great photographer. and what i discovered in my print book in their research including here at this library was that i had not realized that i thought she worked for a magazine. she worked for the government. and she had a rather specific assignment to capture poverty and photographs.
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 7:45am EST
strong ties to family and to china. i didn't expect are coming to welcoming with open arms, but it still shocked to hear her mother's reaction a first hearing about me. she was horrified to learn her daughter was dating a foreigner. you will leave me and go away with him, she cried. my grandchildren will not be in china to live with me. i will lose my daughter. she was distraught after that phone call. her eyes red and face flush. i did not know what t to say but i'd enough trouble dealing with obama, let alone her to for now we have each other. at the time particularly at night -- wakefulness and sleep and strange thoughts. the pictures in my mind encompass the image of my youth in kenya and my present life in china. i felt i was in the space the mine to mold and whatever i please with an obligation to my mother, my father, friend or even that long divided but ever present candidates. no, my grandmother. i could imagine have a dialogue. i found this terrific girl, grandma, and i get myself with no matchmaker. don't tell me the unlock with some schmucker doesn't value you. young gi
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2014 4:45pm EST
21st century. anyway, he's very big in china. kenny g is huge in china. in fact, if you go to a chinese ball, which i've been in, they say going home to get people to leave the mall. it's like someone turned on and on switch. they'll start to leave. it's like the pied piper of chinese commerce. [laughter] there's a very important role. so kenny g went to hong kong recently and he and his words, was taken in an assembler, but he happened to take a self he confronted a group of protesters who are pro-democracy protesters. this angered the chinese government who declared him an infidel in one sort or another. he cultivated the fellowship of people who admire him in china. what is he going to do? he's broken some unspoken rules. in classic celebrity fashion he deleted the salty. it was on no china, i don't like democracy. i was taking my innocent law to fellowship has this dark side where we start yourself believe if anyone goes outside the realm. for scholarly research to the article, jonathan crudely cut it from the essay. i spent a lot of time on justin bieber fan sites on the in
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2015 1:30pm EST
everyone participated in the decision. and in the book we actually go through the china decision as an example not of the china issues which have been well covered but rather that we followed our process thoroughly and fully in that particular and very important decision for the company. >> jonathan, i -- how do you feel meetings shaped the culture of google differently than other places? >> well, you were in my weekly staff meeting. >> i was. i learned all kinds of things. >> so our staff meeting we actually had one of the apms assigned to do chain gang tasks each week, and his job or her job was to assemble all of the information so that instead of everybody coming into the meeting and getting updated we actually had all of the information go out the day before and then we would come in and after everybody got really good at sort of reciting their information, i would insist that we go around the table and force everyone to articulate what is it that they need from their peers, the other people in the room, to be more efficient. and that was how we started. that was how we actually r
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2014 10:00pm EDT
and in the book we go through that decision as an example not as an issue of china but as an example of the process. >> dealer in my weekly staff meeting. >> host: i was. >> we had one of the apm and his or her job for to assemble all the information instead of everyone coming into the meeting to get updated day had the informational and go out the day before then everybody got good at sating the information we would go around the table to force everyone to articulate what they need from the people in the room to be more e efficient. that is how we started which eventually you got very good at and eventually you would come in with your list ahead of time why do you start your management meetings with actual data? marissa would show up on her own with a complete study where the users were and where the trends were on each property the moment she put up the slide we would have an argument. but you start with the data. >> host: start with than dash board data. >> if all we have is the opinions we go with mine the [laughter] that is what we call the hippo. [laughter] >> host: tal
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2014 7:45pm EDT
of states to support it. saudi arabia, pakistan, china, which was a key supporter of the war effort, egypt and the united kingdom and others, all were brought together under the leadership of carter and brzezinski, the tactics of the war and the grand coalition of diplomacy that started it secretly was developed in the last week of december and the first two weeks of january. it had support from democrats and republicans. when ronald reagan came into office in 1981, he essentially just continued the carter policy for his entire first term in office. then in 1986 at the prodding of zia-ul-haq, he decided to increase the and bring in the stinger and the stinger of course changed the battlefield dynamics. whether it really led to the so decision to leave is hard to tell. the soviets might have left it indicates. the stinger was obviously going to be the force multiplier in that regard. and in that sense this operation is something pretty rare in history of american intelligence. a success story. there are lots of books about intelligence failures and a lot of them about cia failures. b
