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20171120
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2017 26
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jun 5, 2017 10:17pm EDT
company can make more money by going to china, good luck, and you have to get a job --have to which is you formally made? how do you feel is apparent, when you know that your kid -- as a parent, when you want you can do better things than you have -- but you can't -- can't even find a home for himself, or maybe leave school to be in thousand dollars in depth. i think resident carter's right. i think if you're going to look at human rights codes got to look at the term i use -- the growth of oligarchy in america. oligarchy. what that means, the president touched them both issues, it's not just that on both the -- unbelievably grotesque level of income and wealth inequality, one family in america owns more wealth than the bottom 42%, etc. -- but these guys are not putting their money under their mattress. they are using it politically. so, we live in a country where people fought and died for democracy, and you get the koch brothers in sheldon adelson and a handful of billionaires able to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to elect candidates the wealthy and the powerful. and this
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2017 3:05am EDT
china. good luck to you. parent wheneel as a you know that your kid, who you love so much and you want better things than you had, that is the american dream, your kid can't afford to go to college, can't even find a home for himself or herself. or maybe leave school, $50,000 to $80,000 in debt. president carter is right. if you are going to look at human rights, you have to look at the term i use -- the growth of oligarchy in america. oligarchy. and what that means and the president touched on both of the issues, it is not just an unbelievably grotesque level of incoming wealth inequality. one family in america owns more wealth than the bottom 42%, etc. but these guys are now putting their money under their mattress. they are using it politically. so, we live in a country where people fought and died for democracy, and you get the koch brothers in sheldon adelson and a handful of billionaires able to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to elect candidates who represent the wealthy and the powerful. and this recent bill, everybody is familiar with this terrible bill passed last thurs
CSPAN
Jun 10, 2017 11:32pm EDT
, our company can make more money going to china, good luck to you, and you go out and get a job at half the wages you formerly made? how do you feel as a parent when you know that your kid, who you love so much and you want better things than you had -- that's the american dream -- your kid can't afford to go to college? can't even find a home for himself or herself? or maybe leave school $50,000, $80,000 in debt? so i think president carter is right. i think if you are going to look at human rights, we have got to look the term i use is the growth of oligarchy in america and what that means, and the president touched on both of the issues, it's not just unbelievably grotesque level of income and wealth inequality, one family in america owns more wealth than the bottom 42%, etc., but these guys are not putting their money under their mattress. they are using it politically. so we live in a country where people fought and died for democracy and you got the koch brothers and sheldon aledleson and billionaires able to spend millions of dollars to elect candidates who represent the wea
CSPAN
Jun 6, 2017 7:08pm EDT
work one day and someone said, a company can work more money by going to china, good luck to you. you go out and get a job at have to wages. how do you feel is apparent when you know your kid who you love so much and you want better things then you had, thusa american thin dream, your kid ct go to college and find a home for himself or herself. maybe they leave school with $80000 in debt. president carter's right, ifar you're going to look at human rights you have to look at the term i use is the growth of oligarchy in america. what that means and the president touched on that, it's not just the unbelievablysq grotesque level of income and wealth inequality. one family in america owns more wealth than the bottom 42%, et e cetera. but, these guys are not putting their money into their mattress, they're using it politically. we live in a country where people fundi for democracy. and then you have people in a handful of billionaires able to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to elect candidates who represent the wealthy and powerful. las this recent bill, everybody's familiar with the
CSPAN
Jun 23, 2014 4:10am EDT
state department has eight countries of particular concern. china, iran,ma, north korea, said arabia, sued on, and his pakistan. -- this back to stand. some of these a been recommendations for several years. countries that we are recommending that have not been designated as countries of concerned are egypt, iraq, serious,serious, -- vietnam. we list pakistan at the top of the list. they have not been designated as countries of concern. if there is one country the top , that is pakistan because of horrific abuses that take place there. the last designation by the state department were in 2011. we strongly advocate annual designations. these recommendations become part of a wallpaper. noted -- nobody notices them anymore. we really need annual designations. we want to make these designations on an annual basis. a second.to stop you i want to let others respond. , ihaih respect to the have been hopeful. participating in no partisan politics. we have noticed that in the last sear since mr. rouhani' presidency, we have had cemeteries desecrated and people stabbed in their homes. there's
