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20171124
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2012 18
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2013 8
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
: well, boeing is, a series of agreements with china. one day it's going to come to regret because the company will be really either at chinese subsidiary or working pretty much for the benefit of china and not a u.s. company. and without the plane exports, the sale of boeing planes, our trade deficit would be massive. envy -- what boeing has done basically is turn over its technology to the chinese, to the extent that they are now producing there very own medium-range. >> the equivalent of a 737. >> guest: the equivalent of a 737 plane. they won't be going any more. at some point in time the chinese will sick and it's very nice and we will keep you around, but we don't need to. and how this could happen really says more about the government's involvement in trade policy. we see no problem. it just -- here is the handwriting on the wall. just look and see what you think about it. >> host: what is a faustian bargain? >> guest: in exchange for selling the chinese airplanes, boeing is transferring more of its production to china. so all of this is in the short term. the idea is they are a
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2011 12:00am EST
, muddy waters and the china media experts from? >> guest: note. [laughter] that sounds interesting though. i have actually been pitched a bunch of china stories. first of all there is so much corruption it's dangerous spending in the amount of time following people making -- people are making fortunes in china right now doing crazy things. but it's a little bit dangerous for me to do one of those stories. i don't know specifically what story he's talking about the there have been some good ones. >> host: are you familiar with richard's worked in relationship to the moon? >> guest: you know it's familiar to me but i don't know. if you give me more light know what you're talking about. >> host: that's all we've got. mario in miami. you are on booktv with ben mezrich. >> caller: when you mention the real approach meant [inaudible] >> guest: good question. a lot of people want to know -- a lot of people come to me with their story they want money i think. i have two types of people, people who want money or have so much money they don't want money they just want their story told, which is oft
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
that is as generous as this one. that's one of the points i've been making recently is that china, which is now spreading itself around the world developing man cans to extract natural resources in western africa. they are all over central, south america. until recently they were mostly they're just as extractors. they were taking the riches of those countries. the united states on the other hand has always been both any government away and the nongovernmental way. there when the need is great but if you look at haiti at all the agencies that respond. with other agencies as well. they came in from israel and central europe. i have been involved in something called international rescue committee which for a long longtime refugee organization founded originally by albert einstein to help refugees from central europe come to america during nazi germany. then it kicks are as of again as a hungarian revolt but it's been very active in southeast asia. now in the middle east, and we're all over africa with medical programs and resettlement programs come in getting visas for people who ne
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 9:00am EST
complicated that is trying to understand it is too hard for a small group of china's centrally located planners to ever fully be able to do. and so the way the markets work as they say look, no individual person has to understand the whole thing. the market works because every individual in the market understands just a little bit of it. you can focus on your part buying and selling, creating, sharing. in your part of the world, and over all the totality of all these agents will end up coming up with new solutions to problems, meeting people's needs and so when. so markets are a kind of pure network in that sense. where the pure progressives differ from traditional libertarians is that we don't think that markets solve every problem in society.elf there are many facets of human they experience that are not necessarily solved by mark is, in fact, markets create their own problems sometimes. they approach of bubbles and i things like that. in the internet, there are a lo anies that were trying to build a global network, that would unite computers all around the world and they all
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 9:00am EDT
also they would be paid a decent wage relative to china and we wouldn't have any more -- we would be able to cut down immeasurably on street crime if they had something constructive to do. >> guest: interesting point. it is true we have seen in the success of technology companies, apple and google and amazon, we have seen a great success in american innovation as part of our society where we agree the companies have been tremendously successful and we lead the world in terms of technology but a lot of the jobs that are being created to build those gadgets are overseas in china and so there is a question how these companies can help us deal with the unemployment problem we have or lack of good manufacturing jobs but let me make an additional point which is a big one in "future perfect: the case of progress in a networked age" which is this. there is the interesting questions about why the tech sector has been so successful. one thing we agree on in the state of the economy, technology companies and silicon valley and seattle and new york are the envy of the world. one key reason for t
