Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20170921
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 196
KQEH (PBS) 146
WETA 120
KQED (PBS) 67
WMPT (PBS) 64
WHYY (PBS) 24
DATE
2011 225
2010 108
2012 108
2013 66
2014 48
2009 32
2017 27
2015 3
2016 0
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 617 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jul 18, 2011 2:00pm PDT
tavis: good evening. we wrap up our week long look at china. tonight, have a distinguished panel of chinese americans. tonight, we will explore many issues we discussed during a recent visit to china, including the good and the bad of china's economic boom, the environment, human rights, and the complexity of u.s.-china relations. our round table conversation on china is coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it is the cornerstone we all know. it is not just a street, a boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from the viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: i am pleased to be joined by a terrific and distinguished panel. first up is john chan, former chair of the c-100. cindy fan is the dean of social s
PBS
Aug 17, 2011 12:00am PDT
tavis: good evening from china, i am tavis smiley. we are here talking to everyday chinese about the issues that matter most to them, the environment, the economy, education, the future, the family, real issues, real people, every night from the people's republic of china. our conversation begins tonight right now. >> every community has a martin luther king street. this is a place for wal-mart standing together with your community to make everyday better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, ing provided by -- >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: this is the view of beijing from the roof of the microsoft campus. this is second only to their headquarters. the big cities are already jammed and in the next 10 years, they expect the largest internal migration in history there is a downside to all of this gallup and growth and you can see it, a thicket ago, bikes dominated the streets. today, everyone would like a car. -- a decade ago, bikes d
PBS
Aug 16, 2011 12:00am PDT
♪ tavis: good evening. tonight and all this week we move throughout the country of china trying to listen and learn about the chinese people. talk about china must always be the economy but this week we will talk about the people and the social issues, environment and education. all these issues the people of china are wrestling with. we spend this week on location. that is coming up right now. >> every community has martin luther king blvd. it is the cornerstone we know. it is not just a street but a place where walmart stands with your community to make everyday matter. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer,we're proud to join him in improving financial literacy. and remove obstacl -- >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: i first came to china one year ago and wanted to return as soon as possible. now i have come back with doctor cornell west and more than 30 members of my staff. some of the footage you'll see struck this week was shot
WETA
Jul 14, 2011 12:30am EDT
tavis: good evening, from china, i'm tavis smiley. we're here all this week to listen and to learn as we speak to the chinese people about the issues that matter to them. the social husband is. the cultural issues. their families. the future, education and environment and so much more as we're on location tonight and all this week. i'll have more in a moment. >> the cornerstone we all know. it is not just a street or with your demoupt make every day better. community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance proudly tavis and nationwide insurance working to improve financial literacy and the economic >> nationwide is on your side >> additional funding provided by -- >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] >> this is my second trip to china and i've come back with some of my staff and good friend and colleague, dr. cornel west. we're something of an anomaly in china. you don't see many african-americans. it resulted in some friendly curiosity. that same curiosity greeted andrew ballen when he arrived in beijing a
WHUT
Jun 21, 2011 8:30am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation about china with henry kissinger, a man who paved the way from the 1970's for the most populous nation. his latest vote is called -- book is -- "on china." with his reading. difference -- tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy time. pbs station from viewers like you. ththank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> dr. henry kissinger's long career includes his time as u.s. secretary of state, during which he was awarded the nobel peace prize. he made a historic trip to china, which ushered in an era end a relationship that continues to grow in importance and complexity. his new book is called "on china." thank you for your time. let me start with some basics. how much of the way we view china and the way they do business has to do with this huge and gap between the numbers of people -- 300 million americans, and 1.3 ha billion chinese people -- how much of the way we see things differ
WHUT
Oct 26, 2010 7:00pm EDT
. tavis: i literally just got back -- i am still kind of jet lag -- i got back two hours ago from china. so many chinese citizens told me to say hello to president carter. they would ask me about my work on pbs. your name kept coming up. >> i was over there three weeks ago. tavis: they told me. recently, you and 15 nobel laureates sent a letter to leaders of the g-20 asking them, when they see president hu jintao after their summit, to do what specifically with regard to dr. liu, who just received the nobel peace prize? >> we want them to release him from his imprisonment, but also that his wife be free so she can be at liberty to travel the world and talk about her husband and his ministry. he has been an outspoken and courageous human rights activist, as you know. we think neither she nor he should be punished for his freedom of speech. tavis: the chinese government's position is that his receiving the nobel prize was an insult to their country and to the rule of law inside of china. >> he had been arrested under chinese law and convicted of illegal activities and sentenced as a priso
