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CSPAN
Sep 21, 2014 3:15pm EDT
latest book is entitled "a china man's chance: one families downand the chinese american dream." join me in welcoming eric lu. [applause] >> the question begs to be answered, why the title? >> first of all, thank you for having this conversation and thanks to the world affairs council and asian society for gathering us together today. i really excited to talk about this book, and the title in particular, the phrase "a chinaman's chance" many people noes phrase that has fallen into both disrepute and out of use. it is a slur in essence. and a phrase that has its origins from the earliest days when chinese immigrants arrived in the united states, and laborers from china were given some of the most thankless, dangerous, life-threatening jobs in laying the railroads, mining, such that they often had a slim to no chance of surviving. which got short-handed in the language of the time as china man's chance of surviving, and ironically, that phrase long survived its original usage. by the time, 100 pleasure years later, when my father immigranted to the united states in the late 1950s
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2014 3:00pm EDT
world, what ever quarter existed was part of an empire. in china and the ideas that states balance each other didn't exist. in the islamic world it didn't exist in that sense. the sovereignty of states and the balance of their actions with each other was believed to produce in the national order and international order. that is why i started to attempt to of fly to the contemporary circumstances. this is not a cook book you can read to the international order will be, it is an attempt to tell you, this is what we are up against now. and ways of looking at it. it does not say that i don't know what the end results of these conflicts and these ambiguities that you described will be. >> what i am getting at is that the westphalean piece which was 1648 after the 30 years' war, those who like to believe history repeats itself, remember the fight over the shape of the paris peace corps table, 1648, and an endless number of doors so everyone could enter by the same import door and i believe you described they had to walk -- >> this same moment. >> some things don't change but the more relevant
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 9:00pm EDT
francisco. .. unlocking the power of possibility. the latest book is entitled a china man's chance, one family's journey in the chinese american dream. please join me in welcoming eric lewis. >> the question begs to be answered, why the title? >> have in this conversation, gathering dust together today. i am really excited to talk, and this title in particular, the phrase "a chinaman's chance" by think many people know the phrase that has fallen into most to pub of this review and out of use. it is slower, and in essence, and a phrase that has its origin really from the earliest days when chinese immigrants first began to arrive here in the united states and laborers from china were given some of the most thankless, dangerous to life threatening jobs and labor wrote mining mounds and so forth such that they often had slim to none chance of surviving which cut short handed in a length of time as a teefor. that phrase long survived its original uses. by the time were under plus years later when my father emigrated to the united states in the late 1950's my dad as a real sponge for la
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2014 8:00pm EST
, wyatt went to china to find out who was making this cheap chest of drawers that war threatening to bring history down. he was thinking about filing what would become the world's largest antidumping petition, and so that comes before this part, and this where is i'm telling you how i found the story. and it sort of laying out all the threads of the book, i was driven initially by the question of, what happened to all those people who lost their jobs. half of the work force was displayed, almost 20,000 people. where did they go? what happened to them? and the second driving question was really, was there another way? was there another way it could have been done? and so a friend of mine, who was visiting last week, who helped me with the book, andrea tzer, lives in washington, dc, and she said your book is wonderful. she said, you found this amazing story that goes all the way to china and back. and the guy is still alive. [laughter] >> you know how lucky you are? living history. so, i'm going to read. once in a reporter's career if one is very lucky, a person like john bassett iii comes a
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 8:30pm EDT
tonight, that people say, what do you remember nixon for? and one says, china. or watergate. those two things. let me just list some of the things he did very quickly. in his first term before watergate. the ended the vietnam war, brought our troops home, brought the p.o.w.'s home. opened up china to the world and west. negotiates the evidence greatest strategic arms agreement since the washington naval treaty of 1922. he rescued israel in the yom kippur war. he brought egypt out of the soviet bloc other into the west. ended the draft. gave 18-year-olds the right to vote. desegregatessed the south. only 10% desegregated when johnson left office. 70% when nixon left office. he created the epa, osha, and the cancer institute. he named four justices to the supreme court, including two chief justices. the lat e e'er one, william rhenquist. he then won a 49-state landslide, unbelievable. the biggest loser of all times, 49-state landslide, and he put together a political coalition that dominated presidential elections for 20 of the next 24 years. had it not been for watergate i think peo
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 6:50am EST
personal odyssey of self-discovery across three coulters, a person with a bumpy road, kenya, china, and america. so i will start with a couple of readings and i welcome, welcome any comments or any questions that anybody has. thank you. i was just saying i can walk with us. this is not working, right? can i use this? i will use this one. thank you. kenya, where it all began. africa is a place of sublime contrast and savage indifference. but you for the first time of lions hunting and killing, muscles rippling in the sun. to see a -- to see pick up the body of opponents with justice deep alternate of blue sky that stretches for infinity. of sampling experience. how do i can do what it means to grow up in such beauty and harshness? i can only show the vignettes and memories the pass in and out of my consciousness like sunlight through a diamond facets. the years, days and hours shift in bloor like a mirage hovering over a burning hot road. born in 1965, i lived in kenya until i was 18. the scene of potent defense of the bard before life also furnish me with the bricks from which i la
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2014 1:30am EDT