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2012 9:00am EST
trip to china, he comes home and finds his door won't open. so he and the man who drove him home, cabdriver or livery driver giggle with the door, a neighbor says -- called the police and says i don't know for sure whether it is a break in going on but these two guys who look like they're trying to jeter with the door to get in a don't know what is going on and a police officer goes over and henry louis gates is in his house and a police officer comes in and asks identification. professor gates was not too happy about that but shows an identification showing he lives in the house. it is his house. they have words. the officer essentially lowers him outside. professor gates is screaming at the officer and the officer arrests him for disorderly conduct. in my view the officer was wrong in arresting professor gates even if it was the case that professor gates was not being deferential to the officer, even if it was the case that professor gates was hollering at the officer. police officers carry around weapons. they should be very well trained. they should have discipline. they shou
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
nomination. henry ford is again a democrat. he ran for the united states senator -- china, got cheated out of his seat, but he had been a good advocate during world war i, and was the premier guy in the country publishing the dearborn independent. in the elders of zion, and the international jew. >> host: did he tend to support third-party candidates or supportive of the democratic ticket? >> guest: he would not go off on his own. he would not go off on his own. i think he was a democrat. it had something to do the republicans in the new deal. there was a poll in 1922 or 23. the choice of the american people -- number one was henry ford. this was after all the anti-somatic stat. ann harding was well below that. besides knowing that they were coming and the republicans had taken a big state in the midterms. >> host: what was the effect of the socialist party in the 1920s. >> guest: they can drive five, six, seven, eight, 9% of the vote. for long periods of time they tended to do better in bloggers. when it's going to be a blowout, doesn't matter who you vote for. once closer, they said
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 8:00pm EST
off the coast of china somewhere. columbus thought, that's unusual. columbus then goes on to write that this gate made me realize that the water is coming from a very high place and i began to think that the world is not spherical, the pear-shaped. i stopped right there and i said, wait a minute, they told us that columbus proved the world is round and here he is in his own words say in the is pear-shaped, he then goes onto say, this high point on the earth, where the water comes down is like a woman's, highest and closest to heaven. they didn't tell me that in seventh grade. i'm sure i would've taken notes. but perhaps when you read history or geography and you get it in the sense of the people who've lived through it and this is one of the thing i do in my book is to include these historic voices, american voices, voices of geography, races of the president. it becomes alive, human can a meaningful. it's not just that long list of speeches. indeed, columbus started an era of discovery and exploration that transformed the whole world. it's difficult to say he discovered a world fo
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 8:00pm EDT
killed. china doesn't want to acknowledge the discriminations in western china against the weaker people. many nations hide from the past. but we owe people the truths truths and the history and the value. we owe them repair. we're not doing that. not only that we don't even want to talk about it as a society. >> host: you say the loss of heritage is comparable to the holocaust to some of the other jen sides. >> guest: holocaust was twelve years. this is 246 years plus a century. people lost their names, they lost their languages, they lost their culture. they lost everything. many people had their jen genitals severed. thomas jefferson, when he was 42 years old had a relationship with a 14-year-old girl, sally, that he owned. and it wasn't frowned upon. we know what it would be called today. that was routine. we lost any idea of who we were. it was our past, our memory vanished. and we worked ourselves to early deaths. and built the capitol, built the white house, harvard law school which was endowed by isaac royal from the proceed of sale of slaves he owned. he and the west indies. the
CSPAN
Jun 5, 2011 12:00pm EDT
proposed. and so these five countries -- the united states, france, britain, china, russia -- they rarely agree about anything. so it's, it becomes very difficult for the security council to order that something be done that will address the problem. the question is why can't we reform the security council? maybe we could have majority rule or something like that. but then what happens is no state will concept to that -- consent to that because they're afraid they'll be in the minority with respect to some issue that matters a great deal to them, and then that would cause serious problems that they're not willing to tolerate. that's the basic problem of international organization, and the united nations doesn't solve it. >> host: on the first weekend of june every year, the chicago tribune sponsors the printers row lit fest held in downtown chicago. we're at the university center at the corner of state street and congress just south of the loop. we're with author and law professor eric posner for our "in depth" program. we're also covering, booktv is also covering several panels here at t
