Skip to main content

About your Search

20090604
20171121
DATE
2015 34
2016 25
2014 17
2017 12
2013 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2015 12:02am EST
stabilize relations with china. they detail henry kissinger's 1971 secret trip to china and richard nixon's official trip a year later. national archives and the richard nixon foundation hosted this event. >> good morning. i am the archivist of the united states. it is a pleasure to welcome you here today. a special welcome to our c-span audience joining us from around the country and around the world. today, we have the latest in an ongoing series of nixon legacy forums. when asked about his library president nixon said i have insisted that the nixon library and birthplace be not a monument to the career of one man but a place where visitors and scholars will be able to recall the events of the time i served as president and to measure in way the policies my administration pursued. i hope the library and birthplace will be different, a vital place of discovery and rediscovery, of investigation, of study, debate and analysis. those words will be our touchstone as we begin a major reservation at the next in library this year. except for the recently opened watergate exhibit, the every has be
CSPAN
Apr 25, 2015 2:10pm EDT
in structure and sudden diplomacy and china. five years of the nixon administration were a fruitful time in foreign policy, many called in the golden age of diplomacy. this one is going to focus on the vietnam war, negotiations and the paris peace accords. it was one of the biggest and most intractable problems that nixon faced when he walked in the door and took office. it is difficult today in 2014 to comprehend the vietnam war. the country had already -- was already on the edge because of the kennedy and martin luther king assassinations. the vietnam war exacerbated those tensions. and the draft meant every family was affected. we had over half a million american troops halfway around the world in a war we cannot seem to win but we do not know how to end. there were demonstrations across the nation. young man burned their draft cards. risking prison. some fled to canada to avoid going to war. as the war dragged on, the antiwar sentiment crept across the country. dividing family and friends. lyndon johnson, who was the president, had no choice but to withdraw for reelection. as vi
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2016 11:00am EST
russia was, where china was, where these things work. but if you look at a map, russia is really big and china is really big and the british empire is really big, so it looks like there is a lot more part of the world that are on our side than against us. who is against us? this tiny island of japan, this bootheel of italy and germany. this covers a bigger part of the globe come begotten nations, in terms of resources and population. he wants people to feel we can win this war because more of the world is on our side. we have to keep going because we have a lot. so, we're jumping ahead a few months. this is april 28, 1942. what is interesting here is that he is talking specifically about the home front and what the home front means. the context is, we have had the battle of the coral sea, but we have had one tiny moral victory that the doolittle raid's have managed to take off in military mission and dropped bombs in tokyo, essentially knows it difficult damage but listen to his reference in it when it comes up. anything else? mary: i will do the statistics later. pres. roosevelt: relati
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2016 12:00am EDT
regarding resident nixon's trip to china and the influence it had? mr. clapper: well, actually i cannot say much about it because as i say, i was a young pup at the nsa at the time. i think the pdb in the run-up to the, it is my understanding there were a lot of discussions about interests outside the pdb because it was certainly a tremendously historic event as we were reminded during our tour today. it "reset" the relationship with china, and the legacy continues today. i think pdb treatment in the run-up served as a tutorial, if you will, but i also believe that the president was receiving inputs from other sources, national security advisor, secretary of state, beyond what was in the pdb. >> differently was a seminal event that continues to resonate to this day. mr. brennan: president obama is leaving for china next wednesday attending the g 20 summit out that. president nixon's to go to china was significant and it is a good example of how to keep secrets before something takes place. this is part of the lexicon, something that will reference unexpected and needing to have s
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2014 8:00pm EDT
. china and chinese leaders figure prominently in the manuscript sections i read. a main reason the manuscript has a many pages is that jeff, in tour de force job of research and writing, gives his readers long narratives with how the end of the cold war appeared to those nations. that greatly expands the breath of jeff's story and even his explanations of how american policymakers must act to -- must act. such an international perspective has become the fashion in the writing of diplomatic and international relations history for good reason. madebroad history has clear that the united states policymakers act in a world bound by different interests, which makes the american position in the world both clear in its distinctions and similarities to other powers both great and small. this internationalizing project has its strengths and the pages our spends the accounts on compelling. i also see a weakness in this approach. i think i am following a little bit of what andy card said. jeff almost never laid these parallel histories the u.s. policymaking. president bush's understanding of
