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20170922
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2017 46
2016 7
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
BBC News
Jan 21, 2017 10:45pm GMT
finding out how china is reacting to the new american president. before his election, china could simply dismiss donald trump‘s rhetoric as the over—inflated bluster of the campaign trail. not any more. is britain coming together over brexit? after the prime minister clarifies her brexit strategy, jeremy cook finds out whether people on both sides of the debate are stilljust as divided. and, big fish in little tokyo. rupert wingfield—hayes finds out why the world‘s largest seafood market is moving and why some are not happy about it. these are the really big ones. these are the fish that are 200—250 kilos and these are the ones that might reach record prices. the current record for one fish here, $1.7 million. well, there‘s no doubt what was the biggest international event of this week, it‘s been trailed for months, but now donald trump has finally been sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. one nation who will be watching the new american leader closely is china. mr trump broke with decades of precedent last month by taking a telephone call from a tele
BBC News
Jan 22, 2017 12:30am GMT
out how china is reacting to the new american president. before his election, china could simply dismiss donald trump's rhetoric as the over—inflated bluster of the campaign trail. not any more. still haunted by violence and death. jeremy bowen reports from the ruins of eastern aleppo and assesses the future for the syrian conflict. foreign intervention has transformed this war and the way it's looking, right now, foreigners, not syrians, will dictate the way the war ends. is britain coming together over brexit? after the prime minister clarifies her brexit strategy, jeremy cook finds out whether people on both sides of the debate are stilljust as divided. crisis at stormont, as northern ireland's power—sharing executive collapses, forcing new elections. gavin hewitt reports on fears of a return to the shadows of the past. what does all this mean — uncertainty for northern ireland, without an executive, key areas of government will be stalled. and, big fish in little tokyo. rupert wingfield—hayes finds out why the world's largest seafood market is moving and why some are
BBC News
Jan 14, 2017 10:45pm GMT
. a visit to china's mo5t polluted city. we find the worst winter smog in recent years i5 poisoning its people. it's like living under a cloud. the smog i5 harming my childrens' health. and the sounds of stonehenge. david sillitoe investigates how new technology is revealing more of the ancient stones' secrets. what this new vr technology is offering is a chance to return back and see what this place used to look like in the past. to brazil's amazon rainforest now, where a battle is under way between its indigenous people and big business. the brazilian government i5 defending plans to build dozens of huge hydroelectric dams, which they say are vital to meet the country's energy needs. but environmentalists say the plans are a disaster for the amazon and will result in more deforestation and global warming. wyre davies has been to belo monte, the site of the first of the new so—called mega—dams to assess their impact. voiceover: from the heart of the planet's greatest rainforest, emerges one of the world's biggest civil engineering projects. a monolithic monument to progress. th
BBC News
Jan 2, 2017 12:30am GMT
network of correspondents around the world. coming up: stand off in the skies above the south china sea as we fly over one of the most contested areas in the world, incurring the wrath of the chinese. the captain has said we are a civilian air craft but it made no difference whatsoever they just repeated that threat to leave the area over and over again. tiny victims of yemen's forgotten war, we find starving children in desperate need of aid. they have fever and diarrhoea and without medicine he passed away. under fire on ukraine's frontline, tom burridge and his team reach one of the conflicts most volatile hotspots where the fragile ceasefire has collapsed. make no mistake, it can cost you your life. ian pannell reports from barack obama's former hometown and finds gun crime is out of control. and battle of the sexes. we meet the moroccan warrior women taking on and beating the berber men of north africa at their own game. the bbc went to extraordinary lengths this year to get a rare glimpse of china's determined expansion in the south china sea, one of the most contested areas anywh
BBC News
Feb 20, 2017 12:30am GMT
patrolling this border. also, tensions in the straits of taiwan as china flexes its muscle against what it sees as its breakaway state. carrie gracie reports on beijing's attempts to stop taiwan going it alone. to let taiwan float off towards independence — well, that, to beijing, would be unthinkable. the war against fake news. amol rajan reports from germany, the first country to use the law to try to stop false reporting. with elections coming up, there's a growing determination to take action against fake news. and capturing the secrets of the galaxy. palla ba ghosh reports on a project to link 12 telescopes around the world to take pictures of a black hole. the united nations says it's willing to use further force against militias in the central african republic to prevent country from sliding into anarchy. thousands of un peacekeepers have been deployed there amidst fears of genocide. rival christian and muslim militias began fighting in car more than three years ago. thousands of civilians have sought shelter at the fragile un red line around the town of bambari. well, fergal kean
