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20090604
20171123
DATE
2017 6
2016 4
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2016 1:00pm EST
development in countries like vietnam, india, china and many many other countries that have integrated into the global economy has proved that it was a tremendous boom to their living standards, to their wealth and a lot of people accept that. but, then they say oh, we were wrong in thinking that they lose out from capital-- international capitalism. they won big-time, which must mean we are the losers in rich countries because they still believe that the idea that the economy and world economy in which people can only gain if someone else loses out. a kind of pre-adam smith in view of the economy where trade does not benefit both parties to the agreement and that's a very dangerous assumption that leads to a search for a scapegoat. this is a graph that you might have seen. this is the so-called elephant graph of the increase in average per capita in household income of each percentile group around the world. all over the world between 1988 and 2008. former world bank economy who assembled the data and created this graph and it looks a bit like an elephant because you can see that the
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2016 6:45am EST
replaced by the richest people in china. and they are still poor, some 60 percent as rich as the western middle classes which means it looks like it's income growth is coming down in those areas as well but that's more an illusion that comes from population growth. if you keep population growth, if you pretend the population is stable over these years, the elephant wrath shifts to the redline instead and then it's not the zero percent income growth, it's not a 10 percent income growth, it's 25 percent income growth to the 80th and 90th percentile. but then something else interesting happens when you look at the raw data. there are countries that really stagnated or even saw a reduction in incomes for those 20 years. japan and ex-communist countries like bulgaria and they made more progress over 2008 but that's not relevant to this graph because it only goes until 2008. so that's true that it happens but that is not what the western middle classes with. they don't live in eastern europe, they don't live in japan. if you adjust for that as well and you look at a new version of the elephant
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2016 7:30pm EDT
people were replaced by the richest people in china. they are still poor, some 60% as rich as the western middle class which means it looks like income growth is coming down in those areas as well, but that's more an allusion that comes from population growth. if you keep population growth, if you pretend that the population is stable over these years, the elephant graph shifts to the redline instead and then it's not 0% income growth, it's a 25% income growth. but then, something else interesting happens there are a few countries that stagnated they made more progress after 2008 but that's not relevant for this graph which only goes to 2008. they don't they don't live in eastern europe or japan. they just for that as well and look at a new version. you can see a constant population we have the redline instead where the percentile that we talk about increased income by 40% over these 20 years. we don't have to bother about the yellow one. there has been an increase in incomes in western countries for western middle classes as well, but i also have to point out that's not the most
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2016 6:30am EST
president putin and president xi jingping of china. i'm calling this the return of the united states, one of the best books i read in the last ten years is by nobel prize-winning economist douglas north and colleagues of his called violence and social orders. and what they were trying to get at is the notion of how do we handle violence in society and humanity as the agriculture revolution took off, hit upon one solution which is basically what they call natural states. natural states are essentially organized as client network, top men, if you will, elites who are militarily potent and ranged to whom they distribute resources. they hand out monopolies over time. the point here is that this was basic organization of human societies up until two cinch -- centuries ago that we saw in the chart from -- that johan showed us earlier in economic growth. the problem is -- and johan documents this very well in his book, is that we have been moving in the direction of greater democracy, greater freedom, greater openness over time but stalled lately. the question here is would we have a reversal of
fastest growing region, to china. we need to catalyze u.s. entrepreneurship and be the leader in r&d and higher education. these advantages don't just make us competitive, they, too, make us safer and stronger. ultimately, of course, the greatest source of american strength is our people. the extraordinary skill, spirit, diversity, and audacity of americans. our founding ideals, including the inherent equality of every human being. our commitment to free speech and a free press. our welcoming of immigrants from every corner and calling them simply americans. make no mistake, the world watches very closely what we do and say. so we must ask, what message are we sending now? because at this moment, our single greatest weakness as a people, as a country, and as a global leader, is our profound political polarization. it hasn't always been like this. i grew up in this city, and i'm old enough to remember when loyalties and even major legislation crossed party lines. when civility was the norm and politics mostly ended at the water's edge. that seems like lifetimes ago. but it wasn't. we
-pacific, the world's fastest growing region, to china. we need to catalyze americanthe entrepreneurship and remain the global leader in r&d and higher education. these advantages don't just make us competitive. they, too, make a safer and stronger.ultima ultimately, of course, the greatest source of america's strength is our people. the extraordinary skill, spirit, diversity and audacity of americans. our founding ideals, including the inherent equality of every human being. our commitment to free speech and a free press. our welcoming of immigrants fror every corner and calling them simply americans. make no mistake, the world watches very closely what we do and say. so we must act -- asked, what message are we sending now? because at this moment, our single greatest weakness as a people, as a country, and as thn global leader, is our profound political polarization. it hasn't always been like this. i grew up in the city, and i'm old enough to remember when loyalties and even major legislation crossed party lines, when civility was the norm andd politics mostly ended a
effort is to work with the un, work with china, work with japan, work with south korea to try to find a way out of the situation. we press on. there are many different efforts underway. we have a full government approach to this as well. i spent as much time with the secretary of treasury as i do the secretary of state as we try to craft a sustainable policy forward. let me ask the chairman to address your other question. >> thanks for giving me the chance to clarify. first of all, we haven't changed the broad guidance to our forces that are working with partners underground. that is they stay at the last covering field position short of the objective in that they don't actually close the enemy. specific case that i mentioned was in the past we have partnered in advising and the against level director because of the complex train inside of the city of mosul, the commander felt that the brigade level didn't allow them to be at the point where they can provide the kind of advice and combined arms support necessary. we allow them to partner at the battalion level. that doesn't change the
open up the coal mines and bring jobs back from china. oh, really? oh, really? so, what is it that we are doing. by the way, i have a coal miner card from coal that my father gave me. he had it in his office when he was in congress in the 1930s and the 1940s. i have the coal miners in my office all the time. i think clean coal is the oxymoron of all time. but i love the coal miners. they love coal and don't want to deal with pensions and health care and all the rest for the coal miners. this whole thing about people voting for them because they are going to open the coal mines is emblematic of the challenge we have from a message standpoint. but we have no problem from a value standpoint that unify us. and again, the humility to accept new ideas, fresh ideas, entrepreneurial thinking about subjects. even solomon, when he was going to be king, he was so humble. he was following david. he prayed to god, how can i have the wisdom to succeed david? that humility is what god came to him and said, solomon, because you did not ask for great wealth or longevity or vengeance against your enemi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)