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 9:00am EDT
give ourselves enough credit. no other country is as generous as this one. china is developing cavs to extract natural resources in western africa. they were taking the riches of those countries where they were. the united states has always been -- the greatest. if you look at haiti and other agencies i have been involved in the international rescue committee and by albert einstein to help refugees from nazi germany. it kick started the hungarian revolt. very active in southeast asia. now in the middle east and we are all over africa with medical programs, resettlement programs, getting these ofs from people who need to get here. highly congressional staff that operates around the world. one of many. doctors without borders is another one. save the children. no other country in the world is as generous or proactive in advancing human rights. >> host: wendy haze radius in your achene watcher international development and i would like to know what you think about the changes in burma. >> guest: it is very heartening and a perfect example of what happens if you keep the pressure on for
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2011 9:00am EST
china, china has many advantages over us but they don't do as well as we do. they don't create social networks across race and across nationalities as well as we do and this is a great creative force when you have two different people, three, four, seven different people with different cultural and racial backgrounds coming together that just creates a burst of creativity. now i know i'm highlighting a positive and there's a whole negative side, but i do think -- as we feel so depressed of ourselves in the country and we think we're in decline, that -- >> host: we're about an hour in our three-hour conversation with columnist and author david brooks. david is joining us from san francisco. go ahead, please. >> caller: good morning and thank you for letting me participate. a couple of what i call quasi personal questions. one is, i'm a big van of william f. buckley. and i watched david on the charlie rose memorial show that took place right after mr. buckley died. and on that show they played excerpts from his last appearance on charlie rose. and it -- during which mr. buckley said he
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00am EST
south america. he thought he was off the coast of china. he sees a great river rushing into the ocean. we awe know it's the oronoco river. columbus writes this is one of the rivers mentioned in the book of genesis. if you read that you must realize he thought -- columbus thought he found the garden of eden. one of the four rivers mentioned in the book of genesis. that was rather extraordinary to me, the idea that columbus thought he found the garden of eden, which at that time, in the late 1490s, was understandable, people thought the garden of eden was a appraisal and might be off the coast of champion somewhere. columbus then goes on to write, this made me realize that the water coming from a very high place, and i began to think that the world is not a spherical but pear shaped. and i stopped right there and said, wait a minute. they told us that columbus sailed to prove the world is round, and here in his own words he is saying, the word is pear-shaped. he then goes on to say the high point on the earth where the water is coming down is like a woman's breast, and this high place i
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2013 12:00am EDT
reagan was just in china of the time you saw a figure was far from sunshine he was pretty viciously attacking carter as someone did that know what he was doing a and opening danger to american lives for what he was doing to the soviet union he was not afraid to make attacks on jimmy carter -- jimmy carter also something people forget of rated winning in 1880 that conservatives need to take into account bad economies helped liberals that is why fdr could win four separate elections for having the worst economy in american history everyone thought the gap was closing because of the iranian hostage crisis based on the economy he was well ahead so in the last election in cycle people were saying mitt romney he just has to campaign on a bad economy just point to barack obama to say he is bad economics. no. everybody it still has a job so for the most part they don't hurt democrats but help them what plagues them is lack of the enemy that before the soviet union it was the glue is what stuck together what the fiscal conservatism opposition to the soviet union once they felt there was no e
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2012 12:00am EDT
