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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 237 (some duplicates have been removed)
BBC News
Jun 1, 2017 4:30am BST
always be some worse options that they take. and in china, that has often been the case. but how bad it can be we did not anticipate, massacre, bringing tanks, hundreds of thousands of troops, under siege, the whole beijing city under siege. and in my personal account, i mean, yes, we paid a great price. i have not been able to see my parents, my family, for the last 25, 26 years. it is a great price to pay, but my price doesn't even compare with those who lost their life that night, hundreds if not thousands of them. let's go back to those days of may and june, 1989, then we will look forward to where china is today and where it's going. but if we go to 1989, here is an interesting thought that ihad. you were using this word "democracy" at the time, and yet you were a child of a one—party state. yes. you were brought up in the country created by chairman mao. yes. how on earth did you know what democracy was? well, first of all, the communist party never really denied the term of democracy. and in fact, the word democracy in chinese translated back into english is people rule. so, he
BBC News
Jun 1, 2017 2:30am BST
against humanity. the taliban has denied any involvement. china and the european union are preparing a joint statement in support of the paris climate change agreement, in an apparent attempt to take over global leadership on the issue. president trump, a well—known climate change sceptic, is set to announce whether the america will withdraw from the accord. now it's time for hardtalk. welcome to a special edition of hardtalk with me, stephen sackur. today, the bbc is running a series of programmes about democracy, the idea and the reality. it's a theme our guest today has reason to consider in great depth. wu'erkaixi was one of the leaders of the tiananmen square student protest in beijing in 1989. he became one of the chinese government's most wanted men. he escaped, and he now lives in exile in taiwan. and today, hejoins me, and a hardtalk audience here in london. applause. wu'erkaixi, welcome to hardtalk. thank you very much. we could use more platforms like this to voice our idea. well, i want to talk to you all about your ideas. and i want to begin by taking you bac
BBC News
Jun 17, 2017 2:30am BST
and the world could be better and the west could trade with china or brazil, or whatever might have been the case. it was really a very positive story. but we have seen growth rates slow down dramatically, even in china and india. but also, there has also been a much bigger sense of winners and losers in the west. inequality. inequality, yes. bernie sanders was telling me the other day that as far as he is concerned, the rise of the billionaire oligarch class is one of the fundamental sicknesses that is undermining the health of his nation, the united states, today. well, it's possible. although, if you look around the world, you realise that globalisation has actually dragged a huge number of people out of poverty. in fact bernie sanders said during the campaign that he thought globalisation wasn't working for the us and elsewhere in the world. i think that is a mistake. in the us, you have winners and losers. but in china, you have had an extraordinary transformation in people's living standards over the past few years. so you have different attitudes towards income and quality. i
BBC News
Mar 14, 2017 4:30am GMT
fault. from the definition of the communist party of china, they would say that the china government will choose... field candidates for you to elect election. but i would say that, if there is a screening process to deny 01’ there is a screening process to deny or reject all of the pro—democracy politicians to be the candidates of the elections, it is not a democratic election at all. so what will your view be of the likely winner of this chief executive race? because we don't know yet, it looks as though carrie lam... well, let's call it selection. carrie lam, it looks as though she is the likely winner of this process. she is deemed to be close to beijing, she has already had a senior position in the executive of hong kong. would you regard her as completely illegitimate, given the circumstances? carrie lam being elected, it would be a nightmare at all. and i would say that he would be the chief executive of hong kong after the 26th of march is not dependent on the hong kong people or hong kong elite. it depends on president xi. so whether the president of china will elect car
BBC News
Jun 14, 2017 12:30am BST
. and this video is trending on bbc.com scientists in china have discovered six dinosaurfossil beds in the north eastern city of yanji. they're the only ones to be found in a modern urban area. that story is popular on bbc.com across asia. stay with bbc world news. now on bbc news it's time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i am stephen sackur. the western world, for so long the dominant force in global politics and economics, is confused and uncertain. in the past week, elections in the uk and france have pointed to fractures in europe. donald trump's worldview and angela merkel‘s are poles apart. the western consensus on liberal economics and globalisation is no more. my guest is stephen king, influential economist, writer, and chief economist to hsbc bank. is globalisation stuck in reverse gear? stephen king, welcome to hardtalk. thank you very much. given the dramatic nature of events in the uk, we have to start with britain, and then move our perspective to the world as a whole. but the uk. we have just seen an election that has brought about a hung parliament and a sense that
