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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2016 6:00pm EDT
discussing our five miles off china. when i relations committee wrote to the president, we received back, neither you nor any other american need feel that the u.s. will be involved in hostilities. that is the issue, i believe we must meet our commitment to formosa. i support it and the islands. the treaty does not include these two islands. mr. nixon suggest that the united states should go to war if these islands are attacked. i suggest that if formosa is attacked or any area that formosa, an attack on then of course the united states is at war. what mr. nick some wants to do us to theed -- commit defense of these islands, when they are free territory and not part of the defense of formosa. the commander of the adriatic fleet has said these islands are not worth the bones of a single american. they are not within the treaty area. they were not within the treaty area when the treaty was passed in 1955. spoken with china about reducing the number of troops he has on the islands. bill: the next question is percent of the kennedy. st: you said that it is important that the united stat
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2015 10:45pm EDT
administration discuss nixon's attempts to normalize relations with china in the 1970's. they detail secretary henry kissinger's visit and nixon's official visit one your later.
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2014 12:15am EDT
with historical empires and distraction. the bank of china resort was also a popular photograph it -- the bank of chambersburg was also a popular photographic subject. so these photographs began to be reduced and harper's weekly got into the game, and they purchased many of these and created illustrations out of them, and they published a group of three illustrations in their august 20 issue, so less than three weeks after the fire, depicting the ruins of timbers berg including both street views like this one of main street and also individual portrait like this at the bank and the franklin hotel and then the town hall. so these images really help us spread the news of chambersburg, especially across the north and help northerners really visually access the destruction. they were appealing, they were visually appealing, but they were also emotionally and intellectually shocking to those who look to these images or visited the ruins themselves mostly because of this contrast that i already mentioned about what that building was before and then when it had become. as a viewer, you ar
CSPAN
Apr 19, 2015 5:15am EDT
late 19th century to china and elsewhere. african-american star going to africa, especially south africa, and have a very important influence with this civilizing mission that they are going to bring the most modern christian values to people of color around the world. prof. glymph: i would like to mention as a counterpoint at the same time there was a very important -- religion and its import in terms of the war and emancipation, african-americans were incensed on thinking about the secular component of what all this meant. if it meant to going to africa to help christianize the africans, on the other it meant taking hold in america of their political rights. unlike religion during slavery when all you could do was to pray to god and hope something happens, not you can pray and do something to make something happen. i think that was a very important distinction between slavery and freedom. prof. varon: we have talked in the context of the lost cause in memorialization, the construction of historical memory. let's turn to that topic for african-americans and particularly about com
CSPAN
Jun 7, 2015 10:00am EDT
letters from hawaii, morocco, egypt, liberia, india, japan, china. this really is a global undertaking. the country with the greatest volume of letters was great britain. if you include the british empire as a whole, they sent 437 documents, which is almost 40% of the total. wherever they came from, the letters tended to be written by political leaders. a lot from presidents, heads of states. let's also -- lots also from local political officials, town mayors and that kind of thing. but there are lots and lots of letters from ordinary people as well, groups of people who got together. they referred to themselves as the citizens of this town, residents of this city sometimes used phrases like the working men of wherever. they came from trade organizations, religious groups, fraternal orders and anti-slavery societies as well not surprisingly. what did the letters say? first and foremost, the one common theme that runs through them all is that they were all expressions of sympathy, of condolence for mary lincoln and her family, for the u.s. government and the american people
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2015 10:55pm EST
over from the madison era. there were only ten matching place settings in the white house china collection. springfield friends commented that the executive mansion really resembled a second rate hotel with its threadbare carpets and chopped up drapes. mary was determined to set a very high standard and prove her refinement to the washington social arbiters. her increasing isolation might have hastened her plans. london journalist william howard russell discovered that even after a month, the washington ladies had not yet made up their minds that mrs. lincoln is the fashion. they missed their southern friends and constantly draw comparisons between them and the vulgar yankee women who are now in power. mary decided she would have to make a splash to prove herself and was looking forward to the summer when she might regroup and redecorate hoping once congress recessed, the crowd will be gradually leaving the city and we may hope for more leisure. but events intervened. and following the attack on ft. sumter and lincoln's call to arm, her new home became the nerve center of the di
