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tv   News  Al Jazeera  October 27, 2013 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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... protesters marriott treastr of the nation's capitol. 1 year after super storm sandy devastated the east coast, a look at what it takes to get back on its feet. searching for an escape. special coverage of refugees who are leaving everything behind in hopes for a better life. we believe that we can make the world listen to us. there is time to speak out. the fight in thailand to keep the image of buddha sacred.
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welcome to al jazeera america. i am morgan radford in new york. demanding answers. germany is sending senior intelligence officials to washington after leaks reports accuse the nsa of spying on the german chancellor's cell phone for years. >> a major mag claims that the u.s. has been tracking her phone even before she became chancellor. once more, her number was on the spy list when president obama visited berlin earlier this year. protesters took to the streets just outside of the capitol to demand that congress investigate the nsa. jean mazur has more >> reporter: in washington, hundreds gathered to protest the national security agency's surveillance programs. the man who made them public was called a hero, former nsa contractor edward snowden is in
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russia but sent a statement. >> it's about power, control, and trust in government, about whether you have a voice in our democracy or decisions are made for you rather than with you >> reporter: the protestors messaging, you have been listening to us, so now hear this. >> it may be because we don't know what's going on. it bothers me because every time you send a tweet or an e-mail or take a picture or do anything that involves any kind of data, phone calling, anything, you don't know that that information is being heard somewhere and i think that's wrong. >> i think people have a right to privacy. >> i am here because i support the constitutionals -- the const constitutional view that we secure from unreasonable search and says you're. >> the demonstrators delivered to congress a petition with more than half a million signatures urging that domestic sur value answer be stopped.
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>> it is time to roll back the surveillance state. it is time to restore the fourth 578dment. it is time to repeal the patriot act >> reporter: some speakers acknowledge that many americans are appear pathetic about nsa surveillance and bringing about change will not be easy. later this week, a coalition of countries will send a resolution to the united nations. it's expected to be one of the strongest condemn nations of u.s. surveillance to date. >> turning tables, a shift concerning the white house's middle east policy. susan rice tells the "new york times" that may president obama wants to take a more moderate approach to the region saying, quote, we can't just be consumed 24/7 by one region. as important as it was, he thought it was a good time to step back and re-assess nap critical no-holds-bar way how we perceive the region.
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she says there is a whole world out there and we have interests and opportunities. the white house, a dramat a push to focus on broader agendas. a move as russia tries to take advantage of a recent rift between the united states and cairo this, after the u.s. is sending aid to egypt this morning. putin subpoena planning a visit to the country in hopes of gaining access to egypt's mediterranean ports. more than 50 have been killed. more than 100 injured in a wave of bombings in iraq. the coordinated attackers targed business streets? baghdad. there has been no claim of responsibility. this has been a deadly month in iraq. more than 600 people killed. sectarian violence is at the
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highest level since 2008. five men accused of plotting the 9-11 attacks are trying to argue against the death penalty. their lawyers say the cism a violated the men's rights by torturing them in secret prisons many relatives say they just don't cared. their loved ones suffered a war worse fate. rosalyn jordan, from the pretry overhearings taking place >> reporter: one of the major decisions that dominated at guantanamo was the matter of torture. the defense wants to be able to bring into the discussion the u.n.'s convention against torture, which would allow their clien clients, the five men accuse did of planning the september 11th attack, to game some sort of redress for the torture they say they suffered when they were in cia custody between 2003 and 2006. one part of the strategy was for one of the defense lawyers to bring in an outside counsel who
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specializes in international war crimes including the matter of torture. however, cheryl boreman was not allowed to bring in toby cadman to talk about what he saw and what he could bring to the local proceedings. here is some of what mr. cadman had to say to reporters. >> if you don't deal with these issues now, it's going to cloud the entire judicial process. and i think this is a very defining moment for the u.s. i think everybody looks at the u.s. as the beacon of human rights and democracy and this is really setting the u.s. back almost into the dark ages. >> reporter: even though the five defense teams have already entered a number of motions trying to get more evidence about the cia's rendition program entered as evidence in this trial, they have also taken the step of writing directly to u.s. president barack obama, asking him to declassify the rendition program because they say, without that information, there are people in the united
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states who will know more about how their clients were treated than they will be able to say in open court. they say in a defense case that involves the death penalty, that's inexcusable. what does the prosecution think of this? >> the public is going to know what the prosecution knows. i mean our case in chief is going to be to the public. there won't be any so-called correct evidence. >> the next pre-trial hearing in the 9-11 case won't be heard until december. during that time, you are going to see more efforts to try to bring up more of the questions about torture and how it might affect the outcome of this trial brought into play in a number of filings. there is no possibility of the trial starting at this point before 2015. >> that was al jazeera's rosalind jordan in guantgaubt bay. the united states could squander billions of dollars in after gran stanchion once troops are withdrawal.
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they say the troops will just no longer be around. military officials say the lack of troops will make it harder to keep tabs on construction work. that includes 15 current projects that are already bank rolled, like $230 million being spent on a highway, a $75 million installation of a new turbine at a damn and another 60 to $80 million on army basis for the afghan army. these officials say they will have to turn to private contractors, and that will add another $200 million to the growing afghan budget. any news is good news these days for kathleen sebelius and it looks like the health & human services secretary may have found some in the ongoing healthcare debacle. enter the data hub. she praised one of the few error-free portions of the website. she said the speed and performance of the data hub was great saying it's quote a model of efficiency and security. she has been taking heat for the
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p persistent errors and will be grilled wednesday by republican law makes makers. >> a stabbing in brooklyn has left five people dead. new york city police say a suspect is now in custody. they say some of the victims were young children. there are reports there may be additional people injured and police are investigating whether the suspect is related to the victims. one year ago today, the east coast was bracing for what would be a deadly super storm sandy. in the year since, some homes and businesses have been repaired. others, gone for good. as communities have tried to rebuild themselves, there is a shadow group of works who has done a lion's share of the clean-up, undocumented workers. kaelynn ford has their story >> reporter: luciano and alfredo have worked construction for years. in the days after hurricane sandy, they took to the streets to do what they do best. together with other undocumented immigrants, they formed volunteer clean up brigades.