BBC News
Jan 12, 2017 12:30am GMT
dealing with china. a new species of primate has been found in china. you are up—to—date. stay with us here on bbc world news. first on bbc news, it is hard to talk. welcome to hardtalk. the waiting is almost over. we are about to see what kind of impact of president donald trump will have on the us and world at large. today, my focus is the international arena. our guest has been close to the centre of us policy—making for three decades. he was a senior adviser to both bush presidents and has offered his insights to the president—elect as well. from diplomacy with russia and china to global trade. how one predictable will trump be? richard haass in new york city, welcome to hardtalk. thank you, stephen. you've just written a book with the cheery title a world in disarray. in your opinion, does the election of donald trump to the presidency add to that sense of a world in disarray? it's more the world the 45th president of the united states will be inheriting. it's the result, in part, of things the united states has done but also failed to do. it's in part simply a result of the e
BBC News
Jul 26, 2017 2:30am BST
china in 2013 and met the prime minister. did that not make you feel uncomfortable? no. a country that has a one child policy? restated clearly our position. when we met the prime minister of china, we put clearly what we called vision 2020 which put clearly the choice of the individual and the woman is very important. he endorsed that and said, we will move on forward. immediately after that we set the two child policy. that was changed in 2015. you made a statement welcoming it. exactly. what we are saying is we are not working with all the governments that we agree with entirely. we make our position is very clear, even the fact that choice, individual rights, they are written on a placard in our clinics. we provide services to immigrant populations. but women in china have no choice. you say you went in 2013, he met the prime minister, you said you should have this one child policy, it changed in 2015, that's fine. but you know what your predecessor, the director—general, did and what she said in 2009, in china. this is what she called china's one child policy. it is very co
BBC News
Jun 28, 2017 12:30am BST
is china. china has already made significant investments. and the us, and the us. but china is very striking. a 51% stake in piraeus port. i think they may have done a massive deal to take over he redevelopment of the olympic park, not sure if that is finalised. it has been not finalised yet. but it is in the offing. a senior chinese official says he his desire is to see the partnership between china and greece taken to a new level. are you entirely happy with the idea that china is buying key assets and has big ambitions in your country? it's not only china, though. but i would like to talk about china. i don't know what this means in terms of that new level. what i know is... i am asking you. i don't know whether i would characterise it that way because i see other interests, not only from china but also the us and from austria, i see from germany, the german—owned hellenic telecommunications announced investment of 1.5 billion euros over the next five years, 400 million to be spent this year. so i don't think there is any concern from deutsche telekom. perhaps the concerns are
BBC News
Jul 26, 2017 4:30am BST
china in 2013 and met the prime minister li keqiang. yes. did that not make you feel uncomfortable, though? no. a country that's got a one child policy, forced abortion? we state clearly our position. when we met the prime minister of china, we put clearly what we call vision 2020, which puts very clearly the choice of the individual and the woman is very important and sexual productiveness has to be of free choice. he endorsed that and he said, you will move on forward. immediately after that we'll set the two child policy. that was changed in 2015. yes. we made it in 2013. you made a statement welcoming it. exactly. what we are saying is we are not working with all the governments that we agree entirely. we engage with them, we make our positions very clear, our associations, even the fact that choice, individual rights, they are written on a placard in the clinics, that we provide services to immigrant populations in china. but women in china have no choice. you say, look, i went in 2013, i met the prime minister, i said you shouldn't have this one child policy, it changed in 20
BBC News
Dec 27, 2016 4:30am GMT