CSPAN
Mar 4, 2017 2:24pm EST
america, but in the section of strategy for communist states, with china. the strategy outlined was a nonpolitical approach that accepted the limits of acknowledging the results were limited. it argued the united states tried to -- would try to encourage improvements, including areas of family reunification and political prisoners. this leads up to [no audio] were conducted -- united states made it known that it hopes to discuss with cuba, withoutprisoners. this leads up preconditions, the range -- of issues between our countries, such as repatriate -- repatriation. carter allowed press corps restrictions to expire, and is respect -- restrictions on u.s. dollars spent on travel extensive to cuba. the united states opened their first intersection of neutral embassies, and established and -- established some form of relations. normalization of human rights were inseparable elements of a new approach to cuba. internal policy briefing the and of march, the administration detailed logic for normalization, arguing that it was consistent with the administration's commitment to universalistic
CSPAN
May 9, 2016 10:26am EDT
probably will have to see movement from china. and that for us to see movement from china, we're going to have to see greater consolidation of international opinion. you've touched on this. the core of it will be the rfk in japan, which gets beijing's attention. if we can tcontinue building ths international consensus, what are some actions we want from china to help improve the lives of north koreans to maybe get more help on the beabductees. american and korean politics are becoming more interesting. we have an election this year, korea has a presidential election nerks year. what is your sense of the continuity of our current approach to this problem and what would you say to the next administration to make sure we continue with the kind of momentum we've had to date at least in international opinion and to build on that going forward? minister lee, do you want to started then we'll go to bob. >> the most paimmediate problemf course involves and the north korean defectors because north korean defectors risk their lives to cross the border. but as you all know, crossing the border in
about china's relation of human rights -- violation of human rights? the -- receive any good reception here at the u.n. with your conversation with colleagues including the palestinian ambassador? amb. haley: did you write that down on where he started? [laughter] amb. haley: this weekend will be very important. i think it will be important at a number of levels. first and foremost, dealing with north korea. the united states has seen china say they are concerned about north korea but we have not seen them act like they were. with this administration wants to see them act and we hope china will respond favorably. that is the goal of this weekend, to see that china will act on north korea. we know at the end of the day, we know the one north korea will china. to will be obviously, they are partnered economically and we need to talk about those things but i do think the way the weekend will go will depend on how that conversation with north korea a is because that is very front and center. i think the president has made it clear he needs to see actions from china. we hope it is a good co
emergencies. purchased online by mid level dealers from chemical suppliesu in china and shipped by world wp wide delivery services. a single kilo gram produced 10,000 doses. the frenzy of flaca united the community under the drug prevention and coalition of the united way. the rapid and extensive response brought world wide media attention and pressure on the government of china to ban the prohibition -- or the production and sales of alpha pvp along with 1500 synthetic drugs effective october 1, 2015. within two months, flaca was done from the streets of fort lauderdale. demonstrating how a community working together across multiple organizations can attack a global problem. over the past two years, non-pharmaceutical fentanyl produced in labs in china and probably mexico have been linked to the majority of more than 1300-fentanyl related deaths just in florida. the non-medical pharmaceutical fentanyl has been sold as street heroin, and more recently been described as xanax and other pills. they have been identified tragically after people have died. a vital surveillance system for involve
