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BBC News
Apr 22, 2017 12:30am BST
the current spending on foreign aid. those are the latest headlines. let's get some more news from the election campaign. the chancellor philip hammond says he would prefer the government to have more flexibility on taxes. speaking to the bbc, he hinted that he would like to change the conservatives' 2050 manifesto promise not to raise income tax, vat or national insurance. —— 2015. it was the solemn pledge, tweeted to the voter by david cameron before the election of 2015 —no increases in tax, vat or national insurance. will it be repeated before this election? today, the chancellor, visiting washington for a meeting of leading industrialised nations, hinted maybe not. i came into politics not to see taxes rising but to see the burden of taxation falling as our economy grows and that remains my very clear political ambition. but you do not support specific tax pledges, not to raise income tax, national insurance and vat, because it would tie your hands. all chancellors would prefer to have more flexibility in how they manage the economy and how they manage the overall tax bu
BBC News
Apr 22, 2017 12:00am BST
welcome to bbc news. i'm ben bland. the man who shot dead 3 welcome to bbc news. i'm ben bland. the man who shot dead a policeman in paris on thursday is said to have four previous convictions. officials have given details of his time in prison. translation: during his imprisonment of a0 years he didn't show any signs of radicalisation. —— 14 show any signs of radicalisation. —— ia years. security forces mobilise ahead of the french elections. the pm says everything will do to make sure the elections go smoothly. us troops target and kill leading member of the so—called islamic state group in syria. as theresa may campaigns for the upcoming election in the uk, there are suggestions of a possible softening of the government's thomas not to raise taxes. last week harry styles went to number one with this debut single! can he do it again? and the royal couple on the radio as they visit the bbc to talk about at all health and play some charttopping music. —— mental health. campaigning in france has ended ahead of the first round of voting in the presidential election. the
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 11:30pm BST
hello. this is bbc news, with martine croxall. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. the prime minister declines to say whether she will continue with the tories‘ policy of pension increases, while the chancellor, philip hammond, hints the economy and how they manage the overall tax burden down, rather than having to have their hands constrained. as france goes to the polls for the first round of voting, prosecutors say the gunman who shot dead a policeman in paris was a convicted criminal. a report into the deaths of three soldiers during an sas exercise in the brecon beacons has concluded it could happen again. hello and welcome to our look ahead i bringing us tomorrow. record, and the barrister and broadcaster sophia cannon. tomorrow's front pages. thank you for staying for a second review, which is an unusual retreat! the financial times says there's alarm within downing street as the chancellor hints that he wants to scrap the 2015 conservative pledge of not raising taxes. the mirror also leads with the chancellor's comments. it suggests mr hammond
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 11:00pm BST
this is bbc news. the headlines at 11pm: the prime minister declines to say whether she will continue with the tories‘ policy of pension increases, while the chancellor, philip hammond, hints that the conservatives may leave open the possibility of tax rises. all chancellors would prefer to have more flexibility in how they manage the economy and how they manage the overall tax burden down than having to have their hands constrained. as france goes to the polls for the first round of voting, prosecutors say the gunman who shot dead a policeman in paris was a convicted criminal. a report into the deaths of three soldiers during an sas exercise in the brecon beacons has concluded it could happen again. and at 11:30pm we'll take a second look at tomorrow's papers, including: the times says trump is not preferencing britain. good evening and welcome to bbc news. on day three of the election campaign trail the prime minister and the chancellor have given theirfirst hints about the conservative manifesto. theresa may says she'll keep the current spending on foreign aid, despite p
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 10:45pm BST
levels. this is bbc news. the headlines at 11pm: the prime minister declines to say whether she will continue with the tories' policy of pension increases, while the chancellor, philip hammond, hints that the conservatives may leave open the possibility of tax rises. all chancellors would prefer to have more flexibility in how they manage the economy and how they manage the overall tax burden down than having to have their hands constrained. as france goes to the polls for the first round of voting, prosecutors say the gunman who shot dead a policeman in paris was a convicted criminal. a report into the deaths of three soldiers during an sas exercise in the brecon beacons has concluded it could happen again. and at 11:30pm we'll take a second look at
PBS
Apr 21, 2017 2:30pm PDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation, newman's own foundation, giving all profits from newman's own to charity and pursuing the common good, kovler foundation, pursuing solutions for america's neglected needs, and aruba tourism authority. >> planning a vacation escape that is relaxing, inviting, and exciting is a lot easier than you think. you can find it here in aruba. families, couples, and friends can all find their escape on the island with warm, sunny days, cooling trade winds, and the crystal blue caribbean sea. nonstop flights are available from most major airports. more information for your vacation planning is available at aruba.com. >> and now, "bbc world news." tim: this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington, i am tim willcox. no to the authorities and already convicted of attempted murder, how did karim cheurfi slip through the net to kill in paris? forced into hiding, gay men in chechnya escaping persecution and torture. ♪ tim: and one room, 2 grammys. we meet the british multi-
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 10:00pm BST
think they know how this ends, but there are 48 days to go. john pienaar, bbc news. the chancellor philip hammond has said he would prefer the government to have more ‘flexibility‘ on taxes. speaking to the bbc, he hinted that he would to see amended the conservative‘s 2015 manifesto promise not to raise income tax , vat or national insurance. he was talking to our economics editor kamal ahmed in washington. it was the solemn pledge treated to the voter by david cameron before the voter by david cameron before the election of 2015. no increases in tax, vat or national insurance. will it be repeated before this election? today the chancellor visiting washington for a meeting of leading industrialised nations hinted maybe not. i came into politics not to see taxes rising, but to see the burden of taxation falling as our economy grows, and that remains my very clear political ambition. but you do not support a specific tax pledges not to raise income tax, national insurance and vat, because it would tie your hands. all chancellors would prefer to have more flexibility in how the
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 9:30pm BST
. now it is time for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch. they are off again as bbc news embarks on covering another general election campaign, how much attention should be given to the views of people like brenda from bristol? not another one. oh, for god's sake! i can't stand this. and correspondentjohn sudworth on the challenges of reporting from north korea, surrounded by government minders. my myjob is to work out how far i can push being a nuisance and an annoyance without getting me or my tea m annoyance without getting me or my team into difficulty. tuesday morning saw one of those moments when, after an hour of speculative gossip, almost everyone here in the niche broadcasting house , the newsroom here at. listened to an announcement, takes a deep breath and embarks on a period of frenzied, journalistic activity which, in this case, could last for seven weeks here is the bombshell. i have just chaired a meeting of the cabinet, where we agreed that the government should call a general election, to be held on the 8th ofjune. all day, reporters and presenters flocked to dow
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 9:00pm BST
this is bbc world news today. the headlines from... the man who shot dead a policeman in paris on thursday, carrying shoes he had for the these convictions. officials have given details of his time in prison. melo during his imprisonment, or m years, prison. melo during his imprisonment, or“; years, during that entire period he did not show any signs of radicalisation. security forces mobilised head of the french presidential elections. the prime minister says everything will be done to make the election goes smoothly. as theresa may campaigns for the upcoming election here in the uk, there are suggestions of a possible softening of her government's promise not to raise taxes. police investigating the bomb attack on the football team bus last week make an arrest and revealing motive may have been money. melo last year, harry stiles went to number one... can he do it ain? went to number one... can he do it again? built ed shearer in the claim that top spot? he had 13 weeks at numberone that top spot? he had 13 weeks at number one before harry came along as spoiled his easter. sou
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 8:45pm BST