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2015 8:00pm EDT
peace accords and the president's historic visit to china. this is just under two hours. >> good morning. i'm here to welcome you on behalf of the richard nixon foundation which co-sponsors these legacy forums with the national archives. it's a wonderful partnership. david is responsible for 12 billion documents, some of which is placed at the library, which is his facility. and we, in turn, have the people who created those documents. if you're old enough to remember warren beaty and the movie "shampoo," we've got the heads and he has the shampoo. since my experience on nixon's staff was on the domestic side we tend to favor topics that i knew. that didn't include foreign affairs but we've stumbled on to a brilliant and helpful counterpart of me that is my pleasure to introduce. that's kt mcfarland. you know kt as fox news analyst. everybody has to start somewhere and kathy troyas started as a clerk typist on the graveyard shift of national security council when she was a sophomore at the george washington university. >> actually, i was a freshman. >> see, my facts are wrong alr
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2015 3:38pm EDT
certain asian countries, particularly china and japan but also in the philippines. chinese migration is the first to be restricted by congress. congress passes the chinese exclusion act, first time congress deliberately prevents a particular group from emigrating to the united states. it is not until 1943 that the chinese are allowed to immigrate again. china is given a tiny quota of 100 immigration slots which is , insignificant, i think you will agree. it is really not until the 1960 that we begin to see the number of chinese who come to the u.s. >> whether or not the u.s. can learn from other countries or whether other countries learn from the u.s. about what we do with immigration, how would you respond? how would you respond? maria: i think we tend to view the american experience as exceptional. but i think we see echoes of the american experience and american policy in other parts of the world. i think now, there is greater discussion between nations on issues of immigration policy. i know certainly for the americas, every couple of years, representatives from the uni
CSPAN
Apr 5, 2015 8:01pm EDT
. victimization, the paris peace accords and relations with china. the national archives cohosted with the richard nixon foundation as part of the nixon legacy forum. it is almost two hours. >> good morning. i am here to welcome you on behalf of the nixon foundation. it is a wonderful partnership. david is responsible for 12 billion documents. some 43 million pages of wish he left at the nixon library in california. we have done over 30 of these. and i've helped produce of them. says my experience on nixon's staff was on the domestic side and that did not include foreign affairs. we stumbled upon a brilliant and helpful counterpart at it is my pleasure to introduce. that is kt mcfarland. you know kt as a fox analyst. everybody has to start somewhere. kathy troia started as a typist on the graveyard shift when she was a sophomore at george washington university. kt: i was a freshman. >> my facts are wrong. she grew in stature and importance under nixon. under president reagan, she was a contributing member of the national security council. she has kindly conceded to moderate. and in tha
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2014 12:02am EST
the fact that i did not tell them i was going to china. but at times you have to keep your counsel, and i felt that at the time, this was one of those times. right after the cabinet meeting, i asked henry to come in, and i told him of course. we had to inform foreign governments of course, that sort of thing. he supported the decision, he regretted it, but it was asking too much to ask me to be dishonored, as he would put it, to have me go to trial for six months. it was a tuesday afternoon. i said to general haig that i would resign, but it would be with dignity and no rancor. your exit will be as worthy as your opponents are unworthy, he said. and then i thought a minute and said, well al, i really screwed it up, didn't tie? -- didn't i? he did not have to answer. when i arrived in the room, i knew it was pretty tense. i can always tell with mrs. nixon, or the time with the fund -- nixon, remember the time with the fund, and she had this pain in her neck. when she saw me, she put on a great act. i guess it was an act. she got up and threw her arms around me. she said, we are all
CSPAN
Jul 19, 2015 8:30am EDT
-- 350,000 dead, about 100,000 civilians. china, 10 million dead, 6 million civilians. poland, 8 million dead, 6 million civilians and the great majority were jews. japan, one of our principal adversaries, 3 million dead, one million civilians st most japanes civilians kille no i the atomic attacks but in the firebombing raids. that began in late 1945 -- civilians. most japanese civilians were not killed in the atomic attacks but in the firebombing raids that began in 1945. the united states, not a trivial number but you put it on the scale with the numbers and you see the picture. on the civilian side in a war that globally claimed more civilian deaths than military, civilians killed whose deaths are attributable to enemy action in the 48 states that have a star on the flag, the continental united states or lower 48 bear cold today -- -- they are called today, six people. audley and off they dive together in the most improbable place of a forest of the mountainside -- oddly enough they died together in the most improbable place of a forest on the mountainside. the dead were a 26
