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20090604
20171022
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2017 22
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
Bloomberg
May 10, 2017 9:00pm EDT
, not as profitable in europe, but no profitable in china. why are you so successful there? mary: the buick brand is a strong brand. it had a rich history in china, driving officials around in the 1920's and 1930's, so great rand. we have been able to grow the chevrolet brand and the cadillac. it is one of the fastest-growing's luxury brands. david: you used to have a lot more brands, pontiac, oldsmobile , now you have chevrolet, cadillac, buick, and gmc, are those the main ones in the united states? mary: yes. david: cadillac is your premium, right? presidential the limousines, bombproof, have you ever been in that car, seen what it is like him are you can't comment? mary: i really can't comment. [laughter] david: ok here it i guess the average person couldn't afford something like that? what was the atmosphere like when you were working there? mary: it was very difficult. , theve 220,000 people restructuring was primarily with america, but that is 100,000 today, so itloy was a difficult time. that is where you saw the resolve. things most special general motors is the minimum women
Bloomberg
May 17, 2017 9:00pm EDT
states, not as profitable in your, not as profitable in latin america, but is profitable in china. why are you so successful in china? do you manufacture cars there? mary: yes, but i think is back to the buick brand. in is a strong brand. it had a rich history in china of driving some of the chinese officials around back in the 1920's and 1930's. so great brand. we have also been able to grow the chevrolet brand, and the cadillac. the cadillac is one of fastest-growing luxury brands. we build many of the products in country there. david: you used to have pontiac , which is gone away, owes mobile, and i have chevrolet cadillac, buick and gmc. , are those the main ones in the united states? mary: yes. david: of those, cadillac, for example, that is your premium. right? it also makes the presidential limousine, which is like bombproof or something. have you ever been in that car to see what it's like? or you cannot comment? mary: i can't comment. [laughter] david: i guess the average person cannot afford to buy some thing like that probably? probably not. [laughter] david: you joined
Bloomberg
May 13, 2017 10:30am EDT
profitable and united states, not as much in europe but it is profitable in china. why are you so successful in china? the manufacture cars there? mary: yes, but i think is back to the buick brand. it had a rich history in china of driving some of the chinese official around back in the 1920's and 1930's. great brands. we been able to grow the chevrolet brand and the cadillac. the cadillac is one of fastest-growing luxury brands. we build many of the products in country. david: he used to have pontiac that has gone away and oldsmobile. now you have chevrolet, cadillac, buick and gmc. are those the main ones in the united states? mary: yes. david: cadillac, that's your premium. it also makes the presidential limousine, which is like boprf or something. ever been in that car to see what it's like? what you cannot comment? mary: i can't comment. david: i guess the average person cannot afford to buy some thing like that. probably not. he joined general motors in it was a dominant company, then he went south for a while. what was the atmosphere like when you are working there? mary: it was very
Bloomberg
Jul 29, 2017 3:30am EDT
that apple not miss out on cars? ♪ emily: let's talk about the world's second-biggest economy, china. how does apple navigate what seem to be uncertain economic and political waters there? tim: china, for us, we make all of our decisions for the long-term. and so, we are not investing for next quarter or next year, we are thinking about many years out. and as i stand back and look at china, i see mega-trends that -- there that make china an incredible market, and i don't mean just a market to sell in. i also mean a market for application developers. we have 1.5 million application developers in china now. probably closer to 2 million. it's an incredible marketplace for talent, and in terms of the size of the marketplace. so this -- the short-term kinds of economic moves up and down, i don't get too excited about. emily: how realistic is it to expect that double-digit growth for apple can continue in china? tim: it didn't continue last year. emily: are the days of double-digit growth over? tim: i think we will do better this quarter than we have the last several. that doesn't mean tha
Bloomberg
May 20, 2017 9:00am EDT
in europe and latin america but very profitable in china. why are you so successful in china? the manufacture the cars they are? mary: yes, we manufacture several cars there. it is a very strong brand. it had a rich history in china of driving some of the chinese officials around back in the 1920's and 30's. a great brand. we have been able to grow the chevrolet brand and cadillac. cadillac is one of the fastest-growing luxury brands. we build many of the products in-country here. david: general motors used to have more brands, pontiac, oldsmobile. now you have chevrolet, cadillac, buick, and gmc. are those the main ones in the united states? mary: if. -- yes. david: cadillac is your premium, right? in also makes the presidential limousine which is bombproof. what is it like? mary: i cannot comment. [laughter] david: i guess the average person could not afford to buy something like that. probably not. motors but itral was a dominant company in the united states. and it went south. what was the atmosphere like working there? mary: clearly, it was difficult. across the globe, we hav
Bloomberg
Feb 1, 2017 8:00pm EST