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 7:17pm EDT
biggest provider of energy to the military superpowers in the united states and soon china and the bilateral trade agreement that harper a signed and ratified a week before his trip to china as well as the comprehensive economic trade agreement in the european union which has also been signed but not ratified yet. there is an agenda that is being led by our extremist government to really walk canada into becoming somewhat of this resource colony to the military superpower across the planet that's not to say canada isn't an imperialist power in its own right because they have the bilateral free-trade agreements with a lot of countries in the south like through and others where canada is acting as the reader of the treasurer chest and so to speak and in all of this political bs is of course indigenous peoples and the sovereignty movement and the right to protect mother earth into the sacred waters from the agenda of big oil and king cole and places like northern tarzan's. i think the important thing to understand is that it is the same manifestation of the experience that has been go
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 9:30am EST
, soon china through the bilateral free trade agreement that harper just signed and ratified a week before his trip to china as well as the comprehensive economic trade agreement with the european union which has also been signed but not ratified yet, you know, there is a agenda afoot that's being led by our extremist government to really, you know, lock canada in to becoming this, somewhat of this resource colony to military superpowers across the planet. and, you know, that's not to say that canada isn't an imperialist power in its own right, because they also have bilateral free trade agreements with a lot of countries in the global south like peru and others where canada is acting as the raider of the treasure chest, so to speak. and stuck in the midst of all of this geopolitical bs is, of course, indigenous peoples and our sovereignty movement and our fight to protect the sacredness of mother earth, our fight to protect our sacred waters from the agenda of big oil, places like the tar sands. and i think the important thing to understand about idle no more is it's the same manif
CSPAN
Mar 1, 2014 8:03pm EST
said, i'm done, and going to leave and eventually he went to china to build a big project in china. he is in china working on a huge project their annie gets a cable grand that says come back, we are ready to build now. so he comes back. what else? other questions? >> was wondering how you got into the subway from the back bay? >> was a huge obstacle they had to overcome. in one of the transit commission reports they were explicit in saying this time i'll has to be all to vote on watt are. they had to make it so secure and watertight that they would not get any water because they knew the public was terrified of that. water was going to come in. there's a great anecdote in the book where the first time in boston the engineer and the chief contractor took a group of people like the mayor and the governor down into the tom and everyone was prepared for this to be dank and dark and and wet. that is what they expected it to be and at one point he flipped on a switch and you have to remember this is the time when light olds were new. edison invented the light olds a decade earlier so it was
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2015 6:45am EST
you deal with the south china sea and china's aggressive behavior, you might hear a load of stuff come your way which may or may not be true. people like to cherry pick quotes from the founders to support any position. on the one hand, john quincy adams we know as you pointed out would be against all forms of intervention. america goes not abroad. that's in 1821 when he says this yet two years before he is supporting aggressive military policy expansionist military policies into florida which is spanish florida at this time. because preemptively he can begin to match the threat of military force spanish power out of florida to make sure falls into our own orbit. i would say just as a caution for begin to consider your question be wary of understand what john quincy adams would say about a threat today. that said with all that background, what would john quincy adams say debate about the threat of going abroad? i don't know if you would be against it, nor can it really tell you he would be for it. by think he gives us some good caution to think about. i wanted to make the point wit
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2014 9:50pm EDT
they have no concept. they have no national concept but it's a different issue in china than with respect to the muslim world in the religion and the state emerged. >> i'm going to see if we can get somebody all the way back in the last row. yes. >> $500 for derek's last game by the way. >> i wanted to thank his excellency for all the wonderful things that he's had to say over his career on the importance of statesmanship and statesmanship wasn't mentioned tonight. and i wonder where can we learn how to be better statesman unaware is statesmanship being talked anyplace in the country that you can sit on as fulfilling that role that was developed in your own writing over the years that reflected on this book. >> that's a very important question because statesmanship consists of helping to lead your society from where it is to where it hasn't been switched me the combination of courage and character and above all since the trends of the period -- our society is extremely pragmatic and continuous problem-solving rather than the reflection of the historical revolution as its principal
