Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20180123
STATION
DATE
2015 36
2016 33
2014 18
2017 10
2018 2
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2016 12:00pm EST
china. but theyuered cities didn't quite get the whole country under control and they kept saying that they were leaping from victory to victory, which was true but they were not winning the war. wonder,ere starting to this war that was supposed to be over in one month, after four years it hasn't ended. what is going on. the most acute sign of this prolonged war that they didn't was going was their hunger. the rationing system had been put into effect in april of 1941. the main target was the rice, which has such a huge place in japanese diet. they don't have anything else. rice is the thing and as long as they have rice they are healthy. but they don't have this rice. anothere to do with kind and even then they have to dilute it with potato or something. in early 1941, by the fall of 1941, all the major metropolitan cities had to do this rationing system. it must have been scandalous to quite a worrying sign. we can't really question the authority because it is already in a semi-war economy and they .re not really an independent since 1931, since the manchurian incident, the majo
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2014 12:00pm EDT
it already. those 21 decided to remain in -- >> korea. >> korea which is inaccurate, it's china, isn't it? that doesn't give me much faith right away of what's going to happen in this article. here are the army prisoners of war, when i say this, no navy service person was part of the 21. you're supposed to say yeah. it doesn't mean you are better. i hope you get that. it means the army is in a position to be captured much more than the navy. what is the thesis of the article? often the title will reflect that. not always, but. it mentions a myth, doesn't it? >> brainwashing myth. >> brainwashing myth, and what was the rest of it? the title? the brainwashing myth, go ahead. >> i actually had a question in terms of the brainwashing prisoners of war, she uses the word many and that didn't seem like choice words. under the picture, then it says they refused repatriation during the korean war, i was curious what the u.s.'s stance is in a prisoner of war becomes a -- >> remains behind? >> well, they made a mistake there, which we may or may not get to. they will consider them dishonor
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2016 10:23pm EDT
on in europe after world war ii. it encompasses the fall of china, the communism, korea, vietnam, all kinds of topics that we'll talk about over the next couple of weeks. so, it not only has a foreign component. we're also going to talk today what's going on, the effects of the cold war here at home. and we'll talk about presidential elections. about a domestic issue known as the red scare, sort of the second red scare. and how the united states is sort of going to be gripped with suspicions and paranoia about all things communist. so a lot of ground to cover today in terms of foreign policy and domestic policy. all right, so we're going to start with the origins of the cold war. where do we start? well, let's go back really to 1941. last class period when we discussed the war itself, one of the mistakes that i mentioned that hitler made was when he invaded russia in the summer of 1941. he tried to have sort of a second kind of blitzkrieg to get in, get out and knock the russia, the soviet union out of this war. it didn't happen. an early winter, he gets bogged down and then eventuall
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2014 8:30pm EDT
war, most japanese soldiers are in china, not on the islands defending against the americans. so they're doing their best, despite the american submarine and air blockade, to bring troops home from china. to defend the home islands. and as we talked about earlier during the q & a, they're going to arm the civilian population. or the official policy becomes known, the glorious death of 100 million. the idea that rather than surrender, the japanese are going to fight to the death, as a nation. and this is an illustration of japanese school girls look to be in the 10 to 12 range, maybe early teens at the latest. training to resist the american invasion, using bamboo spears. and you'll note in the background, you'll see a lot of army leadership. this was an official program. this is sponsored by the government. this is required by the government. all right. is there a way out for japan at this point? as you've already pointed out, their chances of resisting the invasion to actually stop the invasion aren't good. so what are the possibilities for getting out of this thing? >> talk to
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2015 8:00pm EDT
of it as an entry point from immigrants from china and japan. two-thirds of the euimmigrants from angel island were from those two countries. according to our search, it ranged from places like denmark and luxembourg, vietnam, cambodia and laos, spain, switzerland. people also came south from canada and north from south america. when immigrants would dock, they would land on a pier. this is the first sight they would see. there are three entrances here. racial segregation was the order of the day. there was an entrance for employees, there was an entrance for whites, and then an entrance for asians. the different groups were segregated from each other through this administration buildsing. ellis island is enforcing laws in europe. it is in new york. most of them are coming across the atlantic. it is primarily enforcing laws that are targeting asian americans. the laws are very different. while it is mostly a processing center, angel island is a place of interrogation, health examinations, and detention. this history is not as well-known. but it is important. it helps shape our mod