BBC News
Dec 31, 2016 3:45am GMT
that spans two mountains in china. dan simmons went to the oldest national park in china. tucked away on the edge of this world heritage site, someone has decided to build a bridge from the middle of nowhere to the middle of nowhere. unlike me, they hope, the thousands of visitors who will come here will not be too scared to look down. 300 metres through the highest glass walkway in the world. these are the final days of construction for this three—year project, more than 300 engineers have worked through all weather conditions to build what is also the longest glass—bottomed bridge in the world. a breathtaking 430 metres. crossing the zhangjiajie grand canyon. the walkway itself is just 60 centimetres thick, so the challenge to keep everything stable has required some fresh thinking. 70 glass balls are to be positioned on the springs along the walkway. they have been designed to move to counter any swaying. these curved railings will persuade up to 800 visitors to keep changing direction. 0ffsetting the resonance caused by hundreds walking at a constant speed. 0ur hosts were keen
BBC News
Mar 6, 2017 12:30am GMT
launched from an area near the border with china, where a missile base is located. the white house has asked congress to examine president trump's claims, that barack obama ordered his phones to be tapped during the election. there has been a denial of the allegations by the former director of national intelligence. the second day of china's annual national people's congress is getting under way, with the focus on economic reform. francois fillon, the embattled centre—right candidate in france's presidential elections, says he won't quit amid allegations of corruption. mr fillon said he's made mistakes, but is the legitimate choice of the party. now on bbc news it's time reporters. hello. welcome to reporters. i'm david eades, and from here at the bbc newsroom, we send our correspondants to bring you the best stories from across the globe. in this week's programme, the other side of the american dream. as donald trump sets out his vision for the next four years, ian pannell assesses the challenges that lie ahead. if you want to know what poverty in america looks like, well, this is i
BBC News
Jan 3, 2017 3:30am GMT
at enemies who have been made already. he's not even in office. china, for example. absolutely. just china! how is 2017 being seen in the middle east in reference to donald trump, what difference will he make? i have a cynical feeling that donald trump could create another sheikdom in the united states, to be honest. because if you look at his cabinet, it is either generals or ex—generals, and billionaires or businessmen. typical middle eastern formula. is that a good thing, bari? we need just the headgear, that's all! seriously... he has headgear already! different headgear! the problem is, we are extremely confused in the middle east. who is this man? what is he going to do? he signalled to the left and turned to the right. we don't know actually what his intention is. he said he wants to make america great, but he is, if you look at him, he is supporting or following vladimir putin's policies on the middle east and other parts of the world. so where is that independent american president here? this is what's worrying me. the other thing is, i believe this man's foreign policy in
BBC News
Jan 28, 2017 10:45pm GMT
china and pakistan and it makes no secret of the fact it has been talking to the taliban. but there is an even more pressing reason to remain, this is the aftermath of a taliban bomb—blast in the heart of kabul earlier this month. at the military hospital, policeman mr rashidi is recovering from horrific injuries. donald trump and his advisors are unlikely to want to be responsible for america's longest war ending in what many people would regard as a clear defeat. justin rowlatt, bbc news, kabul. are dutch children the happiest in the world? youngsters in the netherlands consistently rank at the top of surveys of well being. so what's the secret? well, apparently parents go out of their way to please them and teachers expect less of them. than some of their european counterparts. anna holligan has been to meet two british mums who have gone dutch to see what happens when you place children at the centre of society. this doesn't take much, according to the dutch, they've got the most contented babies, the happiest kids and as adults, the best work—life balance. the lessons start wi
BBC News
Dec 27, 2016 3:30am GMT
skies above the south china sea. rupert wingfield—hayes flies over one of the most contested areas in the world, incurring the wrath of the chinese. 0ur captain is saying that we're a civilian aircraft, not a military aircraft, it didn't make any difference whatsoever, theyjust repeated the threat to leave the area over and over again. tiny victims of yemen's forgotten war. nawal al—maghafi finds starving children in desperate need of aid. he just had fever and diarrhoea and because they didn't have his medicine he passed away. we've just arrived in what is called the prong zone. under fire on ukraine's frontline. tom burridge and his team meet one of the conflict's most volatile hotspots where the fragile ceasefire has collapsed. you can't make no mistakes, it cost you your life, literally. ian pannell reports from barack 0bama's former hometown and finds gun crime is out of control. and battle of the sexes. we meet the moroccan warrior women taking on and beating the berber men of north africa at their own game. the bbc went to extraordinary lengths this year to get a rare glim
