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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,424 (some duplicates have been removed)
WHUT
Sep 30, 2010 9:00am EDT
americans know china even less, i think. so if we don't understand enough then misunderstanding happens and then people get wrong ideas, wrong signals or interpreted the signals wrong. so all these things will happen. there are 100,000 chinese now studying in the united states of america. there's about 0,000 meshes studying in china. you know there are 300 million people learning to speak english? >> rose: 300 million people in china? >> in china. there are people learning to speak chinese also, but small numbers. also growing number, but still rather small. the point is, america really does not understand china well enough. >> rose: we continue this evening with a look at mongolia and a conversation with its prime minister, sukhbaatar batbold. >> this is a good time and especially with given strength and advantages we have like rich mineral resources and strong neighbor... china is a market and opportunity and is emerging market i think with this tree sort of big advantages, mongolia has got a strong possibility to develop and now we have the challenge and especially for my gov
WHUT
May 10, 2011 3:00am EDT
between the united states and china. and we have secretary of the treasury tim geithner and the leading chinese official, the vice premier, wang qishan. >> ( translated ): the most pressing problem we are faced right now is the problem of inflation. inflation is a problem we place on importance of china. >> it would be good if we tried to take the politics out of economics. very hard to do. just listen to the fiscal debate in the united states. it's hard to take the politics out of economics. i think the most important thing we can do is just try to demonstrate and explain that we are working to address the problems that exist between us. >> rose: also this evening, francis phuc yam ma, the politica scientist who's new book is called the origins of political order. >> i've never seen a period where you can have such a period of outcomes. even if two of the cases turn out good, egypt and tunisia develop into democracies. yemen could sink into a state of chaos and it's already got al qaeda there. >> rose: an exclusive conversation between the secretary of the treasury and the vice premier
WETA
Sep 30, 2010 12:00pm EDT
english? >> rose: 300 million people in china? >> in china. there are people learning to speak chinese also, but small numbers. also growing number, but still rather small. the point is, america really does not understand china well enough. >> rose: we continue this evening with a look at mongolia and a conversation with its prime minister, sukhbaatar batbold. >> this is a good time and especially with given strength and advantages we have like rich mineral resources and strong neighbor... china is a market and opportunity and is emerging market i think with this tree sort of big advantages, mongolia has got a strong possibility to develop and now we have the challenge and especially for my government we have a coalition government and how do we deal with these advantages and also the certain difficulties or challenges which might come from the mineral development, this would be the issue for us. >> rose: china and mongolia next. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring t
WETA
Sep 28, 2011 11:00pm EDT
between china and the united states. they are are guo 3├▒shuqing. >> i think the economy is doing too much and the business and education and also scientific research and other area but we have some advantages in some areas but even in that area we need some reform restructure. >> charlie: and you can say that with no fear of worrying that some how somebody else in as important as youre will object to you saying that? >> ah, we have different views it's good. >> gao ziqing. >> i've been back here and i always find myself on the defending side of the system trying to explain to my countrymen where the system is superior and now i find it more and more difficult to do that ee especially after in the economic field and political field so people start to think well maybe, you know, the reason why our system has been here for over 2500 years is the reason. >> charlie: and gao ziqing. >> the china and the united states have relation for three years and we come along way and accomplished a lot but if we want to continue t make progress i think we really need to trust the other side. >> c
Bloomberg
Jan 26, 2016 7:00pm EST
global coordination going on. you are seeing china do its own thing and it disrupts the system. and we -- i have been around a long time and this is probably the lowest level of global coordination since the 1980's. charlie: there is some influence, isn't there? hasn't the chinese changed a little bit or said they intend to change currency issues? mohamed: think of an orchestra. the chinese basically when the instability gets too large, they put global responsibilities before their domestic responsibilities. they don't appreciate their currency. when financial markets calm down, they say we have to take care of domestic responsibilities and weaken their currency. that has been the cycle. in august, they surprised everybody with appreciation. that caused a lot of global instability. when calm returned in november, they went back to pursuing a currency depreciation until we had another shock in december and january. that shows you china is trying to balance domestic responsibility with a global responsibility. you're are the second largest economy in the world. you have to act respons