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2015 8:00pm EST
events in her cousins defense. mary cannot indulge in the extravagance -- she selected find china. chargers were new colors named after european battles. she designated this with the seal of the u.s. on each piece. presidential china was nothing new. this is the very same pattern i saw that was selected by the first lady michelle obama the. what is remembered are not her taste or her pay judaism but that she ordered a second set at a cost of $1100. they insisted that it was not paid for by the district commissioner as is most charged. fueled rumors about the extravagance. he regaled his daughter with tales of mrs. lincoln's overspending. scandalous reports that mrs. lincoln. and lincoln himself. and the treasury department. newspapers full of allegations feel the controversy. beenirst lady may have compromising the ethics to which her husband subscribed. particularly frugality. there is no evidence to suggest that she participated in criminal conspiracy. what was actually investigated for bad financial practices. remove from office. naturally not only was this called a conspiracy,
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2016 9:07am EDT
it's true in china and russia and true in new york and true in arkansas. we have a growing inequality and if we can curb it -- and i think in california our tax -- 13% tax does that. the top 1%, famous top 1%, they pay 60% on the california income tax, 60%. and the income tax is half of our general fund revenue. that's fair. of course, it has the unintended consequence that it makes our tax system very volatile and virtually impossible to manage. between fairness and practicality falls the shadow. i would say we're doing a lot, not enough from a human and moral sense but we'll do more as the opportunity presents itself. >> governor last issue -- >> we can't let the governor go without asking if he's ever going to run for public office again. >> i'm 78, i'll be 80 when i finish, there's at least two more offices i can -- >> governor, before we wind down this confession, you've warned as a nation we're falling asleep on nuclear weapons. >> we are. i would venture to say that there aren't more than three people in this room, if that, who know the fire power of our nuclear arsenal that is
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2015 9:09pm EDT
, it is the only case of a bull i know who carries his china shop with him. but as witty as sir winston was, he also had that special attribute of great statesmen, the gift of vision. the willingness to see the future based on the experience of the past. it is this sense of history, this understanding of the past that i want to talk with you about today for it is in remembering what we share of the past that our two nations can make common cause for the future. we have not inherited an easy world. if developments like the industrial revolution which began here in england and the gifts of science and technology made life much easier for us, they have made it more dangerous. there are threats now to our freedom, indeed to our very existence that other generations could never even have imagined. there is first the threat of global war. no president, no congress, no prime minister, no parliament can spend a day entirely free of this threat. and i don't have to tell you that in today's world, the existence of nuclear weapons could mean if mott the extinction of man kind then surely t
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2014 12:00am EST
italy. he has served as a lecturer. in both germany and china. he has received service awards. fordld a three year foundation grant. he has served on the boards of several academic organizations. in 1975, he was elected to fight phi.i kappa that recognizes excellence in all academic disciplines. he served as western regional vice president for six years and as the 26th president from 2004 two 2007. he is described by his students as, and i quote, "a wise, wonderful and passionate professor". he has published many articles on poets. his recent book is entitled "poetry and the american presidency". it talks about from george washington to barack obama who red and wrote poetry. the book offers a unique look into men who occupied the white house. tonight's presentation is titled, "reading poetry in the white house, the surprising story of theater roosevelt -- theodore roosevelt." please extend a warm welcome to dr. paul for lazo. [applause] >> good evening. welcome. i want to begin by thanking those were arranged this evening. and also thinking the administration at fairhaven for their hosp
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2016 10:17am EDT
the hat when he served the president and mrs. reagan n the trip of 198420 to beijing, china, there was a very important state dinner given. and it was president reagan was its host for the premier. enit was one of the brand new american hotels. may have been the hyatt. it was called the great wall hotel. the reagans were hosting the dinner. they wanted to have an orchestra play american music for the chinese to show that there were western hosts. but the orchestra was all chinese and the conductor was chinese. and it turns out that the chinese only knew three songs. that was it. after they played threatt songs, they stopped. jim being partly in charge of all the arrangementes for the dinner knew this was not very good. so he went over to the conductor who spoke only chinese, jim did not speak chinese. it turns out that jim spoke a little german and the chinese conductor spoke a little german. they communicated somehow in german. jim communicated to them and said, look, i know you only know three songs. you need to plate three songs over and over again. so jim, welcome to the nixon