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2014 3:15pm EDT
latest book is entitled "a china man's chance: one families downand the chinese american dream." join me in welcoming eric lu. [applause] >> the question begs to be answered, why the title? >> first of all, thank you for having this conversation and thanks to the world affairs council and asian society for gathering us together today. i really excited to talk about this book, and the title in particular, the phrase "a chinaman's chance" many people noes phrase that has fallen into both disrepute and out of use. it is a slur in essence. and a phrase that has its origins from the earliest days when chinese immigrants arrived in the united states, and laborers from china were given some of the most thankless, dangerous, life-threatening jobs in laying the railroads, mining, such that they often had a slim to no chance of surviving. which got short-handed in the language of the time as china man's chance of surviving, and ironically, that phrase long survived its original usage. by the time, 100 pleasure years later, when my father immigranted to the united states in the late 1950s
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2014 1:00am EST
in america and someone from china or kenya can go to the web site of the library of congress and get access to her photographs and even by a - - it. it is all public domain. she did do a lot of photography and the '50s and '60s that is private that is that the oakland museum. that is different in she did wonderful stuff the last two decades despite not being up to full strength during that period. >> host: wish you need as a woman as a photographer? >> guest: as a studio portrait photographer there were many women doing that out of their homes. you could do that why you took care of your children and would cook your dinner as a documentary photographer or of the road road, absolutely. the only woman in the federal project but also the only parent. when she married paul taylor together they had six children. she was extremely lucky to marry him. the husband from heaven. he adored her and thought she was a genius. uso secure in his own career he never felt this light is resentment of her. he even traveled with her to work as her assistant while she photographed them. because part of he
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2014 11:00pm EDT
not here and going there. to china is investing enormously in the military including the deep water navy. and other nations as well. happen to think the president's policy king komen the personal charm and to. >> did pay a you look tired of a lot of wall if it is most life help elife help electr that is where we want to push to see the american the have and may in diplomacy is could carry so strong nobody could ever think otherwise. [cheers and applause] in devil of life to say we could be involved in the world to keep bad things from happening in we had intelligence that isis was being formed but the president just watched as is spread across iraq is difficult to pull it out. this last kind of group is a terrible conclusion for the world and us. they are not. [applause] >> after this the most important paying to participate in the cold water plunged. [laughter] i cannot wait to see that. >> i am of plunge cheese. >> my daughter dump the bucket on my head spinning reducing the children of illinois i were raised by gay and lesbian parents that the sexual merry jack is legal in illino
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2014 8:00am EDT
, guess what? hey, america's not here and we're down there. we can compete, we can build -- china's investing enormously in a military including a deepwater navy. russia is investing in their military capabilities. and so, and there are other nations as well that are expanding their military might and ambitions. i happen to think that the president's policies, this going out with a personal charm offensive and believing that people all want the same thing, we can all get along. and by the way, there may be a multipolar world militarily is the way to go. who else besides us? if it's a multipolar military world, are the others russia and china? is that what we want to the see? i believe in having an american economy, an american diplomacy, an american military so strong that no one in the world would ever think of testing us and that's -- [applause] so as a good republican, i'm proud to say i'd like to return to the principles of harry truman. >> yeah. [laughter] >> i'd like to once again say that we will be involved in the world. it's important to be involved in the world, to keep ba
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2014 1:00pm EST
the people's republic of china after the fall of chang, that lasted 16 and 22 years respectively. five presidents. we are on the 11th president in the case of cuba. and the united states did not simply decline to have normal relations with cuba for 48 years and still counting. but it's also spent most of the past half century openly and actively attempting to overthrow the government of cuba. now there is no similar estrangement in the history of u.s. foreign relations. you can go back to the days of thomas jefferson and george washington and can't find a similar estrangement. so the interesting question is the one i start out with in this book. what have we been trying to accomplish? at one level the explanation is easy. we have been trying to protect our interests. that is what we always do. many of you take place i150, introduction to the foreign policy course, and we will say it all nations try to protect their interest. in the case of cuba, washington has been trying to protect economic interests. the second and much more important for many decades for over three decades by
