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20090604
20171214
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 30
DATE
2011 21
2012 17
2010 7
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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
WHUT
Mar 20, 2011 6:00pm EDT
going on inside china for the last 30 years? >> fundamental changes. absolutely. the country is virtually unrecognizable today compared to what it was 30 years ago. i was there 30 years ago. >> i know. you were born there, weren't you? >> i was born there, world war ii, lived there with the communist revolution, and i went back three times during the cultural revolution. i was part of the negotiating team when we negotiated diplomatic relations. i've seen china in lots of different forms. >> it seems that when we were focused in afghanistan and iraq, china went from, say, zero to 60 in the last 10 years, especially economically. >> 10 years ago, china realized it was rising so rapidly that it was undoubtedly going to cause concern amongst its neighbors. it adopted a policy of alleviating concerns in the region -- soft diplomacy, very effective. it formed a strategic partnership with the association of southeast asian nations, negotiated a code of conduct for the south china sea. it has been undoing some of the benefits, because the results of the financial crisis has given china
WHUT
Apr 24, 2011 6:00pm EDT
china. kissinger was shocked to discover the chinese were not communist in their behavior. he dealt with the soviet union and he found the chinese were very chinese. after working for him for five years, i did a book on chinese negotiating behavior because was quite distinctive. >> you have a whole other culture at work. >> from the point of view of the institute of peace, negotiating is a major tool for managing conflict. our objective is to strengthen the ability of our officials to negotiate effectively. one of the things we discovered is that the state department, the foreign service institute, does not do explicit training in negotiating skills. they look to our foreign service officers to basically learn on the job. the foreign service is small. our diplomats are overburdened. they're working triple time, so they are expected to learn the skills on the job. >> i have a friend involved in conflict resolution. that is a skill and unto itself. >> mediation is another dimension to this. we have produced a whole range of books, not just china but north korea, russia, france, germany. we
WHUT
Oct 30, 2011 6:00pm EDT
migrants came from china and india and they did not bring their wives. so nobody cooked for them. some genius said the opportunity and fashioned a cart with a stall and they planted themselves all over singapore they were already doing street food vendors in the '60s and '70s. somebody out there said let's get rid of them. another genius said we cannot do that. if we do that, what are they going to eat? they have become an institution that said singapore over the years. so there we have it. this is one of the larger ones. it houses 200 tiny little stalls. today, there are 110 all over singapore. each one specializes in one dish. some sell a particular cuisine, something the family came up with that has become iconic. so naturally, this being chinatown, folks are selling chinese food, but you can find indian food and western food. >> cheap. >> convenient, iconic. there -- i think street food -- i did not bring it here. if we could superimpose the food guide here, there's about 150 different street food dishes from staples to snacks to seafood and meat. >> how about the food scene in sin
WHUT
Dec 19, 2010 6:00pm EST
last decade or so. china, at the same time, made dramatic moves in so many different areas. how do you see china right now, vis-a-vis the united states? >> is a major question. i happen to believe and have for deed time that china is in t a rising superpower. china has become the other superpower in many ways. and we should recognize this. you mentioned it to the global village. hopefully, the fact that we are increasingly interdependent economically, financially particularly -- this will lead to a degree of cooperation between the united states and china. in other words, if we suffer too much here, the chinese will not necessarily benefit but they may actually suffer as well because we are being increasingly interlinked with our economies. right now in europe, there is a renewed fear in ireland and other countries. there is no reason for americans to gloat about this. if a country in europe is having financial problems, they are going to decrease their imports from the united states. the whole global village is creating interdependent, which in some ways can be very helpful. they
WHUT
Jan 8, 2012 10:00am EST