is very much oriented towards the rest of the world and the pacific basin. china and korea and japan, australia, and to latin america, are always at the forefront of the way in which we think about our relationship to the environment and the way in which we regulate it. we have problem here now. we success any cleaned up a lot of our smog evictions. we evicted most of the heavy industry. we cleaned up our cars and vehicles. the air is much cleaner now. now we have smog coming to us from china, not only blowing across the pacific, which they're noticing, but we have a lot of diesel engines coming through, chips that come 0 to the sport of long beach and los angeles and then trains and trucks that haul those goods off to chicago and kansas city, and we exported our smog but we're bringing it back in the form of the goods which are manufactured offshore. so, change is the way in which we have to regulate it. we have to can, how to decope with a globalized economy because we're not separate phenomenon it. >> host: you have talked about the tensions often involved in these issues, and one
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2014 3:45pm EDT
part of the u.s. military. david eimer, a former china correspondent for the sunday telegraph, examines the social and political landscape of china's remote regions in "the emperor far away: travels at the edge of china." and in "blood aces," doug swanson, investigative project editor at the "dallas morning news", recounts how the late casino owner, benny binion, helped shape current day las vegas. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> starting now on booktv, peter finn talks about the publishing history of boris pasternak's dr. zhivago. the manuscript of the book -- which was banned in the soviet union because of its critical depiction of the 1917 revolution -- was smuggled out of the country in 1956 and published widely around the world. the cia, recognizing the ideological value of the book, published a russian-language version and smuggled it back into the soviet union where it was sold on the black market and became an underground hit. this is about half an hour. >> hi. it's a great pleasure
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2014 8:00pm EST
book we actually go through the china decision as an example not of the china issues which have been well covered, but rather, that we followed our process thoroughly and fully in that particular and very important decision or for the company. >> jonathan, how do you feel meetings shaped the culture at google, and how did we do them differently -- >> well, you were in my weekly staff meeting. >> i was. i learned all kinds of things. >> so the, our staff meeting we actually had one of the apm assigned to do chain gang tasks even week, and -- each week, and his job or her job was to assemble all of the information so instead of everybody coming into the meeting and getting updated, we actually had all of the information go out the day before, and then we would come in, and after everybody got really good at sort of reciting their information, i would insist that we go around the table and force everyone to articulate what is it that they need from their peers, the other people in the room, to be more efficient? and that was how we started. that was how we actually ran my staff meetings
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2014 4:00pm EST
. thinking about the drivers of that, seems to me one of the main ones was china, london, new york for being the capital of global finance 0 learning more about it, and this was the very powerful source, the process of learning more about its started with fists embarrassingly simple thing, literally not knowing what words meant. and an embarrassing extent. >> your father was the banker. >> the old fashioned to more. a sleepy colonial institution called hong kong and shanghai bank. at that point, 200 biggest bank in asia. it was the biggest bank in the world. and you lend money at 6% and on the golf course. and you don't accidentally blow up the world. >> when you were a kid blowing up did you have a sense what he did for a living? >> no, he didn't talk about it much. he didn't like talking about money. he occasionally talked about -- he would point to one of the areas that has been on tv, pointing to a shoe factory and saying he had given when he was a local branch manager the initial loan to start the business. a lot of people feel put off, they feel kind of never get their head aroun
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2014 2:55pm EDT
to try to force the them out of china, but neville chamberlain would not go along with it. in september 1938 when hitler, thanks to his presumed military superiority, was able to bluff the british and the french into handing most of czechoslovakia over to him. this was a great shock in the united states, and it was at that point that roosevelt, first of all, talked about increasing aircraft production. but secondly, set in motion new military planning by the joint board, the senior military authority. and that planning, which was completed in 1939, was for a war potentially against germany, italy and japan without any help from any other power. in other words, they were already preparing for the situation in which hitler might have defeated britain and france. now, this nightmare suddenly seemed to be coming true this april and may -- in april and may of 1940. first, the germans, under the nose of the british navy, not only occupied denmark, but managed to seize norway. something which according to the traditional rules of warfare they shouldn't have been able to do, but they
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2014 1:25am EDT
the british to try to force the japanese out of china but that failed when china would not go along with it. the next big turning point was the munich agreement in september 1938 when hitler thanks to his presumed military superiority particularly in the air was able to bluff the british and the french into handing czechoslovakia over to him. this was a great shock in the united states and it was at that point that roosevelt first of all talk about increasing aircraft production but secondly set in motion new military plans by the joint board the senior military authority. that plan which was completed in early 1939 was for a war potentially against germany and japan without any help from any other power. in other words they were already preparing for the situation in which hitler might have defeated britain and france. now, this nightmare suddenly seem to be coming true in april and may of 1940. first, the germans under the british navy not only occupied denmark but managed to seize norwalk something which according to the rules of warfare they should've been able to do since the b
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2014 4:15pm EDT
an anti-china to build a project in china because he didn't think he would be around to see the new york subway happened. he was in china working on a huge project their any cable grants us come back, we're ready to build now. so he comes back. what else? other questions. >> i was wondering the waters in the back bay that must've been very difficult. >> it was a huge obstacle they had to overcome. one of the transit commission reports were explicit in saying this tunnel has to be able to float on water. they knew they had to make it so secure and so safe and watertight that it just would not get any water because they and the public was terrified of that. water is going to come in and whatever. it's a great anecdote for the first time in boston the engineer in the chief contractor took a group of people like the mayor and the governor down into the tunnel and everyone was prepared for this to be dank, dark, and wet. that's what they expect it to be. at one point he sort of looked on a switch. you have to remember this is the time when lightbulbs were no. i mean, edison invented the