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>> after sandy, thousands of day labors who lived in the same neighborhoods who were affected were among the first responders, way before fema, why before the red cross. they went into neighborhoods. they brought relief to the many people that give them jobs. the homeowners have given them jobs for years. >> daily laborers here worked for free, clearing debris and distributing food and water. >> the people were grateful and very happy that we were there working but they didn't know who we were. we just came up and started helping without being asked to. we felt compelled to do it >> reporter: it's not the first time undowd i am grants have been on the front lines. >> one quarter of the workers were undocumented immigrants according to a 2006 university of california berkeley study. those researchers say the reconstruction after hundred sandy is no different. >> in katrina they came to help
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with efforts but in new york, we have tens of thousands of undocumented workers who were directly affected themselves by the hurricane. so they are helping others who can afford the rebuilding process but they could not every day rebuilding their own dwellings. >> without access to gos federal assistance, maybe rely on say th this. they offer safety equipment and training. >> we didn't know anything about safety in the beginning. we didn't even have gloves. now, we are going to osha classes to learn about safety, to learn how to clean out mold, to be prepared. >> a year later, day laborers say their communities have also changed. >> people looked at us different after the help we offered them. the americans who once looked at us suspiciously in the street, now when we see them, they say hi to us. >> that's when we realized what had changed after hurricane sandy. >> the irony is while the
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operations discuss the future of the 12 million undocumented immigrants in this country, those undocumented immigrants are defining the future of many neighborhoods. this is a case of sandy, a case of new orleans. it was day labor who rebuilt that. it was day labor who brought back the sense of community >> reporter: communes these i am grasped are saying -- these immigrants are saying are stronger than ever. from network. eboni deon. starting off with wet weather as you make your way out across the southern plains. it's starting to shift a little further south, bringing rain into parts of southeastern texas around the houston area. we are also going to see that rain kind of spreading its way
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eastward, eventually getting into the mississippi valley. also, a nice warming trend on top as well. first, let's get you a close-up on where we have the rain. no severe thunderstorm warnings at this time. we are expecting heavy lane to positive moved in to houston and we could also be delivered some strong wind gusts as well as the possibility of small hail. any travel plans along, say, i-10, you might want to hold off until the rain moves out of the area and conditions will gradually improve throughout the day with scattered activity as we head into the afternoon. in the northeast, a clipper system moved in yesterday, light showers hanging on around boston area this morning. all in all, much of the northeast will enjoy mostly dry afternoo afternoons. temperatures will be on the cool side for some of you. notice this morning, we aren't seeing widspread 30s and 40s and we have a of 45 degrees degrees in atlanta. it's 48 in d.c., 48 degrees in new york city. when you womcompare that to whe
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we were yesterday, high temperatures as much as 12 degrees milder. yesterday, we were all the way down to 28 degrees. we are not feeling that bitter cold air this morning across the southeast. even as we head through the day, high temperatures are going to warm up nicely getting back to where we should be for this time of year around atlanta, climb to go a high of about 70 drivers degrees. we will make it into the mid 60s, closer to 80 degrees in houston. maybe not as warm yesterday thanks to the clouds and wet weather. that will hold our numbers down. we will feel the heat across the southwest and we are expecting a cool down into the northwest. >> that's where we are expecting a winter storm to get going as we head into the later afternoon. that will spread snow across the inter mountain west. some snow will be heavy at times. that's why we have a winter storm warning in effect for much of montana. >> eboni bdeon, thanks. >> sicily's mount aetna sent
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streams of red-hot lava in the sky. while there were no evacuations in the area. air traffic was disrupted and flights were delayed. this is the 14th time aetna has e resulted just this year. a record oil discovery in algeria. officials say they have discovered more than a billion barrels of oil in the southernrageon. the country will rely on fracking and al year i can't is one of the largest natural gas suppliers to europe and the energy giant in africa. refugees in search of a letter life is part of our special team coverage. a look at who they are, why they are leaving, and where they are headed. plus conscious clothing, the growing trend by retailers to know where their clothes are coming from and how they are being made.
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all this weekend, al jazeera america has been looking into the increasing number of deaths for people around the world willing to risk everything they
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have. the u.n. says not since 1994 have there been so many refugees. the u.n. also says more than half of all refugees come from just five countries: afghanistan, iraq, syria, somalia and sudan and that war remains the number 1 cause for their flight. afghanistan tops the list, one in every four refugees worldwide is afghan. the majority in pakistan and iran. frequently, the routes are dangerous, often in cramped conditions, on small boats or trucks. and along the way, refugees may face bribery and even abuses. recent ship wrecks in the mediterranean have killed hundreds of migrants which has put more pressure on european leaders but the danger hasn't stopped people from risking everything they have in hopes of reaching a better life. two of the areas that have been flooded by refugees are tunisia, where many my grants come from libya as well as the
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island of lampadusa where refugees have arrived. we are covering the story from both place. we have nozinina but first to barn bephillips in italy. i understand you are standing at one of the primary boat ports in europe. >> that's the first glimpse of europe that most refugees ever see. what are some of the dangers people face trying to even get to that point? >> well, they have to come across hundreds of miles in some cases on badly maintained boats often with not enough fuel, without the navigational skills or abilities, and that's why you see so many tragedies out in the middle of the mediterranean, the significance of where i am. i am on that little island, lampadusa, a few square miles of barren rock and scrub but if you are coming on one of those boats, say, from libya or
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tunisia, for example, this is the first part of europe that you will reach. it's been voted the most beautiful beach in europe. but how easy it is to forget the drama and tragedy that plays out every day just a few miles offshore from lampedusa. the italian navy has sent one of its bigger ships to help with the crisis. we were on board and at the hold found a pathetic cargo: 318 people picked up at sea the previous time. most of the africans are young men. many are aratrayans. they paid smugglers thousands of dollars to flee their country. it is very dangerous >> reporter: then there are the syrians, of all ages. none know what will happen next.
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some are too young to understand where they are. they are registered straight away. the navy will take them to sicily because lampedusa is struggling with the immigrants it already has. but this is not an italian program. >> the biggest part of these i am grasped wish to go to germany, norway and other parts of europe that have a more flourishing economy. this is a historical situation in which people are leaving their homeland because of the change of the climate, because of wars. so it's a massive activity. >> reporter: this is the center which the i wanted alian authorities built to house migrants. there is always a lot more here at these days. there are over 700 inside. we were not given permission to
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enter. so through the fence, we spoke mohammed from damascus. how was his sea journey? >> so dangerous, so crowded. the waves, the sea, like you say, it's too dangerous >> reporter: what do you want now? what is your dream for the future? >> to complete my studies. so to have respect. >> lampe dusa was a sleepy place known for fishermen in some sense but now it has a fame it never desired, the island which people risk everything to reach. now, of course we are approaching winter in the mediterranean. strum typically you would expect the numbers of my grants to drop off.
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but as you can see, the weather is warm. it's very calm and, indeed, over the last few days, more than a thousand migrants have been picked up . >> thank you for joining us. we turn to nozinene. why are so many refugees leaving? >> reporter: well, for various reasons. from north africa, because it's such an easy route for them, particularly in lib 830,000 or so people have left from libya since the beginning of the year. there is very little security there. the tunisian government tamped down on this coast guard making it far more difficult for people to leave onbosis. we are closer to where barnaby is right now than, say, in libya. but people are leaving for economic reasons. you speak to tunisians leaving from here. they have no chance no, hope of finding jobs here and, of
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course, there are people fleeing from war in somalia and aratraya. and they are making their way all the way to libya and to this coast line to try to get to europe. >> nazine, thank you for being with us. meanwhile, millions of people in kenya lack sufficient access to save drinking water. the u.n. says it's creating a sanitation crisis but a new discovery has potential to change the country's water dm dilemma. >> children and grandchildren on a daily search for water in kenya's dry county. there is a drought in some parts. that means they have to go farther and dig deeper to get the water. and when they find the water, it does not matter how bad it is, they have to make do. water-borne diseases are common.
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they have not heard about the discovery of a large volume of underground water 30 kilometers from her home. >> getting food and water has always been a struggle for my family and i. if what you are saying is true, then our life will change. i just hope it's not just another false promise. >> this is one of the two aqua fears that have been discovered. they may be large enough to supply the country with water for 70 years. >> people here always knew there was water underground. it's called t"the land of water where regions immediate to, a life line to thousands. >> drought-related deaths are common in this region. lorbeck shows us his father's grave. such deaths are what the government want to stop. the water will be crucial for
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irrigation with a good supply to water, it can produce enough feed to dis stain its people. >> our first priority is to ensure the community benefit from the water. there are thereaf, we can see how the rest of the country can also enjoy these resources. >> it will take a while of the water reaches each person. this family, on hearing about the discovery, moves closer to the acqui fer sealed of now. they decided today move on. they head into the sudan, maybe into sudan, itself, a two-day journey. they hope by the time they come back, they won't have to move again. katherine soi. al jazeera. >> a crucial election for a u.s. ally as voters go to the poll.
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it will ruhis bill yon air cands expected to win the presidential election. 23 other candidates are on the ballot. voters are heading to the poles in argentina today where congressional mid-term e elections are being held and will determine if president christina kershner will be allowed to run for a third term. poles indicate the ruling party will lose ground and president kersher has been sidelined from subject from a blood clot in her brain. >> busy owners turn to gun-free zone. >> internships, they are coveted position by many college students, but should they be paid? the media giant has thrust the issue back into the spotlight. >> i am mark morgan, just when you thought you had seen everything, the world series serves up an ending that will be talked about for years.
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>> every sunday night al jazeera america presents... gripping films from the worlds top documentary directors tonight, a sherrif who implements the law... >> we investigated, arrested and detained 33,000 illegal aliens... >> the young girl who sufferes from it... >> i never thought this would happen to my parents... >> one issue, different sides, yet they remain two americans. premiers tonight,
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9 eastern welcome back. i am morgan radford. protesters marriott streets of the nation's capitol calling for a change. hundreds call for congress to investigate the nsa. this comes as a report in a german magazine claims the u.s. monitored german chancellor merkel before she was in. the call more more tres piece has spread to guantanamo gay. lawyers very long a request for president obama. they want him to declassify details of the cia's secret interrogation program because they argue the program was an act of torture. that prevents the men from a fair trial. >> contackathleen says the spee performance is a model of efficiency and security.