of correspondents from around the world. coming up: stand—off in the skies above the south china sea. rupert wingfield—hayes flies over one of the most contested areas in the world, incurring the wrath of the chinese. you can't make no mistakes, it cost you your life, literally. ian pannell reports from barack 0bama's former hometown and finds gun crime is out of control. and battle of the sexes. how scientists are using animals for organs. the bbc went to extraordinary lengths this year to get a rare glimpse of china's determined expansion in the south china sea, one of the most contested areas anywhere in the world. beijing is building huge artificial islands on the spratly island chain, which the americans and others insist are illegal. the area is difficult to get to, but rupert wingfield—hayes flew in a small civilian aircraft into china's self—declared security zone 200 kilometres off the coast of the philippines. this is what he found. it's just before dawn on the philippine island of palawan. even at this hour it's hot, but there's no sign here of the trouble brewing a
BBC News
Jan 11, 2017 4:30am GMT
russia and china, to global trade and climate policy, how different, how unpredictable is trump going to be? richard haass, in new york city, welcome to hardtalk. thank you, stephen. you've just written a book with the cheery title a world in disarray. in your opinion, does the election of donald trump to the presidency add to that sense of a world in disarray? it's more the world the 45th president of the united states will be inheriting. it's the result, in part, of things the united states has done but also failed to do. it's in part simply a result of the end of the cold war, the loosening up our international relations, the rise of certain countries like china and so forth. this is the world he's inheriting. where i think he may have added to it slightly, and notjust him, but first in the american political campaign. candidates including him were saying things and endorsing positions which, shall we say, were untraditional. the fact that, for example, senator sanders, secretary clinton and donald trump, all three rejected the major pending trade agreement, the so—called trans—pa
BBC News
Jan 5, 2017 12:30am GMT
the dynamic within nato. yeah. we haven't talked about china. but many people, not least barack obama with his so—called pivot to asia, believes that actually the key national security interest for america going forward lay in the pacific and in relation to china. donald trump says he doesn't even feel bound by the traditional recognition of the one china policy. so, put your mind towards broader horizons of asia, the pacific, and the us and the east. do you see problems there, too? i do, because i think we recognise we live in the asian century. the power and wealth and the power of decision is shifting east over this century. you can see the beginnings of a clash between a resurgent chinese exceptionalism and an american exceptionalism that we've all grown up with. and probably the focus for that is the south china sea where china has made it clear, i think since 1948, that it regards the south china sea as sovereign waters. and the united states and many other nations in the region and elsewhere subscribe to the un convention on the law of sea and say, no, these are part of the g
BBC News
Sep 26, 2017 12:30am BST
space. china has largely blocked the whatsapp messaging service, the last of facebook products to be available there. chief executive mark zuckerberg had been pushing to re—enter the chinese market. this story is trending on bbc.com. a 13—year—old girl from wales has become the first female in europe to complete a wheelchair backflip. lily rice is raising funds to take part in the wheelchair motocross world championships. that's all from me now. stay with bbc world news. now on bbc news it's time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i'm stephen sackur. there is a special breed of business leaders who acquire a public profile far beyond their core business. think trump, branson, and a host of others. but is a flamboyant style and diversification into sports or media necessarily good for the bottom line? my guest today is one of asia's best—known businessmen, tony fernandes, boss of airasia, football club owner, one—time formula 1 investor, and a dabbler in reality tv. is it easy to lose sight of what matters most to business success? thanks very much. tony fernandes, welcome t
BBC News
Jan 4, 2018 2:30am GMT
view, i don't see them playing up in my view, i don't see them playing up and down the south china sea taking on china but i do think we have wa nted taking on china but i do think we have wanted and needed for the un a naval rapid reaction force for many yea rs naval rapid reaction force for many years and i think this could be a lead role for britain but with commonwealth partners. but to begin with this notion of britain rising to the challenge of local markets and a focus on the military because it seems much more important to focus on trade. we am -- we have a history of merchant trade. we have gone and opened markets in the past. you may sound like a rude yard kipling novel. the reality is quite different. —— rudyard kipling. kipling novel. the reality is quite different. -- rudyard kipling. when i left the house of commons, i left it. i was in business in the uk in textiles. in russia with steel and oil and textiles. in russia with steel and oiland in textiles. in russia with steel and oil and in america with pharmaceutical industries. i am not talking completely with no kno
BBC News
Jan 25, 2017 12:30am GMT