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2014 9:33pm EDT
can compete. with china's building, investing enormously the military including the deep water navy. russia is investing in their military capabilities and other nations as well are expanding their military might and ambitions. i happen to think the president's policies, this going out with a personal charm offensive and believing the people all want the same thing. we can all get along and by the way the navy in the multipolar world militarily is the way to go. who else besides us if it's a multi-polar military world are the others russia and china? is that who we want to see? i believe in having an american economy, and american diplomacy and an american military so strong that no one in the world would think of testing us. [applause] >> says a good republican i'm proud to say that i'd like to return to the principles of harry truman. i would like to once again say that we would be involved in the world. it's important to be involved in the world to keep bad things from happening. we had intelligence telling us that isis was being formed and i might come into iraq and attack a cit
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2014 7:45pm EDT
guess what? america is not here we can compete china is investing enormous in in the military including deepwater navy is in their military capabilities i think the president's policies and believing that people all want the same thing we can all get along the be a multi polar world militarily who else besides us? if it is a multi polar world are others russia and china? is that what we want to see to have the american economy and diplomacy and military so strong space in the world would think of testing us. [applause] and so i am proud to say i want to return to the principles of harry truman. to say we will be involved in the world. but to keep bad things from happening. intelligence tells us that isis is being formed a and the president watched now it is difficult to pull it out it is important. this kind of group would-be a terrible conclusion for the world and for us. and not pulling back to say we hope that things will happen. that is like paying the cannibals to eat you last. [laughter] we have to be involved we're the leader of the free world. we will promote our values and free
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2014 1:00pm EST
photographerphotographs were published without her name on it. and anyone, someone from china or kenya can go to the website of the library of congress, and you can get access to her photographs and you can even buy beautiful prints of them and there's no permission involved. and she did do a lot of photography in the 1950s and the 1960s that is her private photography and not worked differently. but there were some wonderful things despite not being a full string during that timeframe. >> host: will she unique at the time? being a photographer? >> guest: many women did it out of their own homes. so you could do this in one room while you took care of your children up her dinner. especially someone who is on the road, she was absolutely unique. not only the only woman but the only pair in. when she married paul taylor, they had six children. and she was extremely lucky in marrying him. he adored her and he thought she was a genius. he was secure in his own career but he never felt the slightest resentment of her. he even traveled with her and he would engage people in conversation whil
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2014 4:51pm EDT
and economic union that would compete with your european union, nato on the one hand and china on the other hand. that is the way how i see them looking at that. in terms of the authoritarian regimes, ukraine -- not estonia, not las via, not lithuania -- but ukraine creates a major challenge to that kind of arrangement, authoritarian arrangement that exists in russia today. because good half of ukraine speaks russian. in terms of many elements, not all, but many elements of political culture, they're very close. and many pro-democratic activists in russia look at ukraine and kiev with hope that this middle class that has ability to modellize itself without support from
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 6:30pm EST
china they call the united states and as we have seen of the united states isn't providing the leadership, nobody else will. i wish that were not the case. we would love to see nato and europe and countries coming to say let's get together to respond to these crisis but it's the united states that drives the process and about has to be the role of the president and the role of this country. we have the value system to ensure that we are the leaders in the world that is facing a number of dangerous threats. >> we are running out of time. you can take two more questions and then you will have a final question. >> it is an honor to speak with you tonight. my question touching on something that you spoke on earlier what advice would you give a young person today looking to start a career in public service? will >> the best advice is to jump in and get involved. we take the polls with the young people at the panetta institute, and they are discouraging because young people are turned off by the dysfunction in the town and public servants aren't doing what they are supposed to do the
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2015 7:30pm EST
some of them stayed on. a polish jewish refugee who went to china early in the war to escape the nazis became a member of the chinese communist party stayed in china until his death a thing. he was still there. i met him 1980 or 1981 at the american embassy of all places. thank you. [applause] >> their books for sale and you can bring them back here for him to sign. [inaudible conversations] booktv recently visited wheeling west virginia with the help of the local cable partner comcast. we start a trip with jeff rutherford. his book, combating genocide on the eastern front, examines combat and occupation policies of the german army during world war ii. >> we are with jeff rutherford author of combating genocide on the eastern front. why did you write this book collects. >> i've always been interested in the second world war and the war was between nazi germany and the soviet union so i looked for my dissertation and i want to do something on a complex that i was also interested in and not just a military confrontation but the ideological struggle that the nazis were raging agains
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 5:04pm EDT