currently going on. >> where would china, russia, turkey, the arab world, fit into the picture as we take a look at iran? i know i have thrown everything that you there. >> many of the arab countries, saudi arabia in particular, are very concerned that if the united states were to negotiate with the iranians and find a strategic relationship, this would come at the expense of both saudi arabia and israel. there is not a lot of regional enthusiasm. >> everybody has their own agenda. >> everyone has their own agenda. these people don't all favor war, but the status quo is attractive. russia and china i would argue are the two biggest benefactors because we have sanctioned ourselves out of the influence. no one trades with iran. the two countries that have replaced are china and russia. this goes back to 1995 when the u.s. was imposing the largest sanctions at that time. 15 or 16 years later, it has become quite true. did they put the screws to iran? >> i would say the turks have, based on their own interest, they are a rising power and their economy is doing well. they have ambitions o
WETA
Sep 2, 2012 10:00am EDT
door is arrested to the north, the biggest thing on earth, and china to the east. you've got those two big ones. but within their, you got kazakhstan and around the edges you got kurdistan, whose pakistan -- uzbekistan and tajikistan and turkmentstan did essentially is a very then you move to afghanistan, pakistan, and from there on down to the subcontinent. >> for the folks at home as well -- but also to help my education -- when all of these countries were named stan, but that part has a reference? >> it is literally country. just like stana is literally capital in kazakh. >> this is the 20 the anniversary of independence, and it is amazing that the culture has gone back 1000 years and then you jump forward and you say 50 years ago, part of the soviet union, and now 20 years ago, independence. how did you see the future of kazakhstan? >> kazakhstan is still writing its own future. nobody can predict where it is going. they made commitments -- last year you may know they were the head of the organization of security and cooperation in europe, and they made a long- term vision for a co
WHUT
Feb 26, 2012 10:00am EST
. >> what do you think that china wants? >> status. influence. the reassertion of what it views as its normal historical role. this is a country that has been a state for 6000 years, with occasional breakdowns. it sees itself as a central power in the world. the question and the challenge for us is how to make them compatible with our very important role in the world. we can sustain its. that is the challenge that both of us face. quite frankly, i have to say that to some extent, both of day and we are delinquent in doing that. we have let ourselves slide into an increasing, acrimonious kind of exchange, which runs the risk of something very bad. >> they need a strong america, do they not? it serves their interests? >> it does. think what would happen if they decided to pull out all the dollars they had invested. >> absolutely. so, we have a mission. kind of summarizing mission with strategic vision, putting those in parallel, what are the next steps? what has to be done? >> in a consistent fashion, trying to draw turkey and russia into the west. turkey is doing it, russia is doing
WHUT
Dec 5, 2010 9:00am EST
second fastest-growing behind china? >> yes. >> not behind the united states? >> that would be a bad place to be right now. [laughter] >> let me say, how many billion people? >> 1.1 billion people. >> how many people? >> now we go to the other extreme. 36,000. >> 36,000 in liechtenstein. tell us a couple of facts about liechtenstein we should know. >> you should know that we are more than banks. contrary to everybody's believe, 40% of our gdp is generated by manufacturing industry, and only 29% or 30% by financial services. another fact one should know is that on a per-capita basis, and that is the only way in which i can impress -- on a per-capita basis, we are one of the most if not the most highly industrialized countries. >> bordered by what countries? >> bordered by switzerland and austria. and the size of washington, d.c. >> ok, good. singapore, city state. what does that mean? >> singapore is a city state. new york city is a state. imagine is a country. it raises an army, such a foreign service, educate people, run a government, a cabinet, but i think people should know that s
WETA
May 27, 2012 10:00am EDT
problems and he has not been able to continue that. >> what do you think china wants? >> status, influence. a reassertion of what it views as its normal historical role. this is a country that has been a state for 6000 years with occasional breakdowns, but still, continuity. it sees itself as a central power in the world. the challenge for us is how to make that compatible with our very important preponderant role in the world, assuming we can sustain it by domestic changes as well. that is the challenge we both face. i have to say, quite frankly, that to some extent, both they and we are delinquent in doing that in the sense that we are letting ourselves, both of us, slide into increasing -- kind of acrimonious exchanges, which run the risk of demonizing each other. that would be very bad. >> they need a strong america, don't they? it serves their interests. >> and we need a strong and healthy china. it serves our interests. think what would happen if they decided to pull out of the dollars they have invested. >> absolutely. we have a mission. kind of summing up our mission wit