matters who you are. a shout out on radio 1 is still great. the headlines on bbc news: jeremy corbyn pledges labour will protect the triple lock guarantee on increases to the state pension — but theresa may refuses to say whether she will maintain it. officials in paris say the gunman who shot dead a french policeman was known to them as karim cheurfi — a convicted criminal. the nhs trust, under investigation over the deaths of babies, was told it needed to improve ten years ago. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. now it's time for meet the author and this weekjim naughtie talks to michele roberts about her new book the walworth beauty. dickensian london in the year of the great exhibition, and the churning metropolis of our own time. brought together by two characters whose stories are intertwined and this and who reach for each other across the years that separates them. michele roberts' new novel, the walworth beauty, is a hymn to london. it
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 8:00pm BST
this is bbc news. theresa may signals the conservatives might drop their commitment to the rate at which state pensions increase —— but the prime minister rules out cuts to the uk's foreign aid budget. melo what we need to do is look at how that money is spent and make sure that we're able to spend that money in the most way. in paris —— prosecutors says the gunman who shot dead a policeman on the champs elysees was a convicted criminal with a history of violence. the nhs trust —— under investigation over the deaths of babies —— was told it needed to improve ten years ago. jeremy corbyn‘s ally len mccluskey is re—elected as the leader of britain's biggest union, unite. melo and hanging on in there. and the duke and duchess of cambridge make a surprise visit to radio 1 as part of their campaign to raise awareness about mental health. michelle roberts on her latest novel which bring together contemporary and victoria london and with the help of some ghostly presences in a tale of longing and desire. the prime minister and the chancellor have given theirfirst hints
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 7:00pm BST
this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm. theresa may signals the conservatives might drop their commitment to the pensions triple lock but rules out cuts to the uk foreign aid budget. what we need to do, though, is look at how that money is spent and make sure that we are able to spend that money in the most effective way. paris prosecutor names the gunman who shot dead a policeman on the champs elysees as karim cheurfi, a convicted criminal. the nhs trust under investigation for the deaths of babies was told it needed to improve ten years ago. jeremy corbyn ally len mccluskey is re—elected as the leader of britain's biggest union, unite. and in the next hour, a warning teenagers are slipping into a life of cyber—crime. the national crime agency reveals the average internet hacker is just 17. the duke and duchess of cambridge make a surprise visit to radio 1 as part of a their campaign to raise awareness about mental health. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister and the chancellor have given theirfirst hints of what will and what may not be in the conserva
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 6:30pm BST
sunshine means it will feel pleasant enough. it is largely dry for most of us again. this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm. theresa may signals the conservatives might drop their commitment to the pensions triple lock but rules out cuts to the uk foreign aid budget. what we need to do, though, is look at how that money is spent and make sure that we are able to spend that money in the most effective way. paris prosecutor names the gunman who shot dead a policeman on the champs elysees as karim cheurfi, a convicted criminal. the nhs trust under investigation for the deaths of babies was told it needed to improve ten years ago. jeremy corbyn ally len mccluskey is re—elected as the leader of britain's biggest union, unite. and in the next hour, a warning teenagers are slipping into a life of cyber—crime.
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 6:00pm BST
for the double. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. on day three of the campaign trail the prime minister and the chancellor have given theirfirst hints of what will and what won't be in the conservative manifesto. theresa may says she'll keep the current spending on foreign aid, despite pressure from within her own party to cut it. but she would not commit to keep the so—called triple lock on pensions, which guarantees they rise by inflation, average earnings or 2.5% each year, whichever is highest. labour has said it will. and the chancellor, philip hammond, has hinted that he would like to end the party's promise not to increase taxes. our first report tonight is from our deputy political editor, john pienaar. trust me, i'm a politician. no leader stays popular forever but theresa may clearly feels that she is well liked enough for now to make promises that some might like but others wilmot. she looks confident, and the message is one we have heard before and will again. what drives me, the passion that i have in politics, is to make the united kingdom a country th
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 5:45pm BST
. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news, to take us through the cinema releases this week is jason solomons. what do we have this week? the glamour of old school hollywood comedy backdrop for a love story between a starlet and her chauffeur under the watchful eye of reclusive billionaire howard hughes in warren beatty use rules don't apply. we have the sands of time, which reveal voices from a hidden mirror in the form of gertrude bell's, letters from baghdad as read out by tilda swinton in the doctorate —— in the letters from baghdad. and wartime london's rubble provides the setting for gemma arterton and bill nighy a in their finest, as they struggle to produce wartime propaganda and —— wartime propaganda movies. we begin with rules don't apply. warren beatty, he hasn't had the best of yea rs! beatty, he hasn't had the best of years! with that oscars fiasco. it has been his 16 years since he wrote and directed... this was meant to be his big return. as he gets older is he getting better? this is a vanity project that he wrote, directed, starred in... it's interes
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 5:00pm BST
this is bbc news at 5pm. i'm christian fraser live in paris, where the city is once again dealing with the aftermath of a suspected terror attack. the gunman who shot dead a policeman on the champs elysees was known to the authorities as a potential islamist radical. as parisians pay their respects, the prime minister declares sunday's election will not be derailed. translation:: the government is fully mobilised so that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. in today's other headlines on bbc news at 5pm: theresa may signals the conservatives might drop their commitment to the pensions triple lock, but rules out cuts to the uk foreign aid budget. corbyn ally len mccluskey is re—elected as the leader of britain's biggest union, unite. i'm probably meant to go across the radio to you now, but i'm hanging on in there. the duke and duchess of cambridge make a surprise visit to radio 1 to raise awareness of their mental health ahead of sunday's london marathon. and will gemma arterton and bill nighy be at their finest? jason solomons wi
electronic media, which includes "ebony" magazine, the "new york times," the ""washington post,"" msnbc, mpr, bbc america, c-span, voice of america, the "tavis smiley show." -- [ laughter ] "the dia "t "the diane rooem show and cnn. [ inaudible ] okay. it was a long list, okay? so please take a moment to help me welcome our guests for the evening. [ applause ] >>> hi, everyone. can everybody hear me okay? thank you so much for joining us. you guys look good. 7:00. on a friday. you beat the week. congratulations. so we're going to try and keep it a little bit informal. we were having almost too much fun in the green room. so we're going to try to bring in a little bit of that fun to our conversation. obviously, let's start with the basics. i'm going read the 13th amendment so everybody understands what we're going to be talking about. it's really short. it was ratified in the senate in 1864, and then in the house in 1865, it became law that year. it is known as the amendment that abolished slavery. i'm going to put that in quotations for a minute. so it reads, section 1, neither slavery
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 4:00pm BST
hello. this is the bbc news. the headlines: france's prime minister has urged the country not to allow yesterday's attack in paris to derail sunday's presidential election. one police officer was shot dead before the gunman was killed. the government is fully mobilised so that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. security is being reinforced ahead of the election and campaigning has been paused — although some of the main players have been giving their reaction to this latest attack. the other stories on bbc news: speaking on the campaign trail, theresa may said the uk will continue to spend 0.7% of national income on the foreign aid budget. theresa may signals the conservatives might drop their commitment to the pensions triple lock — but says the uk would continue to spend 0.7 per cent of national income on foreign aid. what we need to do is look at how that money is spent and make sure we are able to spend that money in the most effective way. at least 20 children are dead in south africa, after the minibus they were in col
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 3:00pm BST