administration, many of you guys came to us and whether it was russia or ukraine or burma or china or any number of places to take a tougher stand and you were right to do so. >> behind the democrats when we had the bush administration i didn't much like the bush administration but i absolutely believe that president bush thought the united states should be a force for good in the world. and i was routinely at the state department and national security council urging those folks including paula who is still in the room to take a stand on this or the other. >> i don't feel that way about the current document of the white house. >> i think that we have to be open about this and think about what it means. >> there were a number of people this week who criticized president trump for not calling for the release and condemning these protests. i found myself not sharing that criticism. >> i don't want them to be calling for the release of anticorruption protesters. >> it would be hypocritical to do so. from my standpoint, the thing, he in many ways represents some of these young people in russia
russia or the ukraine or burma or china or any other place, you urged us to take a tougher stand and you were right to do so. i'm a democrat. when we had a bush administration, i didn't much like the bush administration. but i absolutely believed that president bush thought that the united states should be a force for good in the world. i was routinely at the state council urging those folks, including paula, i don't know if he's still in the room, to take a stand on this, that or the other. i don't feel that way about the current occupant of the white house. i think we have to be open about this and think about what it means. there were a number of people this week who criticized president trump for not calling for the release and not condemning the protests. i found myself not joining in on that protest. i don't want pruch to call for the release of anti-corruption protesters in russia. it would be hypocritical for him to do so. from my standpoint, the thing -- he in many ways represents the thing that some of these young people in russia were protesting against. he has told us ver
movements in russia and in china, in cuba, and countries around the world. and trying to have the world rights movement. . >> we know that several groups are persecuted. they call non-traditional religious minorities. one of them is jehovah's witnesses. going to file a claim to ban this group. >> thank you. being the right policy to bring about change. then religious freedom. who wants to take them. >> i'll take the first two. might want to say something about the third. there are a lot of things that we can do. i think the sanctions we now have are minimal. we have to protect ourselves and protect the information space. not allowing these planes to be bombing in syria and ukraine. you know, but probably the most effective thing we could do is to really cut off access to our investment system. reorganized crime and corruption reporting project. which just came out with a report that the guardian reported on. $20 billion of stolen money. could be as high as $80 billion. the video that they did about medvedev had $1 million. but it's much, much more than that. these are enormous sum
trump has said if china is not going to solve north korea, we will. can you tell us how? and also speaking of human rights, we've been talking in this country a lot about russia's violations of human rights. should we talk a bit more about china's violations of humanon rights backs and on israel-palestine thing that jason greenblatt has been enriching talking about the regional approach rather than israel palestinian first. did that receive any echo, any good reception here at the u.n. with your conversations withnclg colleagues, including the palestinian ambassador? >> okay, so -- did you write that down on where he started? i should have something to write -- let's start with president xi. t this visit this weekend will be very, very important. and i think will be important at a number of levels. first and foremost in dealing with north korea. i think the united states isrea. seen china for 25 plus years say that they're concerned about north korea but we haven't seen them at like they're concerned about north korea.ct and i think this administration wants to see them act anythi
missiles to china. stay to one or the other. and don't be discouraged. on my first week six years ago i sent an op-ed to our opinion editor who is now studying law at yale and his response was i'm going to pass on this, thanks. i'm sitting right next to you, you skinny weirdo. i will knock you out. and he'd always taken my op-eds but they will be shot down and you will have put a lot of work into them. it will be hurtful but don't quit. keep on going. also you can take the same op-ed and shop it to multiple places but don't let it be printed in more than one place because most people do want exclusivity. i think that's it for letter to the editor. if you're doing an op-ed you have to stay short but you have a lot more room. generally unless you're a genius you should stick to around 500 or 750 words or max out at 1,200. stay to this model for years. eventually if some of you are lucky, people will care about your opinion and you can go on forever, but not yet. so, you want to keep people engaged. and you want to stay local and stay timely, again, why i'm a conservative is not a good o