WHUT
Aug 21, 2011 9:00am EDT
? >> classic central asia would anubegistan. bigges you can include afghanistan in that group. china is also very close to central asia. >> does the word "stan" mean something? >> it means where the rulers sets, headquarters, if you like. >> how about kazhak? >> one legend says that it drew from a white swan. the other theory is that it was a freedom-like person. >> they were a nomadic people long ago, a pastoral people? >> yes. we hail from one of the early walks of life for the human race. our ancestors go back to syrian tribes. sometimes they're called saka tribes. then there were the huns. you remember attila the hun. >> yes. then there were ancient turks and on and on and on. >> if you put all of the kazaks together, is very national characteristic? >> many. one which will it be immediately jumped out is hospitality. peacefulness. friendliness. >> a few years ago, there was a film, a borat film, that made fun of kazakhstan. did that hurt? >> i do not think it was a mocking kazakhstan. it was mocking other countries. he is a very smart businessman. we do not have any complaints abou
WETA
Jun 19, 2011 10:00am EDT
historic plea and ethnically western parts of china were also very close to central asia. >> there are a lot of stanz floating around here. >> it is an ancient persian road which means a place where the ruler sits. basically, it is a headquarters. >> that is the stan part of it. what about kazak? >> they are a legendary people that like to surround themselves with legends. some say that kazak is translated to a freedom-like person. >> long ago, they were a nomadic people? " yes, we were an ancient nomadic people. we hail from one of the early parts of the human race. our ancestors go back to ancient tribes. then theree were the huns. he is our proud and sister, atilla the hun. >> if you put all of the kazaks together, is there and natural characteristic that would jump out as to the kind of people -- >> many. one of them which will immediately jump out is hospitality. peacefulness. friendliness. >> a few years ago, there was a film, "borat," that made fun of kazakhstan. did that hurt on a personal or professional level? >> i think it was not mocking kazakhstan. it was mocking some
WHUT
Mar 6, 2011 9:00am EST
other people taking responsibility for what has happened. >> who you think china can dominate without its political revolution? >> inside 20 or 30 years, china will dominate economically. the muslim world could have dominated demographically because of the very high rates associated with radical islam. it is becoming a trend in that region. >> we will live in a different world dominated by china, india, and success to some extent by muslims as well. >> that is all for this week. from all of us, goodbye. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc newsnight" was presented by kcet, los
WETA
Nov 21, 2010 10:00am EST
them got $120 and now they live in a penthouse on central park west? the chans, from china, entrepreneurs and business people. >> all kinds of things. one of the things that is key about modern immigration, particularly amongst asians, many of them are doing business with their home country. when my father left the soviet union he was out of touch with his sister for 50 years. today i met a student from brazil. her brother married a brazilian woman. the bride's family could not get visas to come to the wedding. my students took a digital camera and a laptop to the wedding, took photographs, posted them on the internet, and the bride's family was watching a real time slide show of the wedding. these kinds of connections, these communications -- teh chan family left china in terror. hated communism. coming to america, setting up shop as a small-time accountant. one thing leads to another and when china starts to open up commercial ties to the west, he has a friend of a friend of a friend that wants to sell fireworks in america. one thing leads to another, in one generation ag
WHUT
May 20, 2012 6:00pm EDT
dependent on. you have new partners, political and economic. china is in there big time. iran, india. >> in the case of china, there is development in terms of trade. less interest in investment. in the case of iran, and there are limited -- only a very few countries. they, looking everywhere. 15 free trade agreements on the last decade. >> thank god we came on. gary >> important for bilateral -- >> is very important for bilateral relations. >> you have been out there making friends and forging partnerships. the relationship between the u.s. and colombia is long lasting and very important. >> very close. not only regional interests. colombia is part of the un security council, voting in working with the u.s. in very difficult, critical issues, such as syria, iran. and working hand-in-hand to promote democracy. we support the efforts in the u.s. afghanistan. we are quite involved. for me, it is -- support the efforts of the u.s. in afghanistan. for me, it it is very refreshing. years ago, it was drug. we want to diversify our agenda. now we talk about energy development, global politi