headlines: china has asserted its indisputable sovereign in over parts of the south china sea. the us vowed it will protect it interests. the new man in charge of formula one racing has launched a strong attack on the man who ran it for a0 years. and this story is trending on our website... a five kilometre ice bridge on the yellow river. locals have described it as a huge white dragon lying between the valleys. plenty more to come on bbc world news. first he run bbc, hardtalk. —— here. welcome to hardtalk with me, zeinab badawi, from the world economic forum in davos where my guest is one of the world's most senior politicians, germany's defence minister ursula von der leyen. she's also deputy chair of angela merkel‘s ruling cdu party. does the arrival of donald trump in the white house, plus brexit, spell the start of a new world order and mark a shift in power away from the west? minister ursula von der leyen, welcome to hardtalk. thank you, zeinab. the president of germany, joachim gauck, has said, earlier this month, "with the inauguration of a new us "president, we face
BBC News
May 9, 2017 4:30am BST
absolutely could not live with. this despite numerous meetings in beijing and china at the helm of this. plus, as you mentioned, i made three trips to north korea, including going to their nuclear reactor. at the end of the day, they basically decided they would rather have nuclear weapons. the question is, can this president, working with very familiar elements, china, south korea, can he create a situation where north korea says, "we are better off giving up our nuclear weapons"? certainly, we were prepared to put whatever they wanted in the agreement, provided they were willing to give up their weapons. we were not prepared to look the other way and pretend they were giving up nuclear weapons when in fact they weren't. i think it's a very tall order to get them to do this. they have a new leader, kim jong—un. at least his father seemed to care what the chinese thought and tried to engage in these negotiations. kim jong—un shows absolutely no interest. right, well you negotiated with the father's team rather than the son's, but at least you have some sense of how they operate. whe
BBC News
Jun 27, 2017 4:30am BST
there is real investment into greece today and thatis investment into greece today and that is china. china has already made significant investments. and the us. but china is striking. at 5196 the us. but china is striking. at 51% sta ke the us. but china is striking. at 51% stake in piraeus port. the redevelopment of the olympic park, not sure of that is finalised. it has been not finalised yet. but it is in the offing. a chinese official says he sees potential in the partnership between china and greece going to a new level. you entirely happy with the idea that china is buying key assets and has big ambitions in your country? it's not only china, though. i would like to talk about china. i don't know what this means in terms of that new level. i am asking you. i don't know what i would characterise it that way because i see other interests, not only from china but also the us and aust rio, from germany, set the german telecommunication company announced 1.5 billion euros over the next five years. —— austria. some to be spent this year. there is no concern. . . be spent this ye
BBC News
Sep 7, 2017 12:30am BST
world, china, korea, humour is humour, business is business... is that really true? from the little time i spent in cultures like japan, for example, it struck me, not speaking japanese, but japanese business culture is fundamentally quite different to what we see in europe. that is true, that is true, but alcohol is a great leveller. well, in some countries that wouldn't work. maybe you are not so big in those countries. fine, but social occasions, i bring to business a lot of the relationship. much of it is done socially, creating relationships that go beyond the office. it doesn't matter if you are injapan, india, the middle east, people are the same. they would say people want all the frills, "low—cost will never work," they say. they are surprised. when you get something injapan they wrap it up in about 25 pieces of paper. but when you strip it down, people want simplicity and a low fare, and they want to travel more. did you make enemies in asia? you brought a european model of airlines to asia. you took over airasia but you transformed it. you had seen what 0'leary was doin
BBC News
May 9, 2017 2:30am BST
very familiar elements, china, south korea, can he create a situation where north korea says, "we are better off giving up our nuclear weapons". certainly, we we re our nuclear weapons". certainly, we were prepared to put whatever they wa nted were prepared to put whatever they wanted in the agreement, provided they were willing to give up their weapons. we were not prepared to kind of look the other way and pretend they were giving away, giving up their nuclear weapons when in fact they won't. i think it's a very tall order to get them to do this. they have new leader, kim jong—un, at least his father seemed to ca re jong—un, at least his father seemed to care what the chinese thought and tried to engage in these negotiations. kim jong—un shows absolutely no interest. right, well you negotiated with the father's tea m you negotiated with the father's team rather than the sun's. when donald trump says things like, you know, "we could end up having a major, major conflict with north korea, absolutely." major, major conflict with north korea, absolutely. " and major, major conflic