your enemy. but we've looked up china and england at that time. these words were mostly written in a letter and printed in the times he can see the work he put into it to have jokes about drips of money. puns are an acquired taste for some of us but people respond. sometimes it is so laden joke. and the iconic image is. did you probably had to have a show about this. this was a great photographer and what i discovered in the research at this library is a had not realized she worked for the magazine that she worked for the government and had a rather specific assignment to capture poverty in photographs. she worked for a man named a striker who would do a great cartoon book and setup the photographers to look for images of poverty to make the case that government spending was necessary. was it real? totally. where is their propaganda? yes. that is why capture in it "the forgotten man" the book so we try to you draw that in the cartoon that -- book he has a great ability as a mother was not having a of a good day. but also a drew the pages before and after. and then it in economics for
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 7:45am EST
of all the u.s. spends more than annex 13 countries combined. china is included and not on the military. we have 11 aircraft carriers. china has one that they just recently got used to the ukraine. i think a lot of this is manufactured. i think we have to figure out how to keep spending on our military. i think we create drugs. we are excellent at creating threads in this country they really serve no immediate existential dread to the united states. i mean we could talk about all the potential enemies. what we've realized -- what we've realized is how our military is not the solution here we are currently fighting an enemy we created in iraq, an enemy that did not exist before we invaded iraq to the military is the last thing we should be thinking about as far as the name forward as a country, as a planet. all it does is destroy. we are not protecting anything. we are not saving anything. so anyway, we can go on about it, but i just think there's other things to be concerned about. >> i really appreciated hearing both of your comments. it sounds very similar to things that seem
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 9:00pm EDT
concerned about their children. i don't know how many time is heard that. india and china are on the rise and our kids no longer have a competitive advantage, just being from the united states. they -- to address this one father said i took my son with me on a business trip to china so he could see our our people in asia work so their kids could see what was coming other. family took their daughters on a tour of a call center? india to understand the forces of globalization, and they said to them if you don't have a skill set that is unique or new jersey set that is unique, your job is going to end up in another country. which is probably terrifying to hear when you're ten. right? so, these families -- i hope i'm conveying it but a lot of anxiety. among the wealthiest family is talked to, they needed a net worth north of so millionbefore they felt really fortunately secure, and so all of this is to say that the dividing lines among us are not just economic. they're also emotional. in terms of how we're defining security. >> one of the thing yours book brings out is there a lot of coping m
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2014 7:00am EDT
he left to china. he is in china working on a huge project there and he gets a cable gram that says comeback, we are ready to build no. so he comes back. [inaudible] >> it was a huge obstacle to overcome. one of the transit commission reports, they were explicit in saying that the still has to be able to float on water. they knew they had to make it so secure and so safe and watertight that it just would not get any water because they knew the public was terrified of that, that's was going to happen, water was going to coming. there's an anecdote in the book with the first time in boston the engineer and the chief contractor took a group of people like the mayor and the governor down into the tunnel and sort of, everyone was prepared for this to be dank, dark, smelly and what. that's what they expected it to be. at one point he sort of flipped on switch and gentlemen but this is a time when lightbulbs were new. edison invented the lightbulb sort of a decade earlier. so it was a new thing. and sort of flipped a switch and the entire tunnel was bathed in bright white light, and everyo
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2015 12:00pm EST
would do about isis how he would respond to vladimir putin or how he would deal with the south china sea and china's aggressive behavior you might hear a load of stuff which may or may not be true. people like to cherry pick quotes from the founders to support any position so on the one hand, john quincy adams, we know as you pointed out sir, would be against all forms of intervention. america goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. that's an 1821 when he says this. yet two years before he is supporting aggressive military policy expansionist military policy into florida, which is spanish florida at this time. because preemptively it can begin to nudge through the threat of military force, spanish power out of florida to make sure it falls into our owner bit. so i would say just as a caution before i begin to answer your question be wary of understanding what john quincy adams would say about a threat today. now with all that background, what would john quincy adams say today about the threat of going abroad? i don't know if he would be against it, nor can i really say he w
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2013 7:15am EST
if you're president of the china today, do you order drone strikes knowing that civilians are going to die? well, you sort of have to if you are going to be a leader of a great nation. >> this one is more directed to mr. brands. you talked about how history was written by the victors but you also said that most of our knowledge from the support comes from the south. my question is why didn't you write the videography and somebody today like -- robert e. lee comes to mind, some from south like jefferson davis. >> so is the question why didn't i write about them over -- >> i mean, war is still two-sided spent let me elaborate on this basis of the southern interpretation of the war. one of the things that happened and people like john hay were complicit in this, and many members of the republican party, in fact those who call themselves liberal republicans who joined in with the democrats to run against grant in 1872. there was this great desire and one can understand it, to forget those late unpleasantries as southerners like to call the civil war. they wanted to get over the sexual c
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2014 9:00pm EDT