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2015 1:00pm EDT
in full coordination with the government of britain, china, russia, and other allies. the world remembers frequent eleanor roosevelt. years of grave responsibility took their toll. a grateful world honors him today. douglas macarthur named supreme allied commander in japan. china,der of fighting the commander of the mighty pacific fleet. harry truman, four months after taking over as president, leads his country to victory and peace. mr. truman and his cabinet meet in emergency session. secretary was on hand as the president breaks the momentous news of japan's surrender. >> i have received this afternoon a message from the japanese government in reply to the message forwarded to the government by the secretary of state on august 11. em this reply a full acceptance of the potsdam declaration which specifies the unconditional surrender of japan. in the reply, there is no qualification. arrangements are now being made for the formal signing of the surrender terms at the earliest possible moment. general douglas macarthur has been appointed the supreme allied commander to receive t
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 7:00am EDT
china and the philippines in this way did a local story become global or nearly so. mccarthyism, the anti-hook campaign in the philippines, all of which followed closely the outbreak of conflict in korea indicated the presence of small cold wars both similar and different that constitutes or constructed the big cold war. in the end, professor masuda concludes "people translate it had meaning of the korean conflict through local lenses." and in this way created the entity that we have called the cold war. listeners and readers will recognize how challenging and even provocative professor masuda's interpretation is. he has read everybody. he's read the usual suspects on the cold war. he's read gatt thys and melvin lefler. but he's taken to heart the work of people likian a kwan and mary caldor among many others. his debt to those who have insisted on the privacy of domestic politics in the formation of cold war discourse, thomas christian son, jeremy surrey is obvious. professor masuda's contemplation of cold war epistomology is, however, largely his own and it is remarkably bold.
CSPAN
May 31, 2015 11:54am EDT
for immigrants from china and japan. two thirds of the immigrants who did come through angel island were from those two countries. as you can see, there are over 80 countries represented for the immigration stream that came through angel island according to our research. it ranged from places like denmark, french indochina to south africa, spain, switzerland. there were people who came south from canada and north from south america. this is a photograph of the administration building on angel island. when immigrants would dock, they would land on a. -- would land on a pier and go up this and this is the first site they would see. there are three entrances here. racial segregation was the order of the day. there was an entrance for employees, for whites, and for asians. within that administration building, there were separate waiting areas as well. at all times, the different groups were segregated from each other through this administration building. so, when we compare to ellis island, ellis island is primarily enforcing laws that relate to immigrants from europe. it is in new york
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2015 8:01pm EDT
enemies. in this case, north korea and the volunteer army in china. and because it really does impact our world today. korea is one of our most important allies, trading partners, and so our involvement in korea was a very important moment. important fory its role in activism and in getting many of the younger people in the united states involved in politics, involved in protest. and it demonstrates that the united states government is very much influenced by his constituents and responses to it. but we are going to focus on the environment of both these places. and we are going to start here with korea. that means land of the koreanscalm -- what believe is the phrase that best captures the essence of the peninsula. the war we are going to talk about is the fighting between 1950-9053. for the allied troops, the war went on much longer than that. 1945 or 1947, when were capitalism arguments. the war is ongoing. it is only governed by an armistice, not the street. it reflected military u.n. involvement in actual combat tuition. so the map there of the korean peninsula, tigers are very i
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2016 2:43am EST
communist enemies. in this case, north korea and the people's volunteer army in china. and because it really does impact our world today. korea is one of our most important allies, one of our most important trading partners. so our involvement in korea was a very important moment in u.s. history. of course, vietnam is very important for its roll in activism and in getting many of the younger people in the united states involved in politics, involved in protest and demonstrating that the united states government is very much influenced by its constituents and responsive to it. but we're going to focus on the environment of both of these places. and we're going to start here with korea. so this means land of the morning calm. that is what koreans considered to be the phrase that best captures the essence of korea and the korean peninsula. the war that we're going to be talking about, as you all know, the fighting took place between 1950 and 1953 for u.s. and u.n. allied troops. the war went on much longer before that. it began really in 1945, '47 when there were internal conflicts between thos