will have many more like this about russia and china. the rise of these traditional rivals are really concerning to people back home. russia, i would like to talk to dr. carpenter on russia. i have a second follow-up on hybrid warfare. i want to talk about georgia. i want to know what lessons we've learned after eight years? the russians have history of creating frozen conflicts without a peace treaty everything seems to be going normal and i know next year in one of their regions, chavali, having referendum joining russia again. this is pressure russia keeps putting on there and i'm very concerned. james clapper, director of dni, national intelligence the nation of georgia despite progress on western nations and reforms is increasing risk from russian aggression and pressure. i visited serbia last year and met the georgian defense minister, tina kitalshi, and heard her concerns about ongoing pressure in georgia. what lessons have we learned in terms of standing up? i know georgia in the u.s., national guard had a forward deployment there. i would like to get some feedback on t
great place to work and i felt or china. thank you. >> her ability to hold faith for politics and for multiple views for a wide range of heroes. your ability to hold faith for ideas for risk for possibility and for that i'm eternally grateful. [applause] >> jeff bezos is one of the world's most highly respected leaders. he is known as an entrepreneur passionate inventor and a success builder. at amazon we know him as all of that and much more. he is our trusted ceo who guides us and challenges us with his remarkable intellect and curiosity. he is the model for using amazon's leadership principles in our daily work. he is a warm and witty conversationalist who loves to laugh and he is a old strategic thinker who thrives to maximize impact. stefan mckinzy's donation of $2.5 billion to washington state marriage equality campaign exemplifies how to have meaningful's far-reaching impact impact. their gift was 25 times more than the amount i requested. it was a staggeringly generous gift and it beautifully strategic amount. it allowed us to make big early advertisement and gets discounted r
technology to control the flow of information. last year g-mail saw its traffic in china reduced to zero when chinese authorities prevented main land users from accessing it. in turkey government authorities blocked youtube and twitter for several days in leadup to elections. in cuba while the government has publicly committed to expanding internet access access remains restricted for the vast majority of the population. something we will be working with u.s. service providers to help change. access to information is also critical to fighting corruption and the secretary highlighted that as another major theme of the reports this year. the connection between corruption, human rights abuses and authoritarian governments. this is evident in many places. venezuela is one country that we highlighted in this context in this report. in china while the government cracked down on corruption, it also convicted civil society activists associated with the new citizens movement in retribution for their public campaign to expose official corruption. china has now introduced draft laws on foreign ngos, nat
terry branstad who nominated by president trump to serve as u.s. ambassador to china. he was asked by members of the foreign relations committee about his relationship with the chinese president, cyber security, and china's role in north korea. this is just under two hours. pound -- gavel pound] >> foreign relations committee will come to order. we are honored to have so many people here today. i do wonder what's happening back in iowa with the governor, two senators and so many distinguished individuals here and we're glad to have all of you here in support of our nominee. out of deep respect for senator grassley and ernst, the ranking member and i both will defer our opening comments so that you do not have to sit through those. i know that you would like to say wonderful and glowing things about our nominee and we know that you have other business that you need to tend to so what we'll do is ask you to please go first. we will then begin the business in the normal way and move to testimony by governor branstad. if would you begin the most honorable senator grassley, we'd appreciate
branstad to be the next ambassador to china. he testified earlier this week before the senate foreign relations committee. he talks about his relationship with the chinese president, china's role in north korea and cyber security concerns. this is just under two hours. >> the foreign relations committee will come to order. we are honored to have so many people here today. i do wonder what is happening back in iowa with the governor and two senators and 70 distinguished individuals here. we are glad to hear have you here in support of her nominee. out of out of deep respect for senator grassley and senator ernst, we will defer our opening comments so you do not have to sit through those. i know you would like to say wonderful and glowing things about our nominee and we know you have other business to tend to. we will ask you to go first and begin the business in the normal way and moved to testimony by the governor branstad. if you would begin the most honorable senator grassley, we appreciate and thank you for honoring us with your presence here today with thank you for your service i