CSPAN
May 16, 2016 12:01am EDT
refer to an event in the 1950's where red china threatens taiwan and offshore islands. eisenhower stood firm against them and it said they will have to climb over the seventh fleet to do that. so listen to what ronald reagan said in 1967 about dwight eisenhower. [indiscernible] [indiscernible] communist will know that better than anybody else. gene: he was saying that they had to stand firmly against evil. that there was good and evil in the world and he was recalling a time in america when dwight eisenhower was at the home that america -- helm that america did stand firm against enemies. around this time, eisenhower encourages ronald reagan to run for president. there is a memo of conversation where he encouraged ronald reagan to run as california's favorite son. he did have plans to run all along. but at the gop convention in 1968, if ronald reagan was planning on it, he may become the nominee. and that encouragement can be traced to eisenhower. reagan said, i suddenly see what president eisenhower said, perhaps one of our greatest mistakes in vietnam was assuring the enemy in a
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2016 10:30am EST
far as you know, are the different in china from the war at that time? hear froml also general maxwell taylor and dean rusk. for the complete american history tv we can schedule, go to www.c-span.org. >> the reality is, the best president, the greatest presidents, have been willing to recognize the smartest person in the room. and to surround themselves with people they felt were smarter than themselves. >> tonight on q&a, former secretary of defense, robert gates, discusses his book "a passion for leadership, lessons on change and reform from 50 years of public service." he has served under several presidents, including george w. bush and barack obama. >> when i was director of central intelligence, i came to believe very strongly that the american people had given cia a pass on a lot of things because of i believe that after the end of the cold war, we would have to be more open. about what we did and how we did and to another extent, why we did it to help the american people but understand why intelligence was important to the government and why presidents valued it. >> toni
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 5:00pm EDT
change with the muslim brotherhood now in charge of egypt china rising, north korea isolated and starving, a ran on the brink of owning a nuclear weapon, or rack -- iran on the brink of owning a nuclear weapon, iraq, syria, afghanistan suffering from the results of political unrest. the truth is there is no finer group of young men and women prepared to deal with these issues. you have learned the value of hard work, character integrity teamwork, cooperation. you are well read, extremely bright. you are among the most patriotic group of young americans i have ever met. in closing i want to personally thank each of you for your faith in god, your patriotism, love of our country. thank you for your willingness to lead and defend our nation. thank you for recognizing that despite our failings and shortcomings in this country america is without doubt the greatest good the world has ever seen. the peace we seek, the security we need, the freedoms we cherish simply would not exist without the collective efforts of all of us. never forget the events of september 11 2001. support the tro
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2015 8:00pm EST
trade agreements, including getting china a nuclear nonproliferation treaty for the world, across a broad spectrum, he saw building on that interdependence as a priority, and he also saw, the last thing i'm going to say, the dangers of globalization. what he would call the dark side of globalization. all of those forces that enabled good things to happen also enabled bad things to happen. the same computer that allowed some scientists in russia to help map the human genome also could help them hack into a power system in the united states and close it down. so we also begin the process of trying to protect our critical infrastructure, deal with terrorism, and i think that is the wedge into which president clinton begins his presidency and way before 9/11, it seems that was a frame. -- that was the frame. >> i was thinking about the layering and the work that was going on, for example, while you are doing the work on nuclear weapons, you had nato enlargement, and the freedom support acts. i was on the hill at that time see you had a norma's amounts of money being generated on the pub
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2014 12:00pm EDT
what i was doing today for all the tea in china because it has gotten their he political. -- gottenten very very political. it has gotten very at this arial, particularly in florida. every time there is an election ,- very adversarial particularly in florida. perfect never have a election if there are humans involved because there are going to be mistakes made. there are going to be things that happen. but i give them all a lot of credit. so, go home and hug your supervisor of elections. thank you. [applause] >> i don't know if we have time for questions. joe? ? nope. all right, in bush versus gore and other election cases, there is a trend for judges to rule in accordance with their political philosophy. please comment on what this implies for judicial ethics. i am going to answer that one, everybody. let me say this to you. people do not ascend to the bench at any level within like mind. it just doesn't happen. from the day you are born, all your activities in society, in school, with your friends, former philosophy that you have as to literally everything in life, and