WHUT
Jul 15, 2011 8:30am EDT
tavis: good evening, from china. i am tavis smiley. i have had the pleasure of sharing my unique experience with some of my personal staff and my friend and colleague, dr. cornel west. the people have impressed us with their candor and friendliness. it would be a the authoritarian government and their grip on modern china and even for us. minor flareups emerged at some surprising moments. i will share two of those experiences. this all begins in just a moment. >> every community has a marvelous the king boulevard. this is the cornerstone we all known. this is not just the street or a boevdar wherertaldma- stands to get there with your community to make everyday better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles mpmanvontia sat . ame na conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. tavis: additional funding provided by -- >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thanyou. [captioning made possible by kcet public television]
PBS
Jan 19, 2011 2:00pm PST
. if the 20th century belonged to the united states, does the 21st century belong to china? do we need to accept the fact that we won in the 20th century, but it belongs to china in the 21st century? i ask that because we all know that hu jintao, the leader of china, is headed to the city in a number of days to speak to president obama in a summit. does the 21st century belonged to china? >> first, i have a comment before you insert -- before i answer your question. i am glad i did not go to princeton, because i did not understand half of what dr. west said. i would never have graduated. i would not be sitting here. [laughter] i would first say to you -- i run around the world and i am fortunate enough to do a lot of business around the world. we beat ourselves up pretty bad. i think that is one thing we always like to do. i think there is a lot of countries out there who would love to be america. they love americans. and the fact of the matter is that we are all sitting here talking about this. we are very open and from a very diverse background. that is a good sign. there are a
PBS
Aug 15, 2011 12:00pm EDT
upcoming week devoted to china. i travel to china for a series of conversations about the many complex issues facing the most populous nation. we will stop the week one week from tonight with a panel of chinese americans including john chan. we're glad you joined us. coming up right now. >> every community has martin luther king boulevard. it is the cornerstone we know. it is not just a street but a place where wal-mart start -- stands with your community to make everyday matter. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. we're proud to join him in improving front -- financial literacy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always pleased to welcome don cheadle to the program. the star can be seen in the forthcoming summit "the guard." he can also be seen in the showtime series "house of lies," a comedy about the world of business consulting. here is a scene from that show. >> are you going to help your not? -- me or not? have you ever been shot before it?
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 12:00pm EST
, that's a long way from a little town in china. >> i was just trying to follow you. tavis: oh! as a matter of fact i was looking for you. i was on -- honored to be on this list with lang lang earlier this year, the time 100 list and i -- they had a big party in new york and i looked all around to find you but you were playing a concert in holland. >> i could not be there that night, unfortunately. tavis: how much traveling do you do around the world doing concerts? >> 130 concerts but next summer i'm taking two months off. tavis: seriously? >> emmitt tavis: what brought that on? >> i've been working hard in the summers and i think this summer i'm going to really take time off. tavis: any idea what you're going to do in that two-month hiatus? >> maybe go to the beach or study another language maybe. tavis: i was saying to you how much i like the scarf you have on and you, to my surprise, you designed this scarf? >> yeah, i designed this and the aim is to help my foundation. so the profit goes to the foundation. tavis: your foundation does what? >> to support young pianoists and to re
WHUT
Dec 28, 2010 8:30am EST
, to the future, you invest in education and free trade and one in coop wration china and india and asia. all the continents will create massive numbers of jobs. i'm optimistic about america. the rebirth to have american cream dream is part of that. i think america that is talent. quite a different challenge, which is the growth of a middle class, on almost every continent in the world. tavis: you narg the book that markets -- argue in the book that markets need morals. let me say to you at best, some would find that oxymoronic and at worse, laughable that markets can, in fact, have morals. >> i think you have to underpin free markets. important in your family life, the way you deal with your neighbors and the way you expect a small business to operate. if you don't value integrity and responsibility and fairness and people doing the duty and telling truth, then you don't have a successful economy in long run. what happened is that wall street and the financial institutions and britain and elsewhere forgot at the center of the economy there has got to be trust. they shreded the trus
WHUT
Feb 11, 2011 7:00pm EST