hello, you're watching bbc news. the french prime minister has stressed that he does not want yesterday's attacks to derail the elections on sunday. the government is fully mobilised so that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. security is being reinforced ahead of the election and campaigning has been paused — although some of the main players have been giving their reaction to this latest attack. the other stories on bbc news: theresa may confirms the uk will continue to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid. what we need to do is look at how that money is spent and make sure we are able to spend that money in the most effective way. at least 20 children dead in south africa after a minibus collided with a truck. research by the national crime agency suggests the average cyber criminal is someone in their teens. and the former aston villa and england defender ugo ehiogu has died suddenly at 44, after suffering a cardiac arrest. good afternoon. details have been emerging about the man who opened fire on the champs ely
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 2:00pm BST
the sunshine, a pleasant day. i is 15 or 16. the other stories on bbc news: retail sales fall sharply, as the weak pound pushes prices up. research by the national crime agency suggests the average cyber criminal is someone in their teens. and the former aston villa and england defender ugo ehiogu has died suddenly at 44 after suffering a cardiac arrest. he died this morning. we are supposed to be concentrating on the final campaign day of the election, on sunday, turned to the attack on the was brought into custody, in thejury, but on the was brought into custody, in the jury, but was on the was brought into custody, in thejury, but was rallies have been cancelled today, and we these pictures show the final moments of the police had been deployed on this avenue, to they ended up the french media has named karim cheurfi and the victim has been named as a 47 europe. france is still piecing together the exact from what we understand, the attacker drove along the shore and stopped around we are hearing that the other two policeman that are injured are not ina policeman that are i
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 1:30pm BST
sunshine, a pleasant day. i is 15 or 16. the other stories on bbc news: retail sales fall sharply,
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 1:00pm BST
election. that's this sunday at 6:30pm, in france decides on the bbc news channel. the latest retail sales figures show sales down by 1.4% in the three months to march — their biggest fall for seven years. so what's going on? our economics correspondent andy verityjoins me now. — why has this happened? well, partly you can answer that question by your every retail experience, —— everyday retail experience, —— everyday retail experience, we all go around the shops and we have that feeling we haven't had for a while and that is, gosh, that has gone up. food prices we re gosh, that has gone up. food prices were falling for about three years but if you look at the average retail price, the consumer price indexis retail price, the consumer price index is up by 2.3%. i think we have a different index there, but other rich pay, up 2.2% is not keeping up, so rich pay, up 2.2% is not keeping up, so there is a renewed squeeze on living standards. we have that squeeze on living standards from 2011 to about 2015 and then wages starting out —— started outpacing prices but now we a
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 11:00am BST
this is bbc news. i'm karin gianonne live in paris, where the city is in shock after last night's suspected terror attack, which left a policeman dead and two others seriously injured. the headlines at 11: the attack in the heart of the capital saw people fleeing the main boulevard — police shot the gunman dead. the prime minister has urged citizens not to give in to intimidation ahead of sunday's election. translation: the government is fully mobilised that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. as prosecutors are searching the paris suburbs, the government is reinforcing security ahead of the election and campaigning has been paused — although some of the main players have been speaking this morning. i'm annita mcveigh — also this hour: german prosecutors arrest a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week. he was hoping to make money out of the attack. votes will be counted today in the election for the new boss of britain's biggest trade union, unite. and the former aston villa and eng
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 9:00am BST
the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. german prosecutors have confirmed they have arrested a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week. prosecutors say the man, who has german and russian nationality, was a market trader hoping to make money if the price of shares in the team fell. with us now is our berlin correspondent, jenny hill. in the immediate aftermath of the attack as people speculated what the attack as people speculated what the attack might be —— what the motive of the attack might become this probably was not one of the things that came to mind. no, this has taken a bizarre twist. dortmund is one of germany's most beloved football teams and many people feared the country had once again been targeted by islamist extremists. instead, as you say, prosecutors have now arrested this man, in his late 20s, withjoint german and russian nationality. they said that prior to the attack he bought something like 15,000 stock market options which enable you to sell shares when they drop in value, so sel
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 8:30am BST
this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and rachel horne. high security in france after the gun attack in paris that left one policeman dead and two more seriously wounded. it's a tense time for a nation on the brink of an election. live from london, that's our top story. yes — it's a historic moment for france as voters go to the polls on sunday for its closest election in living memory and one that'll have consequences far beyond its own borders, posing major risks for the european project. also in the programme, we're going to find out why america thinks cheap steel from asia is a threat to national security. and we will bring to the latest market action as investors wrap up another trading week. and we'll be getting the inside track on global economic challenges and the threat of protectionism — words of warning from the imf‘s boss christine lagarde. all this and more with our economics correspondent andrew walker. and do you shop on the internet? online shoppers in the uk spend more per household than consumers in any other country. we want to know what
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 5:30am BST
this is bbc world news. the headlines — france's president francois hollande has promised absolute vigilance after the gun attack in paris that left one policeman dead and two more seriously wounded. it happened on the busy champs—elysees, in the heart of the city. the attacker — who was known to the intelligence services — was shot dead as he tried to flee the scene. police have searched the suspect‘s home in the eastern suburbs and are investigating whether the man had any accomplices. the islamic state group says it carried out the shooting, naming the attacker as a belgian, abu yousif. the incident comesjust days ahead of the first round of the french presidential election. some of the candidates have suspended their campaigns in light of the attack. an emergency meeting of the security cabinet is scheduled later. now for the latest financial news with aaron heslehurst and world business report. france prepares for the closest election in living memory, posing major risks for the euro and the eu itself. plus, riding the economic cycle — the imf says global growth is f
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 5:00am BST
hello, you're watching bbc world news. i'm chris rogers. our top story this hour — france's president, francois hollande, promises absolute vigilance after the deadly gun attack in paris. the shooting on the champs—elysees claimed the life of one policeman. two more were seriously wounded. the suspect, shot dead by police, was a french national known to the security services. i'm karin giannone in paris, a city in shockjust days before the first round of france's presidential election. we're live in the capital to assess the security situation and what the attack might mean for sunday's vote. hello. 1—storey dominates this hour. the french president will chair a meeting of his security council this morning after a gun attack in the heart of the french capital. the gunman targeted police officers, killing one and wounding two others and a passer—by. the gunman drove up to a police bus, got out and began firing an automatic weapon thought to be an assault rifle. officers then shot him dead. it happened on one of the city's best known streets — the avenue des champs—e
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 4:30am BST
of the candidates have suspended their campaigns in light now on bbc news, hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk, with me, sarah montague. just a few months ago, russia was congratulating donald trump on becoming president, and expressing the hope that both countries would take their relationship to a whole new level. now, moscow's relations with the us and the west are so bad that the russian prime minister dmitri medvedev talks of them as "ruined". that was after america's response to the recent chemical attack in syria. but even before that, there was the stand—off in ukraine, and accusations of russian interference in american elections. now there are fears the russians could meddle in the french elections and other european votes this year. my guest is vladimir chizhov, russia's ambassador to the eu. will russia promise not to pervert democracy in europe? vladimir chizhov, welcome to hardtalk. thank you. france's foreign ministerjean—marc ayrault has accused russia of meddling in french democratic life. is that true? of course it's not. well, i'm afraid that this wave of anti