CSPAN
May 17, 2015 12:45pm EDT
the american search for influence in china, a search that continues to this day. every producer has the dream of selling to every chinese citizen and becoming rich. think about if you could sell one t-shirt every chinese citizen, one billion t-shirts. you would be doing well. it's a huge body of people. many americans are involved in looking out to asia as china sees the new markets. americans look at home and in their backyards in latin america for new resources to use to produce things abroad. babel look south to cuba for resources like rubber and food resources like sugar. one historian writes that it is sugar that makes the economy go. it is true. people used to drink tea without sugar. now they start drinking it like snapple. they start drinking more sugar. why? why did they developed more sweet tooth? any guess? what is your name? liam. >> and more resources, sugar is a luxury item. they can buy more of it. you don't think about it but it is a luxury item. >> i was going to say now that we have the ability to integrate with other societies we can get these items easier now. wh
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2014 8:00pm EDT
make the point that something like this it did happen in china. >> you're absolutely right. fear of playing on the their sister and enemy over there and if they take -- it is playing on the fear of if they are the enemy if they take one. >> tags exactly what this picture is. the fact that our distinguishing this chinese woman from the japanese got a look at his hand holding onto her leg.'for color difference. that's what we've been getting that. color difference. there were not german internment camps. heaterays the european t from japanese. >> i was cautious not to strain our racial epithets to the pacific. they are easily leveraged into the war on the european front. bear in mind, we knew about the atrocities in 1942. we did nothing until two years later. millions of jews died. and getn our butts nothing. -- and it did nothing. we could've saved jewish refugees. anti-semitism both at the government level and overall masses. you are absolutely right. when we look at, the next two lessons, we look at jim crow going to war. when you take the jim crow to war, you kind of have the abil
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2014 2:00pm EDT
-pacific war, most japanese soldiers are in china not on the islands defending against the americans. they are doing their best despite the americans submarine and air blockade to bring troops home from china to defend the home island. as we talked about earlier during the q&a, they are going to arm the civilian population. the glorious death of 100 million. the idea of rather than surrender, the japanese is going to fight to the death as a nation. they were trained to resist the american revolution using bamboo speers. in the background you see a lot of army leadership. this was an official program. this is sponsored by the government. this is required by the government. is there a way out for japan at this point? their chances of resisting the invasion to actually stop the invasion aren't good. so what are the possibilities of getting out of this thing? >> talk to the soviets. >> talk to the soviets. see if they can't get soviet medication. the japanese do not understand the agreements that have been made between the american, british, and soviet leaders. the soviets are going to e
CSPAN
Feb 15, 2015 12:07pm EST
, actually, the 18th century. china launches an expansion to the west. and basically destroyed the major step, nomad empires. the point i want to get across is this feature of eurasian history in the 1700s. china is not worried about the step nomads after the 1800s. if you look at this in the broadest perspective, it is exactly the moment that a certain kind of lifestyle, certain military technology or tactics, exactly the moment when it's over, finished, antiquated in eurasia. it suddenly appears on the plains of north america. so it is almost like it is a balancing mechanism in the world where horses crop up and they have their heyday in north america well into the 19th century. let's take a break. should we take a break? what was funny about the heyday? >>hay day. >> i did not think about that. i did not think about that. let me give you a few more points, and then we will take a break. where do the french fit into this story? they are trying to expand west in the 18th century from louisiana and canada. they have a number of objectives. finishing up that discussion of the spread
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2015 1:11am EDT
. it's really the 18th century where china launches this expansion to the west and basically kind of destroys the major kind of step empire, the nomad empire in the west. the point i wanted to get across is, this feature kind of ends in the 1700s. china is not worried about step nomads after the 1700s. if you look at this in the broadest perspective, at exactly the moment that a military technology or tactics, exactly the moment when it's over, finished, antiquated, it suddenly appears on the plains of north america. it's almost like there's a balancing mechanism in the world where horses crop up and they have their heyday in north america well into the 19th century. let's take -- should we take a break? what's funny about the heyday? pardon me? >> hay day? >> i didn't think about that. let me just give you a few more questions and then we'll take a break. where did the french fit into this whole story? the french are trying to expand west in the 18th century from louisiana and canada. they've got a number of objectives. finishing up a little bit of that discussion of the spread of h