WHUT
Jan 19, 2011 3:00am EST
>> charlie: welcome to our program. tonight the u.s.-china relationship and the context of a state visit by the president of china. first, the chinese perspective. and then two journalists and an academic. they look at the relationship and what we might expect from the meetings in washington. we conclude this evening with the conversation with garry trudeau, the creator of doonesbury. the chinese visit to the united states and garry trudeau when we continue. maybe you want school kids to have more exposure to the arts. maybe you want to provide meals for the needy. or maybe you want to help when the unexpected happens. whatever you want to do, members project from american express can help you take the first step. vote, volunteer, or donate for the causes you believe in at membersproject.com. take charge of making a difference. additional funding provided by these funders: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: hu jintao the president of china arrived in washington today for a very important four-day visit to
WHUT
Aug 19, 2009 6:00am EDT
evening with what some say is the most important bilateral relationship in the world. it is between china and the united states. for china's perspective, we turn to china's ambassador to the united states. >> china's development will be peaceful, china's development is opportunity for each, including the united states. china's development should not be viewed as a threat and we don't want to be a threat, we want to live in peace with everyone. >> rose: mubarak and obama, china and the united states. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> rose: as many of you know, we had a conversation with egyptian president hosni mubarak on friday in cairo. today president mubarak was in washington meeting with president obama. it was president mubarak's first visit to washington in f fe years after cooling in u.s. relations during the bush administration. the trip comes as the obama administration is deeply involved in trying to break a dead locke in middle east peace talks. it wants israel to halt settlement activities and is asking arab leaders to make concessions to move the process fo
WHUT
Jan 22, 2011 3:00am EST
the president of china has been visiting the president of the yut in an official state visit. we talk this evening to the former ambassador from china to the united states, zhou wenzhong. >> of course, what we hope is that we'll have relationship in which we will treat each other as equals. so in that sense, i think in the world, every country is equal. i know this is a very diverse world and diversity that makes the world so colorful. and countries, no matter the size of it, big or small, are all equal. >> rose: we continue our coverage of china in the united states with american businessman john mack who has made frequent trips to china to understand the chinese and look at mutual business opportunities. >> it wasn't until the early-- late 80s, early 90s they started making this huge conversion and changing their economy, so you can understand why they don't want to see outside companies come in and take control of some of their major businesses. they have to be cautious. but, at the same time i think if you build the sense of trust, communications, over time, some of the compl
WHUT
Nov 17, 2011 6:00am EST
with jing ulrich, j.p. morgan's managing director in china. >> i think china will continue to grow around 7 to 9% per annum. of course there are lots of challenges ahead. given the economy set aside you can't continue to grow at 10% per annum. if you look at the fundamental drivers for china's gdp, i think we can hit that growth target. >> charlie: fromcting to china went we coinue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: john mac visms here an oscar nominated author for elect particular performances. he started with th theatre company before making his film debut in places in the heart mu his most well-knownovies include dangerous liaison, shadow of the vampe beg john malkovich here's a look at some of his work. >> if i had any place elseto go night i would gladly leave righnow. when i came here all i asked was to be leftlone. i'm not some kind of freak to be here on display to the amusement of those hooligans you call children. >> i'm doingeverything i can. i'm telling you i'm doing everything i can. >> i'm
PBS
Jan 19, 2011 11:00pm PST
for dinner we talked to henry kissinger who years ago went to china and changed the relationship. he speaks this evening about the relationship today and in the future. >> one should shouldn't protect the trade line in which china is dominant. they have a major power with its own big problems. there's no reason why we should not remain in a position of equality in some areas, superiority, maybe not. so i don't accept this. but we will no longer be as dominant as we were right after world war ii when we were the only functioning maintained country. and we have to adjust our understanding of the world into a world in which there are other countries that are capable of asserting their interests, not just because they submit to our leadership but they can make us adjust some of the things. >> charlie: a program note. we had promoted a conversation with joe schultz the former secretary of state. that program will be seen next week. tonight kissinger for the hour. maybe you want school kids to have more exposure to the arts. maybe you want to provide meals for the needy. or maybe you want
PBS
Aug 17, 2010 12:30pm EDT