BBC News
Mar 13, 2017 12:30am GMT
. china's chiefjustice has told parliament that one of the supreme court's biggest achievements was imprisoning rights activists. he boasted of the severe penalties given to those he believed had endangered state security. and this video is trending on bbc.com members of pakistan's small hindu community have been celebrating ‘holi', the festival of colours which welcomes in the spring season. that's all from me now, stay with bbc world news. now its time for reporters. welcome to reporters. i'm philippa thomas. from here in the world's news room, we send our correspondents to bring you the best stories from across the globe. in this week's programme: inside north waziristan. owen bennett—jones finds the pakistan army back in control of the tribal area on the afghan border, after a huge military operation to clear out al-qaeda and the taliban. around one million people from north waziristan fled when the conflict was at its height, and the question now is will they come back? saved from slavery and worse. naomi grimley meets the young yazidis who escaped the so—called islamic s
BBC News
Jan 14, 2017 4:30pm GMT
medical supervision. a visit to china's most polluted city. we find the worst winter smog in recent years is poisoning its people. it's like living under a cloud. the smog is harming my childrens‘ health. and the sounds of stonehenge. david sillitoe investigates how new technology is revealing more of the ancient stones‘ secrets. what this new vr technology is offering is a chance to return back and see what this place used to look like in the past. eight years ago, president obama swept into power in an historic election which put the first african american in the white house. it marked a new era and the start of a period of hope for many. but now, as he says his final farewells and his successor donald trump prepares to take over, what will his legacy be? what has he done for race relations, gun laws, health care? and how united is america? jon sopel looks back at the domestic issues which have defined the obama presidency. cheering and applause. it wasn't just the hope when barack obama came to office, it was the wild expectation too, that the country's problems would be solv
BBC News
Mar 14, 2017 3:30am GMT
new atrocities by government forces and local militia. making china's skies blue again. carrie gracie investigates beijing's new measures against old polluting vehicles. the chinese economy is still fuelled by coal. and in the one party state there is little the public can do, to force the politicians here to deliver air fit to breathe. and the beauty of the brain. fergus walsh meets the researchers unlocking the science of thought. the tribal areas on the afg han—pakistan border have long been associated with militancy and lawlessness. the ancient tribal customs, with their emphasis on both revenge and hospitality, have been challenged in recent years by violentjihadis, imposing sharia, not tribal law. north waziristan became home to al-qaeda, the taliban, and jihadists from all over the world, but as owen bennett—jones reports, after a long and bloody military campaign, the pakistani army is now firmly in control. for years now, these remote areas on the afghan—pakistan border have been a haven for violentjihadists. in 2014, the pakistan army launched a campaign to win
BBC News
Jan 31, 2017 3:30am GMT
country's future with senior officials from china and pakistan and it makes no secret of the fact it has been talking to the taliban. but there is an even more pressing reason to remain, this is the aftermath of a taliban bomb—blast in the heart of kabul earlier this month. at the military hospital, policeman mr rashidi is recovering from horrific injuries. translation: this is my message to the taliban: you have injured me but i want you to know that it is only going to make me stronger and more determined to defeat you. it is a brave stand but the american analysis is clear — without long—term assistance, the country will not survive in tact. donald trump and his advisors are unlikely to want to be responsible for america's longest war ending in what many people would regard as a clear defeat. justin rowlatt, bbc news, kabul. from afghanistan to rare access to the remote deserts of western sahara and one of the world's longest and political humanitarian humanitarian crises. the region is claimed by both morocco and the native sahrawi people. tensions between the two have caused t
BBC News
Jan 17, 2017 3:30am GMT
and produce countermeasures if he continues to question china's attitude to taiwan. the last man to leave his foot prints on the moon has died. the american astronaut and commander of apollo 17 was one of only three people to go to the moon twice and the last man to walk on the surface. he said the experience in 1972 meant he felt like he belonged to the universe. time now for reporters. welcome to reporters. i'm james menendez. from here in the world's newsroom, we send out correspondents to bring you the best stories from across the globe. in this week's programme... as barack obama leaves the white house after eight years, jon sopel looks back at his legacy as the united states‘ first african—american president. i think his legacy to him is more important right now to paint a picture that he did a real good job. but, most black folks are disappointed because we feel he could have done more. the culture clash in the amazon. we report on brazil's plans to build huge hydroelectric dams, which could change the world's biggest rainforest for ever. the impact of so many of these st
