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20090604
20171121
DATE
2017 8
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
discussing today. but yes the united states has a lot of challenges. china rising, other countries creating infrastructure, you know, better bases, china expanding the access. you know, of all the countries in the world i would prefer our problems over anybody else's. if you think about the way we look at the world today, we still have that $600 billion military budget. we're worried up here about whether it's enough. thank god we can have that conversation when we have a resource base that allows us to have that. that's about 35% of world total military spending but it doesn't guarantee that you'll succeed in any given conflict. the next 35% of world military spending is in the western alliance system as well. all of our allies despite their underspending we have have so many of them because the western community of nations has become so strong and enduring. partly because we're sort of a la carte. if you fight with us, you don't, you sit it out. for all of our mistakes, i don't mean to do a poor imitation of bob kagan or anyone up here, but for all of our mistakes we have about 7
wants to shore up american power and reinforce deterrence of russia and china. i want to invite you to explain about where you think we are and specifically what does the defense budget have to do with it? how do you see in broad picture terms the role of u.s. military spending and capability in hopefully deterring the war and keeping us, as you say, dealing with all measures short of war especially for dealing with russia and china and other big picture threats? >> thank you. it's a great pleasure to be here today. it's a great question. the way i would think about it is we are very -- everyone is very concerned at the moment because of the president's sort of views on u.s. foreign policy and at a moment of discontinuity are some things going to change. on november 7, the day before the election, the world wasn't in terrific shape and the u.s. had very severe strategic problems and the next president was going to confront anyway regardless of whether it was trump or clinton. i think we need to look at those broader forces to get the sense of the type of strategic problems that the adm
. confronts with china are usually very about the overall naval sort of balance of forces and there are these specific provocations and that beijing initiate and then had to respond to it and those, i think, are likely to be protracted over many years and adversaries, of course, get to play a large role and have a large say in the type of dilemmas that are posed and they rye to pose the most difficult ones possible and they will continue to do so. so i think it's about hundreds of different decisions, strategic decisions that would be taken in the asia pacific, if i had to respond not just to each individual provocation or act of provisionism but more on the totality of shaping that sort of environment and regional order. so if trying to build a way for an island for the atlantic strip and it was impossible to actually deny them access as secretary tillerson mentioned in his hearing, because that might be escalated, what are the type of things that can be done to ensure that's a strategic liability over time rather than the asset and counterproductive from their point of view over a 5 o
american power and reinforce our deterrence in russia and china, explain where we are in foreign policy, what was the defense budget to do with it? how do you see in broad picture terms the role of us military spending and capability and hopefully deterring the war and keeping a stealing with all measures short of war dealing with russia and china and big picture threats. >> a great question, everyone was concerned the president's views at a moment of discontinuity, something is going to change. on november 7th the day before the election, the world wasn't in terrific shape but strategic problems the next president, regardless whether it was trump or clinton, we need to look at those border forces to get a sense of the strategic problems the administration faces was part of our budgetary problems but there are strategic problems separate to that. 10% or 20%, those problems still remain. what happened is over the last five or six years the post-cold war assumptions about the world came apart. since the cold war we operated under the assumption we are living in an age of conversion
russia and china. i just wanted to invite you to explain where you think we are in foreign policy, and specifically what does the defense budget have to do with it? how do you see, in broad picture terms, the role of u.s. military spending and capability in deterring the war and keeping us, as you say, dealing with all measures short of war, particularly russia, china, and other threats? thomas: thank you. it is a great honor to be here today. it is a great question. everyone is very concerned at the moment because of the president's views on u.s. foreign-policy at a moment of discontinuity. , theay before the election world was not in terrific shape. the u.s. had there is severe strategic problems that the next president was going to confront anyway, regardless whether it was donald trump or hillary clinton. we need to look at those broader forces to get a sense of the type of strategic problems the administration faces. part of them are budgetary, but there are also strategic problems separate from that that would exist whether the budget increases 10% or 20%. those problems still re
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)