welcome to our program. as china becomes the second-largest economy in the world, we talk with jim fallows and stephen roach about its economy and its political future. >> there's a crucial point that was made to me by some chinese officials when i was there about two years ago. it stuck in my mind since then. the officials said whenever people outside china think of the country, they think of everything multiplied by 1.3 billion. he said, we have to think of everything divided by 1.3 billion. our national output, jobs, land, resources and all the rest. so it's a challenge still ahead of them. >> for the last 30 years as china has focused on exports and investment, the consumer society has been left behind. private consumption as a share of chinese g.d.p. is only about 36%, literally half that of the united states. over the next five to ten years, that share has got to move up. and with a consumer society comes more a free and open communication, freedom of choice aspirational values, upward mobility. it's hard to accomplish those aspirational goals without a more open and free pol
PBS
Jun 5, 2014 12:00am PDT
wek. >> rose: welcome to the program. we look at the event on june 4, 1989 in china. with evan osnos, orville shell, chai ling, nick kristof. join us for a conversation about the history and the implications of tianamen square. >> to be in the square during the weeks leading up to june 4 was like being at some incredible festival almost, the feeling of sort of elation as if something had lifted. the press for the first time was absolutely free. people all across china were watching what's happening. and it was an amazingly feeling of sort of sudden lack of repression, and everybody, i think, believed that this was an inflection point. >> rose: a moment of change. >> they would never get this thing-- this jeanie back in the bottle. but, of course, that was a very naive presumption. >> rose: we conclude with jeff widener, the man who took one of the most famous pictures of all time, a young man in front of a tank. >> then suddenly, we heard a noise down the street, and it was a familiar sound of tanks. i went to the balcony, and i thought this is a nice composition air, compresse
PBS
Sep 7, 2017 12:00am PDT
asians reckoning. >> there's very little on japan and china. and this is a highly consequently relationship with the world's second and biggest economy, asia's two superpowers, and with a really difficult emotional, scared history. you know where one considered-- china considered itself to be japan's big brother. was brutally invaded by japan and really only in the last 10, 20 years out of the last 150 years china is getting back on top again. and the funny thing about these two countries, they've always demanded the west quite rightly treat them as equals. the west had very racist policies towards asia 50, 100 years ago. but japan and china really struggled to treat each other's, each other as equals. you know, lends itself to an extremely antagonistic relationship. >> glor: we continuing with michael schmidt who broke the story of the boston red socks use ang apple watch to steal opponent's hand signals. >> the yank yees knew that something was going on so they were trying to take every measure that they could to stop it, to stop them from doing that. and that's part of the t
WETA
Aug 17, 2010 12:00pm EDT
people outside china think of the country, they think of everything multiplied by 1.3 billion. he said, we have to think of everything divided by 1.3 billion. our national output, jobs, land, resources and all the rest. so it's a challenge still ahead of them. >> for the last 30 years as china has focused on exports and investment, the consumer society has been left behind. private consumption as a share of chinese g.d.p. is only about 36%, literally half that of the united states. over the next five to ten years, that share has got to move up. and with a consumer society comes more a free and open communication, freedom of choice aspirational values, upward mobility. it's hard to accomplish those aspirational goals without a more open and free political system. >> rose: we continue with the story of pat tillman. the n.f.l. star became a soldier and was killed in afghanistan. there's now a documentary about his life. we're joined by its director, amir bar-lev, and the narrator, actor josh brolin. >> tillman's platoon was set upon on all sides by a taliban ambush. tillman ran out ahead
Bloomberg
Sep 18, 2014 10:00pm EDT
share his vision of helping grow e-commerce to the benefit of china. with no cease-fire inside, our battle became more contentious. we had one card up our sleeves that ebay had not anticipated. to pay $1agreed billion in cash to alibaba.com. the move is designed to catch up with the ebay. yahoo! is going to become alibaba's big is investor in alibaba will take over yahoo!'s china operations. >> it was one of the biggest deals in internet history and set off a media frenzy. for the first time, a chinese in a company had taken over the local company. with a search engine in our portfolio, we boldly plant that -- >> ebay has been trying to build and be as successful as a lot of companies in china. this is really representing a big challenge for ebay in china. >> the mood was euphoric. mandarin]ng >> to make the partnership work it was critical to smooth and integrate yahoo! china under ali baba's management. we chartered a transfer to bring yahoo! china to visit their new national headquarters. it didn't take long before we realize that the two teams have very different cultures. seeme
WHUT
Jan 17, 2012 6:00am EST