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sebelius will be grilled wednesday by republican lawmakers will healthcare.com.gov. hundreds of businesses in seattle are declaring themselves to be gun-free zones posting signs that say no firearms welcome. tonya moseley tells us why >> reporter: 5 points has been here. every famous musician has been kicked out. seattle's 5 point gaffe ane went gun free. >> i like guns. i don't think people need to carry guns to get a hamburger. >> owner dave meinert at the urging of the mayor helps recruit others to declare themselves gun-free zones as well. >> the idea is if a lot of private businesses get together and ban guns, it makes carrying guns kind of an unfriendly thing in seattle and changes the conversation around gun ownership. >> reporter: week, another business joined that conversation.
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the 100th since august. it doesn't take much to do it. sign up online and sdmrdisplay sticker. these businesses are taking action because the city hasn't been able to. >>reporter: for years, the see of seattle tried to ban guns in public places like this park. but the washington state courts ruled that cities have no authority to regulate guns. >> the private businesses can regul regulate. they can tell people to wear shoes and shirts and tell them to leave their guns elsewhere. >> we think the gun-free zone is stupid. >> alan got lieb founded the foundation. he is wanting stricter state background checks. as for gun free zoneses, he says there are thousands of businesses. having 100 sign up isn't much to brag about. they don't stop any crimes from happening. they don't make people safer. you know, but it's private property. if a person wants to go do it and alienate gun owners who might go there and shop or spend
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money, that's their privilege. >> back at the 5 point, owner dave meiner. it says he hasn't lost business but he has seen threats of boycotts and bad reviews. for him, declaring his business gun-free is a statement worth making. >> it is a symbolic thing for sure. i mean we don't think that by declaring gun-free zones we are going to, that, alone, is going to end gun violence. but i think it is a symbolic thing and in a political battle, symbolism has an effect, and it's important. the anti-gun violence group washington cease fire is coordinating this campaign. it's leaders say groups in other parts of the country have approached them to see how to get similar programs up and running. tanya moseley, al jazeera, seattle. >> cease fire is planning a day of amendments rally where families will plant daffodils to remember those who lost their lives to gun violence. for the first time, cadets
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will no longer have to say the phrase, "so help me god." they say the reference to god is now optional. the change comes after complaints that the god reference violates the constitution. the academy agreed saying the change respects all cadets including those who are not religious. for college undergraduates, internships are widely considered the best way to get your foot in the door, so to speak. some internships pay, many only compensate in the form of course credit. former unpaid interns have taken their former employers to court in order to recoup lost wages and overtime pay. just this week, con day nastee di decided to end it's internship program. our next guest did that. he took his former employer to work for fox searchlight pictures where he worked on the
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20 film. >> thank you, morgan. >> i, myself, took some unpaid internshi internships, in part, because i think the company was teaching me more than i could offer them at the time. so what would you say to interns who feel like unpaid experience is better than no experience at all? >> well, i would say experiences like yours are lucky, and for every good internship that's a true learning experience, there are a hundred that amount to nothing more than wage theft, an employer taking, oftentimes, an entry-level job, slapping the word intern on it and sthinking they don't have to pay for the intern any more. >> wage staff? >> wage theft. >> wage theft. okay. the minutes you become staff, though, the rules change. i mean one of the best things one could argue about being an intern is that it's a very low-fixed game. you are soaking up information. you are not really a threat to other employees. but if interns are paid, weill that then suddenly change? >> you talk about the difference when you switch to being paid
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staff. a case was thrown out in new york stave of an unpaid intern claiming sexual harassment and the judge decided since she was not an employee and she wasn't staff, those workplace protection didn't apply to her. she had no standing. >> on the other hand, though, do you think that by, for example, paying interns, perhaps like the one you even mentioned t will open the doors for lower income students? a lot of times, it's wealthier gifts who can every day not top paid. do you think now others will have a chance? >> absolutely. one of the big problems with this practice is that it favors privilege. if you can afford to work for free or your parents can offered to support you or increasingly now that it's depicted to be on people's resumes, people will go into debt in order to do these internships. that is keeping people out of the market plates or really unfairly burdening them at a time when we are facing a historic jobs crisis we haven't seen since the great depression. it's really affecting young adults and most unpaid interns
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are young adults -- more than anybody else. the idea is, for example, that conde naste is going to stop their internship program. what needs to be pointed out is they are stopping unpaid internships. now the work they have been doing will be done by paid staff. >> that's creating jobs. >> okay. you mentioned a did the youth component of this. there is an age component that oven accompanies internships but you were almost 41 when you were an intern. most interns are really half your age. when you think about cases like conde nast, are you worried about the other hundreds of students who may get their footed in the door for the their first job. >> how many jobs do we eliminate to give the handful of young people the opportunity to show their stuff to the $6.87 billion every year? that doesn't make sense. it's not just asking other people tom sacrifice their job
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so some college students can get some experience. >> experience often leads to future jobs? >> but shouldn't the intern who is deriving benefit from the labor being performed in the moment -- >> shell out a little bit, too. okay. i can see that. >> the idea that somehow you are giving interns the opportunity to show their stuff so that somebody else can pay you later, i mean that's sorts of like a trickle-down theory. it just doesn't make any sense. >> a trickle-down theory. former employee at fox search light pictures, thank you? >> thank you for your interest in this story. a little something this morning for twitter to tweet about. the new york stock exchange stage add successful stress test for symptoms ahead of twitter's ip. on. the dry run was a way feet exchange to avoid technical glitches that hinder the debut on the nasdaq last year. the social media site is expected to sell shares around $20 apiece.
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an arrest in connection with that accident up in north carolina state fair. police arrested the carnival ride's operators after investigategations show the ride was tampered with. he faces several counts. people were hurt when the ride restarted as passengers were getting off. three of of the five are in the hospital. major you are going to your wild's weekend football game and then seeing this. >> that's a hot air balloon that ran into trouble over marietta, georgia. two 4th grade teams were playing. a parent shot this video from the stands. all of the children got off of the field in time. no one aboard the balloon was injured either. the game resumed once the balloon was cleared.
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mark morgan is here with sports. there was a wild finish. >> we have had thrilling come from-behind but the ending last night will likely be dissected for years. >> let's show you. jake on the hill. cards on the first man or mat holliday. it's 1-nothing, st. louis. now, still in the 1st, molina brings holiday around and the cardinals go up 2-zip. first game back in st. louis, cards looking good. boston threatening top of the 6th. 2 to 1, daniel nava. bottom of the 7th, holliday again hitting 385 in the series. this shot down the left field line scores carpenter and car loss belt ron 4 to 2, cardinals. the drama starts to build from there. top of the 8th now, two out, runners on the corners, a run in.