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2014 5:01pm EST
in china. he wanted to send a letter to his friend. it turned out it took 90 cents to get a letter to shanghai in 1863. the postal employees opened up this letter to see -- there is no return address label on the front, they want to see who do we send this letter back to. they opened the letter and it was full of disloyal and anti-emancipation content. so instead of returning the letter to garland, they promptly arrested him. i'll give you a sense of what he said. he blasted the lincoln emancipation proclamation as unconstitutional and unjust. and he proclaimed -- and i'm going to censor the n word here, and i'm going to do that throughout the talk actually -- that the administration have at last shown their hand and that their principles and their hearts are blacker than the negro they're fighting for. garland was promptly sent out of the army and out of military lines. so far the cases i've given you have all been sudden dismissals of officers, but some of these guys were court martialed, so i'll give you some examples of these. there was the ordinance sergeant right here in washing
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2016 6:00pm EDT
his career will be acting as a official observer for the u.s. army. china,sent on a tour to and rush out where he makes observations about their military. he finds much to be admired with the he iss, -- with leading this renaissance while -- he is frustrated at the way his tactics and doctrine are being implemented and some of the resistance he meets along the way. on march 15 1891 he is in california and he will commit suicide. the last thing that is published is a military policy of the united states. they were published in 1904. upton is a key figure in these lessons learned as it applied to tactics on the battles legal -- battlefield. thank you. [applause] thank you very much we will usn to ian, who will take across the pond, as it were, and look at european legacy of the american civil war. thank you, chris. first a bit of a personal antidote. four years ago i was getting my history. as i was graduating, again, a proud moment. i did a dissertation on british memoirs of the interwar. . memoirs written by servicemen who fought in world war i. would have come up to me and reach out
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2015 6:00pm EST
china with him. he boards a ship in san francisco in december 1877. it takes six weeks to get a hong kong. probably uphill. [laughter] he arrives in february of 1878. after he is installed he is like what am i doing here? but he is in hong kong. when 2-3 months he looks of the books. he sees there were two sets of books. one for the state department and one for them. these guys were charging, if a prostitute, and prostitution was legal, chinese prostitutes were legally immigrating to the united states. if a prostitute did not want to have a medical exam for a few extra one -- u on, she could avoid that. these guys would just kind of let that go. it would make 15 extra dollars. u.s. flag sailors, merchant marines who wanted three nights, they would charge two dollars. he would make money off of that. opm, license for opmpium. $10,000. a lot of money. mosby being mosby he said dossier back to the state department advising the state department they have a real problem on their hands. you cannot imagine what happened next. the state department lost it. it disappeared. can you imagine? [l
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2015 9:59am EST
in canada. the kids cannot go to china with him. he boards a ship in san francisco in december 1877. it takes six weeks for the boat to get over to hong kong. probably uphill. [laughter] he arrives in february of 1878. after he is installed, he is like what am i doing here? but he is in hong kong. within two months or three months, he starts looking at the books. he sees there were two sets of books. one for the state department and one for them. these guys were charging, if a prostitute, and prostitution was legal, chinese prostitutes were legally immigrating to the united states. if a prostitute did not want to have a medical exam for a few extra yuan, she could avoid that. these guys at the consulate would just kind of let that go. they would make 15 extra dollars. u.s. flag sailors, merchant marines who wanted three nights, it would normally cost a dollar a night, they would charge two dollars. they would make money off of that. a license for opium. it was $2.50. these guys were getting $10,000. in those days a lot of money. , mosby being mosby, he said dossier back to the state
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2015 9:00am EDT