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2014 12:00pm EST
japanese as a whole of what they are doing in china or the philippines. >> i want to tie this -- if you 60, i think that the comment is made about -- this is the first full paragraph, the commission also argues that the current conflict in japan was inseparable from to fundamental development, westward expansion and racial struggles. had been interacting in the pacific since the 1800's. the commodore opened up japan in the 1840's. we may not be as familiar as the japanese as with the germans, but we had interactions for at least 100 years on a national level, cultural level. so i think when you take that into consideration of the next chapter, do we not have notions of the japanese or what they are prior to the beginning of the war? >> let's go to lucas. i was replying to him. then over to chris. >> there are notions, but it is not like the groundwork we have from world war i. world war i, you have what the germans are doing in belgium. people referring to them as the homs. dehumanizing the germans. we are familiar with their culture, especially on the west where there are a lot of
CSPAN
Oct 23, 2016 1:00pm EDT
transformation in the expansion of asian immigration post 1965. >> china is a communist country, right? so if it was because of the cold war policies, and china was communist. >> why not more chinese refugees before the 1970's? why not more chinese refugees at the moment that china becomes communist in 1950? there are very few chinese refugees who come in. what do you think? >> i believe the chinese government had very strong restrictions on the mobility of their people. >> where would they have fled to? hungarians fled into austria and it is easier to get them out, that is part of the story, but there are u.s. allies in asia. they go to taiwan, but why did did not more taiwanese and chinese come to the united states? >> anti-asian sentiment? >> absolutely. the mccarran walter act has very strict national protocol. refugees are a way around it. it is largely in the foreign-policy latitude. the united states, before getting involved, if it wants to avoid a military conflict with china in the 50's. when you accept the country's refugees it is like a foreign-policy statement. it will beco
CSPAN
Jul 26, 2015 12:00am EDT
and 1945. every night, every day harris would a circle with a china marker a german cities he intended to destroy. and every night the british bombers would head off to do that. with the results that if we set the moral issues aside for a moment -- we will talk about that at the end of the class maybe -- the military results were mixed. largely because of weather continuing problems with accuracy, german air defense targeting, and intelligence. but by 1942, there is a rescuer. right? in sight. this graphic shows billy mitchell and the man on the left as you look at it, that would be your right the author. the air war plan developed one. he treated this almost as a mathematical calculation. how many bombers would it take to defeat germany? how many targets, how long. there is almost a quality to this calculation, in line with the american way of war, the scientific engineering project. as i recall he calculated about 5000 bombers would be necessary. it turned out he miscalculated. and he made some assumptions about the nature of the german industry the nature of the highly industrialize
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2014 12:00am EDT
china or the philippines. >> i want to push back on that a little bit because -- and i want to tie this -- if you go to page 60. that he makes that comment. the first paragraph, middle, the japan --omic with conflict with japan was inseparable from fundamental development, westward expansion and racial. we have interacted in the pacific since the 1800s. commodore perry opened up japan in the 1840's. we may not be as familiar with the japanese as with the germans, but we had interactions for at least 100 years on a national level, cultural level. right? so i think when you take that into consideration of the next others, do weand not have notions of the japanese or what they are prior to the beginning of the war? >> sorry. >> let's go to lucas. because i was kind of replying to him. sir, butwere notions, not the groundwork we have from world war i. world war i, you have what the germans are doing in belgium. which leads to people referring to them as the huns. you already have that groundwork of dehumanizing the germans. meanwhile, with the japanese -- we are familiar with their culture,
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2015 8:49am EDT
the 18th century where china launches this expansion out to the west and destroys the major step empires out there in the west. this goes well beyond our course. this feature of eurasian history ends. they are no longer worried about step nomads. what is ironic is that exactly the moment that a certain kind of lifestyle, certain kind of military technology or tactics, exactly the moment it's over, finished, antiquated in eurasia, it suddenly appears on the plains of north america. there's this balancing mechanism in the world where horses crop up and they have their heyday in north america. should we take a break? pardon me? >> [ inaudible ]. >> i didn't think about that. i didn't think about that. let me look at a few more points. where do the french fit into this whole story? the french are trying to expand from louisiana and canada. they have a number of objecti objectives. finishing up the discussion of the spread of the horse s on to the plains. people rising and falling very quickly. the shishon indians with the bows everyone was so frightened of. when lewis & clark go west