countries really paying attention to what is going on. a huge issue in china, japan , western europe , people try to create dementia friendly societies. who was on the front lines as the first responder? the caregiver for the we make the assumption there well.fcqá"tiup)e getting sick tg care of our loved ones. they pay lip service to us and that should make some of you upset. i wrote this because i don't want anyone to live the life i have lived. i made my choices then and believe them or not i have had reporters second-guess why i would do this. but if you see this tizziesqe6Ñ up close there was nothing left for me to do.:11xz because of early onset they hide out big apple, it -- the hippocampus goes into overdrive they fight to keep control as they lose control. the struggle that you have the drop-off is very precipitous because they fight so hard so long so it is not the soul progression but something more precipitous. doctors say those as early onset do not last long but i in"r my 20th year but the doctors don't know. they all went to west to telesco when they said to me harvey
CSPAN
Jun 14, 2015 6:04pm EDT
manufacturing then it goes to some place like china india or vietnam where their regulations are not nearly as stringent as ours there will be more emissions and more pollution so i don't think it really helps the globe. doesn't help the united states economy and most certainly doesn't help globally. >> i should just add if a company is poisoning rivers are poisoning the air we have regulations to take care of that and that's something if they were destroying the planet that would be one question but the department of energy and the epa, they are the perfect example to get into talks about regulatory reform. if we look at some things proposed in congress right now it would make it so that congress and there's a large bill over a certain cost congress would have to approve it rather than use regulatory agencies functioning as their own branch of government even though they are not elected. this is something we could do to rein in the executive branch rather than pushing regulations over and over and the general tendency of agencies is to overstate the benefits of what they are doing a
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2013 11:00am EST
china of its day during this period. britain was the world's economic superpower but there were a number of other powerful players on the world stage at this time. france was a major player even after the napoleonic wars, russia was a rising power, spain was becoming less important but still a player. on the one hand, this age of nationalism, all these competing powers that pursued their national interests and end up with some great powerful self-interest and statesman. otto von bismarck became prime minister, so the age of blood and iron is coming. in britain, austin is famous for saying britain had no internal friends, only national interests. in france you had napoleon iii and victor hugo's description, i will read his fantastic description of napoleon iii, napoleon is a man of middle height, cold, pale, slow, looks like he is not quite the way, esteemed by women who want to become prostitutes and men who want to become prefects. that is what we are dealing with in this era, that is the cast of characters. many self-described realist foreign policy thinkers like henry kissinger
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 6:45pm EDT
50,000 years ago we had people in the north china sea all over asia. these were maritime people and yet we find people in the arct arctic, up in the arctic 40,000 years ago way on up near the bering straits, 30,000 years ago but there is no, but north america remains untouched. the best we know about 50,000 years ago. people have been here for 30,000 years but were totally invisible and they are just a smattering of people. there were pre-clovis people but there's no evidence they thrived or even survived that there were a few people. the big migration happened when the clovis people whose first site is in montana upstream of us right now. that was the first successful colonization of the americas. somehow it's all in here argued carefully. i think they probably had to wait. there were people in the last end they had to wait until the quarter held out. we know the quarter melted out because -- visited north america. they were hunted in alaska over 300 years ago. they showed up because of the four shouts. elk would have needed a quarter from alaska to montana that was rich enough. na
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 3:30pm EDT
attention to what is going on. a huge issue in china, japan, all for western europe. people are trying to create dementia friendly societies. who was on the front lines as a first responder when something goes out? the care giver. we make an assumption in this country that care givers are well. we are getting sick taking care of our loved ones. they are paying lip service to us and making assumptions. that should make some of you upset. i wrote this because i don't want anyone to live the life i have lived. i made my choice is then and i have been forced to defend them, believe it or not. i have had reporters second-guess why i would do this. but if you have seen this disease up close, there was nothing left for me to do. the other thing with early onset and because smart people hide out, the hippocampus as you saw goes into overdrive so they fight so hard to stay in control even if they are losing control, some of the behaviors are very bizarre. the struggles that you have, the drop-off is very precipitous because they fought so hard and so long so you see not the slow progression but yo
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2014 7:30pm EST
didn't see that many cases involving companies are conduct in china. that part of it is another aspect of how ad hoc starring nature of these. these. often the ones that get reported. countries with these investigations come to light may tend to be the countries that signed on to the treason for prosecutors feel comfortable going after the multinational country that should be following the laws of its country, even if the bribes themselves are paid. not particularly followed. so much arbitrariness. the company self-reports. even more. they really have three or four paths. some just brought by the sec as purely civil cases. the fines tend to be lower. prosecutors bring plenty of cases will but they bring some as plea agreement. what factors are supposed to consider. consider. no guidance on why some companies should get convicted and some not. you really see cases they completely different paths. testified in the house. three quarters of a million a month. the money they are. might are. might be a drop in the bucket. as some companies have said that the work is important. they need outs
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2015 4:00pm EST
this is a very important time in china for thought and relatively few philosophers of the late 20th century really address this question directly, they often address it in directly but they rarely make it a fundamental problem for their thinking and this is something that strauss did. the question is did he succeed on his own terms otherwise you might say here is a thinker that is actually reflective upon the dangers of a philosopher or thinker's ideas being misused in a socially and politically irresponsible way. but this whole book is premised upon a response to exactly this kind of misuse of his own ideas and writings. so it might be that he wasn't a particularly good example for his own demand about philosophers and thinkers and how they should write and speak in such a way as to be socially and politically responsible which means that in such a way to at least the extent that is feasible in the relatively free society to prevent the misuse of their ideas by people who are political extremists or with extreme political agendas. so on that somewhat critical note i think i'm going