BBC News
Mar 5, 2017 12:30am GMT
china's rubberstamp parliament, the national people's congress, is opening its annual session. the premier is preparing to announce economic targets and other policy priorities. he is expected to aim for a priorities. he is expected to aim fora 6.5to priorities. he is expected to aim for a 6.5 to 7% economic growth rate. the us president has accused his predecessor of wiretapping his phone a month before he was elected. a spokesman for barack obama has issued a strong denial. the centre—right candidate in the french presidential election, francois fillon is fighting to stay in the race. he is embroiled in a growing corruption scandal. police have searched a number of his homes. malaysia says the north korean ambassador must leave the country in the next 48 hours. the two nations have fallen out after death of the half brother of the north korean leader. coming up next it's reporters. hello. welcome to reporters. i'm david eades, and from here at the bbc newsroom, we send our correspondants to bring you the best stories from across the globe. in this week's programme, the other si
BBC News
Jan 28, 2017 4:30pm GMT
officials from china and pakistan and it makes no secret of the fact it has been talking to the taliban. this doesn't take much, according to the dutch. they have the most contented baby, the happiest kids and the best work life balance as adults. the lessons start with brea kfast. adults. the lessons start with breakfast. they place a high value on family life, and communication between members of the family and pa rt between members of the family and part of eating together is about talking together. the dutch scored the highest on children aged brea kfast the highest on children aged breakfast before school. that set them up for the day. chocolate sprinklings clearly contradict healthy eating advice. it dutch kids have some of the lowest obesity rates, which might be linked to the fa ct rates, which might be linked to the fact that so many cycle to school, but, as you can see, bikes and cars have separate lanes, so parents don't have the same worries about sending kids out on two wheels. when they get to school, dutch pupils don't face academic pressure like tests a nd don't
BBC News
Mar 7, 2017 3:30am GMT
tests, the united states begins deploying a controversial defence system in south korea. china targets traffic pollution, as it promises to make the skies blue again. but is it losing the battle against the smog? and we meet thailand's luckiest turtle, called bank, who swallowed nearly 1,000 coins and lived to tell the tale.
cannot dismiss the possible reemergence of risk surrounding china, and emerging markets more broadly. recent months, capital outflows in china have moderated. as the dollar has stabilized in pressures on china's exchange rate has eased. through pressures reemerge, we cannot will allow and recurrence of financial stress, which could affect not only china, but again, other emerging markets that are linked to china via supply chains or commodity is boards, and ultimately conditions here. china is making a challenging transition from export to two domestic led growth and the cost of reallocating to a more dynamic sector could impair growth in the near term. while china has taken steps to limit the extent of the slowdown, there is tension and policy between reform and stimulus and the effects of the stimulus may already be waning. vulnerabilities such as an as capacity, debt, and risks in shadow banking sectors appear to be building and could pose continued risks over the medium-term. the broader fragility of the global economic environment is on leopard to resolve any time soon. growth i
. >> you're talking about the affair in beijing in china. his decision was a personal decision. if you will give me the grace as i go through my book care, this is a pretty meaty book. that was considered a personal decision. we know that he spoke with staff there. we appreciate his years of dedicated service to the state department and for anything more on that i have to refer you to mr. ranke as to his decision why he decided. >> secondly, late last night there is a statement that when out in your name about the death of the head of -- in which you said he was a tireless advocate for women and girls at -- if that is the position of the administration in this building, that the dr. and the unfpa have done this good work, why are you cutting funding for? >> we would send out that announcement because he pass that away. he has done a lot of good work over the years on behalf of the united nations in that arena. we wanted to express our condolences for his family and thank him for the time he has performed at work. in terms of the administration's priorities, women's health is an importa
you the latest numbers. last question. reporter: [inaudible] china yesterday diplomats about the border conditions with indian and the u.s. diplomats. what did they share with you that you can say or what is the u.s. position now on the situation on the border between independent yeah and china? >> i thank you for your question. i know that the united states is concerned about the ongoing situation there. i know we believe that both parties, both sides should work together to try to come up with some better arrangement. we have to go guys. pleas welcome our iraqi friends. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for coming to the united states. hanks everybody. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2017] nick nick >> press tv as iran news language channel the u.s. will impose new economic sanctions. here's a look.