-- truman arrives, 63 days are climaxed by the signing of the united nation's charter. first is china, the first nation that suffered aggression. the delegation of the soviet union, the ambassador signs for russia. great britain is represented by her delegation chairman halifax. the republic of france acting delegation chairman joseph. 38th of 50 nations to sign is the united states. secretary of state. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, we are all aware that this is an extremely historic occasion. the charger for world peace -- charter for world peace has been completed. but this is not the end, it is only the beginning. the great task lies before us, and it is our solemn and sacred duty to see to it the united nations comes into being and fulfills its promise. with faith in our cause and goodwill in our hearts and determination to work unceasingly towards this end, i am confident that with god's help we shall reach our goal. [applause] >> senator donnelly -- connelly is next to sign for the united states. senator arthur vandinburg. [applause] >> commander harold, former governor of
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2014 10:00pm EST
to handkerchiefs, china. if you have the money, you could order anything from great britain. his partner suggested that they run in a glass greenhouse, complete with a british gardener. [laughter] just to show what a mockery this blockade was. his home was ashley hall at the time. when the attack occurred at battery wagner and the north seizes morris island, they could set up batteries to fire over the channel and put ships into the main channel. so the blockade running companies shift to wilmington. and for about a year there is no blockade running business in charleston. then the last year of the war, they start coming back, and they come back with a vengeance. they come up with smaller vessels that come in the channel on sullivan's island. the lucy, the fox, they could sneak in. there was one vessel, the little hattie. to show you how audacious they could be, the little hattie ran the blockade in daylight. usually you would run at night, when no one could see you. >> they were painted dark gray or black. >> very quick and very fast, and the little hattie could make more money
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2014 10:00pm EST
, china, watergate, and nixon's resignation. it 8 p.m. eastern on c-span3 american history tv. >> monday night on "the communicators" -- >> i think all of us as someone who uses a computer every day, we have certain expectations when we fire up our can is about who sees what we are doing, who shares information when, and it any moment -- if the expectations i have are shifted because i realize there might be another party who sees what i am doing -- say for example, if a , saying if iup want help making a purchase -- there are certain lines we do not know we have crossed them until it is too late. that is true for researchers and true for companies. loudly intoalking her cell phone has no problem with someone listening to that conversation on a bench. at the same time you can have someone trying to have a conversation and they will go to somewhereth to be that is completely secluded. we are dealing not only with the cultural context. we are looking at individual experiences and needs for privacy. >> monday night on "the 2.mmunicators" on c-span coming up next, old dominion university pro
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2015 6:00pm EDT
good friend, who was the publisher for china mail and his good friend who was the publisher of "washington star," wait for my command, just like the old days, and he told the state department, "fix it or else." and you know, there were all kinds of diplomats who were starting to retire because they wanted to spend more time with the family. [laughter] they just had enough of the far east and wanted to get back to the good old usa and feel that terra firma under their feet. it happened very quietly. mosby returned back to the united states. before he left, he was advised in april of 1885 that he would be returning to the united states and prepare to leave by july. he sent a letter to president grant asking him to help mosby find a job. he did not have a job, he did not have any contact back in the united eights -- he had been away for seven years. he did not realize that president grant was dying of throat cancer. he did not hear from grant. the day that the ship had finally arrived in san francisco, mosby was walking down the flank, there was a young man on the docks saying cou
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2014 10:00am EST
brought in items for the commercial market, anything handkerchiefs, china. if you had the money, you could order anything from great britain. it was suggested that they run in a glass greenhouse complete with a british gardener just to show what a mockery this blockade was. occurred atack battery wagner and the north seizes morris island, they could set up batteries to fire over the channel. they could put ships into the main channel, so this blockade-running companies shipped over to wilmington for a year, there is no blockade-running business in charleston. the last year of the war, they start coming back, and they come back with a vengeance. they come up with smaller vessels that come in the channel along sullivan's island. they had ships that could sneak in. -- and toone vessel show you how audacious these commanders could be, that vessel actually ran the locate in daylight. they would usually run at night and no one could see them. there were dark and black, very low hull, very quick and fast. this one could make more money and make a quicker run. right in, right at a monitor. m
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2016 8:00am EDT