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 4:00pm EST
competition from china threatens to overwhelm us social mobility is at its lowest point in generations to name only a few versions of the national apocalypse that yet may come. but at the same time, somehow something like an official cult of optimism, the greatest nation in the history of the earth, saturates the land. how did it happen? this is one of the questions the invisible bridge poses. here is another. what does it mean to believe in america? to wave a flag or to struggle towards a more searching alternative to the flag wavers? during the years covered in these pages, americans debated this question with an intensity unmatched before or since. even if they didn't always know that this is what they were doing, i hope this volume might become a spur to renewing that debate in these years at a time that cries for reckoning once more, in a nation that is ever -- that has ever so adored its own innocence and so dearly wishes to see itself as an exception to history. thank you. [applause] >> wow, that was great. stick around we've got some great questions. i mean, these are are really f
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2014 8:59am EST
we were gathered in large numbers congregated in river valleys in the middle east and in china where you had conglomerations of up to 200,000 people within a 14-day travel time of one another. the incubation period for smallpox virus is up to 14 days. and epidemiologists who have done the math and the computer simulation have concluded that smallpox might have been making little jumps into the human species, but only with the growth of agricultural, concentrated populations in river valleys and with grain silos, with explosions of rodent population living on the grain, the virus was able to become immortal in the human species. and smallpox maintained its immortality until it was declared eradicated by the world health organization in 1979. and it now lives only in laboratories in a frozen state. so ebola virus is somewhere in an earlier phase of an attempt, so to speak, to make itself immortal in the human species. we have some images. this is from zaire in 976 -- 1976, and the images are pretty much like what we're seeing today. the guy that discovered it, carl johnson, is st
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2014 11:15am EST
those are with the flying tigers in china and burma. i have to tell a story about joe. wonderful human being. one of the most gracious, genuine people i ever had the pleasure of knowing. and a christian gentleman. he was an evangelist. he would go anywhere to speak about his faith. but beneath that ev angeles, he was also a dedicated, devoted marine corps combat aviator and that meant highly competitive. joe used to joke and say he was so competitive that he had a hard time putting his grandchildren win at go fish. >> how many of the marine corps aces live down -- there were some who lived on to fight in korea here there is what one or more of the non? >> there were no marine corps is in vietnam. the one marine corps and the korean war have been one of the black sheep. his name was jack bianchi flew regular to wear in korea with the marine corps squadron and then another one of these dedicated warriors who lived for combat. he was selected to fly an exchange tour with the air force near the end of the war and he shut down six communists made 15 jet fighters, so the marine cores o
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2015 3:40pm EST
going to consider them. in a nixon goes to china moment where only that strong anti-communist could have gone to that country and opened it up to the west, james madison is able to bring the federalist majority over to his side and pass the bill of rights. it was remarked among madison's many supporters that they have a new hero and it was an unlikely hero, james madison. it was because of the election of 1789 that the bill of rights passed, that the union was cemented and that we are all here today in the freest, most prosperous greatest country in the history of the world and this is set against a very unpromising contest. try to imagine, if you will, a crippling national debt, a government intensely paralyzed by partisanship, leaders that seemed inadequate. i know, you can't imagine it, right? impossible to think about. [laughter] and one of my favorite quotes, mark twain says history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes. [laughter] madison and monroe found themselves trying to make this work against the most unfavorable contest that i think maybe any body of decision makers has e
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2014 8:00am EDT
that keep the city's placed strict operational. in the south china sea bbc news reporter bill hayden deconstructs the complex history in modern day dispute over the important asian trade routes. kathryn harrison recounts the story of a shepherd is to become a military beater in joan of arc. a life transfigured. the book is in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals happening around the country. all this weekend booktv is live from the texas book festival in austin. also happening this weekend is the boston book festival. look for coverage coming weeks and then november 1st the louisiana book festival will be held in baton rouge and from november 22nd to the twenty-third booktv will be live from the miami book fair international. let us know about book fairs and festivals happening in your area and we will lead them to our list. e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> booktv as bookstores and libraries throughout the country about the nonfiction books their most anticipating
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2014 7:30am EDT
the scene in massacre in china. and netanyahu, he's been around a while, as have i, netanyahu gave a famous speech at the university and he said israel's big mistake was it didn't take advantage of the tiananmen massacre to carry out a mass expulsion and the occupied palestinian territories. so you know this guy knows how to connect unpredictable events with political initiatives. that's politics. when the malaysian airliner was bound, he saw the opportunity -- downed. the lost cause, the cease-fire and the malaysian airliner down in turkey now had the pretense to launch the ground invasion. before get to what happened after, i want to dispose of all of the nonsense that has been said about hamas rockets, the miracle of iron dome, and now the tunnels that they have discovered in gaza. let's start with the first. does hamas have rockets? not, when i conjure up in my mind a rocket, i conjure up something pretty tall, pretty impressive, and pretty destructive. that's a rocket in my mind. maybe i have a quaint imagination, but that's what i see. so now let's use some simple, commonsense.