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zand are a bogarts, victorino scores. it's full-all. watch this. bottom of the 9th, still tied, two on, jon jay to pedroia and tom tomakia trying to get alap craig. the ball gets away. craig and middle brooks get tangled up. craig raises home. he appears to be out at the plate but the run is allowed because he was called for obstruction. the cards win 5-4, a wild controversial ending. jessica taft was there and sorts it all out >> reporter: in one of the most bizarre endings in world series history, the cardinals take a 2-1 lead in the series by beating boston 5-4 in walk-off fashion. it wasn't without controversy. bottom of the 9th, of course, a rare obstruction call gave them the win. alan craig got tangled up at third basis with will middle brooks. in the end, he was awarded home plate and monday by his
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teammates. >> i am not sure what happened. i know we won. it was a great play by alan obviously with the condition he is in, putting in that effort for the team. happy it borked out in our -- worked out in our favor. >> the bates runner has every right to go unobstructed to home plate. unfortunately for middle brooks, he was right there and there was skakt. so he could not advance to home plate naturally. >> a tough way to have a game end, particularly of this significance, when, you know, will was trying to dive inside to stop the throw. i don't know how he gets out of the way when he is lying on the ground and when craig trips over him, i guess by the letter of the rule, you could say it's obstruction, abobut like you sa that's a tough pill to swallow. >> intentional and not intentional. he just has to clear the path. i know at some time, it's unfair because he is laying on the ground but that's the way the rule is. >> again, the cardinals with a 2-1 lead now in the series with
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the next two games staying right here at bush stadium. game 4 is sunday night, 8:15 p.m. eastern time and both teams, clay bucholtz versus lance lynn. reporting in st. louis, muz your e, jessica taff, al jazeera. >> jessica, thanks so much. another interesting saturday in college football. we begin in the big 10, minnesota hosting nebraska. the huskers had beaten the golfers by an average score of 40 to 9. second quarter, min soap soda on fourth and 10. phillip nellsons finds ingall there. golfers in ha. third quarter, huskers coming back, taylor martinez will find sam cotton for three yarmdz and a touchdown. that td brings within 7. returning from a toe energy that forced him to miss the last three games. now, less than a minute to go, minnesota trying to close the deal. they do. nelson this time with his legs a short 1-yard run.
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futility against the huskers erased 3243mit. cavils are bowl-he wieligiblbow unbeaten and 5th hosting south carolina. south carolina trails by 7. not not you, conner shaw to nick joe's tied after that 2-yard td toss. chauv needs a touchdown to keep it going. he gets it. bruce ellington, that's a td all knotted at 24. second overtime, andrew bagget trying to force a third ot. 24 yards, it goes off of the upright, a virtual chip shot. south carolina upsets mizzu, and johnny manziel hosting ander bill. first quarter, no score. 10 for 10 on this drive that culminates with an 8-yard touchdowns. a and m up 14-zip. manziel deep to mike evans, 43 yard touchdown. manziel 25 of 35 for 305 yards
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and four touchdowns. thing agies route 56 to 24. i am mark morgan. that wraps up your morning sports. hollywood is porning the lots of march that wallace. >> we all have to stay two vaextra hours to make up for the time we lost. ha! >> her familiar voice. she got her start in t.v. on the bob new heart show. she was also on the popular series, murphy brown. she passed away at the age of 70 in los angeles. it's wet this morning heading out across parts of texas. the disturbancific watching since yesterday has gone through texas and oklahoma and starting to dump rain into the houston area. getting out early this morning, you will run into rain. it is heavy at times. no severe thunderstorms out but
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with this strong storm moving into the area, expect a few claps of thunder and the heavy rainfall with strong wind gusts and the heavy rain will continue to try press off into the gulf and eventually we will see more rain spreading eastward into the lower mississippi valley. around jackson, shreveport, it looks like a wet afternoon for you, although as we go into the afternoon hours? >> it's going to be a bit more scattered. not a total washout for the wrap-up to your weekend. elsewhere, we have quiet conditions, big ridge of high pressure keeping upset us quiet and dry for now across the west. it's allowing united states to kind of heat up here across the southwest. into the northeast, i have been watching a clipper system move through the it's bringing light rain along coastal areas of. aside from that, it looks like the rest of the day will be dry. warmer as we head out across the southeast. temperatures around atlanta going up to 70 degrees. we will hit 58 in dc, around 60 degrees in new york. milder air is in place. contrast that with what we are going to find here across the
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northwest. 55 degrees in billings, but as we get into monday, big changes on the way. we are going to feel that chill in the air as the storm system moves into the area. spokane, but we will hit all the way down into the presents around billings all thanks to a storm system really now just starting to get its act together, light rain. overnight tonight, into the day on monday, that winter storm is going to move in across montana. it's going to bring over a foot of snow in the higher elevations. so possibly upwards to about two feet when it's all said and done. winter storm warnings are posted here it's also going to be bluste blustery. that will blow that snow around and make it difficult to see out roadways. morgan back to you. >> thanks so much, eboni. six months since a high-rise garment factory killed more than a thousand workers. now, some clothing companies here in the u.s. say they are working to improve safety standards for bangladeshi workers.
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kristin saloomi reports >> reporter: in this brooklyn boutique, where and how the clothes are made are just as important as how they look and fit. >> one of the things that we do here is we try to hit all of these categories in some way. >> it's the latest tre, ethical produced fashion. >> i don't know that this store would have been -- would have been able to survive f10 years ago or five years ago but we want a lot of people who want to have conversations about what's happening in bang la. >> a series of factory disasters in bangladesh have helped call attention to the substandard working conditions there. more than 1200 workers died. it's put the spotlight on american clothing companies who rely heavily on bangladeshh factories. a group of 23 u.s. retailers response orders the bangladesh
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worker safety issues. they promised to provide more safety inspections, higher safety standards and $110 million in loans for building improvements. but critics say european efforts have gone much factor. the american initiative allows brands and retailers to retain control of factor inspections, pay nothing towards the v renovation and walk away from the agreement with only minor penalties. al jazeera reached outed to all 23 retailers and the management of the itself. not one would answer our questions on camera. >> if the bangladesh government and factory owners cannot improve the situation unless the brands and retailers are willing to support that process by accepting modestly higher prices for their products. >> it is that demand for lower prices that help drive apparel manufacturing out of new york's famous garment district. at its peak 105,000 made
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clothing here now it's just over 7,000. they make more in one day than bangladeshi workers make in in a month. the safety standards are more stringent not to mention more costly. >> while awareness of bangladesh's problems may be agreeing, it's ette to reach consumers. >> do you think about where your clothes come from and how they are made? >> no. not really. >> we know about it p but we clothe our eyes -- close our eyes on it, i guess. >> the more popular ethical fashion becomes, the more big retailers are likely to change to stay fashion a.m. >> garment workers in bangladesh call to increase worker salaries. the government has not responded. a wisconsin company at the center of a possible listeria
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outbreak has the third recall until just two months. the u.s. agriculture department announced another 50 tongs of meet and 6700 were deemed no good earlier this month. the first retail in september involved more than 19,000 pounds of meat. a religious symbol creating controversy. why images of buddha are stiffering anger in thailand.
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on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced
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>>. >> giraffes may soon become a thing of the past. africa's giraffe population has gone from 140 in the '90s to 80,000 today. conservation say it's due to the rising human population. for the millions of buddists, but in thailand, one
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says it's being used disrespectfully by tourists and rob mcbrie reports from bangkok >> reporter: visitors arriving in thailand, it is a giant billboard that is difficult to miss and with a message to match: don't disrespects buddhism. paid for by "knowing buddha." it says from the tops of french toilet seats to inappropriate add advertisements, commercial an exploitation knowingly or unknowin unknowingyly offends buddhists world wire. >> we expect people who are aware in this campaign, we believe we can make the world listen to us. there is time to speak out >> reporter: if the offenders don't listen to petitionez, their products are boycotted. with 95% of thailand's population being buddhist, they
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are synonymous with thai culture. it presents campaigners with more than enough cases of apparent misuse. for devout buddhist, misuses of the image is oftenive. with the approach of peak holiday season, the tatoo parlors are gearing up for the rush of travelers seeking to etch their bodies. the face of buddha is becoming increasingly popular. tatoo parlor owner calclaude sees no problem with that. himme hindu goes adorn his body. >> the imam is more about art but it has to be placed in the appropriate location. if the tatoo is below the waistline, no matter what their religion, we will refuse to do it. >> but achar abdi?
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>> it is the most obvious case. you should never have it to the body. >> so far, the thai government has resisted calls to legislate against at thtattooing but the prospect it might, sounds an alarm about how to implement such a law. >> they have to the come in here in bangkok and the police arrest them, put them in jail, harass them. whatever. what are you going to do with this? it's going to be very serious. >> almost completely buddhist but with a secular government, for many, tolerance is one of thailand's greatest assets, a virtue worthy of buddha, himself. at the end of our first hour, here is what we are following this morning. the fallout continues over alleged spying by the nsa as new reports surface that the u.s. has been spy on germany's chancellor more than a decade now. susan rice says there is a
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shift in strategy can hing the middle east policy. she tells the "new york times" the add miles per hourstration is taking now a more moderate approach to the region. a deadly day in iraq. 39 people have been killed, 120 injured after 10 car bombings. i am mark morgan. a word obstruction is often used in politics but today, every baseball fan in the country is discussing its definition. we will explain later in sports. >> temperatures will washing back up in the south. a cooldown is expected as the winter storm, with the latest on where over a foot of snow is expected. >> al jazeera continues in two and a half minutes. i am morgan radford.