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2015 1:31pm EDT
the united states is being increasingly challenged, especially in asia by china, and china is developing a powerful capability to fight in the seas, so in many ways, you are seeing a replay of earlier naval rivalries, like what happened between britain and germany, or as i was talking about, britain and the united states, and i do not think the american public -- i think we take for granted our position in the world. i think the world is getting increasingly more dangerous, and i think we need to be spending more on the navy. i know that sounds like coming from some he works for the navy, but i think we should have a greater appreciation. [applause] john maurer: over here, please. what in your discussion in the rivalry with the united states and england, you did not have time to talk about the 5531 ratio, and i would like to know how that affected the united states and great britain. john maurer: yes, in 1921 in 1922 -- in 1921, president harden called a conference which became known as the washington conference, from november 1921 into february 1922 to try to settle these dif
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2016 11:45am EST
watching china and spain and watching europe. was said before, i think he out to shift public opinion because he figured he was going to have to lead a nation to war probably. but the exact date, i don't know. and the second question, i'm just ducking. >> ok. view theid the soviets patient between roosevelt and hitler? they ended up doing the heavy lifting in world war ii. what lessons did they take away from what they said? prof. bytwerk: i don't know. again, it's something i simply don't know enough to comment intelligently on. >> professor, thank you for this fascinating talk. since you are an expert on the german press during this time , and the german propaganda organ, have you ever been consulted by filmmakers in germany? has anybody ever put together a film focusing on just that, the propaganda effort as opposed to the military effort and its effect on civilians, which is what they normally do? prof. bytwerk: there's a bunch of it out there. the germans have done a variety of documentaries. the canadian broadcasting corporation did a multipart series on propaganda during the pe
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2014 10:00am EDT
foreign affairs, where he had a vision with china and the soviet union, it was historic. as we go through time, when we are all gone, as bush says, history, we will not know. we will all be dead. [laughter] [applause] note, let very happy me thank bob woodward and ben bradley. thank you. thank you for coming tonight. thank you very much. you are watching american history tv, all weekend, every weekend on c-span3. to join the conversation, like us on facebook at c-span history. the
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2016 8:00pm EDT
provide vital context for understanding nixon's opening of china. the rest is unsurprising, relations between china and the soviet union in the early 1970's were dismal. what is impressive is the intensity and frequency with which that point is made. in the pdb's of the 1969 and 1970, the cleavage between the soviet union and china is not a defining feature of world politics. if that has important implications, right alongside the pdb's, neck since engagement with beijing may be less original than many historians render it. opening may bea more a response to changes that were already underway in the international system than a revolutionary innovation that created new realities and changed the course of the cold war. in this case, then, the pdb's may dampen the luster of nixon's accomplishments, but in other cases they chasten and refrain his critics. here laos and cambodia are suggested cases. they are routinely described as neutral states into which richard nixon expanded the vietnam war. such assessments of pdb's suggest risk distorting the landscape of choice as decisio
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2015 3:42pm EDT
in china. he would be in prague. he would be in places where people did not speak english but they knew so much about him and loved his music. it amazed him, how his reach was so far, so deep to people who did not even speak english. it amazed him. especially being where he came from. i think sometimes he wrestled with trying to understand that. it was baffling to him. how could a poor young boy from south carolina come into such -- such grace, such favor from god to be able to make this music? never went to school. never finished high school. never went to college. never went to a music school. it just came to him. he always wanted to be for the common man somebody who would go and work those 1314 hrs -- 13 14 hours a day for the family and with still do it every day. he wanted to speak for the common man because he was in that position when my grandfather had to walk from south carolina to augustineaugusta for a little bit of work and a little bit of money, but for a whole lot of time spent. he always talked with the president, linda johnson, opportunity for young african-america
CSPAN
Apr 19, 2015 4:32pm EDT