BBC News
Feb 28, 2017 12:30am GMT
world and there was a great deal of talk of the united states and china, together, leading the move towards a decarbonisation of the global economy. are you happy to think while the rest of the world continues in that direction, the us is performing at handbreak turn and going entirely the opposite direction? yes, i think the us will lead the world to a much brighter future. i think the paris agreement is a dead end. i think that the commitment made to there are largely on paper and not real. i think every country that wants to have a growing and prosperous economy finds out that these kinds of commitments are a huge obstacle to maintaining economic growth. i think you see china has made a promise that its emissions will peak sometime in the 2030s and that gives them a long time to grow and then in the 2030s then can also say, "oh, we have made a mistake, we don't actually believe that now." but that is not what is happening in china. look at what the chinese are actually doing — they are investing so many billions, it is mind—boggling, in renewable energy. they reckon by 2020 h
BBC News
Sep 27, 2017 2:30am BST
double—speak on terrorism. even china has signed a declaration including pakistan—based groups on a terror list. my guest today is pakistan's foreign minister, khawaja asif. are they at risk of losing all their allies because of their inability or unwillingness to control militants? khawaja asif, welcome to hardtalk. thank you. how do you respond to that challenge from president trump that challenge from president trump that pack a stunt often gives safe haven to agents of chaos, violence and terror? —— pakistan. haven to agents of chaos, violence and terror? -- pakistan. well, we have given a statement in response of what president trump said three weeks back. and let me explain that again. our parliaments have almost 40% to 45% territory, kabul has almost no control on that territory —— the taliban. why would they need safe haven, when they have their own territory where they can move freely without any hindrance, without any problem? so this is basically... you know, this scapegoating pakistan for whatever has happened in afghanistan over the last 1.5 decades. at the peak
BBC News
Sep 8, 2017 4:30am BST
the soviet union, it now russia, and china. and i think those two countries bear some responsibility for the situation of the peninsular. and it is kim jong—un situation of the peninsular. and it is kimjong—un in situation of the peninsular. and it is kim jong—un in violation situation of the peninsular. and it is kimjong—un in violation of myriad resolutions and of the nuclear non—proliferation treaty who has just exploded a hydrogen nuclear non—proliferation treaty who hasjust exploded a hydrogen bomb. so where is the outrage? we focus all of our energy... we focus all oui’ all of our energy... we focus all our energy on some of the rhetorical blemishes of the president of the united states. crosstalk i don't think for a moment he will pull the trigger. your point is well taken. if i am invited to pyongyang to have a conversation with kim jong—un i guarantee i will put him on the spot. well i hope so! yes, but right now i am talking to you.|j but right now i am talking to you.” wish you would go there. so do i but right now with you need to talk abo
BBC News
Nov 9, 2017 4:30am GMT
the us is hoping china might put more pressure on its ally and neighbour north korea to abandon its nuclear programme. the world's most powerful leaders will also oversee a signing ceremony for billions of dollars of trade deals. britain's international development secretary, priti patel, has resigned, the second cabinet minister to do so in the past week. she'd held unauthorised meetings with israeli leaders while on holiday in israel. ms patel said that her actions were meant with the best of intentions. the actor and director kevin spacey is facing fresh allegations of sexual misconduct. the us journalist heather unruh has told reporters that her son was sexually assaulted by mr spacey last year. now it's time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i'm stephen sackur. germany is europe's pre—eminent power, but how will berlin use that power over the next few years? the make—up of the next governing coalition has yet to be decided and there are strategic uncertainties as well. how far does berlin want to push eu integration, and how wide could tra ns—atla ntic differences become
BBC News
May 26, 2017 2:30am BST
shareholders. yes, taking it elsewhere, looking eastward, does it sit comfortably with you that china is now actually a shareholder? yes it does. it sits very comfortably with me. how do you think they relate to article one of your charter? article one applies to borrowing and china is not a borrower. if they are a shareholder, they clearly wield some sort of influence. they are one of 67 shareholders. in terms of its weight, it is perhaps more... china is very important for our region, central asia, and other regions. china is also important, ebrd is also important to the chinese model so that they can take it to their own banks. i can see that you are very aware that they are now rivals in the international multi—lending sphere. i don't think they are rivals. they have their own international infrastructure investment bank... it's not their own. it's based in beijing. you would not quibble whether they decide their own strategy. yes, i would. we helped set it up. we were the last multilaterally created bank. they asked for our help on governance, appraisal standards, environmental and so