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devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news. on inside story, we bring together unexpected voices closest to the story, invite hard-hitting debate and desenting views and always explore issues relevant to you.
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al jazeera america - a new voice in american journalism - >> introduces america tonight. >> in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >> an escape from the expected. >> i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. america tonight 9 eastern on al jazeera america
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a new report says the u.s. has been spying on norm's chancellor angela merkel for more than a decade. more backlash and outrage. dozens killed and more than 100 injured after a wave of bombings in iraq. searching for an escape. special coverage of refugees leaving everything behind in hope of a better life. >> hello. welcome to al jazeera america. i am richelle carey in new york.
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>> germany says it is sending senior intelligence officials to washington, d.c. this after reports the nsa has been spying on german chancellor's phone longer than initial reports revealed. a german magazine claims to have seen secret documents from the national security agency. they reportedly reveal the u.s. has been tracking angela merkel's phone since 2002. >> that's before she became chancellor. her number was still on the spy list this year. later this week, a coalition of countries will send a draft resolution to the u.n. it is one of the strongest condemn nations. the nsa has targeted leaders of both of those countries. anger spilled onto the streets. protesters came from several states to voice their frustration, many of them thanking edward snowden for lirringing information about surveillance.
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jean reserve has more >> reporter: in washington, hundreds gathered to protest the national security agency's surveillance programs. the man who made them public was called a hero. former nsa contracto edward snowden sent a statement. >> it's about power, control and trust in government, about whether you have a voice in our democracy or decisions are made for you rather than with you >> reporter: the protester's message to the government: you have been listening to us. so now hear this. >> it may be because we don't know what's going on. it bothers me because every time you send a tweet or an e-mail or take a picture or do anything that involves any kind of data, phoning or anything like th, yo know that that inform information is being out. >> i think people have a right to privacy. >> i support the constitutional view that we should have
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secure -- we should secure from unreasonable skefrnling and seizureearch and seizure. >> deliver to go congress a petition with more than half a million signatures urging that domestic surveillance be stopped. >> it is time to roll back the surveillance state. it is time to restore the fourth amendment. it is time to repeal the patriot act >> reporter: some speakers here acknowledge that many americans are appear path editic and bringing change will not beedes. jean meserv, al jazeera, washington. a significant shift in strategy concerning the middle east policy. national security advisors susan rice tells the "new york times" president obama wants to take a more moderate approach to the renalon. we can't just be consumed 24-7 by one region. important as it is, he thought it was a good time to step back and reassess in a very critical and kind of no-holds-barred way
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how we concede the region. there is a whole world out there. we have got interests and opportunities in that whole world. the new approach by the white house is a dramatic departure from the policies adopted by the bush administration. rice says the president wants to focus on broader agendas. the sunday times says russia president vladimir putin is trying to rekindle ties with egypt, trying to take advantage of a recent rift with the u.s. and cairo. according to the "times," putin is planning a visit to the country in hopes of gaining access tommy script's mediterranean ports. more than 50 people have been killed, more than 100 injured in a wave of bomb inns iraq. the coordinated attacks targeted several shiia districts of bagdan. there has been no claim of responsibility. this has been a deadly month in iraq. more than 600 people killed,
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sectarian violence is at it's. >> highest level since 2008. five machine accuse did plotting the 9-11 attacks are trying to argue against the death penalty. their lawyers say the cia violated the men's rights by torturing them in secret prisons. many relatives and 9-11 victims say they are outraged and their loved ones suffered a far worse fate. the pre-trial heringsats guantgaubt. >> reporter: one of the major issues that dominated the discussion at this week's 9-11 pre-trial hearing at guantgaupt was the matter of torture. the defense wants it to be able to bring into the discussion the u.n.'s convention against torture, which would allow their clien clients, the five men accused of planning the september 11th attack, to gain some sort of redress for the torture they say they suffered between 2003 and 2006. one part of the strategy was for one of the defense lawyers to bring in an outside counsel who
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specializes in international war crimes including the matter of torture. however, cheryl boreman was not allowed to bring in toby cadman to talk about what he saw and what he could bring to the legal proceedings. here is some of what mr. cadman had to say to reporters. >> if you don't deal with these issues now, it's going to cloud the entire judicial process. i thing this is a very defining moment for the u.s. everyone looks at the u.s. as a bike on for human rights and decency of the this is setting the u.s. back into the dark ages. >> the 5 defense teams have entered a number of motions trying to get more evidence about the cia's rendition program entered as evidence in this trial, they have taken the step of writing directly to u.s. approximately president barack anticks asking him to declassify the rendition program because without that information, there are people in the united states
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who may know more about how their clients were treated than they will be able to say in open court. they say in a defense case that involves the death penalty, that's inexcusable. what does the prosecution think of this? >> the approximately public will know what the prosecution knows. i mean our case in chief is going to be to the public. there won't be any so-called secret evidence. >> the next pre-trial hearing in the 9-11 case won't be heard until december. during that time, you are going to see more efforts to try to bring up more of the questions about torture and how it might affect the outcome of this trial brought into play in a number of filings. there is no possibility of the trial starting at this point before 2015. >> that wassays rosalind jordan at guantanamo bay. the u.s. could squabbleder billions of dollars -- squander billions of dollars. the troops who protect projects
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there will no long herb around. it will maybe make it harder to keep tabs on construction projects, things like $230 million being spent on a highway, a $75 million installation after new turbine at a dam. another 60 to $80 million on army posts for the afghan army. these officials say they will have to turn to private contractors and that will add another $200 million to the growing afghan budget. >> a crew usual election for a u.s. alliely as voters go to the poles in georgia for the first time in a while. the current tree is having a very calm presidential election. it will end the decade-long rule of reformist. it will expect to help the base of his rival. his hand picked candidate is expected. 23 other candidates are on the ballot.
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>> an update on the warming trends. hi, eboni? >> this morning, off to a cool start in many locations. across the southeast, warm earn yesterday at this time. in fact, we are as much as 16 degrees warmer in birmingham, 8 in atlanta, 14 degrees warmer in shreveport and houston where the air is milder. we are dealing with thunderstorms rumbling through the area at this time. so, watching out for all of this rain that's been moving crosses oklahoma into texas shifting further south and east. storms are brewing around houst houston, and we do now have a severe thunderstorm warning in effect for the houston area. storms are moving off to the east at about 35 miles per hour. so, a pretty good clip, but they are putting down some heavy rainfall picking up winds. they have been gusting on the order of nearly 35 miles per hour. rain and wind are what you are dealing with around the houston area. wait until the storm passes.
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our warning is up for just about another 20 minutes or so and then once it moves out, we will see rain and storms kind of brewing here over the gulf of mexico. further to the south and east, we will get a little bit of rain as well, mixing in with deposition fog. that will make it difficult to see for travel plans here across southeastern texas. elsewhere across the nation, a clipper system has made its way across the great lakes. we have ling hing light rain showers hanging on around the coastal areas of new england. aside from that as we go through the day, the rain will taper off. we will see mainly a lot of sunshine mixed in with a few clouds but mostly dry for many of you across the northeast. ridge of high pressure in place across the western u.s. keeping us quiet for now. i am watching a developing storm system that will bring snow into parts of the enter mountain west. here across the northeast. >> it's mainly all rain, no snow for our area. we are going to feel a little bit of a bump in our numbers later in the day. but for now, we are at 45 degrees in billings, 33 in
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minneapolis. al cooldown in store across the western u.s. the storm system moves in, we are going to go from the 50s in billings down into the 20s by monday. now, much of your day across montana and idaho will be on the quiet side, at least early on, but once we get past the after hours, that's when the storm system will get going. for now, a few light rain showers clipping northern areas of idaho. we have winter storms up for much of montana, the area shaded in blue. heavy snow and very strong wind gusts. richelle, back to you? >> eboni, thank you. a stanning in brooklyn has left five people dead including a one-year-old child. new york city police say a suspect is in custody. they say four of the victims were children. we are learning others were critically injurand are recovert the hospital. a 37-year-old woman was killed. police are investigating whether the suspect was related to the victims. a big change for a school
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district in oregon. why you may see teachers packing heat in the classroom. refugees in search of an escape route as parted of our special team coverage. a look at who they are, why they are leaving and where they are going to.