and, for example, put tougher sanctions on china in order to put pressure on north korea? ambassador haley: well i think, first of all, let's talk about what a big sanctions resolution this was. the first one was a billion dollars. the second one was $1.3 billion, not counting the 30 percent decrease in oil. we did a 55 -- and just imagine if this happened to the united states -- a 55 percent reduction in diesel and oil. overall ban of natural gas, overall ban of any substitutes; overall ban of textiles; stopping the labor program, which we call as modern-day slavery; stopping all joint ventures so foreign investment goes in there. we have cut off now 90 percent of trade going into north korea, and they are saying that this was strangling. so whether some believe it's big or small, i think what the president is saying is this is just the beginning of what we can do. so it's going to be -- by the time we get going on this, if we have to go further, this is going to look small compared to what we do. but no, it was a massive sanctions bill, and i think the fact that we had a 15-0 recor
burma has made significant strides in removing children from military service. >> china obviously responded with some displeasure, calling it irresponsible. ambassador coppedge: we hope to continue working with all governments. there are recommendations for china as there are four other ranked countries. all countries have recommendations, including the united states. we certainly look at ourselves as well and talk about areas where progress can be made and hope to continue those good working relationships diplomatically. the trafficking victims protection act sets of these minimum standards and the analysis that the state department are to use. this is done by people in the field. we do not consider if it will be positive or negative. we want to be truthful and active and hope to continue our diplomatic engagement. we have heard this report does make a difference. when i travel, i meet with senior government officials who want to do more to address the issue and what to do more to address their ranking, so i hope the internal pressure on a country as well as diplomatic pressure f
with leaders of other countries of which we would love to trade, certainly deep in china among other things , and charge me with getting him memos about the opportunities that we see in agriculture to do that, so we are excited. i know this is a lot of anxiety. the blessing of america is that are so productive. wehave an abundance that need to sell, and that is going to be my task, to go around the world with secretary ross, with trade representative 10 hour undersecretary for trade to make sure american products are on the tables all over this world. i think with the president has done yesterday and secretary since a signal that we need to play fair. that is really the president's issue regarding nafta, that we want a free trade agreement that is free and fair. obviously, what canada has done with their dairy pricing has been very unfair to our northeastern dairy farmers in wisconsin and upstate new york, particularly, and that's not right. what we have shown is they have benefited from their lumber exports to the u.s. for many president'shis administration and secretary ross are wi
president trump saying he is looking forward to constructing a relationship with china, would you elaborate? it is obviously important to us read the president speaks fairly often about china. he understands the national economic interests that we have and the desire for our companies in the chinese market but also the national security interest we have. he obviously wants to do what he can to have a fruitful and constructive relationship with china. he looks forward to developing that as we go forward. a popular commander in afghanistan said today that they could use several thousand more , does the administration plan to send those additional troops? >> i think the president will heed the advice of the generals. that country has yet to happen -- conversation has yet to happen. first, on the comments that have been reported, does the president still stand by his nomination? >> yes. given his position on the president's attitude, given the fact that he has praise or his intellect and integrity, does the president have any regrets about the comments he has made? >> he has no regret
agreement and what china and india are required to do and it's nothing. how many plants, 300 plus coal plants we built in india. why would we sign on to an agreement that is not holding other people to account and asked us to give $3 million -- that the first ante. the trump administration said that's nonsense. i agree with them, it's nonsense. i agree that we should have a conversation, not screaming at each other and not saying that standing up in the middle of my speeches is your climate denier is that i want to have a conversation about this. no, they haven't. when you have a scientist like steve kuhn who stands up and says the science isn't settled yet, i say let's have a conversation and get these guys together. my senate committee i said let's have a hearing and let's have a conversation about blue team, red team and talk this over. >> i want to ask you about cool specifically. scott pruitt, earlier this month, said and he was quoting the department of labor statistics said very simply the us has added almost 50000 jobs in the coal sector, in fact, the core portion he was r