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 4:00am BST
a very warm welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to our viewers in north america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. our top stories: a gun attack on the champs—elysees in central paris leaves one policeman dead, two more seriously wounded. officials say the gunman, who was shot dead by police, was known to security services. mesdames et messieurs, you have to stay back, please. the area is dangerous because of shotguns. please stay back. a massive security operation gathers pace. the so—called islamic state group claims it was behind the attack. president hollande says all signs do point to terrorism. translation: we are convinced that the investigations will show that this attack was terrorist in nature. the anti—terror group has been deployed, and it will lead the inquiry. hello. a major security operation is underway in paris, where a gunman opened fire on a police bus in the heart of the french capital, killing one officer, wounding two others and a passer—by. the gunman drove up to the bus, got out and began firing an automatic weapon, thought to be an assault
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 3:30am BST
our main story on bbc news: a major anti—terror operation is underway in paris, after a gunman opened fire on a police bus, killing one officer and seriously wounding two others. the attacker, who targeted the busy champs elysees in the heart of the city, attempted to flee the scene, but was shot dead by police. officials have confirmed he was known to the intelligence services, and a police search is under way at his home near the capital. the islamic state group says it carried out the shooting, naming the attacker as a belgian, abu yousif. french president francois hollande has held crisis talks with his prime minister and interior minister, and is set to convene his security cabinet on friday morning. the incident comesjust days ahead of the first round of the french presidential election. some of the candidates have suspended their campaigns in light of the attack. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has used his first major speech of the election campaign to pledge that he will put power and wealth in the hands of the people if he becomes prime minister. he presented himsel
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 2:30am BST
from bbc news. my from bbc news. my name is mike embley. one man stories this hour: —— main story. a major anti—terror operation is underway in paris, after a gunman opened fire on a police bus — killing one officer and seriously wounding two others. the attacker was then shot dead by police. it happened on the champs—elysees. very close to the arc de triomphe itself. the gunmen drove a car after the police bus and started firing an automatic weapon, thought to be an assault rifle. he was known to intelligence services. police have been searching his home in the eastern suburbs of paris. the islamic state group says it carried out the shooting. it is just before the french vote in the first round of the presidential election. now, thursday in parliament. hello there and welcome to thursday in parliament. on this programme — as election campaigning gets underway, questions about election expenses from 2015. the commons unites to condemn the detention, torture and killing of gay men in chechnya. there are calls for the government to act to make sure food prices don't go up after brexit. and, find out what this conservative has been doing in the bathroom and why it's going to land him in a whole heap of trouble when he gets home. to my horror, ifound... laughter. a plastic container of olay anti—wrinkle, anti—ageing lotion... but first, and snp mp is demanding the government urgently explain whether or not the police investigation into conservative mps' election expenses swayed a decision to call an early general election. 1a police forces have sent files to the crown prosecution service in relation to allegations of breached spending limits in the 2015 general election. pete wishart wanted to know more before this year's election campaign got into full swing. before we rise, mr speaker, we have to have an urgent statement on the status of all these conservative members of parliament who are currently under police investigation for electoral fraud. it seems that there might be up to two dozen conservative mps facing the possibility of being prosecuted while we are in the middle of an election campaign. the public, i believe, deserves to know what happened under these circumstances and will it be possible for them to continue as candidates in this general election if that was to pass? now, there are a lot of people who suspect that with the first charging decision to be made on the 20th of may, that this is the real reason for the snap election, and we need to hear from the government if this played any feature in its deciding and determining the state of the election. i would like to hearfrom the leader of the house of commons on this issue. the honourable gentleman made a serious point to me about the police investigations. i want to reiterate, mr speaker, what the prime minister said yesterday — that we stand behind all our candidates at the forthcoming election, who will be out campaigning for a strong and stable government in the national interest. a number of police forces have conducted investigations and many have been dropped. now, it's right these matters are investigated properly, but the battle bus was directed by the national party, as was the case with other political parties, and we are confident that individual colleagues acted properly. the shadow leader of the commons returned to the electoral campaign and the reasons given by theresa may for calling an early election. the prime minister wants stability and to strengthen her hand in the negotiations, but blames the opposition parties for calling a general election. but it is her dithering and confusion and watching her back. firstly, what an allegedly arrogant statement, that she should presume to know the outcome of an election. secondly, what has her government been doing for the last nine months? thirdly, can the leader of the house confirm that if the government wins, that we are not entering into a rolling programme of snap elections during negotiations? i think all of us in the house, whatever political perspective we bring to these matters, want to see public services of a kind in which we can all take pride, in which we think work effectively for our constituents, who are vulnerable and in need of help. it is the belief of this government and this party that the foundation for effective public services has to be a strong and growing economy. and the plans put forward by the right honourable gentleman, the leader of the opposition, would render any such chaotic government incapable of funding public services, because they would have bankrupted the british economy, raised taxes on ordinary working families and piled yet more public debt onto the next generation, a betrayal of young people. a conservative asked about government bills that wouldn't now become law because of the early election, including a bill to bolster security in jails and crack down on the use of drugs and mobile phones in prisons. can the leader of the house confirm that the prison and courts bill has now been abandoned for this parliament and will have to start its passage again through the house in the next parliament? and can he tell us which bills will be going through the rather grubby process of the wash up, which is a rather unsatisfactory way to pass laws? the bills that were introduced to this house quite late in the current parliamentary session, and which received carry—over motions, so that they could be debated in what would have been the third session of the current parliament, will fall, including the prisons and courts bill. i referred in my statement to some of those measures that we will be addressing during the wash—up period next week. there are, as my right honourable friend knows, my honourable friend knows, there are discussions going on through the usual channels about how to handle particular pieces of legislation, and i don't want to prejudice what the outcome of those discussions will be. a leading brexiteer, who is standing down at the election, reflected on the task ahead for mps. the next parliament has a very difficult task. the government has to implement the will of the people, as expressed on the 23rd ofjune last year. the opposition has to scrutinise the government in a constructive, but nevertheless, relentless way, to ensure that we get the best deal. but finally, can i just paraphrase nancy astor... i shall miss this house, i shall miss this house more than the house will miss me. gisela stuart. now, britain must deliver the strongest possible siren message over the brutal persecution of gay men in chechnya, a foreign office minister has said. sir alan duncan, who was the first openly gay conservative mp, said the reported torture and killing was the and contempt and pledged to raise the issue with allies in europe and the commonwealth. the arbitrary detention and ill—treatment of over 100 men in chechnya, because of their sexual orientation, is of deep concern to the uk. credible reports suggesting that at least four people have been killed and many have been tortured are particularly shocking. statements by the regional government in chechnya, which appear to condone and incite violence against lgbt people are utterly despicable. the question had been raised by a labour mp. we are talking here about detention, we're talking about beatings, we are talking about abuse, electric shock treatments, and