observer for the u.s. army. he is sent to russia and china to make observations about their military to see if there is any applicability to the u.s. army. he very much transitions the to being more prussian. leads the renaissance while the american army is losing prestige. wayn is frustrated with the that his tactics are being implement it. he will commit suicide. last -- published post-humorously is -- which some folks will take forth and publish them in 1904. but upton is a key figure with the lessons learned as it applies to tactics on the battlefield. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. en,we are going to turn to who will take us across the pond to look at the european legacy of the american civil war. >> thank you. first, a bit of a personal anecdote. four years ago, i was getting my phd in history. , a very was graduating proud moment and i had done a dissertation on the british of the interwar time. memoirs written by servicemen who fought in the british army during world war i. and if you had come up to me at that graduation ceremony and reach out your hand and sai
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2016 1:45pm EDT
of feynman's division -- china's division was sent off. they are skirmishers, which had been pushed back by a very aggressive union skirmish line. so aggressive that some confederate commanders said that just before the order to advance, to repulse this union attack, some -- several of the artillery battles along that front confederate lined head open fired. now the order to advance is given, and mcnair's, part of bragg's and other gates will all step off. after they hit the grass about 200 yards, the second line moves forward. they mention the relative spacing in a column formation. you had to have the proper distance between the lines to facilitate the movement to the left or right of the troops. that formation that long street had while raining the assault was formed with only 50 or 75 yards between the lines. it now has two uncoil as it moves forward in the assault so that there would be enough room for those troops, and the second, third, fourth line to maneuver as needed. after that second line began to move, the third line did not move until another 200 yards, then the fourth
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2015 10:45pm EDT
the swanson gallery today. there is a sitdown restaurant with tables, linens, china, and it all a cart lunch counter for people who needed a quicker meal. visit the soda fountain that we still operate today. they could get their sweet treat their before they got on their train. beyond that there was a barbershop, all spittle, there -- a uso canteen barbershop, a hospital, and it uso canteen. stands and ifne you waited to catch a cab, they took care of you in major you could get everything you needed here at the station. right now we are on the lower level of union station. this is the original tract level. this would have been what passengers would have walked on to get to their train on the original tract. you would have baggage carts, porters carrying luggage and passengers running to and from. this is where it all happen to get on to track one. this would have been open. it was enclosed in the 1990's. when union station was operating this overhang would have been your only protection from the cold and that would have let you get onto the trains . or travel down the concourse to
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2016 12:15pm EDT
to come. no school in france or holland. belgium or italy. china or the philippines. medicine. water or no place to get warm. no place to sleep. everywhere the byproduct -- the byproduct of war. they inevitably interfere with our military operations. it is an imperative necessity they big -- they be controlled. it is the job of the military be maintained. refugees will have to be confined to the areas of their homes. others may have to be reactive -- may have to be evacuated to the rear. control of the theater commander. in cooperation with the military police. individuals -- our -- they can create panic and cause whole people to flee blindly into this -- into the streets of the open roads. even before their homes have been touched. make themselves a perfect target for the enemy. just as it happened here, it happened over china. they became homeless wanderers and created a hazard to military operations by blocking the movement of troops and supplies. it is the same in every case, in every country. no matter where they are going or where they are, refugees are an uncontrolled c
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2014 10:10pm EDT
on civilians in china, the philippines and korea by japan were consistent with and encouraged by sherman's precedent. the logic of saving lives in the long run by these tactics seems to have been refuted by history. finally if you scroll through this entry, the words related to general william t. sherman tags at the bottom include "collateral damage, modern warfare, furd, tmurder, terrori war criminal." now let me little a more modest and fair here. this is not the best source out there on sherman. it was written by somebody named text in tex. it was written and misquotes sherman at one point. and i'll always concede it does also include war hero. but what this does represent is a popularly held view that william t. sherman and the march through georgia and the carolinas during the finally months of the civil war have something to do with the creation of total war. and the millions of civilian deaths in the wars of the 20th and 21st century can somehow be laid at his feet. nor does this view reside entirely on the internet, noted repository of kind of crack pot theories. a histor
CSPAN
Jun 8, 2014 8:00am EDT