point does the administration take a big step on china? all, talk about the sanctions resolution. the first one was $1 billion. the second was $1.3 billion not counting the 30% decrease in oil. just imagine if this happened to the u.s. reduction -- 55% reduction in oil, overall band of natural gas company substitute, stopping the labor program, which we call modern-day slavery, stopping foreign investment. tradee cut off 90% of going into north korea. them.as a strain for i think what the president is saying, this is just the beginning of what we can do. by the time we get going on this , this is going to look small compared to what we do. had ak the fact that we good record, we have a china and russia on board, that's very important. we cut 30% of oil. is there more we can do? there's always more we can do. but from the humanitarian aspect, at what point are you hurting people in north korea? we will all is explore more options. yes, in the red. iran are, russia, and involved in the same debate. behind,"u.s. be left will the focus be when you discuss syria next week -- and will that
trade certainly beef in china to make a personal commitment to do that and charge me with getting him memos about the opportunities that we see in agriculture to do that. so the we're excited. obviously i know there's bane lot of anxiety, about the blessings of america is that we're so productive our american farmers and ran chers have been so productive over the years that we have an abund thans we need to sell. and that's going to be my task go around the world with secretary ross, with our u.s. trade representative, and our undersecretary for trade to make sure american products are on the tables all over this world. >> mr. secretary, is there anything you're willing to do right now on the issue of dairy farmers and the trade relations with canada? is there any specific action that you're planning? >> i think what the president has done yesterday and secretary ross and the timber counterveiling terrorists there sends a signal we need to play fair. that's the president's issue with nafta we won't a free-trade agreement that's free and fair. and obviously what canada has done with th
a free exercise case. doctrinally important, china to lutheran, i will spend more time on that though the advocate health care has practical significance for health pension plans. is a term thatn did not have blockbuster cases, it is an important case in the free exercise clause. it is an issue that has been simmering for many years. the issue is if a state policy of denying grants because of religious affiliation of an official grantee violates free exercise clause in the first amendment. missouri has a program called the missouri scrap tire program that offers reimbursement grants to schools, day care centers, and the like. when they purchase services made from -- surfaces made from recycled tires. case is aon in this day care center affiliated with the lutheran church that has pea gravel on the playground. peaf justice roberts says gravel can be "unforgiving." kids fall down, get hurt, scream and cry. the purpose of this program is to prevent that from happening. it is a health and safety program and an environmental program. the petitioner in this case is a church that runs
bookable as possible. >> this is a man with a question on china actually. the chinese have said they're not going to abide either ruling by the international arbitration and could you give us details on what the u.s. could do? >> we generally don't anticipate things like that so i don't want to get out in front of that. [inaudible] there is diplomatic redress and in europe or you say several times that the iranians seem to of violated articles 13 of the convention. where's the diplomatic response from the united states and where's that redress and is at the end of that? >> our investigation didn't investigate that so i want to confine our discussion today to what the investigation covered. >> but you are not aware of anything like that? unit to aegis came to talk about that. >> a little trouble on the code of conduct thing. before we were deployed we had to go through training which included indoctrination. were these riverine guys and the necc people not given that training? >> there are different levels of senior training and the aviator exceeds the highest level. prior to the event t
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2017 2:09pm EST
internal leaks inquiry right now? you sean: not that i am aware f. reporter: china sent the very first senior official, state counselor, to visit washington d.c., today. whether there will be a meeting in the white house. and what the white house expectation of his visit? sean: the state counselor, for those of you not schooled in the chinese government, is basically the equivalent of our n.s.a. director -- n.s.c. director, correct? so, the ambassador and state counselor came today. ey had a meeting with h.r. master, jared curber in -- kushner. after the meeting ended i believe the state counselor was taken and had an opportunity to say hi to the president before he left. an opportunity to begin that onversation. talk to them on shared interest of national security. you get one more. everybody else got two. reporter: just this morning, president trump mentioned that was his peak for ambassador to china. the governor has apparently positive view on china. how confident the president is on the governor's confirmation to get all the support in the senate? sean: i think he'll receive treme