i do not say this lightly, mr speaker, but some have described gay concentration camps. and, mr speaker, the guardian's shaun walker i think expressed really the horrors that we are seeing. he described the situation of an individual, at least once a day, captors attached metal clamps and sent powerful electric shocks through his body. if he managed not to scream, others would join in beating him with sticks or metal rods and demanding to know the names of other gay men that he knew in chechnya. so, if we have any doubts, mr speaker, of the brutality of this regime towards the lgbt community, we need not have them. so, he asked, what had the british government done to put pressure on the russian or chechnya and governments? we in the government fully condemn this. we do use all engagement with russia to make our voice clear. i did so personally with the deputy foreign minister of russia, when i met him two or three weeks ago, vladimir titov. we spoke on general human rights matters, but also chechnya. and may i say, mr speaker, that i hope this house will be fully united in giving the strongest possible siren message to russia, and to chechnya in particular, that this kind of activity is beyond contempt and not acceptable in the world in which we live. it is nothing short of officially sanctioned policy from the chechnyan authorities, but the russian government, who bears ultimate responsibility for its citizens safety, appears to be looking the other way. and that is scarcely any better. we do need and we are speaking today with a strong and unified voice, but it does seem to me that whilst i applaud, of course, the right honourable gentleman's raising this matter as the deputy foreign secretary, i do think that it needs to be escalated, and as a result of the urgent question today, i hope that we will get an undertaking from the government that it will be raised at a much higher political level. it seems to me that this is a matter that the prime minister really should take an initiative on and she should call in the russian ambassador and demand some answers. this reminds us we are phenominally lucky in this country, those of us who are gay, in particular gay because i remember meeting in russia in 2009 a lesbian activist who was 83—years—old. i asked her how she got away with it, and she said, "well i think president putin thinks that women don't have sex after the age of 80! how wrong can you be," she said. but the serious point here is that we should of course pay tribute to those people who are standing up and are at risk of their own lives, and i'm glad that the government is acting to try and do that. but isn't this all part of a piece? president putin appointed kadyrov, as president in chechnya. he then got elected and 98% of the vote, that doesn't of course seem at all bizarre, does it? but he and putin have both repeatedly abused human rights. they've used violence to excess, they've always resorted to violence when there is another opportunity of providing a peaceful means. whether we like it or not, kadyrov actually has the fundamental support, in some terms, of his nation, as a region of the russian federation. so, how do we undermine that is also about investment and also about foreign aid, in tackling human rights across the world. so, will the deputy foreign minister commit now, here on the floor of the house, in fighting for human rights, lgbti and other rights, in places like chechnya, to ensuring that his foreign aid budget doesn't change after the general election? well, i think we should all commit to fighting prejudice whereever we find it and i hope that when we stand in the election on june eighth, that will be part of all of the views we hold as we present ourselves to the electorate. sir alan duncan. the government has a debt of honour to give all elderly british citizens living abroad an annual rise in their pensions, according to a long—standing campaigner on the rights of expats. around one million uk pensioners are now resident in overseas locations, many in sunny retirement destinations — such as spain, france and the caribbean. more than half of them don't receive yearly increases in their state pensions. in a debate, sir roger gale read from a letter he'd recently received from a 91—year—old british citizen living in canada. i was brought up to believe that britain was a fair country. it's a disgrace. it has to end. it's terrible to meet pensioners over here who say they have to come back to britain because they can't manage. and joe lewis, the 90—year—old, who also lives in canada and has recently lost his wife, will be moving back to the united kingdom as he can no longer cope with his frozen pension. the mp said the uk government had done deals with certain countries, meaning some expats did receive rises in their pensions. so this leads, mr deputy speaker, to the ludicrous situation where a british pensioner living on one side of the niagara falls in canada receives a frozen pension, while another living just a mile across the falls in the united states has a pension rate up—rated every year. additionally, some caribbean islands enjoy up—rated pensions, while other small countries and overseas territories do not. mr deputy speaker, we are now, and i trust that we will remain, in government. and so we should have the opportunity to finally address and put to rest a debt of honour that must be paid. the vast majority of frozen pensioners live in the commonwealth. around a quarter of a million of those affected live in australia and almost 150,000 in canada. these people are not immune from the effects of inflation, yet are forced to cope with their rising cost of living on a static income. as you can imagine, this has a major impact upon their lives. but the reality is that these 550,000 british citizens, british citizens, the same as every one of us here, the same as all of our constituents who are uk citizens, they do not have an mp. they do not have a single person who is directly representing them and fighting their cause. we, as a country, have always prided ourselves on being a caring country. we are one of the highest net providers of foreign aid in the world, and rightly so. we must, however, ask the question as to why we do not feel the need to adequately support our own pensioners who have retired abroad? an increasing number of modern countries operate pensions in line with inflation to pensioners living overseas, regardless of where they reside. today, we must consider why the uk is not doing the same. despite those pleas, the minister said the cost of giving all uk pensioners overseas an annual up—rating was too high. but i think it's reasonable to say that the decision to move abroad, for most people, is a voluntary one. and remains a personal choice, dependent on the circumstance of the individual. it's a voluntary choice to live abroad. those who are eligible for a uk state pension can have their pension paid whereever they choose to live. the rules governing the uprating of pensions are straightforward, widely publicised and have been the same for many years. the government's position remains consistent with that of every government for the last 70 years, and the annual cost of changing the long—standing policy will soon be an extra half £1 billion, which the government believes cannot be justified. now it was back in 2015 that the car—maker volkswagen was found to have installed what are known as defeat devices in its diesel models, so that they would pass emission tests. the matter has been under investigation by the transport committee, who have interviewed the company's top uk executive, paul willis, twice. compensation for uk customers is a critical issue, and mr willis was full of apologies on behalf of the company when he first gave evidence to us in 2015. since then, as i've said, his tune has changed dramatically. in fact, it is now vw‘s position, stated to us by mr willis to the committee a short time ago, that the company has done nothing wrong in the uk, or indeed in the rest of europe, and he told us that because the company has done nothing wrong, no compensation is due. well, this, mr chairman, is treating the uk with contempt. let me remind honourable members of the current position in other countries in relation to compensation. in the us, volkswagen has agreed to provide each owner with between $5000—10,000. a deal agreed in canada will give owners between $4000—6000. and here, nothing, nothing at all. owners who have had their cars fixed have reported problems. i am receiving, almost daily, numerous communications from members of the public, report that their vehicle has been impaired since they had the fix applied. many people have told me of the stress of suddenly finding their vehicle was not working after the measure was applied, and there are instances of the vehicle going into limp mode or a state where the vehicle would not go above a certain speed, and in one case, this was on a motorway, the other cars having to swerve to avoid a collision. in many instances where concerns were raised, the customers were told it was a coincidence and they were asked to pay hundreds or even thousands of pounds for the fault created by the so—called fix to be investigated and put right. this morning, i got an e—mail from a constituent on this very subject, who has a diesel vehicle. neil says in his e—mail, "for the past two decades, i've driven a diesel car, on the advice that this type of fuel was the best environmental choice. i am now in a position of being considered the demon of the roads oweing to thepollution, in particular nitrogen oxide released by these cars. this is due to the car company's fraud use of pollution—cheating systems. " he goes on to say, "i would like to be sure that i will not be the one who ends up footing the bill to change my polluting diesel," and asks if there are any uk schemes being planned to help people who are the victims of the scam. the government continues to challenge