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2014 7:30pm EDT
, latina, to china, an asian or continuous pics she suggests these but multiple streams strengthened rather than weakened the movement and i would just like to argue that the same could be said for the ideological differences among predominantly white feminist groups. indeed, as a scholar i recognize the multiple movements attacking the same issue from diverse perspectives of strategies. nonetheless, as an activist i still side with collective multiracial and broad class of social justice efforts and i still have never joined the national organization for women which doesn't mean they don't do some of this work. it's just that my roots in community-based, multiracial, women's organizing has always made me feel like i just can't go there. so some of these divisions, or maybe i just told recent much longer than linda does. maybe just personality. but this is a small caveat in a book that analyzes issues so close to my scholarship and dear to my heart, this is my only substantive disagreement and, of course, it's generative as disagreements are. by offering complex and nuanced marriages
CSPAN
Sep 20, 2014 9:00am EDT
a difference. .. after that doris kearns goodwin and >> i was an exchange student studying in china in 1989, so i'm very, very excited to be able to introduce our next speaker. i think most of us here may not recognize her, but we certainly recognize her voice. t i'm here to introduce louisa lim to talk about her book, "the people's republic of amnesia." she is the voice, as i said, from china for national public radio or has been, and appreciate that she work -- prior to that she worked for bbc. that she worked for bbc. over a decade of reporting she has earned many prestigious prizes and broadcasting awards for her work. during the previous academic year 2013 to 2014 louisa was a mic wallace fellow at the university of michigan and i just learned for the next academic year she will be teaching at the university of michigan in journalism school. for me reading her book brought back to me a flood of memories from my year in china and especially the events that surrounded tiananmen. having been in china around that time i found a reason quote in "the wall street journal" about her bo
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2014 10:00pm EDT
with china and successfully negotiated the paris peace accord that accomplished the withdraw of american forces from vietnam for which he won the nobel peace prize in 1973 and parenthetically the gratitude of this young attendant in the united states army. thank you mr. secretary. there are countless other honors including the presidential medal of freedom, the medal of liberty and the national book award for history for the first volume of his memoirs, the white house years. his new book, world order is a shrewd and comprehensive analysis of the challenges of building international order in a world of differing perspectives, violent conflict, burgeoning technology and ideological extremism. and if you will learn about the westphalian peace and you will be led on a fascinating exploration of european balance of power from charlemagne to the present time, islam and the middle east, the u.s. and iran, the multiplicity of asia and the continuing development of u.s. policy. in my business the questions are often more important than the answers and secondary kissinger has some brilli
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2014 1:30pm EDT
the big says germany china france you k you can see that this group in 1970 was clustered private debt so is a global phenomenon. how do we prevent and how do we prepare? to prevent we monitor that aggregate if you are convinced of the theory it is easy to see it. i was in the banking industry for a long time and i know regulators have a broad array or arsenal of ways to influence the behavior to increase capital requirements to jawbone are any number of things in recalled of behavior of 2005 for your 2007 were not ordinary behavior's people made loans to people who had no in, or no job and a regulator could have intervened. we think by monitoring of that aggregate regulators could see improvement to a crisis. but that leaves the more important issue of where we are today to repair the crisis. rehab accumulated a lot of private debt to drag down the growth today. the way to a lot stronger economic growth is to reduce the ratio or private equity. a lot easier said than done. that paying that takes money of the economy to contract gdp and that is what happened. it has a contractive
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2014 10:00pm EDT
concerned today? china. where after you can see private debt levels through the mid 2000 it has been on the tear. 18 percent is a threshold china is almost 60 percent. that is the source but we also read about over capacity you all read about the coast city symmetry of the state has been built beyond the need of the country there are entire cities that are empty with tens of thousands of empty residences. and the absolute level we have a new number it looks like over 200%. run away lending again yielded over capacity. real-estate, land, excess manufacturing, empty shopping malls. what is the future of china? we think the crisis is possible but they have something that was not true with united states but they own the banks so it is unlikely china allows for that type of crisis. in addition it has lowe's central government debt and ample net worth probably $3 trillion of foreign currency reserves of the books. it has the capacity to deal preemptively but even so it has a significant and increasing level of overcapacity. people rejoiced recently when china reaffirmed the gross level was
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 5:20pm EST