, getting richer and richer. into china, where h constructs, being an engineer, the great engineer constructs the battlement which saves the europeans and the americans from the boxer rebellion. saves millions of lives of people, americans stranded in europe when war breaks out. no one kws how to do it. he put together a private effort. got people out. might have even got my great-grandmother out. that was one of the worst decisions of the family to go to europe in 1914. but got those folks out. and saved people after the war who were starving, saved people in germany. saved people in russia in the middle east, probably saved two million people from starvation, and was a very energetic secretary of commerce under harding and coolidge after this election, but in terms of personality, dower, pragmatic. you listen to -- one of the reasons why franklin roosevelt comes across like gangbusters in the depression with these fireside chats, is the act he is following. after herbert hoover, you know, anybody could have sounded good. >> host: moving on to 1948, this is your 1948 book, hari tr
CSPAN
Mar 4, 2012 12:00pm EST
guy, a university professor. he takes a trip to china, he comes home, he finds that his door won't open. is so he and the man who drove him home, you know, cab driver or livery driver, they jiggle with the door. a neighbor says, calls up the place and says i don't know for sure whether there's a break-in going on, but there's two guys who look like they're, you know, just trying to jigger with the door to get in. i don't know what's going on. police officer goes over. by this time, henry louis gates is in his house. the police officer comes in, asks him for identification. professor gates is not too happy about that but, ultimately, shows him identification showing that he lives in the house, it's his house. they have words, the officer essentially lures him outside. professor gates is screaming at the officer, the officer arrests him l for disorderly conduct. now, in my view the officer was wrong in arresting professor gates. even if it was the case that professor gates was not being deferential to the officer, even if it was the case that professor gates was hollering at the offi
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 12:00pm EST
does not want to acknowledge its discriminations in tibet or in western china against the uyghur people. many nations hide from their past but we owe people the truth. we owe them their history and we owed them repair and we are not doing that. not only that, we don't even want to talk about it as a society. >> host: you say that this loss of heritage is comparable to the holocaust and some of the other genocides. >> guest: the holocaust was 12 years. this was 246 years plus the century that people lost where they lost their languages. they. they lost their culture, they lost everything. many people had their severed. people lost their tongues. thomas jefferson when he was a boy at two years old had a relationship with a 14-year-old girl, sally hammonds, that he owned and wasn't from the -- we know what it would be called today. that was routine. we lost any idea of who we were. it was our past, our memory was banished and we worked ourselves to an early death. rebuilt the capital, built the white house, and doubt harvard law school which was endowed by isaac royal from the proce
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 9:00am EST
got into a series of agreements with china. one day it is going to come to regret because the company will be either a chinese subsidiary or working for the benefit of china and not a u.s. company and without blowing's plane escorts, sale of boeing planes, our trade deficit would be massive and what boeing has done is turn over its technology to the chinese to the extent that they are now producing their very unknown medium-range, equivalent of 737 plane, they won't need belling any more. at some point in time, china is very nice but we down need you. this is more about government's involvement, and it just has the handwriting in the wall. >> what is the faustian bargain? >> guest: in exchange for selling the chinese airplanes, transferring production to china, all of this in the short term, able to sell your planes to china, and production in the meantime and we continue to ship more and more of it, research facility and even the manual on how to build aircraft, put together over decades by belling, taxpayer supported and boeing is a major defense contractor. for the short-te
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2011 4:00pm EST
, say something. this is a book about america that begins in china. september 2010, the world economic conference. five years earlier, it involved a three and a half hour car ride to a polluted chinese version of detroit. things had changed. the you head to the south road playstation, an ultramodern flying saucer of the building with glass walls and 3,246 solar panels. you buy a ticket from a touch of a kiosk of rejoices in chinese and english and board a world-class high-speed train that makes the trip 72 miles in 29 minutes. the conference itself took place at the convention and exhibition center, a lesson be the flip what the structure a likes of which exists in few american cities. as if that wasn't impressive enough, the sponsors give back some figures. venetic contained a total floor area of two and a half million square feet and that construction of the convention center started on september september 15th 2009 and was completed in may 2010. as i read those lines, october, november, december, that is eight and a half months. returning home to maryland from that trip was describi
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2011 12:00am EDT