sides of the war and japanese cities by the u.s. as well as civilians and china and the philippines and korea by japan were consistent with and encourage by sherman's precedent. the logic of saving lives and the long run seems to be refuted by history. finally, if you scroll through this entry, the words related to william sherman tags at the bottom includes collateral damage, murderer, terrorist, and war criminal. let me be a little bit more honest and fair. this not the best source out there. it was written by somebody named text. it misquotes sherman at one time. if you look at the word association, it includes war hero. what it does represent is a popularly held view that william t. sherman and the march through georgia and the carolinas through the final months of the civil war have something to do with the creation of total war. and the millions of civilians' deaths in the wars of the 20th and 21st century can somehow be put at his feet. nor does this view reside entirely on the internet, noted repository of crackpot theories. a history of henry county, georgia explains simply
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2016 10:30am EST
carte to walk his house filled with grant memorabilia. we dined occasionally on white house china. on the wall was a photograph of abraham lincoln, one of the more famed side views signed by lincoln over to grant. a presentation sword given to grant hung on the wall. there was a peace pipe that had been sent to grant by sitting bull, who must have done it tongue-in-cheek -- some kind of misunderstanding over something. [laughter] >> in the papers. he had some of grant's papers from his early days. if you were a teenager interested in history, especially in that great event in our national experience and you were growing up on the west coast where there weren't -- could you imagine a more heady, more powerful influence than to be able to see and touch these pieces of genuine history? i attribute a fair bit of my withr to that association grant, who was aiming this is an -- a magnificent fellow come in spite of the fact that he tried to kill me. he made us lunch one day. loath cheese. in all of its manifestations. i do not understand why anybody wanted to sit and eat congealed bovine gl
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 4:00pm EST
where she featured the china we see here purchased in mexico, very colorful. first lady mrs. johnson spent a lot of time here at the ranch. it was very important because it provided such a respite from all the turmoil of washington, particularly later in the presidency when the johnsons could come home, recharge their batteries and make that connection back to the land and this place they valued so much. >> first lady lady byrd johnson on c-span. >>> there are serious scholars in women studies. most departments include their fair share of non-ideological academics who just offer straightforward courses, sometimes wonderful courses in women's psychology, or women in literature, but ideologically fervent statistically challenged hardliners set the tone in most women studies department. yet all that i have ever seen. and if there's a department that defies this stereotype, let me know, i would love to visit them. conservative women, moderate women, libertarian women, traditionally religious women, left out. >> her critiques of the late 20th feminism and american culture have let critics
CSPAN
May 13, 2017 1:59pm EDT
war, china, rebellion lasting through the 1850's and 1860's as well. this was a religious uprising, essentially. control ofttle for china. it took 14 years for the ch'ing dynasty to reestablish control over the country. the estimated death war, approximated lee, -- approximated, is between 20 million and 30 million people. war historians and anyone interested in the civil impressed, not in terms of being enthusiastic, but very impressed by the death toll in the american civil war. 750,000 is also the latest estimates. comparing that to china, 20 up to 30 million and you see other of the world are experiencing similar conflicts with even worth this -- worst worse death-- tolls. the u.s., the union victory in the civil war fits well with the trends. at the same time, there were lots of smaller independent movements swimming in the opposite direction from these big centralized nations. nations --zed centralizations. in other parts of the world, atside of europe, india sees rebellion against british authority in 1857. in cuba, after the civil war in 1868, you see the first real attempt
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2015 6:01pm EDT
family in kansas was using their good china and good silver. that is a great example of how generations later, those feelings had not died. i was researching in the library of congress in the newspaper room one day. i came across a newspaper in 1856, "the london times." the front page had the headline "war in kansas." the eyes of the world were literally on kansas. iod was sotorial per significant in shaping the war to come. kansas' role in the civil war cannot be overestimated. i think it is overshadowed because you have the big battles in the east. you have gettysburg and chancellorsville and fredericksburg and all these big battles that overshadow how kansas truly defined the issues, it defined what we would become. the entire civil war is about who inherits the mantle of the revolution. who gets that, north or south? who do we get to be? kansas the fines that. it is all hammered out here in kansas. kansans are the ones who do find it after the war. after the homestead act is enacted, you have all these civil war soldiers moving to kansas. it becomes known as the soldier
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)