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20090604
20170923
DATE
2017 21
2016 4
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
BBC News
Jul 1, 2017 8:30pm BST
outside the eu like america, china and india. many say hard brexit could cause economic damage notjust to the uk but also to the eu. we are the second largest economy in the eu. since the election, things have certainly become less clear. some people believe we should now be pushing for what is described as a "softer" brexit. many argue this makes jobs and the economy the priority — more important than controlling immigration or regaining sovereignty. with a softer brexit, britain could gain special access to the single market, but we might have to make it easier for eu immigrants to work here. we could just try and stay in that eu customs union. that would allow free movement of goods, but not free movement of people. eu trade laws would still apply, which would prevent the uk signing its own trade deals with other countries. brexit is up there as one of the most dramatic european stories i've ever covered. the economics, the politics, and the effect it can have on all our lives. it's a real ripping up of the history books. brussels hosted the first day of negotiations between the eu a
BBC News
Jun 30, 2017 3:30am BST
united states has urged china to respect freedom and civil liberties in hong kong, as president xi makes his symbolic visit marking 20 years of reunification. there will be more celebrations, and pro—democracy protests, this weekend. now it is time for brexit: what's next? hello, i'm katya adler. and i'm kamal ahmed. for the next half hour, we'll try to bring the you the essential, up—to—date guide on the big issue that 33 and a half british people voted on a year ago — whether to remain inside or to leave the european union. that result, 17.5 for leaving the european union, and 16 million for remaining, was a majority for britain exiting the eu, what we all call brexit. but after an election result where nobody won a majority, what has changed? i'm heading to brussels to get some answers, and to speak to those on the other side of the negotiating table. and i am going the other way, to the north, to a town with a special place in my life, and which helps to tell the story of a very divided britain. rotherham in south yorkshire is the area where my mother was born. it voted
BBC News
Jun 28, 2017 3:30am BST
america, china, and india. many say hard brexit could cause economic damage, notjust say hard brexit could cause economic damage, not just to say hard brexit could cause economic damage, notjust to the uk, but also to the eu. we are the second largest economy in the eu. since the election, things have become less clear. some people believe we should now be pushing for what is described asa now be pushing for what is described as a softer brexit. many argue this makesjobs as a softer brexit. many argue this makes jobs and the economy the priority, more important than controlling immigration or sovereignty. britain could gain access to the single market, but we might have to make it easier for you immigrants to work here. —— for eu. we might as well stay in the customs union, which would allow the freedman is a good —— the free movement of goods, but not people. the uk would not be to sign its own trade deals with other countries. brexit is up there as one of the most dramatic european stories i have ever covered. the economics, the politics, the effect it can have on all of ou
CSPAN
May 11, 2017 5:29pm EDT
including china and russia. our guest today is both a u.s. and a uk citizen. is a cleared advisor to the u.s. government on trade issues and a nongovernmental advisory to the international competition network. he has also been a advisor to candidates, including lawton chields and buddy mackay of florida as well as governor mitt romney's presidential campaigns in 2008 and 2012. please join me in welcoming him to the heritage foundation. [ applause ] >> thank you very much, ted. and thank you to the heritage foundation for having me. it's not the first time that i've spoken here. but it certainly is the most dramatic time that i have spoken here. i'll start by saying a few words about the british election and what it does and what it does not mean. because it has been interesting to see how it's been reported and covered in the u.s. i was in the u.s. when teresa may called the wleks nelection uk. i had conversations with members of parliament and other politicians over in the uk this morning and yesterday, and i'm happy to report that this is not a u-turn on brexit but rather an attemp
FOX Business
Jun 23, 2016 9:00pm EDT
used to be able to sell my goods overseas and i used to be able to compete with china. he said i can't anymore with this euro. it's caused so much inflation and the cost of every thing is gone that. what i'm selling my goods for his gone up and i'm no longer competitive. you say this is globalization and he says it's the eu. what is the? >> well, it's economic policy. let's just try and separate the eu from the eurozone but you are talking about portugal. we are talking about a country that is a member of the eurozone. it was unable to use its own central bank to lower rates and lower its currency so it's a separate issue. being a member of that it can be a disaster but fortunately gordon brown in the labour party said you shouldn't join the euro euro -- your o which is sensible. we had to separate those things out. trish: you are saying the eurozone is good and the euro currency not so good. is there a new route that other country should be looking out as a look at the british example here? >> well everyone is struggling everywhere. this is a huge global recession. we have inter