the caller's sort of general view. first to answer the question, china will overtake the united states as the aggregate emitter of greenhouse gases in 20-30 years. i don't know the exact amount, but that was not the point the caller was trying the make. the point the caller was trying to make is the united states has made a substantial contribution to the problem of climate change, it should try to lead a response. you know, i agree. there should be, you know, in an ideal world there would be a treaty resulting in the reduction of greenhouse gases to tollerble level. i agree the republicans dragged their feet and there's unfortunate and not justified, but the problem is that the climate tritety is not going to -- treaty is not going to work unless china, india, brazil, and other huge industrialized nations participate, and they don't seem to be willing to do that. that's the problem. now, why -- why are they not willing to participate? i should say they are willing to receive money, willing to receive sub sigh dies to -- subsidies to reduce, but not willing to cut back on their own wit
CSPAN
Jun 11, 2011 9:00am EDT
them can veto any resolution proposed. these five countries, united states, britain, france and china rarely agree about everything. it becomes very difficult for the security council to order something be done to address the problem. the question is why can't we reform the security colossal? maybe we could have majority rule or something like that. no state will consent to that because they are afraid they will be and the minority, what matters a great deal to them and could cause serious problems. that is the basic problem of international organization. the united states -- united nations doesn't solve it. >> host: the chicago tribune sponsors the printer's row lit fest in chicago at the university center at the corner of state street and congress just south of the loop. we are with author and law professor eric posner for are in that program and we are covering several panels at the lit fest this year. you can watch those live. we covered several yesterday and we will cover three more this afternoon. you will be able to see. we invited a studio audience for people interested in tal
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2011 9:00am EST
waters, and the china media express fraud? >> guest: no. that sounds intriguing though. i am not. i have actually been pitched a bunch of china stories. they are tricky because there's so much corruption. it's dangerous spending any amount of time people making fortunes in china now doing crazy things, but it's a little bit dangerous for me to do one of those stories. i don't know specifically what story he's talking about, but, you know, there's been good ones there. >> host: robert e-mails in, are you familiar with richard hogland's work in relationship to our moon? >> guest: richard hogland, it's familiar to me, but i don't know. if you gave me more, i might know what you're talking about. >> host: that's all we got. >> caller: [inaudible] it seems when the book is out, the movie is out. >> guest: people want to know, you know, a lot of people come to me to tell me their stories they want money. i think i have two types of people telling me stories, people who want money or people with so much money they don't want the money, they just want their story told, which is often more f
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
also they would be paid a decent wage, relative to china and we wouldn't have anymore of this, at least we would be able to cut down majorly on our street crime if these persons had something constructive to do. >> guest: yeah, very interesting point. so there are two things i would say. it is true that we have seen in the success of these technology companies, apple and google and amazon, we've seen a great success in american innovation. that is the part of our society where we all agree that the companies have been tremendously successful and where we really lead the world in terms of technology but a lot of the jobs that are being created to build those gadgets are actually overseas. many of them are in china. and so there is a question how these companies can help us deal with unemployment problem we have or lack of good manufacture manufacturing jobs in this country. let me make a point which is in "future perfect". there is question why the tech sector has been so successful. one then we all agree on the state of the economy, that the technology companies in silicon valley
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 8:00pm EDT
obligation to those who serve. it's also part of my obligation to those here at home to china tell the story as they said, as completely and fairly as possible to tell in this completely as you can in no way it honors the service of those who serve without being coopted by the military. and there were not a whole lot of people who can do that. i'm trying to tow the fine line between being part of the institution of the military and representing, even though no one elected us, the interests of the larger republic which falls on a fairly small group of people. in this case war correspondents. i think that's an important duty , an important responsibility. i think it's incumbent on those who are capable of doing it, are willing to do it, refine and attractiveness about this kind of work to go ahead and do when you can. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> host: and "in-depth" continues with rick atkinson. the next call for him comes from russell in connecticut. russell is a veteran of world war two. >> caller: hello. >> host: hi, russell. how're you, sir? >> caller: on fine, thank you. thank you fo
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)