BBC News
Jan 24, 2017 4:30am GMT
when a moment but to continue this, president xi jinping of china said the world is on the verge of radical change. in ten years, we can expect a new world order. there will be an alliance between china and russia. basically, iam between china and russia. basically, i am putting it to you that the west is in decline. the west in a strategic way, needs strong alliances. he is talking to russia but i also had the chance to listen to this talk, the speech he gave and it was interesting, there was a strong speech for free trade, or cooperation. 0r strong speech for free trade, or cooperation. or an inclusive global management of problems and fairness within the economic systems. these we re within the economic systems. these were new tones. power tones. he was giving our speech. you are implying... he was giving our speech. ec claiming the mantle of leader of the world? filling the vacuum? i would say that, i welcome this attitude, welcome to the club and of course, this openness, this external openness has to be a code and the most important thing is, i am very glad to listen to these
BBC News
Aug 29, 2017 2:30am BST
go and live in china in 2006. quite soon afterwards, you began undertaking tours into north korea, that special economic zone inside north korea, close to the chinese border. why did you undertake those tours? i was sent as a missionary to china, andi tours? i was sent as a missionary to china, and i was living in the chinese community. while i was serving in the chinese community, i was able to meet with north korean defectors and others. i ended up visiting north korea to see what it is like to live there, what it is like to see how people live there. by like to see how people live there. by doing so, i ended up conducting a tour into the country ‘s. by doing so, i ended up conducting a tour into the country 's. when you say you went there to see how people lived, you also went as a christian missionary? that is correct. i am a christian missionary and i was there to see how we could help the people that, how to pray for the people, and how to build a bridge to the people in north korea. you and the people in north korea. you and the people on your tours, you were all committe
BBC News
Nov 7, 2017 12:30am GMT
first dialogue is with china, south korea and japan. but a different dialogue from what we are seeing at least in the public. a dialogue that is not simply the united states making recommendations to china for what we want to see happen, as opposed to a broader dialogue of the entire security context for that region — for china, north korea, south korea, japan. of course, issues like the future american military postulate in the region, should an agreement be reached, is very important to china. i think we have to be putting on the table a lot broader set of issues. this is a case where the issue of north korean nuclear weapons combined with missiles, can be eventually resolved only by enlarging the discussion to include the full security context. right. well, those are words which sound great, but i am very mindful of what is actually happening on the ground. every single day, the north koreans appear more and more determined to develop a capability that in the end would allow them to threaten targets in the mainland united states. no question about that. here is my question. you'r
BBC News
Feb 14, 2017 2:30am GMT
trade, for example trade with china, where the issues to. we just had this argument with the steel union of europe and china. when it comes to syria, there are issues we can work on together. and i want to focus on those things where we can work on them together, not just where we can work on them together, notjust do all where we can work on them together, not just do all these where we can work on them together, notjust do all these historical things we have seen in the past days. -- hysterical. ido things we have seen in the past days. -- hysterical. i do want to be hysterical, but i don'tjust want to focus on what you have outlined, either. i want to focus on what donald trump a europe. he said brexit was the start of something bigger and that other nations would be the european union. and he clearly left the impression that he does not have much time to the european union. well, i would say it is up to the european union, now, to grow up. we have two learn, obviously, that we have to do our things on our own, but i do hope that from sentences like this and the opinion that see
BBC News
Jun 22, 2017 12:30am BST