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2014 1:00am EDT
you. can go anywhere in the world and see california style garden, in nigeria, new zealand, in china they're building subdivisions for tens of millions of people that are modeled on orange county and mod eled on santa barbara, spanish colonial architecture and swimming pools and the pleasure principle at large. so that's the only american style that is really probably indigenous to america and it certainly the only american style i think has become globally influential shall. >> host: in the suburbs, the lawns got big, and now they've gotten smaller again, haven't they? >> guest: simple forces, one is just escalation of real estate value. now expensive to have the big lawn. and in this part of the country the price of water is going through the recover so people are reassessing that notion. property values drive these decisions, and property values are quite high in most parts of the united states. >> host: what do you do here at perrer dine. >> guest: teach urban and environmental policy at the school of public policy, and i teach quite a bit about resource politics and about water,
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 1:00pm EST
of their marketing overseas and market to poor people in india and china and indonesia and africa. you know, soda companies are sinking billions of dollars in marketing in places where people don't need these products at all. in order to meet growth targets. and all you have to do is read the business pages of the "wall street journal," "the new york times" or any newspaper and look at how closely their growth is scrutinized. i would hate to be many one of those companies -- in one of those companies. when students ask me i want to work for a food company, and i want to transform the food industry so that it's working towards health, i tell them they'd better go to a company that's not publicly traded. and if they do go to a publicly-traded company, they'd better make sure it's a benefit corporation in a state that allows corporations to make decisions that are based on other issues, social issues besides just holding stocks. >> host: marion nestle, what about food labels? they were changed in the last seven or eight years. are they effective? >> guest: yeah, the food label is in
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2014 12:45am EDT
china debt, the last president to actually -- to massively -- during the 1920s, one of the most expansionist times in human flourishing. we have literacy rates are increasing. women are actually involved in the work place. coolidge is at the same time that fdr is insisting that photos of himself with blacks be destroyed, coolidge is partying at the negro leagues baseball games. he sign laws that makes nailtive americans citizens and not just makes them citizens but he joins native american describes because he argues if they can join our tribe, i should be able to join their tribe. it's my contention that american history runs essentially from the founders, through lincoln, lincoln to coolidge -- we can debate lincoln ad nauseam. i am of the claremont school which many of you dish recommend you read their review of books. and what essentially happens is lincoln, then coolidge, then reagan, then the tea party movement and then potentially cruz or rand or whatever -- pick your poison. and that's my kind of contention on history. i'm a believing christian. coolidge was a believer a
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 3:00pm EDT
world, what ever quarter existed was part of an empire. in china and the ideas that states balance each other didn't exist. in the islamic world it didn't exist in that sense. the sovereignty of states and the balance of their actions with each other was believed to produce in the national order and international order. that is why i started to attempt to of fly to the contemporary circumstances. this is not a cook book you can read to the international order will be, it is an attempt to tell you, this is what we are up against now. and ways of looking at it. it does not say that i don't know what the end results of these conflicts and these ambiguities that you described will be. >> what i am getting at is that the westphalean piece which was 1648 after the 30 years' war, those who like to believe history repeats itself, remember the fight over the shape of the paris peace corps table, 1648, and an endless number of doors so everyone could enter by the same import door and i believe you described they had to walk -- >> this same moment. >> some things don't change but the more relevant
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2014 7:15am EST
. china has also envelopessed major -- invested major money and an incredible high-speed rail network. because of the ways that it was built, i have my doubts about it. i don't know that that is a model for the to follow, but i do write about that extensively in this book. >> an optimistic perspective. along those lines, what do you see in the research that you read about the young generation getting interested in railroad engineering or the universities creating programs for that? i myself don't see much of that action, but perhaps you have seen it in the course of writing the book. >> yeah, young people and railroads, right in yeah. gosh, i asked an amtrak conductor, you know, this was on the the city of new orleans where sometimes he'll actually get on the pa and, you know, sing that song, the arkansas low guthrie -- arlo guthrie song. ♪ good morning, america, how are you? ♪ don't you know me? i'm the native son. ♪ i'm the train they call the city of new orleans. ♪ i'll be gone 500 mile when the day is done. everyone! [laughter] [applause] >> there's a first. >> yeah. i mea