, on nixon's opening of relations with china. she has written on the uses and abuses of history. most of all, she's known for her two wonderful volumes on world war i. the first that she wrote about a dozen years ago was on peacemaking in 1919. the other just appeared last year and is about the origins of world war i, the war that ended peace. that's the name of the book. the former book, the one that in some ways will be the framework for today's lecture, i suspect one a half dozen of the english-speaking world's most prestigious prizes for the best book on international relations. i'm incredibly happy to have margaret macmillan here with us. she's going to talk for 40 or 45 minutes about wilson in war and peace, then i will engage her in a conversation for 10 or 15 minutes, and then i will open it up for questions. thank you. [applause] margaret: i would like to thank you for that og 5:00 p.m. kind introduction. i should warn you about that joke about mrs. wilson. [indiscernible] i would like to think the miller center for inviting me. it's a great pleasure to be here. i'm ashamed t
CSPAN
Jun 27, 2016 12:01am EDT
. he had the benefit of foreign travel with the reagans and assisted in negotiating trips to china, japan, korea, france, england, and germany. he was very privileged to be at the very historic bilateral meeting between reagan and gorbachev, the account of which in this book alone is worth the read. i encourage you to read it. i will also observe that jim is very insightful regarding the president's communicating skills. jim is going to have to wait for my book for another view. in this book, there's an excerpt that many of the best speeches of president reagan, an element of research that is very valuable to reagan scholarship. jim was there, working with mrs. reagan, when she did the "just say no" drug campaign. it was not in the oval office, but the west hall of the white house. i also did a little personal research into jim that he is not aware of yet. i have my own sources in the white house. i did find out that jim was asked to do a lot of things, impossible things from time to time, he was asked to pull a lot of rabbits out of the hat when he served the president and mrs. re
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2016 5:03pm EDT
the u.s. and china in particular on the south china sea and the ccp. between the two candidates, mr. trump and secretary clinton, what are the differences that you see and the ttp has not been discussed. is there a reason why? would the ttp be the answer for our u.s. leadership in the global arena and supposed to bring us more jobs for americans and supposed to level the plainfields for workers. it does not seem to be we are given accurate information to our democrats. i have talked to many delegates and i don't think they are adequate of understanding. thank you. >> another question. >> right here in the blue dress in the front. >> down here. >> thanks very much for coming. as someone that's not apart of this world. this is really exciting to see everyone in real live instead of "meet the press." trying to spread the good word of secretary clinton. i am from arizona so i have met people who are trump voters, is trying to convince them of this threat that poses. lets pretend in november that he's elected, what can we expect and what will be our strategy moving forward after that. ho
CSPAN
May 10, 2015 2:00am EDT
americans were part of only two of them. china is writing the rules while we are being left behind. that is why trade promotion authority is so important. it is the key to restarting the trade engine. here is how it works, congress sets 150 objectives that our negotiators have to advance. fair rules both sides have to follow, everything from food safety to labor standards and trading on the internet. if these objectives aren't met the deal is off. if they are met, then the agreements published in full for 60 days so the american people can weigh in, and only then will congress vote to approve it or reject it. this gives our negotiating partners the confidence that the concessions that they make will not be endlessly altered once the agreement gets to congress. it will either be voted up or voted down. that ensures negotiators will bring back the very best from our trading partners without holding anything back. we negotiated trade agreements since the 1930's. very much like this since the 1970's. in some quarters it has become controversial. some opposing because of the pressure from spe
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2014 5:05pm EDT
with his diplomatic openings to the country's leading enemies, china and the soviet union and the acquiescence to a wide range of environmental, feminist, civil rights, and other domestic reforms. by reducing draft calls and eliminating the draft, nixon took much of the wind out of the campus-based antiwar movement. at the same time, he courted wallace's support by honoring their cultural fears and concerns. if you think of the people in the 90's and city election who felt left out by the choice between nixon and humphrey weather on the left or right, nixon and the democratic congress spent much of the first term reaching out and bringing them back and giving them a sense that the process of government and politics could work for them. on capitol hill and congressional democrats push nixon leftward it on policies and became a vehicle of which opponents of the war in vietnam could advance their cause. the democratic and republican parties opened up the presidential process so most those who feel shut out in 1968. america holding together, not america coming apart is my theme in thi
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2014 9:40am EDT