have a dream today. (cheers and applause) >> rose: also today, america's ambassador to china, gar locke. >> china has enormous challenges and with it come, we believe, responsibilities as well. to its people and to the rest of the world. and while it has gwn significantly economically, we believe that it needs to open up even more and that it has to play by international rules. and that's why you've seen president obama speaking out about how china must play by the rules, that it cannot game the system from which it has benefited significantly and that we believe that american companies and... can help china achieve their objectives and create jobs for the american people at the same time. and we also believe that they need to step up to human rights, to universal values of human rights. >> rose: we conclude this evening with tom caplan lann, the novelist with the new spy novel call "the spy who jumped off the screen." >> i always wanted to write a thriller but i didn't feel i had enough experience in the world and i didn't feel that i could contribute to thegenre something that was new
PBS
Oct 14, 2010 11:00pm PDT
china talks about china today. >> there are still regulations, censorship, frustrations, that's for sure. but i also see progress, especially through the introduction of the internet. it has become a big public arena that more people would express their opinions towards public policies, pros and cons. and there have been many cases when abuses of power were reported on the internet and the huge public out cry would drive the government to be more spontaneous, to be more transparent, and also it directly led to the change of regulations of practices by the government. >> and klaus schwab joins us, the founder of the world economic forum and he talks about how he sees the world today. >> i'm looking at europe, i'm looking at the united states now. so much preoccupied with the internal issues, and i wonder sometimes how much energy is absorbed by introvert considerations instead of looking out to the world at a very crucial moment because in some way the cards are newly distributed and self power plays a very central role in this new allocation process of power. >> yang lan, klaus schw
PBS
Mar 5, 2015 12:00pm PST
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight, a conversation about china with kevin rudd, former prime minister of australia and now president of the asia society policy institute. >> one final point if you're going out to 2040 is this-- china will have to, in order continue to emerge as a global great power have to deal with a raft of six or seven major challenges around the economy and its demography in that period of time in order for its rise to continue to be unabated. and that involves a range of assumptions, which assume that smart chinese leadership and a bit of luck prevail on the way through. but i'm into the realist business of how do you maximize the prospect of peace and stability, and in asia, where my country is located, we really want to see the emergence of common narrative of the future between the two of them. >> rose: kevin rudd for the hour next. >> rose: funding for "charlie rose" has been provided by: >> rose: additional funding provided by: >> and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. captioning sponsored by rose communi
WHUT
May 31, 2011 3:00am EDT
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight, a look at china, its history and its relationship with the united states through unique eyes-- henry kissinger, whose new book is called "on china." >> what ought to be done is to establish a permanent dialogue at a high level of making sure that we interpret events as they occur in a parallel way and if we don't how we manage our disagreements. that we don't wait for things to bottle up and then wind up in a confrontation. it hasn't yet really wound up in a conontation and i thi is possible to achieve what i'm describi. but in each country there are trends that see the other as enemies. there's an... not really doing it, too, b as i answer questions about this book... >> rose: right. >> ...over half of have seen china as an established enemy. >> rose: kissinger on china for the hour. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in neyork city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: henry kissinger is here. the former national security advisor and secretary of state has just writte
Bloomberg
Aug 20, 2015 6:00pm EDT
funds. top holdings include companies located in china, india and hong kong. nearly 7% of developing markets russianks are in markets. i am pleased to have justin leverenz at this table for the first time. welcome. justin: thank you very much. charlie: you and i met at a conference and had a chance to talk about the world as you see it. has the definition of emerging markets changed? should all the brick countries bric countries be considered emerging markets? fund is deliberately called a developing markets fund, not of emerging markets fund. we are talking about 90% of the worlds population being a part of the world. institutionst is which aren't as stable or robust as the developed world, which is largely the united states, europe, japan. charlie: you are talking about -- justin: sociopolitical institutions, rule of law, different levels of political engagement, institutions that foment development. and it's a pretty generous bunch, in many dimensions. some are very well-developed, like eastern europe. there is a big difference between warsaw and bombay in terms of levels of influ
PBS
Apr 29, 2013 12:00pm PDT