years ago. the american secretary of state says china has a responsibility to force north korea to scrap its nuclear weapons. rex tillerson said washington wants complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsular. this storing is trending on bbc .com — the hug that wasn't when senator marco rubio tried to embrace ivanka trump. it was caught on camera, uploaded and went viral. you are up—to—date. stay with us. now on bbc news, it is time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i'm stephen sackur. when it comes to populist messages delivered with menace, no one does it quite like rodrigo duterte, elected president of the philippines a year ago. since he came to power, around 7000 people have been killed. human rights groups are aghast that the majority of filipinos seem to like his iron fist. my guest is one of the president's most fierce critics, senator antonio trillanes. is duterte taking the phillipines and the region in a new direction? antonio trillanes, in manila, welcome to hardtalk. hello, stephen. thank you very much for inviting me. we speak at a difficult time for your country
BBC News
Dec 19, 2017 12:30am GMT
of competition with global powers like china and russia. in a speech outlining his national security plan for america, he also said the us had no choice but to deal with the challenge from north korea, although he didn't outline how. three people have been killed, and more than 100 injured, after a passenger train derailed from a bridge near the us city of seattle. and this video is trending on bbc.com: china says it's flown its first tourist flight to the south pole. 22 people were on board the jet which made its way from south africa to antarctica. china says the trip opens the way for more visa—free travel to the frozen continent. that's all from me now. stay with bbc world news. now on bbc news it's time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk, with me, zeinab badawi. is the sudanese government coming in from the cold and moving towards becoming a fully integrated member of the international community? the us lifted economic sanctions on sudan in october, ending two decades of its financial isolation. washington says sudan has made progress on human rights, democratic reform
BBC News
Oct 18, 2017 12:30am BST
scores of the jihadi militants are still being pursued amid its ruins. china's top officials are gathering in beijing for the start of the communist party congress, where the next five year plan is about to be revealed. and this story is trending on bbc.com: hollywood star reese witherspoon has alleged that she was assaulted by a director when she was just 16 years old. she said she was angry with the people in the film industry who had made herfeel that keeping quiet about what had happened was a condition of her employment. that's all from me now. and of course live coverage of the china peoples congress coming up. now on bbc news it's time for hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk, with me, zeinab badawi. as the world continues to follow the plight of the rohingya muslims in myanmar, condemnation has been put on the burmese authorities for not doing more to protect them from attacks from buddhist militants. my guest today is acclaimed swiss film director barbet schroeder, whose latest documentary is about an influential buddhist monk in myanmar who uses strong anti—muslim rhetoric i
BBC News
Dec 12, 2017 12:30am GMT
mean, if the united states, russia, china let alone countries like north korea — and we might talk about that more — if those nations do not accept this "international law", what meaning does it have? it will still impact their behaviour and sort of shift their norms. how and why? for example, we can ask banks to divest from nuclear weapons production, and we've seen that for example with the cluster munitions convention, that the us did not participate or sign. but last year, textron, the last american producer of cluster munitions, stopped producing cluster munitions, saying there's a growing international stigma, it's bad business to keep investing in this weapon. and even if perhaps the trump administration now is trying to reverse some policies, the company have said "no, we are not going to do this." setsuko, i want to quote you something. canl... 0k, all right. well, i wanted to quote you something the nobel committee said in their citation in giving the award. they said this, "we live in a world today where the risk of nuclear weapons being used is greater than it has bee
BBC News
Nov 21, 2017 4:30am GMT
united states anybody else. it is china. there is talk of a key meeting involving mr mnangagwa and mr chiwenga, the head of the military, actually in beijing. and that the chinese signed off on the move against mugabe because china of course has vast economic interest in zimbabwe. is china a big player, do you think? yes, but i also know china as one who tries not to interfere in internal politics, except in its own neighbourhood. so i think that is mere speculation. there is no evidence to that effect. nor is there evidence that western countries have been directly involved. there has always been speculation, of course, unconfirmed, that emmerson mnangagwa and in this case, this military coup, would have the support of the british or the british intelligence services. again, that is speculation. so what's next, in your view? i imagine when we stop talking you will be going very soon back home to harare, and you are somebody who constantly speaks out for fundamental transformation in zimbabwe, getting away from what you call the factionalism, opening up of politics, bringing in a new
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