WETA
Aug 5, 2012 10:00am EDT
southeast asia, secondly, we are completely connected to the world. china, india, the developed countries. thirdly, we're working hard to stay abreast of the changes around us and to improve the lives of our people. >> we were here 11 years ago, it has turned out to be such a dynamic city state. >> the whole region has moved and we have tried to keep abreast of the developments around us. the development is there because there is a dime and this is an opening up from india and china. -- because there is dynamic energy opening up from india and china. we are investing in our people, investing in our city and infrastructure, educating our people, living in projects -- living -- bringing in projects, bringing in jobs. we have a good quality of life. >> you mentioned the people here, your ambassador is fond of saying that the people here is that the people of the natural resources. >> that is the only thing we have. location is important really, we depend on our people to create our wealth and our future. we have no gold, no oil, no timber. >> is that the reason that there is a heav
WHUT
Mar 27, 2011 9:00am EDT
up of china. he was shocked to learn that the chinese or non-communist in their behavior. he found that the chinese were very chinese. after working with him for five years, i did a book on chinese negotiating behavior because it was quite distinctive. >> sure. you have a whole other culture at work. >> negotiating is a major tool for managing conflict. our objective is to strengthen the ability of of our officials to negotiate affectively. one of the things we discovered in our work is the state department, the foreign service institute, does not do it as a training and negotiating skills. they look to our foreign service officers to basically learn on the job. based on our experience -- the foreign service is small. our diplomats are working in triple time. so they are expected to learn these skills on the job. >> i have a friend of mine who is involved in conflict resolution and that is a skilled unto itself, is it not? >> that is a whole dimension of this. we produced a whole range of books. china, korea, russia, france, germany. we recently produced one on iran. we picked up o
WETA
Oct 9, 2011 10:00am EDT
the very vibrant region in southeast asia. secondly, we are completely connected to the world, china, india, america, the developed countries. thirdly, we're working hard to stay abreast of the changes around us and improve the lives of our people. >> we were here 11 years ago. it has turned out to be set a dynamic city state. >> the whole region has moved, and we have tried to keep abreast of the developments around us. the momentum is there because there is a dynamism from china and india opening up. southeast asia is not doing too badly, and in singapore we have tried hard to work together cohesive league, and to do things that will put us in good stead for the long term, investing in our people and city and infrastructure, educating our people, bringing in projects and jobs so that we do not just have a high gdp, but a good quality of life. >> you mentioned the people here, and ambassador chan back in washington is fond of saying the people here are the natural resources. do you agree? it is only thing we have. location is important for us. really we depend on our people to creat
WETA
Nov 6, 2011 10:00am EST
have russia to the north and china to the east. but within their, you have kazakhstan and around the edges coming of kurdistan, is pakistan, tajikistan and turkmenistan. those are the five countries that make up what geographers' referred to as central asia. move down just below the menu are down into afghanistan, pakistan and from there on down into the subcontinent. >> for the folks at home, but also to help my education, when all of these countries were named stand, does that have a reference? >> stan is literally country. >> heading toward the finish line, this is the 20th anniversary of the independence -- and it is amazing to think that culture goes back thousands of years. then jim ford and 50 years ago, part of the soviet union. -- then jump forward and 50 years ago, part of the soviet union. how do you see the future of kazakhstan? >> it is very much a place writing its own future. they made commitments, last year, they were the head of the organization of security and cooperation in europe. they made a long-term vision for a country that is very much a western country in th
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)