book is called china super bank, debt, oil and influence, how china developed a bank is rewriting the rules of finance. >> you know, we all know champion's economy recovered vick questionly after the global financial crisis one of the reasons this happened is because of the system of local finance set up all across china that we discovered in our research was actually invented and formulated by this bank back in 1998, by 2008 when things started to go wrong in the global economy, the entire country basically had this system of local finance set up basically shovel ready products, 25 trillion r and b, 4 trillion u.s. dollars worth of projects ready to go, many of those shovels actually hit the ground and the economy recovered quickly and helps keep the communist party in power if you can give the economic goods to people. >> rose: the new computer digital age and the china super bank, when we continue. >> >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, th
PBS
Jan 17, 2014 12:00am PST
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight we talk about china and and the united states with cui tiankai, china's ambassador to the united states. >> i hope the united states will have a better understanding of china's history, culture, china's past, china's present, and maybe china's future. and i do hope that the u.s. will not be so much worried about possible challenge or threat from china. we have no intention to assert everybody. the so-called rise of china is rise from our own past. it's not to prevail over anybody else. certainly not the united states. >> rose: we conclude this evening with kate tempest. he is the a brilliant and eloquent poet and former rap artist. >> i came from a school of rap and of rhyming and telling poems where you just knew it. you put it -- you commit it to memory so that you can go anywhere and be doing it with people and so the idea of reading something from a page, it putsing? between me and you. and if i want to tell you a poem i want it to be almost occurring spontaneously. and if you commit it to memory so well that you don't even have to re
PBS
Jun 7, 2013 12:00am PDT
jinping of china we take a look at u.s. china relations with richard macgregor of "the financial times," james fall owes of the atlanta magazine and noah feldman of harvard law school. >> the u.s. and china have a much broader, i think, relationship than people realize, multiple bilateral dialogues, multiple top-level meetings. but none of them go out much further than, you know, six months to a year. you know, it's a great strategic relationship with great distrust underlying it. and i think this is a risky but necessary meeting, risky for both xi jinping and mr. obama to try and get some sort of, at least, bedrock level of understanding into the bilateral dialogue. >> i think it is important that they meet just for the fact of establishing a communications. and because as richard was saying, we all know the problems president obama has trying to increase his leeway domestically, internationally, the problems that xi jinping faces are larger than that and include some cute ones too, dealing with north korea, japan and the east china sea. i think the one thing closest to a critical iss
Bloomberg
Mar 5, 2015 7:00pm EST
become the president of china. >> the first thing to bear in mind with the prime minister is his family background. he is the son of a holy borough -- politburo member. he was entrusted within and toward and task. -- an important task to oversee the implication of the four special economic zones. that is what he set out to do. he was put in charge of what in china was a highly controversial project. those four special economic zones coincided with the 19th century treaty ports where foreign countries, namely the british but others as well demanded exclusive access to the courts in what was called the unequal treaties between china and the west. to go talk to these after the revolution of 1949 and say, 30 years after that, we are going to open the door to these treaty ports, the left of the party said, you are going to do what? this is the vehicle through which chinese exploitation initially occurred in the internal historiography. so he was given this job. the economic zones were expanded in scope. the number of zones grew. in time, the policies adopted across the country. his fa
Bloomberg
Jun 5, 2014 8:00pm EDT
events on june 4, 1989 in beijing, china. soldiers crushed into tiananmen studento stop a protest. many hundreds died. the chinese government has since tried to erase the events of that day from history. there is a report from seth joan of cbs news today from beijing. >> at dawn, china's flag was raised over tiananmen square as it is everyday, but on this anniversary, extra security forces, some with machine guns, were stationed. >> why are you stopping me? >> while trying to report, we found citizens serving as plain clothed informants. china reveals its authoritarian side. 25 years ago, tanks rolled into beijing's tiananmen square to suppress a weeklong student uprising that had spread across china. the communist government's crackdown turned bloody. it is still not known how many died. estimates range from 200 to more than 1000. as a student in china, do you learn about tiananmen square in the history books? >> not much. >> not mentioned at all. wethese college students who won't name because they took the risk just to talk with us acknowledged it is difficult to find informati
PBS
Oct 26, 2017 12:00am PDT