volkswagen's unacceptable view that they do not need to compensate british motorists that have been affected by the manipulation emissions test. ruskin said that endurance is nobler than strength, and my enduring determination to ensure that we not only closely monitor the progress of volkswagen's implementation of technical upgrades, and overseeing that they appropriately deal with the issues and complaints related to those changes, that we will press to for them to do what they should have done all along. admitted theirfailure, and offered recompense for it. it is, in the end, as straightforward as that. the transport minister, john hayes. you're watching thursday in parliament, with me, alicia mccarthy. labour says food prices are on the rise and is warning things will get worse if there is a bad brexit deal. the accusation came at environment questions, but the minister rejected the claim, saying the amount the poorest households were spending had been stable for a decade. a labour mp began by quoting figures from the office for national statistics, or ons. the ons are reporting a surge in food prices that is likely to continue to rise. children are returning to school after the easter holidays hungry. elderly are being admitted to hospital for malnourishment, and still this government refuse to properly measure the levels of hunger and food poverty in our country. isn't it true that because they refuse to measure it, because then they would have to admit some culpability? now, the honourable lady is wrong. we do mention it. we have a long—standing living cost of food survey which has run for many, many years, and which include a measure for household spending among the 20% poorest households. i can tell her that household spending in those poorest households has remained steady, at around 16%, for at least a decade. contrary to what the minister said earlier, recent inflation figures revealed that food prices are rising at the fastest pace in three years, adding £21 to the average household shopping bill in the last three months alone. when will the secretary of state get a grip on this soaring cost of living affecting millions of families? well, as i pointed out earlier, the question that was raised, we saw the biggest spike in food prices in 2008, because of energy prices then. food prices fell by around 7% between 2014—16. it is true that they have seen a modest increase over the last 12 months of 1.3%. it is quite common in food processing plants for 70% of the employees to be eu migrants. it is not clear where their staff are going to come from in the future. is the minister committed to defending this sector in the brexit negotiations to come, and so avoiding price rises from this driver as well? well, i can reassure the honourable gentleman that i've had regular meetings with food processors. indeed, just two days ago, i had a meeting with the new president of the food and drink federation and this is an issue raised by them. it is the case that around 30%, according to ons, of employees in the food processing sector are from other european union countries. but i would simply say this, the prime minister has been very clear that she wants to safeguard and protect the rights of eu citizens that are here and that she would expect that to be reciprocated as well, and that could be agreed early in the negotiations. does the minister recognise that it's absolutely crucial that the needs of the agricultural sector are placed at the heart of brexit negotiations? because isn't it clear that if the government doesn't get its act together, a bad brexit deal is going to leave british farmers and food producers facing the double whammy of cheap food imports and tariffs on their exports? i would simply say to the honourable lady that access to the uk market is incredibly important for european countries as well. while we export around £11 billion of food and drink to the european union, we import some £28 billion worth of food from the eu. that is why farming unions across the eu are telling their governments that they must have a free trade agreement with the uk. the environment minister, george eustace. mps have approved a motion cancelling the manchester gorton by—election which was due to be held on may the 4th. the seat became vacant following the death of veteran labour mp sir gerald kaufman earlier this year. the leader of the commons said the planned vote had been overtaken by the decision to hold an early general election on june the 8th. the motion therefore requests you, mr speaker, to convey to the clerk of the crown and the desire of this house, that he issued a writ of supersedeas to the writ issued on tuesday the 28th of march for the by—election. this will put beyond any doubt the authority of the act of the returning officer to cancel the by—election process that is currently underway. i understand that this approach is supported by other political parties in the house, as it avoids unnecessary expense and uncertainties that the candidates involved. david lidington. finally, a conservative mp is probably going to be in some hot water when he arrives home, after a tactless comment about his wife and her beauty secrets. during environment questions, sir henry bellingham attempted to make a point about micro beads, small bits of plastic found in many bathroom and beauty products which cause environmental damage when they work their way into the seas and oceans life. sir henry explained he'd been doing some investigating of his own. i was recently rummaging through my wife's collection of shampoos and to my horror... laughter a plastic, a plastic container of olay, anti—wrinkle anti—ageing lotion... complete with exfoliating micro beads. now obviously neither secretary of state nor her minister would ever have need to use such a product, but will she get on the telephone to procter & gamble and tell him that selling this sort of product at the moment is completely outrageous and it should be withdrawn from the market at once? the pursuits of the honourable gentleman are truly extraordinary! minister? mr speaker, what i find extraordinary is that lady bellingham is a flawless picture and would even need these products, so i'm sure that, i'm sure that my honourable friend will be buying flowers later today to make up for this! therese coffey suggesting a way for sir henry bellingham to avoid some marital hot water when he gets home. and that's it from me for now, but dojoin me on friday night at 11pm for a full round—up of what's been another quite extraordinary week here at westminster, as campaigning gets underway forjune's surprise general election. but for now, from me, goodbye. hello. if you think we're finished with winter weather, think again. next week it will turn much colderfor a time. frost and even some wintry showers around for some of us. we'll talk about that weather change in a moment. but this is the fairly quiet picture as friday begins. i say fairly quiet because we have got rain affecting parts of scotland with a stronger wind. it'll be a mild start for much of the uk and where we'd like some rain across those parts of england, wales, into the channel islands that have been so very dry, it is looking mainly dry as the day begins. variable cloud, a few bright or sunny breaks. now, from the thickest cloud in wales, especially north—west england, northern ireland and south—west scotland, a bit damp and drizzly in places, especially coasts and hills. some more persistent rain with the stronger wind across the northern half of scotland. that's cleared away from the northern isles at this stage, so we're left in a colder, showery air mass during the day. quite windy, some of those showers might have a wintry flavour. through the day we take outbreaks of rain southwards across scotland, eventually reaching into parts of northern ireland. we'll keep plenty of cloud, north—west england and wales, into the west midlands, maybe the odd spot of light rain or drizzle. we'll keep some sunny spells, though, east of the pennines, east midlands, east anglia, southern england often cloudy but some bright or sunny spells and some warmth in that sunshine when it makes an appearance. some of us 18 or even 19 celsius. now, on through friday evening, a lot of dry weather to come going into saturday morning. just this zone of thicker cloud, patchy light rain or drizzle edging southwards. to the north of that, colder, colder start to saturday, parts of northern england, especially scotland with a touch of frost. on through the weekend, not a significant change any time soon. that's confined to next week. for the weekend it will be mainly dry. there will be a lot of cloud around at times but some bright or sunny spells. close to this weather front, still a bit of damp and drizzly weather edging its way southwards during saturday. north of that, sunny spells, a few showers running into northern scotland. south of that, we're keeping temperatures up here, so a bit of warmth as the sun makes an appearance. but it will be a cooler feel across many parts of the uk, and particularly where you've got the breeze. but as
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 1:45am BST
turning wintry. a very warm welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to our viewers in north america and around the globe. my name's mike embley. our top story: a gun attack on the champs—elysees in central paris leaves one police dead. two more seriously wounded. officials say the gunman, who was shot dead by police, was known to security services. you have to stay back, please. the area is dangerous because of shooting. please stay back. as a massive police operation gathers pace, the so—called islamic state group claims it was behind the attack. french president francois hollande says all signs do point to terrorism. translation: we are convinced the investigations will show that this attack was terrorist in nature. the anti—terrorist group has been deployed and it will leave the enquiry.
