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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 165 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Nov 16, 2015 7:30am PST
gary marcuse on how cultural traditions intersect with economic growth in cambodia and china. coming up on "earth focus." kalyanee: as an immigrant, as a refugee, you know, from cambodia, my family and i, you know, fled cambodia when i was four years old. and what i realized was what happening in areng valley was that the people were also being threatened by the same kind of displacement and uprootedness. and what i've seen with the chong people is that they live a very beautiful life, completely connected to nature, and i was inspired to make this film to help people understand, you know, how important that connection is. [baby fusses] kalyanee: so the chong people have been living in areng valley, you know, for over 600 years. and we went back to cambodia to film and i discovered, you know, two of the most amazing people i've ever met in my life. and what i discovered was that they are probably one of the most rooted and grounded people i've ever met, and the reason is because of their connection to the land. you know, they feel so grateful for nature because everything they have come
LINKTV
Feb 6, 2016 6:00am PST
: thproblem begins very simply with demand. narrator: and china drives the demand for ivory. knights: china now is estimated to be 70% of the world's ivory market. there is a tradition of ivory carving, but also, of course, the massive growth of the chinese economy. narrator: around 300 million people make up china's middle class today. that's more than the population of the united states, and they are looking to spend their money on luxury goods. ivory has particular appeal because of its long history in china. it has been carved there for more than 2,000 years, expressing many core chinese cultural and traditional values. knights: i think in some cases, people are speculating that ivory is almost like a currency that they can invest in for the future. alie: you walk through beijing and in some of the stores you see ivory mantelpiece, exquisite carvings going for like 50,000 u.s. dollars, 60,000 u.s. dollars. knights: but in addition to that, you have things like chopsticks, bangles that people wear, small carved items. all these things are made from ivory, and unfortunately they are still
LINKTV
Apr 30, 2016 12:00pm PDT
china, ethiopia and rwanda. coming up on "earth focus." [drumming] >> this is china's loess plateau. until recently, this was one of the poorest regions in the country. a land renowned for floods, mudslides and famine. but with the fanfare comes the hope of change for the better. my name is john d. liu. i've been documenting the changes on the plateau for 15 years. i first came here in 1995 to film an ambitious project where local people were constructing a new landscape on a vast scale. transforming a barren land into a green and fertile one. the project certainly changed my life, convincing me to become a soil scientist. the lessons i've learned in the last few years have made me realize that many of the human tragedies that we regularly witness around the world, the floods, mudslides, droughts and famines, are not inevitable. here on the loess plateau i've witnessed that people can lift themselves out of poverty. they can radically improve their environment. and by doing so, reduce the threat of climate change. >> [singing] >> when i first came to the loess plateau, i was astound
LINKTV
May 23, 2012 4:30pm PDT
wings in china might cause an infinitesimal change in wind current that could lead to a hurricane in florida several months later: the butterfly effect. >> first butterfly of the season. kind of warms your heart, don't you think? hey, did i ever tell you about how chaos theory's connected to heart dynamics? >> think it's going to rain? >> feels humid, all right. good air for a knuckleball. >> that wouldn't have anything to do with turbulence, would it? >> well, a ball that spins, say, a fastball, if thrown correct, can take a more predictable, uh, newtonian path as it moves through the air. >> but a ball that doesn't spin? >> well, that's where celestial mechanics meets chaos theory. >> baseball and mathematics, two great american pastimes. so we're here today with steve strogatz, author of the book nonlinear dynamics in chaos and also a professor of theoretical and applied mechanics at cornell university. and steve's going to help us make sense out of chaos on the baseball field. steve, ready? >> hey, you know, your friends pops and red are having a pretty interesting conversatio
LINKTV
Aug 19, 2013 7:30am PDT
you said left. well, i'd better get going before i forget again. all the way to china ? who do you know china ? most of my relatives live there. anyway, thanks for your help. excuse me, young man. what is your name ? henry chang. all right, henry chang i have a little job for you. "a little job." what do you mean ? please, come with me. you are already making one delivery, so why not make two ? what do you mean "make two" ? when you deliver your package you will deliver this. the customer will give you $8.95. you really want me to deliver this for you ? yes, here is the address. and here are the directions. and here is our telephone mber in case you have a problem. is this some kind of joke ? you will do fine. deliver the food first. then you will take just two sho blocks to the post office. the customer will give you a tip, and i will give you something for your trouble. please, the food is getting cold. hurry ! i can't believe i'm doing this. in this episode we are learning... how to give information about ourselves and how to find out about others. your name is often the first t
LINKTV
Jan 14, 2017 12:00pm PST
. within indonesia itself and also china and india, the 3 of them account for f more than h half of the, uh, the world's consumption of palm oil. but the u.s. and european unioion are also major players and can rereally, you knknow, set the standard fofor others to follow. >> we all know about the charismatic megafauauna that lie in africica--elephants, ons,s, hippos, thingsikike that. i guess whwhat's less knowown to the inteternational communityy are t the chaharismaticegafafaua inin asia, anand particulularly sumatra. . so here wewe have ac, 3.5 million hectares of rainforest, it contains about a third of ththe sumatran elepht population, uh, possibly a third of ththe sumatran tiger popatation.t cocontns neaeay 90% of f the sumatran oraututan poputition. 'crititilly importanfor the surviv o of rge mammals, nojust in suatra b b across asia as ll. lephants pfer lowland fore haitat. th'their primeme habita that's also t h habit oror t lananthat's most mand f a agrictural pntations or for gggging concesons as wl. thexpansion palm l plantions rtaiainly s bebeen a kecontribur to eleant