. spicer: i understand. i understand the question. the president said to the president of china last night -- i am carious of the timing -- curious as to the timing of president trump saying he is looking forward to constructing a relationship with china, would you elaborate? the importance of that relationship to the u.s. mr. spicer: it is obviously important to us. the president speaks fairly often about china. he understands the national economic interests that we have and the desire for our companies to access the chinese market, but also the national security interest we have. he obviously wants to do what he can to have a fruitful and constructive relationship with china. and he looks forward to developing that as we go forward. sarah? >> the populist commander in afghanistan said today that they could use several thousand more troops to help with the coalition there. to my understanding, we are trying to get out of conflicts like that. does the administration plan to send those additional troops? mr. spicer: i think the president will need to the of life -- heed the advice of
their continued action and making sure we promote maritime security in thsouth china sea. those e certainly i think some of the priorities of tomorrow's meeting but i am not going to get ahead much further than that on any conversation that may take place. look, we are not going to commt on an ongoing investigation being led byhe department of justice. and that investigatn is apolitical and certainly independent of anything tang place tomorrow. reporter: i also have question on mr. bannon's interview. during that he said i think mitch mcconnell and to degree paul ryan they don't want donald trump's populous and economic agenda. [inaudible] first, does the president agree with that obvious arterization of mcconnell and ryan? ms. sandersthe president is committed to working with congress to get things done. the president has a big agenda. he wants to work with all memberof congress. that iludes republican leadership and democrats. i think you s some the president's leadership last week when he helped strike a deal to make sure that we got the funding that was necessary. we're focuse
interest in pakistan. china has a strong interest in pakistan. having a stable, secure future pakistan is in a lot of our interest. they are a nuclear power. we have a concern about the stability of their weapons. areas in which we should be having very productive dialogue that serves both of our interests, and regional interests as well. again, this is not a situation where the united states is saying, look, it is just us and you. these regional approaches are to bring all of the other interests into this effort. as much as we have done with north korea, i think too often we try to distill these challenges down to where it is just the u.s. and some other country and this is how we solve it. we have to enlarge the circle of interest and bring others into the effort as well and that is what we have been doing with pakistan. [indiscernible] announcer: c-span's washington journal, live every day with news and policy issues that impact you. coming up wednesday morning, chief economist and co-founder of moody's talks about the potential debt ceiling fight and it's possible effect on wall st
advance president 40's trip to china in 1975. he knew he would have a tough election campaign and he said, no foreign travel, pack it all in in 75. kissinger went off to china and my boss at newsweek said i do not want to send a foreign-policy expert from washington to spend the money. eastre already in the far so i send you. representatives the day before thanksgiving, george h.w. that was long ago before we had official relations with the pnc. beijing was still known as peking. a little reception at his residence for the kissinger party and that is where i met him. i
interests in pakistan. china has strong interests in pakistan. having a stable, secure future pakistan is in a lot of our interests. they are a nuclear power here at we have concerns about their weapons. there are many areas in which we believe we should be having very productive dialogue that serves both of our interests and regional interests, as well. again, this is not a situation where the u.s. is saying, look, it is just us and you. our approach is to bring all the other interest into this effort, much as we have done with north korea, assuming a global effort in north korea. too often, it is just the u.s. and some other country, and it is thought that only between the two of us, we have to solve it. we have to bring others into the effort, and that is what we will be doing with pakistan. >> thank you, everyone. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2017] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] recess,g this august the congressional delegation is visiting south k
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