"the new yorker" magazine. >> it is very evidence that jinping wants to lead china back into the center of the world. he want the world to see the country not as just another superpower but as the superpower. and it is also quite obvious that he does not intend to lead the country on the path of liberal democracy. and he wants to show that the model, the rule that he has exemplified of disciplined authoritarian state, that this is a very possible and ideal is model of rule for other countries around the world. >> rose: we conclude with tom friedman of "the new york times." his book thank you for being late, and optimist guide to thriving in the age of acceleration is out now in paperback. >> trump is a brain-eating disease, so that is that he is-- he sucks up all the oxygen in the roomment we feel we have to write about him, so much, as a columnist, on the one hand i don't want to because i'm not really learning anything when i wrote that colume today. i'm just sort of emoting. expressing my concern. but the fact is, a whole bunch of stuff happening in the world. and i am worried
WHUT
Jun 7, 2012 10:00am EDT
>> rose: welcome to the program. we begin this it evening with another inside look at china. this time with james fallows, national correspondent for "the atlantic magazine" and author of "china airborne," in which he looks at aviation as a metaphor for the chinese future and experience. >> there's a lot of concern in china about whether they're now hit a wall or plateau, whether if they do more of this current model just building things and having outsourcing factories, whether they're ever going to get richer than they are now or just bigger. the current 12th five-year plan-- which i think i have discussed with you in the past-- has a big push for what they think of as the industries of the future-- pharmaceuticals, info tech, clean energy, and aerospace. these are the areas where they say rich countries do these things. if we can do these things we'd be rich, it it to. >> rose: we conclude with "the atlantic." his documentary "shoah" is one of the great documentaries ever made. >> it's about the extermination camps. >> jim fallows, claude lanzmann when we continue. captioning s
Bloomberg
Jan 17, 2014 8:00pm EST
letter, the world is looking to the u.s. and china to work together to solve pressing challenges. there is great potential for cultural and scientific exchanges to help us solve problems that would benefit all. >> china is one of the most important countries in the world. its relationship with the u.s. is one of the most important relationships in the world. that relationship continues to grow in size and complexity. me is my guest. he became the ambassador to the u.s. ambassador to japan, i'm very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time in running opal the number of visits to talk about this important relationship. welcome. >> thank you. >> characterize the relationship today between china and the u.s. last several years establishingtic -- diplomatic relations, our two countries have gone through many changes. he just in the world and in our own countries. fortunately, we have been able to identify growing common and manage what differences we may have. that enables us to develop this relationship. i think now it is more on pretenses and stronger and on a solid basis.
WETA
Oct 14, 2011 12:00pm EDT
who is away on assignment. tonight we look at the debate over china's currency. we talk with nouriel roubini of roubini global economics and richard mcgregor, washington bureau chief for the "financial times". >> t unemployment rate is the 9% encolluding partially employed workers. 16.5 including people in jail is 20%, among minorities closer to 30%. very little fraction of this problem has to do with china and the exchange rate, it these do with the policies that lead to the housing boom and t housing bust about the fact that we're not invested in productivity and long-term economic growth. so bme it on t chinese doesn't make sense. of course, in a situation which you have high unemployment rate there is social and political malaise, people blame globalization, people blame trade, people blame china but the fundamental problems of the u.s. are deeper and structural. >> there's no doubt whatever term you use china does manipulate or manage its currency and there are both economic and politic reasons for doing that. obviously they want to support exports which, you know, which
Bloomberg
Jan 27, 2015 10:00pm EST
largest in history and made him the richest person in china. i spoke with jack ma on friday in davos, switzerland. here is that conversation. >> how big is alibaba? how many come every day? how many people come in a week? how fast is it growing? >> we have over 100 million visiting our site, shopping our site. that is every day. we created 13 million jobs for china. and, we grow from 18 people to 30,000 people, in my apartment to four big campuses. compared to 15 years ago, we are big. compared to 13 years later, we are still big. >> how big will you be 15 years from now? >> 15 years ago i told my team that in the path to 15 years, we grow from nothing to this. 15 years later i want people to see no cap. it is already everywhere. i want 15 years ago that we talk about what is e-commerce? why small business using e-commerce? i hope 15 years later people forget about e-commerce. because they think it is like electricity. nobody think it is high-tech. this is something that i don't want 15 years later, we still walk on the street talking about why and how e-commerce can help people. >>
WHUT
Sep 23, 2010 6:00am EDT
is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be ratified by the u.s. senate. russia, a long-ti
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