LINKTV
Jan 6, 2014 7:30am PST
oils throughout the world. within indonesia itself and also china and india, the 3 of them account for far more than half of the, uh, the world's consumption of palm oil. but the u.s. and european union are also major players and can really, you know, set the standard for others to follow. >> we all know about the charismatic megafauna that live in africa--elephants, lions, hippos, things like that. i guess what's less known to the international community are the charismatic megafauna in asia, and particularly sumatra. so here we have aceh, 3.5 million hectares of rainforest, it contains about a third of the sumatran elephant population, uh, possibly a third of the sumatran tiger population. it contains nearly 90% of the sumatran orangutan population. it's critically important for the survival of large mammals, not just in sumatra but across asia as well. elephants prefer lowland forest habitat. that's their prime habitat. that's also the habitat or the land that's most in demand for agricultural plantations or for logging concessions as well. the expansion of palm oil plantations
LINKTV
Oct 19, 2012 2:00pm PDT
pipe. and nays in various forms appear from north africa all the way to western china in very many different kinds of forms. and the nay that i play is associated with turkey. it is this shape, this profile here, that is said to give the turkish nay its particular tonal timbre. but the real place where timbre lives is inside the instrumentalist's heart and head. if the instrumentalist doesn't hear the timbre in the instrument and the music, then the audience won't hear it either. (narrator) while materials and construction are critical in determining the timbrel capabilities of an instrument, it is the musician who makes the instrument come to life. in essence, the instrument becomes the unique musical voice of the player. (redman) i think the connection that you feel with an instrument is oftentimes beyond literal or verbal description. but i think one thing that really attracted me to the sound of the tenor saxophone was its incredible emotional range. [saxophone plays jazzy staccato music] the tenor saxophone can be a very, very tender and sensitive instrument. [resonating, mell
LINKTV
Aug 16, 2012 6:00pm PDT
400 million vehicles >>we never saw it coming, nobody saw china, nobody saw india and all of the sudden, here comes this monster >>politics of oil is such the guy who gets there first with the most troops might control it >>if the arabs just stopped the oil today, how long would we last? >>societies don't last forever - when's the last time you met a roman? >>rule number one when you find yourself in a deep hole is to stop digging and unfortunately as far as i can determine, we're still throwing shovels into the hole >>houston we have a problem film directory nicole torre went inside the oil industry to hear what texas oilman really have to say about the future of oil >>miles: what is the message you're trying to tell us? what does the film tell us that we don't already know? >>well this film is about the history of america's oil addiction. and i made the film, i kinda looked at the whole problem and i realized my own ignorance about oil i wanted to make a film for the unconverted, for middle-america for lack of a better term: that middle of the aisle that kinda brings people tog
LINKTV
Jun 9, 2016 1:30am PDT
world's biggest killers, is that on a plant from china is currently o our best hope foa controlllling this tremendous disease. >> if you look at a all the new drugs approved by the u.s. food anand drug administration betwen 1981 and 2006, almost two-thirds of those would have had their origins in nature, not in our lab. what's more interesting is that oftentimes, nature gives us molecule's that t may not make t fully through fda trials, but teach us a tremendous amount about how our bodies work in helping disease. inre is a drug used patients and used on coronary artery stance. these are little mesh tubes that get put into the blood vesselsls and supply the heart with oxygenen. they are put in after a heart attack and the artery gets clogged. the drug comes from a soil microbes on easter islaland. it's becoming incredibly useful. it turns out that t its value to medicine is far greater as a drug. we were able to understand a part of how a our cells know when to divide because of this drug. ththere is a protein in everery cell called d the molecularr targets and we only discovered this
LINKTV
Jun 30, 2014 9:30pm PDT
india and china into the future. those are all assumptions that are not necessarily guaranteed. >> the campaign to save fish lake was really a small group of incredibly dedicated people that started with the chilcotans. i think if you're going to work with someone, you need to consult with them and communicate with them. it has got to be a partnership between the two. >> i don't see the benefits of destroying our land and our waters and our fish. >> they say it will create jobs, but it is going to ruin our land. the land is priceless, to me -- you cannot replace it after it has been minined. >> the best of our people, in a way. the way i see it, it is an informal genocide. some people may not see it that way, but i do. >> they say in 20 years or so you will get your land back. i don't believe it. >> how does that make you feel? >> sad. >> after an environmental review, the canadian government agreed in 2010, giving it the taseko mining project a thumbs down. this came just after a mining lease had been granted to taseko in british columbia. >> there's inevitably going to be conflict if
LINKTV
May 30, 2016 7:30pm PDT
thompson: it doesn't matter whether you're living in peru or the united states or china, you will be impacted by this change. narrator: but something can be done. people are already adapting to combat climate change.