CSPAN
May 13, 2017 4:10am EDT
transitions in latin america and the wto successions including china and russia. our guest today is both a u.s. and a uk citizen, it's a clear adviser on the u.s. government and a nongovernmental adviser to the international kpeelt network. he has also been a senior trade in the economic advisors to a number of political candidates including democratic governors of florida as well as governor mitt romney's presidential campaigns in 2008 and 2012. please join me in welcoming shanker singham. shanker? [ applause ] >> thank you, very much. ted and thank you to the heritage foundation for having me. it's not the first time that i've spoken here, but it certainly is the most dramatic time that i have spoken here. i'll start by saying a few words about the british election and what it does and what it does not mean. because it has been interesting to see how it's been reported and covered in the u.s. i was in the u.s. when theresa may called the election not in the uk. i think what -- i've had conversations with members of parliament and other politicians over in the uk this morning and yester
FOX Business
Jun 24, 2016 1:00am EDT
china. we are past the time when we should have a tough dialogue with china. who in the united states government is looking at china like that today? >> i think the same issues for the brexit vote, thinkers are thinkers are wrote for full against too much regulation and an aspiration to that type of enterprise do very well at cent drop and i think there are parallels in the think american voters are going to look at this and say we can do that too. stuart: or windows state of shock? are we in the state of shock? i am because i'm so surprised at this result. i was not expecting that from the first went on the air. you are shocked because it has not gone the way you thought. >> we are outside of the arc of light but i believe there are lots of rays of sunshine and we just have to keep our poise. it's worth don't sell your stocks, don't do it. maybe even do some bargain hunting. >> to's point about poison people reacting now the city of london the financial district says they do not see a max -- mass exodus of banks in london. the banks will stay put and the foreign minister said david c
, less than 3% of the world manufacturing was made in china. now it is just under 25%. this new era of change may feel like a threat and there are good reasons to believe globalization is not working for everyone. sluggish productivity growth has left wages falling for many in the u.k. and the u.s. the u.k. and the u.s. has for a long time spent more than we saved, meaning we have to borrow from abroad to cover the shortfall. the response of the international community has been to reduce rather than intensify cooperation and trade. last year the wto, reported a rise in protectionism. we have seen examples of countries failing to play by the rules, intern providing risk for global systems. -- in turn providing risk for global systems. the urgent need to remove excess capacity has not been done. the 1930's showed us the danger of protectionism. it damages global trade. barriers inhibit global and domestic growth. it is through free-trade that we can deliver stable growth to our economy. the only sustainable way to deliver better public services is by boosting productivity. this means mor
to trade and do business all around the globe. countries including china, brazil, already expressed trade deal interests with us. three started discussions on future trade ties like andralia, india, president-elect trump said britain does not have a clue of a tree deal in the united states, the world's biggest comment that -- economy put front of the line. i know my emphasis on fighting trade agreements with countries outside europe led to questions on whether britain seeks to remain a member of the eu customs union and through that full customs union membership prevents us negotiating our own comprehensive trade deals. i want britain to negotiate the trade agreements but i also want to carry free-trade a coss trade. i do not want britain to be part of the commercial policy, and external terrorists and elements of the customs union. they prevent us from starting our own agreements, but i do want us to have a customs agreement with the eu. whether that means completely new customs agreement, associate member of the customs union, i hold no position. i have an open mind on how they do
actually meant the certain parts of the steel industry the imports from china have dropped by 90%. >> all european laws and regulations that she wants to democratically reincorporate into uk law through the repeal bill, which one of them does she want to abolish or amend first? >> prime minister. >> it will be for this parliament to decide or you how we deal with the regulations and laws once they have been brought into uk law. but there are two points i would make to the honourable gentleman. it is right to bring that into eu law into uk law at point which we leave european union to insure there is no legal gap and everybody has certainty of the legislation they will be operating under and the second important point is that once that has happened, it will be for this parliament to decide and to be sovereign in early determining those laws. >> dr. heart. >> mr. speaker, coulds prime minister enlighten us whether her discussions on the subject of higher education and are there any clues as to whether uk universities will retain access to eu research projects after we leave? and al