everyone involved -- if you have a rising middle class like in brazil or turkey or in china, a lot of those people are going to want accountable government because they've got property, the government can take it away and that's right the condition under which democracy has spread in many parts of the world. so it's -- it's a big effort to build political institutions that can actually do those demands for participation. ... why it health or disappears is a problem. >> aristotle said this more than two oh thousand years ago, democracy works best in a society if a a broad middle class. the middle class people are educated. they aware of what the government is doing, and they have property, and if the government can take it away through taxation or confiscation, they won't be happen about that. so everywhere the middle class that when support for democracy. that's why in china, for exple, the is why i think in china, for example, the regime is going to have a big problem because right now there may be 30400 trainees that can be classified as middle class. they're the ones text each othe
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2014 8:57pm EST
nixon for? china. the let me list some th things he did very quickly in h first rm. the end t vietm war, bug t troops ho. netied degraded strategic arms agreement. rescued israel from the home cook for four, pulled egypt in the we ended the draft. 82 yr-d n right to vo. desegregatedheou. 10% when johnson left than 70 percent whenixon left he started e a d osha and nedour justices the supreme court including to chief justis. including wiiam rehnquist who wonhe 49state landslid unlievable "the ggest loser" ofll times when he putogher a polic coalition d at dominated the next4 years. had not been through waterge so those are the ideas from theoss and the d n. thk u very much. [alause] . . can reice what richard nixon did in creating the w jority and a 49 stecalition t reagan re-ead in 19 when he won 49 states 14gainst jimmy rt. don't know thatou can cause thetth is we ae another couny ghnow. we have chgeddramatically demographically. we a dferent country than we re today you can look 1stes includg for he ma-ates lirn, newyork ilnois and pennlvania gone democratic x raight times. can gt the
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2014 10:08pm EST
portion. >> the united states will continue to pursue a constructive relationship with china. by virtue of its size and its remarkable growth, china will inevitably play a critical role future of the region. the question is, what kind of role will it play? i just came from beijing. as i said there, the united states welcomes the continuing rise of a china that is peaceful and prosperous and stable and plays a responsible role in world affairs. it is a remarkable achievement at thellions of people lifted out of poverty in china because the extraordinary growth rates they have experienced. that is a good thing that we should want and welcome that kind of development. ofchina is playing the role a responsible actor that is peaceful and prosperous and stable, it is good for the region, it is good for the world, and it is good for the united states. we will pursue cooperation with china where our interests overlap, and there are sick ethic and injuries -- there are significant areas of overlap. more training between the militaries to prevent misunderstandings. more travel and exchange
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 1:35pm EST
growth rate. >> host: what's another success story? south korea? china? >> guest: you know, south korea's a really interesting success story. it's a long process of transition of giving. it so happened that at first they gave a lot more economic freedom, the about for entrepreneurs to flourish and export to markets. and there was an example of a really successful south korean entrepreneur who founded what is now hyundai from, basically, started as a garage repair shop in 1945. today is, like, one of the most successful car companies, of course. and that's what drove a lot of the early success of south korea. and then at some point south koreans also made a lot of effort to get their democratic rights and demanded their political rights as well as their economic rights. that happened in the late '80s, and they were successful in getting a full democracy in place also. so south korea's now a flourishing, prosperous place where south koreans enjoy both political and economic freedom. >> host: china? >> guest: china's more complicated case and is very misunderstood. i think what we're
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2014 8:53pm EDT
existed in almost total isolation from china. there were millions of refugees in hong kong but no american and there was no trade. it was a listening post but not a very informative one. but the experience that he had their used to be typical of the experience that foreign service officers had. he was assigned to interview visa applicants. he learned rudimentary mandarin chinese and it was a undoubtedly a broadening experience for a graduate of exeter yale to suddenly find themselves interrogating an impoverished and desperate people. and it's an experience which washington think tanks have these days have and it produces i would think less certitude and more humanity than we see on the part of those who think that they are entitled to make foreign policy in washington. i was not close to john negroponte during that. math. we grew up in the same apartment building and we were very close childhood friends until about the age of 10. we went off in completely different directions. i did not see him for 50 years. i then saw him when my brother saw his mother's obituary in the newspape
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