LINKTV
Aug 25, 2016 6:00pm PDT
china. a new app is creating a stir at lunchtime, bringing old favorites to the table. we find out more. in peru we look for one of the amazon's largest fish. how many are left and why do they need protecting? but first we go to russia, a country battling a huge drugs problem. nowhere on earth is more heroin consumed than here. the u.n. estimates that 4,700 tons of raw opium were produced worldwide last year. illegally. morphine is extracted from it.
LINKTV
Jan 9, 2016 6:00am PST
no spiritual discipline epitomizes this more than taoism, the religion of ancient china. in taoism, the universal life
LINKTV
Sep 28, 2012 2:00pm PDT
music existing in china in a simplified chinese character notation. this tablature shows you which string your hand put out and what kind of techniques. but unfortunately, there's no rhythm at all which means you cannot read off music directly from the notation. in most cases, different chin player has their own different interpretation for the same piece. but if the interpretation is very good and everybody likes it, then you become popular and people accept it. (narrator) while notation and sound recording can preserve music, it is the teacher who instructs a student in how to perform. this relationship varies from culture to culture. in japan, it involves the student listening to, imitating, and playing along with the teacher. (oba) in older days, people actually lived with their teachers and helped with the domestic chores. while doing that, they get the essence of their master's techniques and aesthetics. when we learn shamisen these days, we use the notation score, although it is a pretty recent practice. it is very similar to a guitar or lute tablature so the position you pu
LINKTV
Jul 13, 2017 6:00pm PDT
. within indonesia itself and also china and india, the 3 of them account for far more than half ofhe, uh, the world's consumption of palm oil. but the u.s. and european union are also major players and can really, you know, set the standard for others to follow. >> we all know about the charismatic megafauna that live in africa--elephants, lions, hippos, things like that. i guess what's less known to the international community are the charismatic megafauna in asia, and particularly sumatra. so here we have aceh, 3.5 million hectares of rainforest, it contains about a third of the sumatran elephant population, uh, possibly a third of the sumatran tiger population. it contains nearly 90% of the sumatran orangutan polation. 's riticall importanfor the rvival of large mmals, nojust in matra b across ia as we. lephants prefelowland rest bitat. at's the prime habita that's also t habitat orhe land at'sost in dema for agrictural plaationsr for gging coessionas well. the pansion palm oi pltations rtainly s been a key coributor elephan foreshabitat ss. tha's witho a doubt >> the future of th
LINKTV
Aug 28, 2016 2:30pm PDT
: this is a production of china central television america. woman: as the global population grows, the challenge to end hunger only deepens. the u.n. world food program wants to wipe out global hunger by 2030, but can it be done? this week on "full frame," we look at someme of the innonovate and perhaps a little unconventional ideas for eradicating hunger around the world once and foror all. i'm m may lee in losos angelese. let's take it "full frame." in 2012, 5 mba students began developing an idea to address food insecurity in the world's urban slums, but it might seem a little unconventioional to yo. it's insect farming. but guess what? not only did their idea win the world's most prestigious social enterprise competitionon, they beat out 10,000 other competitors and wewere presented the $1 million hult prizize by former u.s. president bill clinton. now,w, since winning the award, two of those stutudents, mohohad ashour and gabe mott, have launched aspire food group. it's s a soal e entprisee focuseon farmi edible incts. ititas operaons inexexico, ghana, andhehe u.s take a lk.k. wom
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 165 (some duplicates have been removed)