than the united states and all of the west. at the same time, there is this fear of china rising as a tiger. the u.s. is having a financial crisis. there is that anxiety. you couple this anxiety of china rising with every body's greatest fear, which is whether we're doing a good job as a parent. i think those came together. the rest is history. tavis: is there something -- obviously, there is. for those who have not read the book, what is the thing or things on the short list that makes parenting different or unique in a chinese family, as opposed to an african american family or somebody else? >> i am using the term chinese family very loosely. i think it is more of an immigrant thing. a lot of south asians and koreans, immigrants from nigeria and the caribbean -- i get the nicest e-mails from the population, people who say, "i could not stop laughing. this is exactly how i was raised. my dad was from ghana. he was very tough and said all these things. i owe him so much." the main difference is a huge emphasis on academic excellence. it is pretty tough. you get in 96 out of 100, wher
WETA
Jan 31, 2013 12:00am EST
geomagic, ping fu. a remarkable journey from labor camps in china to one of the most prominent c.e.o.'s, and she has a new book, "bend, not break," and she was named entrepreneur of the year back in 2005 and now serves on the obama council of entrepreneurship. we are glad you joined us. a conversation with geomagic's ceo, ping fu, coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like yo thank you. tavis: started a successful company is never easy, but it may have seemed impossible for ping fu, growing up under mao, and she was sent to a labor camp, where she adored unspeakable hardships. she knew just three english words into her vocabulary and came with little money in her pocket. my favorite, "hellbo
WETA
Feb 4, 2011 12:35am EST
summit meeting between the u.s. and china is that the u.s. needs to sell more goods to the chinese and others around the world and perhaps the catalyst for a new round of robust exports will be american innovation. tonight, then two conversations about how technology and american ingenuity can propel the u.s. out of this deep recession. first up, gary shapiro, president and c.e.o. of the consumer electronic association and the man behind the largest tech show in the world, c.e.s., in las vegas. then i'll be joined by david pogue, technology columnist for the new york times and hosts of the upcoming four-part "nova" series here on pbs. we're glad you joined us. a look at technology in the 21st century coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide is proud to join tavis to improve financial literacy and remove -- and improve the economic empowerment that
WETA
Sep 24, 2013 6:00pm EDT
something to celebrate, but in china, the side of 14 together is quite a thing to behold. the devastating suicide bombing ofpakistan brings questions negotiating with the taliban and. in one violent moment, this family was torn apart. lost sixstian relatives in the attack on the church. there is no substitute for the brothers i lost, she said. i'll never get them back. and there are dozens of other families here facing sudden losses. over 80 people are now known to have died when two suicide bombers blew themselves up among the congregation that had just finished sunday mass here. protesters have taken to the streets, their anger directed at the authorities for not giving them protection, but also at politicians who say they are calling for talks with the pakistani taliban a. the prime minister had been pursuing a strategy of preparing the ground for dialogue with the militants, backed by other prominent leaders. pakistanis are exhausted with the bloodshed after years in which thousands of civilians and soldiers have been killed, while talks might bring some respite from the v
PBS
Jun 15, 2013 12:00am PDT
the text. let's start with china. a week ago president obama some time with the president of china. early on in his new tenure as president of the people's republic of china. your thoughts a few days after that summit about what was accomplished. sort of way we are not going to know what is accomplished for a couple of years. you had tse two leaders, one just taking office and the other beginning a second term. essentially investing in their relationship, running down something of foundation. they will continue these one on ones and put in may -- motion various meetings for their staffs on some of the big issues. how to regulate cyberspace. we are dealing with various or global issues. accomplished with deliverables. they began a serious conversation about what the united states and china would do to manage various global and international challenges. >> i note and you know this as well that a week or so ago henry kissinger turned 90, there was a big celebration for his 90th birthday in new york city. anyone who is anybody showed up for this celebration. >> it is good i was there o
WETA
Apr 16, 2013 12:00am EDT
together. boston's own, john kerry, now the secretary of state has been traveling try to get china to do about -- something about this crisis in north korea. but get your sense of how we're navigating this potential crisis with north korea right now. exactlytary of state is right. chinaignificant degree, is probably the player most important that can bring some .esolution to this crisis china helps feed a nation which is addressing the salvation. china is providing a great deal of energy to north korea. china borders on north korea and opening its border would have a huge impact on north korea. if there is any nation in the . china helpsworld that can bringe leverage, have some leverage on north korea, and make them understand you cannot go threatening nuclear war in 2013, it is china. i hope very much china accepts its contractual responsibility and does everything that it can to bring north korea into the and stop of nations the behavior that we have seen in recent months. tavis: it never take this bierce -- you never take this behavior lightly. no matter how erratic and bizarre. >>