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al jazeera is looking for people risking everything. not since 1994 have there been so many refugees. the u.s. says more than half of all refugees come from just five kuntz trees. afghanistan, iraq, syria somalia and sudan. >> one in every four is afghan. the majority of those are now in pakistan and iran. seeking a better life abroad can be filled with difficulties. frequently, the routes are dangerous, often be in cramped conditions on small boats or trucks and along the way, refugees may face extortion and
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abuse. recent ship wrecks have killed hundreds of migrants. >> that's put more pressure on european leaders. the daner hasn't stopped people from trying to reach the shores. . where you are is a primary site, one first places that people first >> rope. talk about the dangers people face getting to that point >> reporter: well, absolutely, lampedusa is a tiny item in the middle of the ned trainian, let's than eight square miles of barren rock and scrub. africa is a few hundred miles to the south of here. people set out on boats provided by smuggling gangs but the problem is that those boats are often in very bad condition. the engines might not be working properly. the navigational equipment isn't well maintained and they can run
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into bad weather. that's why you see the kind of stripling employees which we off off lampedusa's water earlier this month. the significance of this little island, none the less is that for those my grants coming from the middle east, from african kun countries, this is the first part of europe they reach. >> it's been voted the most beautiful beach in europe, but how easy it is to forget the drama and tragedy that plays out every day just a few miles offshore from lampedusa. the it al engineer navy sent one of its biggerships. we found 318 people picked up at sea the previous night. most of the africans are young men. many are aratrayans. they paid thousands of dollars to flee their country.
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it is very dangerous. so many younger persons. >> then there are certificateians of all ages. none of them know what will happen next. some are too young to understand where they are. they are registered straight away. the navy will take them to sicily because lampedusa is struggling. this is not just an italian problem. >> definitely nod because the biggest part of these immigrants wish to go in germany, norway and other parts of europe that in this moment, i have a more flourishing economy. this is a historical situation in which people are leaving the home land because of the change of the climate, because of wars. so it's a massive activity. >> this is the center which the italian authorities built to
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house migrants. it's built for maximum 300 people. but there are always a lot more than that these days. at the moment, there are over 700 inside. we were not given permission to enter. >> so through the fence, we spoke to mohammed from damascus. how was your sea journey? >> so dangerous. so crowd. the waves and the sea, like you say, it's too dangerous >> reporter: what do you want now? what is your dream for the future? >> to complete my studies. so to have respect. >> lampedusa was a sleepy space known for fishermen but now it has a fame it never desired, as the island people risk everything to reach.
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>> reporter: winter is approaching now on lampedusa, but there is no sign of these rifles slowing down. so people on this island bracing themselves for more migrants from the south. but now, back to you in new york. >> thanks to barnaby. egypt has experienced rejoints. nazanene is there >> reporter: on the coast lined, coast guard has clamped down on migrants. they are making the journey to libya. we understand since the beginning of the year, 30,000 have made that treacherous journey across these seas to europe. now, libya at the moment has no agreement with italy in terms of deporting people back and, also, there are security problems in the country. there is a porous region of
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thousands of kilometers. also, very little security on the coastline, so that is why migrants are able to leave. they are leaving for different reasons, sdmik reasons because they can't find work back home but, also, fleeing war, particularlyeconomic reasons because they can't find work back home but, also, fleeing war, particularly human rights abuses in places like ethiopia. they are paying thousands of dollars to get on boats and they can't stay in places like libya for very long. if they do, they will be arrested and detained. >> al jazeera, authorities say they have discovered a new rich oil field that contains more than a billion barrels of oil. it will rely on fracking and unconventional techniques to extract half of the oil reserves. algeria is an energy joint in africa. somalia has been plagued by violence for years. it's where many of life's basic netsties are lucketts re. now, gas stations are opening up.
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al jazeera's al shal reports. >> this is what a petro station in mogadeshu looks like. using gerry cans. the situation in the city in the past has been so bad >> no company wanted to risk investing in the somali capitol. now, a significant but calm has been restored that has allowed three pet roll stations to reopen. >> the improvsecurity encourageo open the station. they can buy good quality petrol at a reasonable price. >> now it means drivers don't run the risk of damaging their vehicles with corrupted petrol. >> this fuel is better and cleaner. it's better for the engine. before, the fuel would be ruined because it wasn't being stored properly. hopefully, these petrol stations will get rid much all of the problems. >> with somali vendors selling
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petrol ol street corners, the government faces a challenge of including or appeasing them as it goes ahead with the drive to open more petrol pumps. >> we are in consultations with the street vendors. we have given them a grace period, and soon, we will issue a law banning the sale of fuel except at licensed petrol pumps. >> it has cost many their life. it result in fires breaking out, in some cases, destroying entire neighborhoods. >> the hope is that with the reopening of these stations, at least one part of everyday life in somalia will be safer. jamal al shad. >> heading to the polls for congressional mid terms e elections in argentina to determine if the third will be allowed to run for a third term. poles indicate tshe has been
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sidelines. chronic absenteeism, members barely attend parliament sessions as al jazeera maha mahar satar reports. they have been boycotted for years. >> heated arguments used to be common in bangladesh's parliament. those source of confrontations have been rare. it's not because the political parties have learned to get alo along. there has been no one to argue with. the opposition mvp have skipped over 80% of the working days in parliament. >> appear important part of a parliament's work is representing their constituents. they are supposed to talk about issues that affect the individuals who voted them into the parliament so if a member of parliament doesn't attend parliament or the sessions which we refer to as the pleniary, et
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cetera dprooid depriving his constituents of being heard. it does hurt. >> instead of critiquing government policy, they have boycotted parliament and taken to the streets instead. a 7 arior opposition leader says they have no choice. >> the speaker shutting down the microphones of the opposition. the opposition submitted 205,000 adjournment motions in the span of the first four years of this parliament. would you believe? the government has not accepted a single notice. >> the ruling is the culture of by boycotting parlor parl. since then, things have become worse. the public is frustrated with the behavior much both political parties. >> the ruling party thinks it can do whatever it wants while the opposition feels there is no
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point in doing or saying anything. in this environment, maybe you would be boycotting parliament yourself. >> to avoid it, they are negotiating a power higher sharing deal. very few people are banking on its success. al jazeera. we are just receiving reports five people were killed in cl k clashes in bangladesh today. the opposition was trying to enforce a nationwide general strike today. >> indonesia's c capitol is saying no to monkey busy, cracking down on roadside monkey show. so they want top buy the monkeys and shelter them. the owners will receive vocational training. they say the ban stops animal abuse and the spread of disease by the monkeys. >> an oregon school board has voted to allow teachers to carry
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guns. the board says anyone is allowed to carry guns with a permit and to deny them to carry would be denying them their rights. there are seven schools in saint helens. businesses in seattle are declaring themselves good-free zones. tanya tells us why >> reporter: five points, been here for 84 years, sort of not orous. every famous musician has been kicked outed. >> the five points cafe was one of the businesses to go gun-free. >> i like guns. i don't think people need to carry guns to get a hamburger >> reporter: owner dave meinert helps recruit other seattle business businesses? >> if a lot of private businesses get together and ban guns, it marries carrying guns an unfriendlier think in seattle and changes the kursks around
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gun ownership. >> this week, another business joined that conversation, the 100ths since august. sign up online and display a sticker. these businesses are taking action because the city hasn't been able to. for years, the city of seattle tried to ban guns in public places like this park. but the washington state court ruled cities have no authority to regulate guns. private businesses can regulate. they can tell people to wear shoes and shirts and they can tell them to leave their guns elsewhere. >> we think the gun-free zone concept is stupid. >> alan got lieb founded the second amendment foundation in 1974. his group is collecting signatures for stricter gun sale checks. he says there are thousands of businesses in seattle. having 100 sign up isn't much to bra brag about.