promise of tax cuts. haveout 30 minutes, we china. closing the gain for the lunar new year holiday. also, coming on stream at the bottom of the hour. kuala lumpur and taipei have started their session. attempted start for asia and mixedx picture -- a picture across the region. we have what is going on from the economic data. on. a look at what is going we got a trade balance number this morning. we have shares rising for a second day in sydney. givening up here inflation numbers that we saw this morning. we had glencore trading halted this morning pending of full-year output report. look.take a high.an at a three-day most sincea rose the two any 12 -- 2012. let's take a look at the aussie as well. a bit of chart resistance going towards the 77 area. not much reaction in the bond curve. p thispull of this -- u chart to show you the trade balance. you can see this in green on the far right of the screen. that is the surplus that we saw. have of 25 economists projected the number two past the surplus setback in 2009. rishaad: thank you. the federal reserve giving a nod to the rising e
Bloomberg
Jan 11, 2017 8:00pm EST
china must be warned off. 30 minutes away from trading day in hong kong. have japan data, the yen strengthened. we have equity markets in new york, all giving us clear indication where we should be going. we are looking at singapore, taipei -- it is all going on. >> asian markets set for the highest close since october. sharese have japanese lingering, the greenback held onto wednesday's losses. 7%,iler family mart down giving us a preview what to expect from retailing later results tonight. materials supporting games a second day higher. the yuan strengthens the most against the dollar against emerging currencies. we have shipping rising as much as 29% after trading in shares was suspended on wednesday. sticking with the korean space, a quick check on samsung's shares in the wake of what went on with german lee. halting alding a -- 4 day rally. more with the latest on samsung in just a little bit. when it comes to the commodities sorry, looking with currencies, we have a weakness continuing in the dollar. ase yuan climbing as much 1.1%. we are seeing the yen coinue its price agai
Bloomberg
May 1, 2017 3:00am EDT
tough. >> lower commodity prices pushed china's official factory gauge lower in april, declining from a five-year high. 51.2acturing pmi fell to from 51.8 in march, missing analyst expectations. the first economic indicator for the second quarter signals growth of the world's's second-largest economy is set to slow after unexpectedly picking up in the first three months of the year. the united states is considering a range of options as it reaches out to allies in confronting north korea's latest provocations. h.r. mcmaster said the elastic missile tests this week were in "defiance" of the international community. >> we have to do something, again, with partners in the region, and globally, and that involves enforcement of the u.n. sanctions in place. it may mean ratcheting up the sanctions even further. then it means being prepared for military operations is necessary. >> meanwhile, north korea says it will speed up steps to bolster nuclear deterrents. time for a check on the key asset classes. most european markets are shut for the mayday holiday. the u.s. spending bill weighing in
Bloomberg
Feb 4, 2017 1:00pm EST
china wants to add manufacturing jobs. the president of -- the chancellor of germany must and manufacturing jobs. how do we find a way to help exporters? right? that is a good thing. john: what about the relationship with china? is the prospect of any kind of trade dispute with china, does that worry you? just in the ge context, but an economic context here it there is no good case -- not just in the ge context, but in the economic context. there is no good case where the two biggest economies on earth are going to trade. i think that relationship, that bilateral relationship is significantly important for the whole world. and so, that is one i would be very strong on. good sign that donald trump respects the issue of deregulation. and the issue particularly of corporate tax. do you think there is a possibility that this is an area where business could have a benign effect on administration? jeff: you will have different camps that have different -- you know, i respect walmart but we , are going to have a different perspective on tax reform. we are going to have a different st
Bloomberg
May 31, 2017 9:00pm EDT
. and there was civil war in china. anyway, he was a little nervous. and i said, we are not going to spend time in the past. all i will say is, you did the wrong thing for the company. i made a lot of mistakes too, and here are some of the mistakes i made. after i gave him the mistakes i made, he said, thank you for sharing that with me. we had a very nice lunch. it's not quite clear that he did the wrong thing for the company. life goes on. david: so, you were in a small office, as i recall it, at the seagram's building. jamie: after i got fired come you mean. david: you had a small office. jamie: this shows you how stupid corporate america gets -- the company had been set up. we had a cochairman and co-ceo. john reed and sandy -- i was going to be the president and run the global corporate investment bank and other jobs. because those turmoil among management deals are very tough, we had cohead's of asset management, consumer -- and technology reported to me. instead, all of the staff was reporting to sandy and john. when they did that, i said, you guys are crazy. this will destroy
Bloomberg
Apr 17, 2017 4:30am EDT
. china's growth -- we have additional numbers. a secondlebrated straight quarter as investment picked up and retail sales rose. fixed asset investment group above 9%. march retail sales expanding 11%. a quick check on the markets. seeing downside pressure on the dollar index. this is bloomberg. ♪ >> my father counseled me my whole life, never work for big business. you need to be independent. control your own firm, he called it. he set up -- he was an engineer. he set up his own practice, when he had seven children at the age of 37, with no income. and obviously, he was successful. he was not particularly financially motivated. he was very intellectually curious. to him, education, reading, ideas, debate where the essence of family function. >> you live here now, but you go back and see your siblings. what did i think, now you are a famous person in the united states? do they treat you any different than when you were growing up? >> you must have known my siblings very well, or australians, for that matter. there is actually a cultural phenomenon in australia which i think is a trui
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)