WHUT
Jan 20, 2011 7:00pm EST
. our country needs to rethink how to create jobs here. and china is investing $100 billion a year, united states dollars in investment. we are getting through% or 4%. that is not acceptable. tavis: you said without hesitation, open the markets. maria bartiromo whispered in my ear, "impossible." >> this is where the rubber meets the road. we had tires coming from china and they were being sold at very low levels. cheaper than american company tires. there was a big outcry from workers. why are americans buying those tires and not the tires we make in this country? they're cheaper. how do we -- we are putting terrace to make them -- terex to make them more expensive. -- tariffs to make them more expensive. 300 million people, 3 billion people. our companies need to sell to an emerging middle class, and we need to come to an agreement. in order to prosper all of us. on the big -- two big to fail, i do not think it is necessarily too big to fail. too connected to fail. these are not necessarily evil. if you are connected all the world, you know aig was ensuring everything and when the
WHUT
Jun 9, 2011 7:00pm EDT
think about the time we spent in china, walking in shanghai. it's such a pleasure to be with you. you're one of my favorite television journalists and somebody who -- i wish you were here in washington, we were going to take a walk after the show and talk about stuff. tavis: that's great of you to say. as you may know, i just returned from china and since david set me up so beautifully here, starting monday, july 11 for five nights on this program we're going to bring you a program called "postcards from china." i spent about two weeks in china putting together a five-night special that will air on this program starting monday, july 11, through friday, july 15, about china, the economy, education, the future, the environment. everything about china you could ever want to know you'll see here for a full week starting monday, july 11. david, thanks for the book, "bloodmoney," award-winning writer and columnist for "the washington post" and secondly, for the nice segue to promote my china special, monday, july 11. >> i will be watching. i can guarantee you that. tavis: david, thank
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
. tavis: i was just reading an article the other day on the role that china is now playing on the continent, and if one wanted to be really aggressive, some could argue that china is decolonizing -- re-colonizing the continent. >> i can understand the anxiety in some respects. the european countries, for instance. china, after its phase of communism, they have amassed capital and is expanding that capital in a favorable terms. being able to look at the terms of a new economic force in the world. they probably need the african governments to safeguard what they have one after years, decades, a couple centuries to european powers and make sure they do not sell them, but as far as economic trading relationships are concerned, material, in exchange for technology, in exchange even for political alliances, i always wondered about that. tavis: made the argument is because free enterprise and colonization sometimes goes hand in hand. in africa and parts of the world under the guise of free enterprise. >> unfortunately, it does not stand the test of argument. if you say it is a free marke
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 2:30pm PST
, because he is trying to fight the rise of china. years ago doesn't chinese per capita income was 4% of the united states. now it is 9%. the united states had been the biggest trading partner with every country in asia. now china is the biggest trading partner with every country in asia. china is doing a lot of things right. china is investing many times as much money in infrastructure as the united states. the europeans out of china for a bailout, not the united states. -- the europeans asked china for a bailout, not the united states. >> it is not us versus them. you do not have to fight. it is not one or two. it is a global community. there are reasonable region regional powers. do not discount russia. there are a lot of resources in all of these countries, especially africa, so what needs to happen is a global understanding. i believe the united states can work as a partner. who cares if we are number one any more? if you are not number one, you are not. mean?does number one reaso tavis: how much of this is fundamentally about american imperialism? or the notion of? >> it is the min
PBS
Nov 7, 2014 12:00am PST
that we live in a time where because china is rising and america's more doubtful of itself, right, and its place in the world, we have questions about is the american dream still alive, is there still opportunity, what chance do people have whether they're chinese or other ethnicities, chance to make it, right. i think that our job, whether you are chinese american or not is to -- to have that conversation about opportunity and to make sure that it's not just dumb, blind chance and luck that allows some people to have a fair shot. >> there's a wonderful story you tell about your mother's -- i don't want to call it dumb luck, nothing dumb about it. but just a great story of her connection to a great american named jackie roosevelt robinson. >> yeah. you know, my mom, when she came to the united states, one of the first jobs she got of as a file clerk. she knew a little english. she got a job at a coffee company in new york called chocolate full chock full of nuts. i think it still exists. lonely, shy, scared immigrant woman doing her tasks. over time, she bumped into an executive t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 617 (some duplicates have been removed)