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>> they don't stop crimes or make people safer. it's private property. if a person wants to do it and alienate gun owners who might spend money, it's their privilege to do so. >> at the five points, owner dave minert says he hasn't lost busy but he has seen threats of boycotts and bad reviews. for him declaring his business gun free is a statement worth making? >> it is symbolic for sure. we don't think that by declaring gun-free zones, we are going to -- that, alonetion, is going to ends gun violence. it is symbol i and in a political battle, symbolism has an effect. and it's important. >> the anti-gun violence group washington cease fire is coordinating this campaign. it's leaders say groups in other parts of the country have approached them to see how to get similar programs up and running. tanya moseley, al jazeera, seattle. >> cease fire is planning a day of rememberance rally sunday in seattle. families will plant dav dils to
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remember those who lost their lives. a shift in mid east policy. the white house says it's stranging its long-term strategy in the region. >> when you thought you had seen everything, the world series serves up an ending that will be talked about for years. bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life.
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>> every sunday night al jazeera america presents... gripping films from the worlds top documentary directors tonight, a sherrif who implements the law...
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>> we investigated, arrested and detained 33,000 illegal aliens... >> the young girl who sufferes from it... >> i never thought this would happen to my parents... >> one issue, different sides, yet they remain two americans. premiers tonight, 9 eastern welcome back to al jazeera american. germany's senior intelligence officials are sentence to washington after reports that the cia has been spying on angela merkel for a decade. a string of car bombings across the iraq's capital city. national security vectors susan rice told the "new york times" the region is less of a priority saying there is a whole world out there and we have
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interests and opportunities in that world. joining us to discuss the significance is dr. jason boyce. good to talk to you dr. boyce. let's talk about these comments. put dr. rice's commence in some perspective for us. >> good morning to speak to you as always. let's think about this for a moment. what is dr. rice saying? she wants to secure an arms deal with iran. she wants to peace with israeli and the palestinians and a peace deal effectively with syria. guess what: any one of these would be a major investment of administration time, effort and inclination. to secure all three of them is an i am possibility, especially when you consider this administration has three years left in office and in 12-months time on will have gone through the mid-term elections and a lame duck era will have kicked in. the great challenge, if this is
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a scaling back, where had it originally its intentions place. this is no mean feat. >> do you think this signals they will back off of those that you just outlined? >> one of those are the outlined efforts susan rice has coined. any one of these three areas be it peace between israel and palestine, the peace in syria or securing a nuclear deal with iran, any one of those would be a major achievement for this administration. all will require focused attention from this president. and for the last five years, president obama really has singularly failed to engage in this region. he has constantly farmed outed the region, first to george mitchell in the first term. when that failed, john kerry has taken a very personal approach to securing peace between the israeli and the palestinians.
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talks are ongoing. but this is by know means a scaling back of administration policy. this is very much al huge investment of administration time and effort. and to suggest otherwise is quite frankly as far as cal by dr. riric rice. >> sawedy arabia has threaten today break with the obama administration, angry about its middle east policies. how serious of a threat is this? >> reporter: >> this is the great problem because what dr. rice and the president have done is to basically put the out there its ambitions for the next three years. of course, by doing that, it's revealed its hand. i don't know if you have played cards but i look to play poker because they are so bad at keeping cards close to their chest. if you are saudi arabia or israel, you are looking at this series of priorities priced and thinking, what about your friends and allies in the region? the administration appears to be talking about peace deals with
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israel and palestinians, peace in syria and fundamentally negotiating with iran. those are all very, very problematic areas if you are in the leadership in saudi or in israel, for example. so, it's very clear that when you have the sort of leverage comic delithat saudi arabia does with regard to purchasing weapons and aircraft from the united states, it has the ability to try to hold u.s. policy to ransom. whether it will do so will be efficient tosty in the coming days, weeks and months. >> has the obama administration had any successes in the middle east? perhaps in probation with iran, progress that the u.s. hasn't had in quite some time? any successes as you see it? >> i think what's interesting here, richelle, is the fact that a lot of the breakthroughs with regard to iran appear to be coming from the iranian side. it appears it was tehran who approached washington with regards to discussions about new negotiations after the recent e elections and that the white
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house has been very reactive in this fashion. if you think, for example, about how its approach to egypt has been taken place, whether it would sub port must be arrestac or not -- mubaric. that has gone very badly wrong. the only person i think who has emerged in this region with his reputation intact and if not in answered, vladimir putin has played a cunning game and has very much, i think, caught the americans off guard and appears to be doing so again with regard to egypt by talking about a fourth coming state visit, an attempt to try to secure a new deal with regard to the egyptian lead he wereship there. power 0 is a zero sum game. if the americans try to withdraw, the russians will step up. the united states could find itself natural difficult situation with regard to future allies in that part of the world. >> surely, it takes two for these things to work. i understand you are saying that iran initiated it, but it takes
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two. it takes iran and the u.s. being receptive? >> it does. ply pointed is this: it's great that the iranians are coming guard and the americas are engaging in reciprocal dialogue along with the permanent group plus germany. my point is that this has a wider effect. by talking to the iranians, that immediately puts fears in the israeli leadership and with regard to the saudi leadership, both of whom are very suspicious of the regime in tehran. while it's great the americans and iranians are talk okay a bigger picture. it's understandable why local american allies in that region are naturally coarcts. it's america's interest to d placate those fears. >> i have one more question: let's talk about the nsa. and the spying controversy and these revelations that are coming out.
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in particular, that the german chance lor, angela merkel, that her phone records have been tapped into for years before she was the chancellor. is this the type of thing that goes on behind the scenes between even allies that we just aren't privy to and now that we are, there is a certain dance that has to happen? >> i think so you are quite right to be honest. any one of us realizes we really shouldn't commit to e-mail anything that we wouldn't want read out in an office environment. if you go back 25 years, it was revealed that prince charles and his then wife, diana had their
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phones intercepted 25 years ago. there is no way that a current head of state should be in any way surprised that the americans, in particular, have the ability to eavesdrop. guerrini she can't be surprised, i don't think. >> having said that, dr. boys, going forward, if more revelations continue to come out does it change the dynamic?
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>> it's embarrassing to the united states this material has came out. em sure they rue the day that they employed he hadsnowden. fundamentalsly, it's imports to note that the allies here in europe, for example, are heavily dependent for security protection. many people outside of the united states mock how much america spends on defense. i don't think you will see a
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rupture despite some posturing. >> great to talk to you. senior research fellow in london. have a great day. thank you. marshaled at nat sent ash into the sky. no reports of damage or evacuations in the area. >> appear pending snowstorm for parts of the. ♪ northeast. let's talk about that with eboni dion. >> hi. at least for now, things are quiet across much of the western u.s. there is just a few small areas of concern that we are dealing with. this big ridge of high pressure keeping us mostly quiet at least for now. changes on the way, already starting to see a little bit of light rain across northern areas of washington as well as northern idaho and spokane, we
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are dealing with fog of it's the witnesser weather we are watching outed for. over montan in the northern rockies, those higher peaks up to a foot or two feet of snow. lots of snow. strong winds. >> that's going to blow that snow around. here is a looking at the timing of it overnight as we get into the early part of the day on monday. >> that's when the snow will start to move in. we could see upwards to about five inches of snow before it's all said and done and most of that will fall again on monday in their areas. that slides off to the south and east through this area. temperatures are going to take a big dive. by tomorrow, 29 degrees around billings. our cooling trend will countinu. here into alaska >> high pressure is battling with a storm system moving in, bringing strong winds as well as rain into the anchorage area.