escape. you know you might be caught, arrested, or executed. you illegally crossed into china where you risk being deported back into north korea. if you're a woman, you might become a victim of trafficking, forced prostitution, or marriage against your will. you journey across china to another country in southeast asia. if you are lucky to make it that far, you face a choice. for most, the only reasonable option is going to south korea where the language and the culture are familiar. but a very brave few make the decision to come to america, and , as you will hear in a moment, they are remarkable men and women. like any refugee though, they face countless challenges. refugees typically seek about six months of formal support upon arriving in the united states. they are guided as they look for a place to live and a first job , and they are taught some of the basics on how to navigate life in america. but then, refugees are expected to make it on their own. over the last two years, the bush institute has conducted two studies of north koreans living in the united states, and what we
rooms spot adam start the clock, five minutes. >>> president trump's pick to being ambassador to china testified at his confirmation hearing today an was asked about trade with china and north korea's nuclear program. that hearing is next on c-span 3. agriculture secretary sonny perdue talks about the school lunch program and the use of migrant farm workers. and later, a debate on globalism. president trump's nominee to be ambassador to china, iowa governor terry branstad testified at his confirmation hearing. he was asked about his relationship with the chinese president, cybersecurity concerns, and china's role in north korea. the senate foreign relations committee is chaired by senator bob corker. >> foreign relations committee will come to order. we are honored to have so many people here today. i do wonder what's happening back in iowa with the governor, two senators and so many distinguished individuals here and we're glad to vaufl you here in support of our nominee. out of deep respect for senator grassley and ernst, the ranking member and i both will defer our opening comments
hearing who is nominated to serve as u.s. ambassador to china. he was asked by members of the u.s. foreign relations facility and china's role in dealing with north korea. this is just under two hours. i do wonder what's happening with so many distinguished individuals here. we are glad to have you here in support of our nominee. it is the ranking member and i both -- i know you would like to say wonderful things about our nominee and we know you have other business to tend to. we'll ask you to begin first and we'll begin in a normal way. if you would begin the most honorable senator, we thank you for honoring us with your presence here today. we thank you for your service here today. with that we would love to hear your comment. >> thank you members of the foreign relations committee. it's a privilege for me to be here to introduce the governor of iowa, the next ambassador to china. i would say that this gentleman has been an ambassador all of his life for iowa and will make a good ambassador to china. he has been an ambassador within the united states of america. he has told oth
states. one of those brave souls is joseph kim. in 2006, joseph escaped north korea into china and eventually made his way here with the help of an organization called liberty in north korea. today he is a hard-working college student and a voice for north koreans who still do not know freedom. joseph visited the bush institute in 2014, and we are thrilled to welcome him back. ladies and gentlemen, joseph kim. [applause] >> hello, everyone. my name is joseph kim. today is my second time meeting president bush. what i was offered an opportunity to meet him three years ago, i thought about it and i decided to accept the invitation. as a student, i thought it would be a good thing to meet the president, because how many college students can say i actually met president bush? someone suggested that i should thank him because he signed the act which allowed the north korean refugees to have an opportunity to come to the u.s., including myself. that day when i met him, i thanked him with my brain, the best i could, but not with a heart. during the meeting, president bush asked me how i e
nominated iowa governor terry bran stead to be the next ambassador to china. yesterday the governor testified before the senate foreign relations committee on his relationship with the chinese president, china's role with north korea and cybersecurity concerns. this is two hours. >> we're hopped to have so many people with us today. i wonder what's happening back in iowa with so many distinguished individuals here. we're glad to have all of you here in support of our nominee. the ranking member and i will both defer our opening comments. i know that you would like to say wonderful and glowing things about our nominee. and we know that you have other business that you need to tend to so what we'll do is ask you to please go first. we will then begin the business in the normal way and move to testimony by governor branstad. if you would begin the most honorable senator grassley, we'd appreciate if. we thank you for honoring us with your presence here today and we thank you for your service in so many ways. and with that, we'd love to hear your comments. >> thank you, chairman corker.
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)