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 11:19am EDT
our money in india and china to buy the next deal and that is a true thing. they don't want to look back. you just have to study the past. >> host: it is an interesting point. you started to talk about this and i would like to explore this a little more. you have this conviction that you are not simply talking about all these events that happened from 15 to 30 years ago. you are talking about things that are relevant today. how are you in putting that message and why do you believe it so deeply? >> guest: job creation, it is not the job of silicon valley to create jobs but we have to do something, there are millions of people who won't get jobs again. they're developing double bottom line businesses that are sustainable. it is not this rocket ship ride and they think about employees, when david packard and pulitzer did their company and these older companies started to begin. they are part of the fabric of the community. they supported fire, police, it was a relationship between the employees to the world they lived in and then of course with start ups and apps everything is about c
CSPAN
Apr 5, 2015 8:02pm EDT
resigned and seized the goal for china. here we go with pueblo again. so ford had to take very aggressive action which turned out to be an overreaction. everything we did know it's early to free those people from the cambodians happened after they were released. so we were bombing targets in the cambodian mainland and where is the grad already then released and taken back to the ship. it was apparent they were trying to prove him presidential timber for the upcoming 1976 election. it was an aggressive action that the crew was already lost 41 military people after 40 crewmen had already then released. so trying to prove he could be the president a lot of other people share that. and then the u.n. hostage, very cautious, but he made it to be a national disaster with his rhetoric. presidential rhetoric dries crises. yet another crisis must the president says it is a crisis. in this case, it challenges our national honor. he didn't want to do too much because he wanted to get him out of line. you remember large numbers and the embassy. after that sending the government took over. but january,
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2015 1:15am EST
tigers in china and burma. i have to tell the story about joe a wonderful human being. one of the most gracious genuine people i have ever had the pleasure of knowing. and a christian gentleman. he was an evangelist. he would go anywhere to speak about his faith but beneath that evangelism he was also dedicated to marine corps combat aviator. that meant highly competitive and joe used to joke and say he was so competitive that he had a hard time letting his grandchildren win at go fish. [laughter] >> , near for marine corps bases lived on and there were some that lived on to fight in korea and there was one or more? >> there were no marine corps issues in vietnam. the one in the korean war had been one of boynton's his name was jack bolt and he flew a regular tour in korea with the marine corps squadron and he's another one of these dedicated warriors who lived through combat. he was selected to fly and exchange tour with the air force near the end of the word and he shot down six communists made 15 jet fighters so use the marine corps's only two were ace. >> the marines were obviously
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 4:30pm EDT
faith in the new china and matthew stewart, "natures god: the heretical origins of the american republic". >> let me just lay my cards out on the table here. >> i will tell you right now that in my view, the christian nation myth is worse than a myth or worse than a false interpretation. i think of it as sort of a betrayal of the american revolution and i think it represents precisely the kind of thing that thomas jefferson and thomas paine and others were fighting against. >> the final two title selected to the national book awards one was for nonfiction art ronald rosbottom, "when paris went dark." the city of light under german occupation in 1940 through 1944 and edward o. wilson, "the meaning of human existence." that is a look at this year's long list for the 2014 national book award for nonfiction. be sure to turn yo
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2014 4:00am EDT
issue in china, japan, all for western europe. people are trying to create dementia friendly societies. who was on the front lines as a first responder when something goes out? the care giver. we make an assumption in this country that care givers are well. we are getting sick taking care of our loved ones. they are paying lip service to us and making assumptions. that should make some of you upset. i wrote this because i don't want anyone to live the life i have lived. i made my choice is then and i have been forced to defend them, believe it or not. i have had reporters second-guess why i would do this. but if you have seen this disease up close, there was nothing left for me to do. the other thing with early onset and because smart people hide out, the hippocampus as you saw goes into overdrive so they fight so hard to stay in control even if they are losing control, some of the behaviors are very bizarre. the struggles that you have, the drop-off is very precipitous because they fought so hard and so long so you see not the slow progression but you see something more prec
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 8:00am EDT