, by the way. china. [applause] china -- i. promise i wouldn't be competitive, but china is 25th and took it back to my central point, the entire top 10 societies in the world are free-market liberal democracies. it is because we have both of those values at once together in the country's symmetrically that we are still according to the fastest growing economy in the europe with all those record unemployment and fantastic achievements of the government. and it is a new dynamic government led by teresa may rookie not to just ensure the country's success is helped by this view, but felt by absolutely everybody. i think we should have no shame and championing those ideals and the symmetry around the world and its degree of duplication, the message of global britain could be that we stick out and the human rights as we do for free markets. when it's all said and done, i know this will not be absolutele unrewarding. i think that vote on june the 21st, i think i was a vote for economic and political freedom. [applause] and the last couple of months those kinds of meetings pointing out back
great future as well. >> last week, a freight train arrived from china demonstrating the massive potential of rail freight. the continental rail wagons and lorrie trailers cannot be accommodated on britain's historical rail network because the loading gate is too small. with the prime minister consider giving support to the freight route scheme, which will provide a large gauge line linking all the nations of britain and the european nation beyond? it would take 5 million lorries off britain's roads every year. pm may: the honorable gentleman has raised an issue, which is a different gauge of rail raise -- railways here and on the continent, which is obviously an issue for a considerable time. we want to encourage freight on rails. we have been encouraging and we will continue to do so. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the ministry of cake million , a 30 pounds turnover company, has recently been bought by a french company called mademoiselle desert. they trade across europe -- the ministry of cake -- and into china. would you agree that this demonstrates confidence in our economy that
50 years, but i am sure will have a great future as well. traint week a freight arrived from china demonstrating rail freight. the continental rail wagons and onilers accommodated britain's network because the loading gauge is too small. with the prime minister consider giving support to the freight --te, which will provide linking all the nations of britain and the european nation beyond?" prime minister may: we will continue to do so. thank you mr. speaker. pounds have recently been forward by a french company. trade across europe and into china. does this not demonstrate that it demonstrates confidence in our economy and the european companies. it demonstrates that we can unlock global trade and it demonstrates that the southwest is a terrific place to do business. [cheers] i absolutelyr may: agree with my honorable friend. i think the investment she has referred to of the french the confidence that people have in our economy for the future. it shows a fundamental strength of our economy. it shows that we can unlock mobile trade. of course, the southwest is a great place to do b
the wider world to trade and do business all around the globe. countries including china, brazil and the gulf states have already expressed interest in striking trade deals with us. we started discussions on future trade ties to countries like australia, new zealand and india. and president-elect donald trump has it britain is not at the back of the queue free-trade deal with the united states or the world's biggest economy but front of the line. i know my emphasis on trade agreements with countries outside of europe has led to questions of whether or not britain seeks to remain part of the eu but it is true that full customs union membership prevents us from negotiating our own comprehensive trade deals. now i want britain to negotiate its own trade agreements. but i also want free trade with europe and cross-border trade there to be as frictionless as possible. that means i do not want britain to be part of the common commercial policy. and i do not want us to be bound by the common external tariffs. these are the elements of the customs union. that prevent us from striking our own
arrived from china demonstrating the massive potential of rail freight. the continental rail wagons and trailers accommodated on britain's network because the loading gauge is too small. with the prime minister consider giving support to the freight route, linking all the nations of britain and the european nation beyond? the honorable gentleman has raised an issue which is a different gauge of rail raise here and on the continent, which is obviously an issue for a considerable time. we want to encourage freight on rails. we will continue to use it. >> thank you, mr. speaker. , a 30nistry of cake million pounds turnover company, has recently been bought by a french company. they trade across europe ended you -- across europe and into china. would you agree that this demonstrates confidence in our economy and the european companies? it demonstrates that we can unlock global trade, and it demonstrates that the southwest is a terrific place to do business. [cheers] p.m. may: i absolutely agree with my honorable friend. i think the investment she has referred to of the french company sh