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 1:30am BST
welcome to bbc news. let's bring you up welcome to bbc news. let's bring you up to date with our main story. a major anti—terror operation is underway in paris, after a gunman opened fire on a police van, killing one officer and seriously wounding two others. the attacker, who targeted the busy champs—elysees, in the heart of the city, attempted to flee the scene but was shot dead by police. officials have confirmed he was known to the intelligence services, and a police search is underway at his home near the capital. the islamic state group says it carried out the shooting, naming the attacker as a belgian, abu yousif. french president francois hollande has held crisis talks with his prime minister and interior minister, and is set to convene his security cabinet on friday morning. the incident comesjust days ahead of the first round of the french presidential election. and our main uk headline: labour leaderjeremy corbyn has vowed to "overturn the rigged system" by putting power and wealth back in the hands of "the people". now on bbc news all the latest business news live
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 1:00am BST
. much more details on our website. stay with us on bbc news. welcome to bbc news. i'm kasia madera. our top story: a gun attack on the champs—elysees in central paris leaves one policeman dead and two more seriously wounded. officials say the lone gunman, who's been killed, was known to security services. you have to stay back, please. the area is dangerous because of shooting. please stay back. as a massive police operation gathers pace, the islamic state group claims it was behind the attack. french president francois hollande says all signs do point to terrorism. translation: we are convinced the investigations will show that this attack was terrorist in nature. the anti—terrorist group has been deployed and it will leave the enquiry. we will be live in paris with the very latest. welcome to this special coverage of a major anti—terrorist operation which is taking place in paris, after gunmen opened fire on a police van in the heart of the french capital, killing one officer and wounding two others. the incident took place in one of the city's most famous boulevard is, the
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 12:30am BST
capital. tonight, paris is fearful, and on high alert. katya adler, bbc news, paris. moments after the shooting, reporters at the scene were able to speak to reporters at the scene were able to speakto an reporters at the scene were able to speak to an eyewitness, who said that he saw the attack unfolds. he described how he saw the gunmen use what he thought was a kalashnikov. this is what he said. translation: so i came out and was walking on the pavement. and there was a policeman ban and a man came along in an old grey audi. he parked behind the van and get out with a kalashnikov. i had six gunshots. i thought they were fireworks. we looked down the road and there was no one. he was hidden behind the van, shooting at the police. i think he hit one. as soon as the police got out of the van, he fell. as soon as we saw that, we ran back inside. we hid and when up to the first floor, and we saw shoot him. francois hollande has spoken about the attack. he confirmed that in addition to a police officer and attacker being killed, two other police officers were injured. here is what he had
BBC News
Apr 21, 2017 12:00am BST
with the bbc world news special on a major anti—terrorist operation in paris. a police officer has been killed and two officers injured in a shooting in the heart of the french capital. you have to stay back, please. it is dangerous. a guardsman was killed on the champs—elysees. —— gunmen. the president says that the motive was clear. translation: we are convinced that the investigations will show that it was terrorist in nature. this is the scene live in paris where the champs—elysees remains sealed. anti—terrorist raids are being carried out. the so—called islamic state says it was behind the attack. hello and welcome to this special coverage. a major anti—terrorist operation is taking place in paris after a gunman opened fire on a police bus in the capital, killing one officer and winning two others. the incident took place in one of the city's most there boulevard is, at the champs—elysees, which leads from the arc de triomphe down. it was about 300 metres away from the arc de triomphe. the gunman was shot by police. media reports say he was known to the intelli
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 11:30pm BST
wintry the uk and with hello and welcome to bbc news. i am martine croxall. we will be looking at the papers in a moment. at first, the headlines : there has been attacked in paris. the government has been killed on the champs—elysees. french police have issued an arrest warrant for a second possible accomplice. this is the scene live in paris, where the champs—elysees has been completely evacuated, following the incident. a spokesman for the french interior ministry says that officers were deliberate a targeted. translation: the two officers they we re translation: the two officers they were wounded and other nearby at officers returned fire, and the attacker was killed. officers returned fire, and the attacker i to killed. ”£777, .2 ’ '"' ”f" officers returned fire, and the attacker i to geted. ”£777, .2 ’ '"' ”f" officers returned fire, and the attacker i to get the ”£222 w ’ .22. .22-2 officers returned fire, and the attacker i to get the paris ”£2222 w ’ .22. .22-2 officers returned fire, and the attacker i to get the paris shootings w w .22. www m
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 11:00pm BST
high alert. katya adler, bbc news, paris. the french interior spokesman, pierre—henry brandet, gave reporters this update. translation: just before 9pm in front of number 102 on the champs elysee, vehicle stop next to a police vehicle which was carrying out public order and traffic duties, working under the direction of the prefecture of police. this vehicle was stationary with operatives inside and also some police officers we re inside and also some police officers were carrying out duties on the pavement nearby. a manjumped out of the vehicle and opened fire on the police vehicle, fatally windy one officer from the police vehicle, fatally windy one officerfrom the parisien police force. the man then tried to run onto the pavement. he went to other officers. the two officers that were wounded and other nearby officers returned fire. the attacker was killed. —— wounding. the surrounding area was locked down immediately. emergency response units were deployed to secure the zone. as for the attack of‘s identity, that has not been confirmed in a clear and precise manner. any inf
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 10:30pm BST
will be continuing coverage throughout the night on the bbc news channel but on bbc one it is time for the news where you are. goodbye. you are with us for continuing courage of the major security incident. a french policeman has been killed and two others wounded when the bus in which they and other officers had been travelling in was targeted on the champs—elysees in central paris. a gunman in the car, from which the shots were fired, has been killed. the world—famous street was crowded when the attack started and tourists and passers—by ran from the scene. the french interior ministry said the officers were deliberately targeted in what was probably an act of terrorism, which comes days before the first round of the presidential election. two of the candidates said they have cancelled campaign for friday. a state of emergency is still in effect in france following the mass killings by islamist extremists in paris in 2015. this is what one eyewitness, ogur, had to say to reporters just a short while ago. we were moving towards a car and then i heard two or three shots, but
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 10:00pm BST