kong is not china for now. it is why singapore is not in tunisia. we have involved in several ethnic and it doesn't matter where our grandparents were born. this is our joint inheritance and it is the inheritance that chris talks about. it is the thing that distinction is english-speaking from all the models, that the individual is lifted up the comment at the city is exocet over this state and not his master. if he wanted me to encapsulate exceptionalism in a single rate, you could do a lot of work than what john nodded and said about the massachusetts state can't duchenne, a government of laws, not of men. those words were not john adams. he was quoted in the 17th century and push raider. the shared inheritance together. the big mistake that every generation can make is to take for granted the permanent solution. so easy to become blasÉ about the good davis, all the good anesthetic are less comfortable and moderate and rational. freedom under the lock and the regular election, jury trial. these things are not the natural condition of an advanced society. there presets overwhelming
CSPAN
Jun 14, 2015 12:00am EDT
idea from vietnam to china to latin america the concept of what it is to engage the world has been colonized by the presupposition that ideas can only be legitimate to the tiny set of market conditions in the academic framework. i'm not an anti-academic. what i'm concerned about is whether it is in the larger scope of intellectual work so it becomes crucial if we are trying to speak to our species which means actually speaking beyond our generation really to do something called saying something. one of the things that becomes crucial here is reflected in the audience i see because you because you see there are people in this audience who are aspiring for the academic profession but i see quite a few people because i know them in different contexts or just simply people that love ideas. if they would look at him where people are talking about it more but the question of what he says actually moves her spirit. now when we begin thinking through this it becomes crucial to think through the university press is doing. you know what the book culture is doing because it is reminding us of
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2014 10:30am EDT
secret moderate, at least one who has demonstrated an interest in china have a better relationship with the united states. for what reason? am sure there were plenty. he had given signals as early as june of '85 and navy diver was executed. he personally interceded and held resolve that crisis. and that registered with people like george shultz and others. this was something that probably helps them think, well, maybe something like this could pair now. even when they got to his nephew and they're reaching finally the centers of power, the commander of air defense forces, then met with him. the thought we have this breakthrough. we're getting to the right people. it does not take long before he tells of good news. this has reached a point where our side will form a commission. americans say, who is on the commission to metcalf of the innocent people they'd go with before. it is the same revolutionary guard deputy head of intelligence to is still around. he was considered such a negative force that the name that they gave him was a monster . he is named to the commission that will deal w
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2014 4:00pm EDT
introduce them. moment,on goes to china james madison is able to bring the federalist majority to his side and passed the bill of rights. it was remarked among his haverters that the antis a new supporter, james madison. the bill of rights passed. the union was cemented. we are all here today in the countryost prosperous in the history of the world. this is set against an unpromising context. try to imagine a crippling national debt, government paralyzed bipartisanship, that seemed wholly inadequate pre-leaders that seemed inadequate. you can't imagine it. [laughter] it is impossible to think about. one of my favorite quotes, history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes. [laughter] madison and monroe found themselves trying to make this work against the most favorable context that may be anybody has ever faced. they rose to the occasion. every generation in american history has faced challenges. the first generation did read every subsequent generation did. pestilence, war, economic calamity. each in a ration rose to the occasion and passed on to the next generation of a country that w
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 8:00am EDT
. reintroduce them. in a nixon goes to china moment, where only the strong anti-communist could have gone to that country and opened it up to the west, james madison is to bring the federalist majority over to his side and pass the bill of rights remarked among madison's many supporters that the anti-s have a new hero, unlikely hero. james madison. and because of the election of 789 that the bill of rights passed, the union is cemented, e're all here today in the freest, most prosperous greatest country in the history of the world. set against a very unpromising context. a crippling national debt, a that was intensely paralyzed by partisanship, a seemed wholly inadequate. leaders that seem inadequate. you can't imagine it, right? it's impossible to think about. mark twain said history doesn't repeat itself, it rhymes. monroe make themselves trying to make it work against one of the most nfavorable contacts that i think. they rose to the occasion. every generation in american history has faced challenges, first generation did and every subsequent generation did, postlens or war calamity or al
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 4:15pm EST