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richelle? >> eboni, thank you. imagine going to your child's weekend football game and seeing this. >> what is going on? >> a hot air balloon ran into trouble saturday over mayrietta georgia, a suburb of atlanta. it came right down a football field. there are two fourth grade teams trying to play. a parent shot this video from the stands complete with the natural reaction you hear there as well. all of the children got off of the field in time. no one aboard the balloon was injured either. the game even resumed after the balloon got out of the way mark morgan is here with sports. there was a wild, wild finish in last night's world series game. you have never seen anything like this? >> what is going on? gauge 3, because it did not follow any previous script, an ending that will undoubtedly discussed for years.
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game starts innocently enough. peavy on the hill for the red sox. a man on for mat holliday, a single to right that will score matt carpenter, st. louis with a 1-nothing lead. in the 1st molina brings holliday around with this single. the cardinals go up by a score of 2-zip. the drama starts to build a bit. red sox trailing 2 to 1, not now, tied at 2. holliday, hitting 385 in the series. shot down the left field lines 4-2 cards: top of the 8th, boston trying to come back, twoouts, runners on the corners, run in for the red sox. zander bogarth. little chopper. going to get through? yeah. vi still tied, 2 on the dpoord woo
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middle broncs called for obstruction. cardinals win 5 to 4. a controversial ends can. the umpires explained their ruling. >> the base runner has every right to go unobstructed. for middlebrooks, unfortunately he was right there. there was contact. so, he could not advance to home plate naturally. >> tough way to have a game end, particularly of this significance, when will is trying to dive inside to stop the throw when craig trips over him, i guess by the letter of the rule, you could say it's obstruction but that's a tough pill to swallow. >> intentional or not intention. he just has to clear the path.
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i know sometimes it's unfair because he is laying on the ground but that's the way the rule is. >> now, the n.f.l. was interested in becoming the global phenomenon that the nba has become. to that end, several teams are playing games in london each season and as lee we willings tells us, one n.f.l. is upping the ante across the pond. >> the n.f.l. has a significant fan base in england and increasingly, england is appealing to the biusinessmen wo own sports franchises, the jacksonville jaguars have signed up to play one game a year in london until 016, the latest against the san francisco 49ers. their owner wants to build a giant fan base in england. >> i think n.f.l. needs to grow. there are fans that like to see n.f.l. games. we would like to be a part of it. jacksonville jaguars. we need more fans. >> is there any prospect that you will move the jacksonville jaguars here to london permanently? >> i don't think you can rule
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anything out or in at this point. it's very exploratory, experimental stage to see what the fans want. and what the league can provide. >> now, mr. khan has moved in to english football, becoming the 6th american owner of a premier league club. finance, around $250 million. the club he has baud is fullham, traditionally, a small friendly club in southwest london but crucially, they have a place among football's 20 elite clubs. >> fulham may not have the global appeal of neighbors chelsea but khan is not to be underestimated. he manufactured car parts and built a fortunate of over $3,000,000,000. now, he's behind the wheel of fulham. >> i think this is a special place. i looked at premier league as to, you know, if it would make sense for us to have a relationship, some kind of a
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relationship. and when it was all said and done, there was really only one club that kind of fit the bill. >> he says manager martin moles job is safe. the jaguars have had a worse start. seven straight defeats. they have appreciated the chance for team bonding in the u.k. but what if it was more permanent? >> i mean moving everybody out here. i wouldn't want to be somebody who moved out here unless you move my whole family out. i mean i wouldn't doubt it if it did happen. >> whether it's basketball, hockey, soccer or n.f.l., the link between american franchises and english sport continues to grow. >> khan has not ruled out the prospect that one day, wimberly stadium in london won't be a big day out. it will be hope. lee we willings, al jazeera, london. >> i am mark morgan. that wraps up your morning sports. >> much more to come on
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al jazeera america. keep it here. >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. >>an escape from the expected. on august 20th, al jazeera america i
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many women in india a paying a high price for speaking up for themselves. over the years, there has been an increasing number of acid attacks t people are urging the government to take action. we are going to warn you, some of the images you are going to see are disturbing. tra >> it's been about a year since acid did this. her uncle threw acid on her. >> my life has changed so much. i didn't think i would survive. >> from the chest. >> she has survived but it's difficult for her to hold back the tears. all she wants is to come close to having a normal life. >> i think if i can get better, i can get a job, then i will be able to take care of myself. >> in the meantime, it's her family and friends who are taking care of her. the same can't be said for the
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government. the latest victim of an acid attack is recovering in this hospital outside of mum by. her family -- mumbai. her family is frustrated from the lack of the government assisting her or present this attack. >> we are told there is no money in the fund until november. what are we supposed to do until then? it's not enough for the government to have a fund. they have to create awareness. >> it doesn't matter if it's a public place like this or secluded. experience shows no place is safe from an acid attack. those fighting for change say it will only change when the government cracks down on those who sell the attacks and on tho those. >> t restriction i will sav of acid, it's easy to buy. >> once you are sent to jail for
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10 years, after that, you will go free. what about the girl who has been thrown acid? she is in prison for life. >> dr. gupta is a plastic surgeon has helped survivors of acid attacks. some as young as nine and as old as 70. he believes the only way to stop these crimes is to end the sale of acid. >> unless we make the vendor also equally responsible they should also be published. >> she agrees if people can't buy acid, they won't be able to throw it. a simple solution from someone who now faces a difficult life. fez jamil, al jazeera, mumbai. >> an organize for acid survivors says it's hard to pinpoint how many acid victims there are worldwide because many women are too scared to report the attacks fearing reprisal. for the millions of
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buddists, it's buddists, it's a symbol of peace. some say it's being used disrespectfully by locals and tourists. from bankok. >> for visitors arriving in thailand, it is a giant billboard difficult to miss and with a message to match: don't addition respect buddhism. paid for by knowing buddha, a group that campaigns against the use of buddha's image. an exploitation knowingly or unknowingly causes offense to millions worldwide. >> we expect once we address the issue and people are aware of this campaign, we believe that we can make the world listen to us. there is time to speak out. >> and if the offenders don't listen to perks their products are boycotted. with 95% of thailand's population being buddhist, the
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images are synonymous with tie culture. it presents campaigners with more than enough cases of aapparent misuse. for devout buddhists, misuse of the image is offensive. none more so than when that is tatooed on the bottom. >> the tatoo parlors of bank cock are gearing up for travelers eking to etch their bodies. in the face of buddha is becoming increasingly popular. tatoo parlor owner sees no problem with that. >> hindu gods as well as buddhist scriptures adorn his body. he says it's form of worship. >> it has to be placed in the appropriate location. if the tatoo is below the waistline, no matter what the religio religion, we will refuse to do it. >> but acharabadi says that's
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not it? >> the body having sex, that's the most obvious case. so you should never at all have it into the body >> reporter: so far, the thai government has resisted calls to legislate against tattooing but the prospect it might sounds an alarm for those concerned about how to implement such a law. >> they have to come in here in bangkok and the police arrest them, put them in jail, harass them. whatever. what are you going to do with this? it's going to be very serious >> reporter: almost completely buddhist, but with a secular government, tolerance is one of thailand's greatest assets, a virtue worthy of buddha, himself. >> about six % of the world identifies themselves as buddhists. something this morning for twitter to tweet about. the new york stock exchange haul a successful test for a stress
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test to avoid technical glitches. the social media company is expected to go public by next month sharing sales about $20 each n.f.l. officials have agreed to meet with tribal leaders. the talks come weeks after the tribe hosted a recent symposium in washington, d.c. they contend the name is offensive and derogatory to native americans. the redskins have resisted called to change the name. talks are scheduled to take pla place. that will do it for this edition of al jazeera, thank you for your time. for the latest headlines, go to our website, aljazeera.com. more after the break
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(vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. >> share your story on tv and online.
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this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts.
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>> this is al jazeera. ♪ >> and you join me david foster for the al jazeera news hour. these are the stories we are looking at in detail. in the next 60 minutes. desperate people, desperate measures. >> we look at the daily dangers facing thousands of refugees in an al jazeera news special. >> on the cys coastline of tuni. north africa continues to be a route for migrants to europe. >> and this is where many a

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