CSPAN
Jul 12, 2015 12:45am EDT
, greece too. that's a russian soldier, farmer, feed him! he's fighting for you. russia, china. [falling bomb] why, that's us. hey, farmer, that going, i'm hungry. >> that's an american marine farmer. this is our war now, farmer. we are all depending on you. yeah, i know you're tired. your hired mans quit you. you're all alone. you can get your work done. you don't have the time, you don't let it bother you. don't stop working. maybe you'd like to see what happens every time you stop. ok, farmer, every time i count to three, you stop. 1, 2, 3-- >> i'm hungry. >> it stopped because you stop. only 6% of american food goes abroad. you stop for 10 million american men and women who are hungry. you've stopped when a hundred 30 americans are hungry, new realtors, no work anywhere. it is up to you farmer. farmers save democracy. >> more corn! >> farmers save the world. >> more rubarb! >> more! >> more grapefruit! >> more spinach! >> more grains of bread, grains for life. >> this is me again, the marine, when do i eat? >> how about me, farmer? >> more food! >> quiet, quiet! this is as
CSPAN
Apr 2, 2016 8:00pm EDT
very long trip from china or india to the caribbean. it could take nearly half a year. some critics argued that the contract labor trade resembled in mortality rates the rate of the transatlantic slavery. they didn't want to see a new slave trade emerging under the guise of contract labor. at the same time, anti-slavery theses worried that laborers were actually being oerced or falsely seduced to sunning their laws away. this was the perennial fear of indentured servitude. david these people really know really it did the people know what they were getting into? were the planters on the other end of the deal abiding by their contracts to protect the safety and well-being of the workers? were these contract laborers truly voluntary? or was it just a disguise? in this solution to the problem of emancipation just creates its own problems. i will say about these contract labor migrations is they are a reminder that in the 19th century, the world becomes globalized in a new and intense way. theave not really seen connections between the atlantic world and the pacific world. since the begi
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2016 10:45am EST
representative happened not to be there that way. they were protesting the fact china was built on the security council and not the republican of china. veto was no one to anything. notice that even there we have the cause. americano protect the values. what do you make of that? john? i think it goes along with the last point of portraying it as domestic war. to galvanizes domestic support -- i would say the administrations to do this the united states in the best position to win the war as possible at least world war ii before that. especially with universal conscription. you need the entire public to be behind the war. how do you know the quality of troops? we need 100% dedication from public.00% of the >> easier to get it that way. easier if you are defenseless but fighting for a great cause. easy to sell that conflict. hand, they the other are bound to be disappointed results, because the results will rarely meet the expectations that you arrows in trying to get in to it. one of the reasons the americans were jaded was they felt that ierican entry in world war didn't accomplish
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2016 11:00am EST
america and in china, there was an enormous amount of enthusiasm about finding ways to get to california. lots of hand books like this began to be published. this is published in boston. "an account of california and he wonderful old regions." there was information about the country and the ancient and modern discoveries of gold. help for travelers on thinking about how they would actually get there. there are essentially three ways of getting there. and what they had in common is that they were in all incredibly difficult. unbelievably difficult. 1849. another 20 years were going to pass before you get there by railroad. railroads have been a mentor but so far, they were very short lines. so one of the ways of doing it was by going in a ship. a new type of ship with a lot of sale and capable of sailing fast. so one possibility was to sail from the east coast all the way down through the south atlantic and then around cape horn? what is that like? horrible. the stormy as waters in the entire world. it could take weeks to get around and you often get shipwrecked on the way. so that was on
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2015 1:00pm EST
that way. to graduate students china to professionalize themselves and have the entire trajectory of their career mapped out, when they will do in here and all of that, i say for atot of us during that time, least for many of the politically conscious students with whom i studied philosophy, we were studying not so much because we wanted to subordinate that to a career but because it allowed us to understand the world. think not necessarily about the professional side of it. apply for ad to position at ucla. i did not go out in search of a job. i often say that had i known that by accepting the job at the focus of so much media attention because of my membership in the communist party, i probably would have said thanks but no thanks. that is not what i was looking for. i think my career as a teacher occurred because that is the way in which i can most affect and influence people. usednot trying to say i the classroom to dictate what people think, but i try to use to encourage people to develop independent and critical modes of thinking that might leave them to the conclusions that
CSPAN