east and china where you have conglomerations of 200,000 people within the 14 day travel time of one another. the incubation period is 14 days. epidemiologist have done the computer simulation concluded that smallpox may take the jumps into the human species italy with a concentrated populations of the river valleys with the grain silos with rhoda population it is to come tomorrow and the human species and it maintained its immortality to declare e. eradicate -- eradicated in 1979 by the who and mal lee lives and laboratories and a frozen state. so it is in an earlier phase of an attempt to make himself -- itself a moral and human species. we have some images. this is from zaire their pretty much like what we see today. the guys that discovered it but what is ebola in the way? but that virus particle looks like a strand of spaghetti and only has seven structural proteins better in this spaghetti shape their these enzymes that have a replication process. but at this center of a container of protein is a strand of rna which contains that genetic code of the virus. one recent sample of
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2015 8:00am EST
rights, i plan to introduce them. and a in aches ongo to china moment, only the anti-communists could have gone to that country. james madison able to bring the federalist majority to that side and pass the bill of rights. it was remarked that the anti-s have a new hero, an unlikely hero, james madison. because of the election in 1789 that the bill of rights passed, the union was cemented. we're all here today in the freest most prosperous greatest country in the history of the world. it's set against a very unpromising context. try to imagine if you will, a crippling national debt, a government that was intensely paralyzed by partisanship. a government that seemed inadequate. a leader that seemed inadequate. you can't imagine it, right? impossible to think about. one of my favorite quotes is that history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes. madison and monroe found themselves trying to make it work against the most unfavorable context i think anybody a decision maker would have faced. they wrote every generation faced challenges. every subsequent generation did whether it's pes
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 9:00pm EDT
francisco. .. unlocking the power of possibility. the latest book is entitled a china man's chance, one family's journey in the chinese american dream. please join me in welcoming eric lewis. >> the question begs to be answered, why the title? >> have in this conversation, gathering dust together today. i am really excited to talk, and this title in particular, the phrase "a chinaman's chance" by think many people know the phrase that has fallen into most to pub of this review and out of use. it is slower, and in essence, and a phrase that has its origin really from the earliest days when chinese immigrants first began to arrive here in the united states and laborers from china were given some of the most thankless, dangerous to life threatening jobs and labor wrote mining mounds and so forth such that they often had slim to none chance of surviving which cut short handed in a length of time as a teefor. that phrase long survived its original uses. by the time were under plus years later when my father emigrated to the united states in the late 1950's my dad as a real sponge for la
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2014 5:45pm EDT
china come and put them through los angeles and then this is with u.s. dollars they bring them down across the border and so then for five or seven times what they are worth in pesos so not only for only do only for the long delay for laundering the money but also the currency and this is really hard to detect when you have immigration and customs enforcement and investigations trying to develop the new outfits to counter that and you've got the irs and the financial crimes enforcement network and the department of justice that going after the banks we have never leveled criminal charges against any bank employees we are just slapping them with fines. >> of the the most effective place to go to stop this is take the money. we haven't spent enough money going after the money congress confiscated a million dollars, $10 million bet at the bank level going after morgan chase -- where do you think most of that money is coming in. >> department of justice has been quoted as saying they are afraid of delivering criminal charges because it will partially collapsed the financial system. >> i
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 8:00am EDT
ter, that the states is the one country, but like with china, previously, who does not recognize the as a fact. different. maybe politicians. i mean, the villain of the peace politicians, by the way. basically, constantly interfere. thaw constantly interfere in the workings of what the professionals are doing. this ing is that we have bizarre situation where the revolution is not recognized as ground.ty on the because they assume that recognizing the revolution means and exact and legitimatize everything that comes after it. that that's not the case. i had a conversation with the americans, i said why don't you as a reality but don't have to accept all of the consequences that came with it. accept the revolution's reality on the ground that you make a lot of discontented at what's going on in the moment a ittle more secure in their own position. regime change in the iraqi mode is pretty complete, isn't it? it's not really changing things on the edges, its's uprooting the entire thing and chucking it away. that's difficult to do in iran. it basically pushes the people need to be t
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