. >> into the wider world to trade and do business all around the globe. countries including china, brazil, already expressed trade deals, started discussions on future trade ties like australia, and president-elect trump said britain does not have a clue of a tree deal in the united states, the world's biggest economy. i know my emphasis on fighting trade agreements with countries outside europe led to questions on whether to remain a member of the eu customs union and through that full customs union membership prevents us negotiating our own comprehensive trade deals. i want britain to negotiate the trade agreements but i also want to carry free-trade a cross-border trade. i do not want britain to be part of the commercial policy, and external terrorists and elements of the customs union. and comprehensive trade agreements. do want us to have a customs agreement with the eu. whether that means completely new customs agreement, associate member of the customs union, i hold no position. i have an open mind on how they do it. it is not the means that matter but the end and those end
great future as well. >> last week of freight train arrived from china demonstrating the massive potential of rail freight. the continental rail wagons can be accommodated on the rail on network because it's loading gate is too small. will the prime minister consider giving support which will provide a freight line linking all the nations of britain to each other. it would take 5 million. [inaudible] >> the honorable gentlemen has raised an issue which is the gauge of railways here and on the continent which has been an issue for some considerable time. we want to encourage freight and rail, we have been encouraging that and we will continue to do so. >> thank you very much mr. speaker. the ministry of kate had a 30 million turnover company and recently bought by a french company called mademoiselle's desert. they trade across europe and into china. does this not demonstrate, and would you agree with me that it demonstrates confidence in our economy and the european companies bought into it. it demonstrates that wcan unlock global trade d it demonstrates that the southwest is a t
. including china, brazil brazil and the gulf states have already expressed aching trade deals with us. they started discussions with australia, and india and president-elect trump has said britain -- the world's biggest economy but front of the line. i know my emphasis on fighting trade agreements with countries outside of your has led to questions about whether britain remains a member of the e.u. customs. and it is true that full custom union membership prevents us from negotiating our own comprehensive trade deal. and i want britain to be able to negotiate its own trade agreements. but i also want free trade with europe and cross-border trade to be as frictionless as possible. that means i do not want britain to be part of a commercial policy and i do not want us to be bound by common external elements. these are what prevents us from striking our own comprehensive trade agreement with other countries. but i do want us to have a customs agreement with the e.u. whether that means we must make a completely new customs agreement or to remain the signature to, i hold no preconceived
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2017 7:56pm EST
-span.org for a full list of the schedule. >>> up next on c-span3, the president of china defenders globalization at the davos forum in switzerland, then public diplomacy and national security. a look at justice sandra day o'connor and later, confirmation hearing for congressman mike mom p -- mike pompeo. ♪ >> the presidential inauguration of donald trump is friday. c-span will have live coverage of all the day's events and ceremonies. watch live on c-span and c-span.org and listen live on the free c-span radio app. >>> at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland, china's president talked about his country's role in the global acade economy. president xi jinping said you can't blame the world's economy on the globalization alone. he's the first to address the forum and introduced by klau
they should create jobs and crackdown on cheating. from countries like china. in states like wisconsin. i hope that we can work together to achieve these goals in the years ahead. they had gained a lot of national attention. as been on the top of my mind for many years. i would like to take the opportunity to go down a bit further into some of the plans to ensure that they will improve economic activities you have really borne the brunt of some of the bad trade deals very directly. they read negotiate one of the nation's trade agreements. the chapter of the agreement allows mexicans in canadian companies to bid for american tax payer finance projects as domestic companies. can you commit to eliminating that at nafta. speemac i think all aspects of nafta would be put on the e
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)