Mar 1, 2015 12:30am EST
the japanese because of their aggression in china. the same as we are now sanctioning the russians because of ukraine and have sanctioned cuba. for no particularly good reason anymore. for more than 40 years. november 1941, this is three weeks before pearl harbor, los angeles times front page headline was japanese put under f.b.i. inquiry. so the press knew it was coming. and, through the press the public knew it was coming. and the -- this is the kind of thing that would happen. something is a big business in big buttons that said i am an american. or said i am chinese. the chinese were allies, we were allies of the chinese in world war ii. and of course, most americans could not tell the difference between someone who was chinese and someone who was japanese. this is -- "life" magazine ran sections, most biggest media in the country then, on how you can tell the difference between japanese and chinese. a popular cartoonist did a riff at the time and did this for "life" magazine. also how to spot a jap. and it's pretty funny stuff. you were supposed to check the distance between t
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2016 3:55am EST
happened not to be there that day because he was protesting the fact that nationalist china was still part of the security council and not the people's republic of china. so there was no one to veto anything. but notice that even there, we've got this great cause. we want to make sure that communism doesn't spread. we're going to protect american values. hadow what do you make of that? john. >> this goes along with our last point of portraying it as a defensive war in order to galvanize domestic support and administrations do this to put the united states in the best position to win the war as possible, at least world war ii and before that. especially the universal con description. you need the entire public to be behind the war or how do you know the quality of troops we're sending over. >> we need 100% dedication from almost 100% of the public. >> it's easier again if you're defenseless but you're fighting for a great cause. it's easier to sell that conflict. although on the other hand, you're bound to be disappointed with the results because the results of that conflict will rarel
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2016 8:00pm EDT
70's when they do come? like, why not more chinese refugees at the moment that china becomes communist in 1950? there are very few chinese refugees that come in. what do you think? thoughts? yeah. >> i believe the chinese government simply didn't let them out or, like, had very strong restrictions on the mobility of their people. >> there is that. where would they have fled to? in hungarian, they are flying into austria to a u.s. ally. it's easier to get them out. that's part of the story. there are u.s. allies in if asia certainly where they could have -- there are many refugees who do flee. they go to taiwan, but why not more taiwanese come from taiwan into the united states? the answer -- i already alluded to it. do you want to guess? >> maybe, like, historically anti-asian sentiment. >> absolutely. >> anti-asian sentiment has not gone away in 1952 or 1960. the mckaren walter act has very strict national quotas still, and refugees are not counted as that, but it's largely in the foreign policy latitude. the united states before getting involved militarily, it wants to avoi
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2016 12:00am EDT
good as another as long as he is honest are decent and not a -- or china men. chinese and chaps, so do i, it is race prejudice i guess, but i was strongly of the opinion of yellow men and asia and white men in europe and america. this is early harry truman. is that going to influences thinking? he always refers to african-americans as -- they said truman never used any other word to describe american -- african-american. he was full of prejudice good one thing we have to factor in his racism. the second thing we have to factor in is the fact that the united states bombing policy and asia was what we call strategic bombing. ted cruz got a little bit of flak recently when he called for carpet bombing of civilians in syria. that is against the law. it is a war crime, and should be. well the united states policy and asia was what we call strategic bombing, which meant indiscriminate urban bombing. in europe, we took great care until late in the war to avoid bombing civilians. we had strategic nodal points to in japan from the very beginning we would ride after civilian populations to tr
CSPAN
Jun 4, 2016 3:00pm EDT
china, semi-free labor was brought to peru. many of them ended in the chincha islands where they had to work off the cost of their transport, mining guano. it was awful work, they got paid very little. it was defeated the fertility revolution in the developed world. it is also a story about the decline of slavery and the rise of other types of global labor and migration. suicide was also a really major problem, particularly among the chinese workers, who often kill themselves because the work was so awful. here's a look at one of the sheds, and the deposits. these are people here with guano carts there filling. they would then put them in these canvas chutes, to take to the united states and europe. between 1840 -- there is an ad for pacific guano. and just a look at the period of kuan no export, really peaking and 1870's. a little decline there, and then going down again after that. in this period, exports were more than 12.6 million metric tons. talk about mining. think about this in relationship to our lecture on coal mining. there is a real analog here between tapping into these fos
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)