capital. tonight, paris is fearful, and on high alert. katya adler: the bbc news, paris. our correspondent christian fraser is in the champs elysees. a developing, breaking story. what is the latest, christian?” a developing, breaking story. what is the latest, christian? i can tell you, the police operation that was under way for the last two hours around the champs elysees has come to an end. police activity we're seeing is around that car, which has pulled up alongside the police van. thereafter render it police officers working on that car. to the east of paris they are going to an apartment they believe is linked to the attacker. we don't know yet whether attacker. we don't know yet whether a second attacker was involved. it is possible. the counterintelligence police here, dgs i, in france, say they know the identity of the attacker, it would suggest their may well be a terror link. three days before a french election there will before a french election there will be working through the night to find out who this person was, who did he speak to, who did he know? and w
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 9:30pm BST
back into the bbc news roo m to a ccess we have plugged back into the bbc newsroom to access all the latest information. all the stations nearby to wear this attack is taken place have been closed. police are also warning people not to spread any misinformation that has not come from a trusted source save the authorities. also, the counterterrorism officers have offered an investigation into the shooting. you will notice this wire from reuters talks about gunmen, we're not sure whether it was a gunman or gunmen, but one person has been killed. according to a police source, speaking to the authorities. a couple of other things to mention here. donald trump has come out and offered his condolences to france over what has happened, saying, it looks like another terrorist attack. james has been helping us from the newsroom of the bbc in paris. christian was just by the champs—elysees. we spoke to him on outside source when it was not clear when this story was developing, but we are clear now it has happened. is is still ongoing? do we know if this is still ongoing? do we know if this i
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 9:00pm BST
continues here on bbc news. we have a developing story in paris where there has been a shooting on the champs elysees. this is from a french news agency stating that one police officer has been killed and over the wounded by the shooting in the champs—elysees, and we are told by the french interior ministry that an attacker has been killed. next i can show you live pictures coming into the bbc newsroom. you get an idea of the operation underway in the city. let's bring in christian fraserfrom the bbc who is in paris. what have you heard? funnily enough ros i started broadcasting with the one hour ago, started broadcasting with the one hourago, i started broadcasting with the one hour ago, i saw the police and i knew something was wrong, i did not know where it was but i know there was a commotion. we are broadcasting here, that is etoile behind us, the traffic is being redirected away from the champs—elysees, it's being directed towards concord and the street is empty, they have pulled back the cordon towards etoile and the helicopter is basically making a grand circle around the c
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 8:45pm BST
us here on the bbc news channel who lives on the champs elysees. you lives on the champs elysees. you live very close to where this took place? i have not been hearing the shots but i have been seen lots of cops on my street. the street those of the champs elysees ir one and a half blocks away, as they would say in america. there were helicopters circulating above our head. that is a very strange feeling. however, you see people in the street, police, and there is a hotel opposite my windows, people are walking, they do not look like they are in a hurry and they are walking down the street. there is an element of calm because the champs elysees is very big. an area has been cordoned off and they say in the news you should avoid the area but, for those people in the area, they do not know what is going on. what is the advice that people will be given, then? we understand they will not evacuate buildings because that would put people at greater risk. on the champs elysees on any given day, you have over 100,000 people. so it is an practical, it would create more itibss an practical
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 8:00pm BST
this is bbc news. and martine croxall. the headlines at eight. jeremy corbyn has pledged to challenge what he called a "rigged system" and said the final result was not a ‘foregone conclusion‘. but of course they do not want us to win, because when we win it is the people, not the powerful, who win. the prime minister reiterates her commitment for net migration falling to the tens of thousands following britain leaving the eu. this follows speculation that goal might be scrapped. i believe sustainable net migration is in the tens of thousands, for people coming from the eu as well as people coming from the eu as well as people coming from outside the eu. nigel farage the leader of ukip says he will not stand in the election. also in this hour.... the final television pitch to voters in the french presidential election. 11 candidates are taking to the stage in a televised set—piece debate, ahead of the first round vote on sunday. scientists discover drugs which could slow down the progression of a range of degenerative brain diseases including dementia. an meet the auth
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 7:45pm BST
good, because it fits into the daily routine. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. it wasn't buried in the ground or marked on a map, but the largest hoard of gold coins everfound has now been declared treasure — after it was discovered hidden inside an old piano. the sovereigns are thought to be worth more than a quarter of a million pounds, as sima kotecha reports. a piano which was donated to a college in shropshire, butjust before christmas, this man discovered hundreds of coins in dusty hand—stitched packages underneath its keyboard. i'd been called in to tune and repair this piano, so i took out a couple of the keys and up in the top here, and hey presto, there were some interesting packages. so i quickly got my penknife and quickly undid one of the ends. then i thought, that's gold! experts say it's the largest gold sovereign hoard everfound in the uk. it consists of more than 900 coins, most of which were made during queen victoria's reign. out of all these coins, this one is the oldest. it dates back to 18117. this one, however, was made in 1915 and that suggests the coins wer
BBC News
Apr 20, 2017 7:00pm BST
type of show he used to host. colin paterson, bbc news. let's speak now to the media analyst claire enders, she joins us from london. he has been a very significant revenue spinnerfor fox he has been a very significant revenue spinner for fox news for a very long time. responsible by all accou nts very long time. responsible by all accounts for up to half $1 billion of advertising every single year. he has been very significant and the major opinion programmes on fox news, in particular his, have been extraordinarily pro—donald trump. you could say that rupert murdoch graded fox news in 1986 and that network created president trump. you think there was any morality in the fox news decision to listen to what was it really all about money? was it the younger murdoch saying we do not want a news organisation with this cloud hanging over?” not want a news organisation with this cloud hanging over? i am certain that james murdoch would have been angry about the accusations of sexual harassment. last summer when roger ailes was on hold, it happened very quickly again. he appointed ext
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