openings to the country's leading enemies, china and the soviet union, as well as with to a wide range of environmental, feminist, civil rights, and other domestic reforms, or reducing draft calls and then eliminating the draft, nixon took much of the wind out of the campus-based antiwar movement. at the same time, he courted wallace supporters by pandering to their cultural fears and concern. whoou think of the people in the 1968 election felt left theyy nixon or humphrey spent most of the first term giving them a sense that the process of government and .olitics could work for them on capitol hill, congressional leftwardspushed nixon on policies and became a vehicle of which opponents of the war in vietnam could advance their cause. the democratic and republican parties "jew process so most of -- opened up the presidential nominating process so most of those who felt shut out in 1968 felt emboldened to pursue their goals through the two-party system. it is for those reasons that america holding together, not america coming apart, is my theme in this book. the resilience of a po
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2014 12:00am EDT
, china and the soviet union, as well as with his acquiescence to a wide range feminist,mental, civil rights and other domestic reforms. by reducing draft calls and then eliminating the draft, nixon took much of the wind out of the campus-based antiwar movement. at the same time, nixon courted wallace's supporters by alternately honoring and pandering to their cultural fears and concern. if you think of the people who, in the 1960 election, felt left out by the choice between nixon and humphrey, whether on the left or the right, next in and the democratic congress spent much of nixon's first term reaching out and bringing them the senseiving them that the process of government and politics could work for them. on capitol hill, congressional democrats push nixon left on domestic policy and became a vehicle to which opponents of the war in vietnam could advance their cause. opened up the presidential nominating process so that most of those who felt shut out in 1968 felt emboldened to pursue their goals through the two-party system. it is for these reasons that america holding together,
CSPAN
Apr 23, 2016 2:05pm EDT
idea was maybe new at the time, but the boxers in china would also be anointed with special oils in 1900, during the boxer rebellion. and they too would be blessed by a priest in the shell and monasteries that they cannot be killed by foreign bullets, they would be impervious, which was not the case. and certainly wasn't the case with a prophet and his warriors. when tecumseh formed the federation, he had around 500 to 700 warriors, while the united states army had more than 1000 men. they were stationed at the area west of profits town at tippecanoe. heavy casualties led the shawnee to retreat to their home base at profits town. they had retreated. there were heavy casualties on both sides. what profits town would've looked like with log homes. what they called log houses for meetings. the curse. the shawnee fled from profits town. as the american army under harrison had invaded. in, hegeneral came burned the village, he confiscated all of their winter food and destroyed it all. and desecrated the remains of native americans in a local cemetery. dug up bodies and literally desecrat
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2015 11:45am EST
. presidential china was nothing new. this was the very same pattern i saw that was selected by first lady michelle obama at the inauguration luncheon for her husband in january 2009. what is remembered as neither mrs. lincoln's taste nor patriotism, but that she ordered a second set at a cost of $1100 emblazoned with her own initials. grimsley insisted this was not paid for by the district commissioner, as was most unkindly charged. lincoln's rival, the secretary of treasury, fueled rumors about mary's extravagance and i natural irregularities. he regaled his daughter with tales of mrs. lincoln's avarice, her overspending, scandalous reports about mrs. lincoln, and lincoln himself emanated from the treasury department. newspapers full of allegations fueled the controversy, and gossip had a field day. the first lady may have been compromising the ethics to which her husband subscribed, particularly frugality, but this no evidence to suggest she participated in any criminal looks -- criminal conspiracy. would was investigated for bad financial practices, removed from office. naturally,
CSPAN
Feb 15, 2015 4:35pm EST
decision to help save mexico when 85% of the public, 85% of the public were against it. china wto access and, the way he managed in the asian financial crisis. what people saw was courageous decisions that were unpopular but they did create a degree of confidence. to go to this overall philosophy, the values as talked about, work and responsibility, but also a general sense that a president could be progressive in his investments progressive in seeking to make sure the benefits are shared by the middle class, by the hard-working, low income families. that you could do that in a way in which you saw to shape markets, not stop markets. the fact that one of the great things with the internet giants at the time was, provide the president left the internet -- the development of the internet, the fact that in crate -- in trade he moved toward trying to have more labor standards. it was an understanding that you could be both pro-growth and progressive. that you to be reasonable and realistic about market and have they -- and how they develop. i think this defines him and i think you wou
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)